PROMOTING INNOVATION IN SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, AND TECHNOLOGY LEARNING

The North Carolina Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education Center (SMT Center) promotes and supports innovation in science, mathematics, and technology learning. Founded in 2002, the SMT Center focuses on the state’s elementary and secondary schools to provide all children in North Carolina with the necessary knowledge and skills to have successful careers, be good citizens, and advance the economy of the state. These goals are increasingly dependent on a student’s proficiency in science, mathematics, and technology.

www.ncsmt.org

The SMT Center advances its mission by:
U Serving as a catalyst for innovation and change in education U Advocating for research-based instructional programs in schools U Providing tools, learning methods, and technical help to educators U Recruiting community and business leaders to promote advanced science and mathematics learning in North Carolina for citizens of all ages

Through the Teacher Link Program, scientists across North Carolina are working with teachers to integrate inquiry-based science into the curriculum. Teachers collaborate with mentor scientists and engineers (Teacher Link Fellows) in N.C. communities to bring science to life in the classroom. With these exciting, interactive lessons, young people develop a thirst for knowledge and look forward to learning even more science and mathematics.

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The SMT Center has launched a statewide science education reform effort to support school districts as they develop strategic plans for their science curriculum. By partnering with the National Science Resources Center, the SMT Center is offering LASER training to all North Carolina school districts. LASER is a proven model of technical assistance and training in which superintendents, principals, and teachers develop and implement research-based science programs. With this model, teachers receive the tools, training, and support they need to integrate inquiry-based science in their K-8 classes.

For more information contact: Samuel H. Houston Jr., Ed.D. President & CEO 919.991.5111 919.991.0695 fax www.ncsmt.org

COLLABORATE One way to engage students and get them excited about science is to get them involved in competitions. Statewide science competitions allow students the opportunity to put what they’ve learned in the classroom into practice in a challenging and rewarding way. The SMT Center works to make schools and students aware of the different competitions and also to connect the competitions with scientists and engineers who serve as judges or volunteers. The SMT Center also supports the North Carolina International Science Challenge, which sends a team of students to Beijing, China to compete in an international science competition. This once in a lifetime opportunity not only gives students a chance to practice their science skills, but also a chance to experience another culture.

The SMT Center advocates extensive reform to create an inquiry-based science curriculum in order for our students to be globally competitive. Science should be interactive and include lab experiences, kitbased materials, experiments, science fairs, museum visits, and science competitions. The SMT Center is working with various policymakers, nonprofit organizations, and school and community leaders to rethink what makes a quality science and mathematics program. A current area of focus is on developing an instructional tool that will allow learners to demonstrate their knowledge and capabilities. This tool will allow students to go beyond simply answering multiple choice questions and show how they can use prior knowledge and access new information to answer challenging questions. By answering the questions, students will not only learn but deepen their problem solving skills.

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P.O. Box 13901 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-3901

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