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Name: RAFAEL, DUNE VIENIS KAREN N.

Year & Section: BS-


Pharmacy 4A
Date Performed: November 27, 2009 Rating:
____________________

Activity No. 08
METHYL ALCOHOL

I. Objectives:
1. To detect the presence of methyl alcohol in a sample by performing
oxidation tests, and phloroglucinol test,
2. To understand the principles behind each test, and
3. Interpret the results after performing each method of detection.

I. Data:

Method of Detection Observation/s


Oxidation Tests:
a. W/ glowing copper Actual: The color of the flame changed
spiral to green.
Ideal (+): Appearance of red rose ring
(Warren, 1921).
b. W/ KMnO4 Actual: The liquid is colorless.
Ideal (+): The liquid is colorless after 10
minutes of standing (Warren, 1921).
c. W/ Potassium Actual: Blue green color appeared after
dichromate addition of sulfuric acid.
(Deniges-Simmonds Ideal (+): In a few minutes a violet color
Method) will appear, if more than traces of
methyl alcohol are present, otherwise it
may take 20-30 minutes .
Phloroglucinol Test Actual: The solution turned from dark
brown clear upon the addition of methyl
alcohol and later turns to rusty brown.
Ideal (+):

I. Answers to Questions:
1. Who is at the greatest risk from reproductive hazards exposed to
methyl alcohol intoxication?
Pregnant and lactating mothers are those who are at the
greatest risk from reproductive hazards exposed to methyl alcohol
intoxication since methyl alcohol is teratogenic and is secreted in
breast milk.

2. What are the major toxic effects of methyl alcohol?


The majority of the available information on methanol toxicity in
humans relates to acute rather than chronic exposure. The toxic
effects after repeated or prolonged exposure to methanol are believed
to be qualitatively similar but less severe than those induced by acute
exposure (Kavet and Nauss, 1990). These effects include CNS and
visual disturbances such as headaches, dizziness, nausea and blurred
vision. The role of formate, a metabolite of methanol, in chronic
toxicity is unclear .

I. Conclusion/s:
Methanol, also known as methyl alcohol, wood alcohol, wood
naphtha or wood spirits, is a chemical with formula CH3OH (often
abbreviated MeOH). It is toxic: drinking 10 ml will cause blindness, and
as little as 100 ml will cause death. It is the simplest alcohol, and is a
light, volatile, colorless, flammable, liquid with a distinctive odor that is
very similar to but slightly sweeter than ethanol (drinking alcohol).
Pregnant and lactating mothers are those who are at the greatest risk
from reproductive hazards exposed to methyl alcohol intoxication since
methyl alcohol is teratogenic and is secreted in breast milk.

II. Bibliography:
• http://oehha.ca.gov/air/chronic_rels/pdf/67561.pdf
• Warren, W. H. (1921). Laboratory Manual for the Detection of
Poisons and Powerful Drugs. New Jersey: Read Books.
Warren, W. H. (1921). Laboratory Manual for the Detection of Poisons and Powerful
Drugs. New Jersey: Read Books.
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (August 22, 2008). "The
Emergency Response Safety and Health Database: Methanol".
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/ershdb/EmergencyResponseCard_29750029.html.
Retrieved March 17, 2009.