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Submitted by

Requirements
Topic
Facilitator

: Octavia S. Cuyangan
: Public Safety Management/Acad. Paper
: Fire and Earthquake Drill
: Dr. Jezreel B. Vicente

INTRODUCTION
During a damaging earthquake, life-protecting actions must be taken immediately. There will not
be time to decide what to do next; everyone must already know how to react appropriately. After an
earthquake, further life-protecting actions such as emergency evacuation or first aid administration may
be necessary. Fire and Earthquake drills and exercises are an extremely important part of our
preparedness .
BODY OF RESEARCH
Earthquakes are a common occurrence, rumbling
below Earth's surface thousands of times every
day. But major earthquakes are less common.
Here are some things to do to prepare for an
earthquake and what to do once the ground starts
shaking.
It’s important to keep getting out these
basic fire safety messages. Because, people still
just don’t get it. And ignorance can be deadly.
Several surveys over recent years continue to find
that 80%-90% of Americans feel safer from fires at
home than in a public building, or feel equally safe
in both locations.
Unfortunately, they couldn’t be more
wrong. Nearly four times as many fires occur in
residences as in non-residences, and they are far more deadly. 85% of all US fire deaths happen in
homes.
Yet people seem far more concerned about dangers they are less likely to face. Less than half of those
surveyed correctly identified fire as the event most likely to cause harm to them or their family.
The risk of dying in a fire is actually:
149 times more likely than dying in a flood;
126 times more likely than dying in an earthquake;
39 times more likely than dying in a hurricane or tornado.
Perhaps the false sense of being safe from fire at home explains why only 18% of survey respondents
said they worry about the dangers of fire more than once a year. If we can get people to think about fire
safety at least twice a year, it will be a huge leap forward!
It’s important to keep getting out the basic fire safety messages. Because, people still just don’t
get it. And ignorance can be deadly. Several surveys over recent years continue to find that 80%-90% of
Americans feel safer from fires at home than in a public building, or feel equally safe in both locations.
Unfortunately, they couldn’t be more wrong. Nearly four times as many fires occur in residences as in
non-residences, and they are far more deadly. 85% of all US fire deaths happen in homes.
Yet people seem far more concerned about dangers they are less likely to face. Less than half of those
surveyed correctly identified fire as the event most likely to cause harm to them or their family. The risk of
dying in a fire is actually:

 149 times more likely than dying in a flood.checked regularly to ensure they are operational. Each teacher or employee shall have a copy of the Fire Exit Drill. science labs. aquariums and other displays near seating areas. Emergency exits must be clearly indicated. demonstrations.extinguishers and alarms . electricity as outlined in the District's Operations Manual. students to be silent and follow directions. to ensure proper procedures are followed regarding use and storage of hazardous equipment and substances. 2. 7. Attention must be given to such things as: free-standing cabinets. 2.in writing and must be viewed regularly with students. (b) Identify and make known to students and staff primary and secondary evacuation routes. The principal of the school shall instruct all employees in fire drill procedures subject to existing conditions. Fire drill procedures must be clearly stated . gas. (c) Drills should include steps to be taken during the actual earthquake and actions to be followed once the ground stops shaking. it will be a huge leap forward. (b) Before actually conducting earthquake drills. If we can get people to think about fire safety at least twice a year. (f) Provide for regular inspections of high hazard areas such as industrial areas. (e) Follow procedures for dealing with shut off valves for water. Therefore. (g) Provide for regular inspections of classrooms to identify and minimize potential hazards. Perhaps the false sense of being safe from fire at home explains why only 18% of survey respondents said they worry about the dangers of fire more than once a year. Phone numbers of emergency personnel must be readily available. and the procedures for releasing students. 6. DISCUSSION Fire/Earthquake/Disaster Drills Fire Drills 1.  39 times more likely than dying in a hurricane or tornado. audio-visual equipment on portable carts. 5. and wall shelves. Such a discussion should include the possibility of noise during a quake and the need for students to be silent and follow directions. (d) Have fire equipment . teachers. ceiling tiles and light fixtures. Hazard Assessment and Reduction In preparing for the eventuality of an earthquake much can be done to earthquake proof a building to minimize most common hazards and maximize the safety of students and taff. 3. pianos on wheels.  126 times more likely than dying in an earthquake. the results of a quake and the need to take shelter. as well as anything peculiar to a classroom or school setting. it is important to explain what might be expected and the procedures to be followed during an actual earthquake. it is essential that students and staff react immediately and appropriately at the first indication of ground shaking. 4. maps). gyms and libraries. bookcases. drills should provide for classroom discussions. Some suggestions to the principal regarding assessment procedures include a reminder to: (a) Review assessment measures regularly with staff. wall mounted objects (clocks. and other personnel. Earthquakes 1. the probability of after shocks and the procedures to be followed if elsewhere at time of quake. Total evacuation fire drills must be held at least three (3) times in each school term. Drills The following suggestions are given to principals regarding the establishing of earthquake drill procedures: (a) Because earthquakes strike without warning. etc. Fire extinguishers must be readily accessible and checked regularly. heavy objects on high shelves. (c) Ensure there is always unimpeded access to the building and site for emergency vehicles and personnel. and exercises designed to help students and staff learn and practise where to seek shelter and how to protect themselves from falling or flying objects. In the Event of an Earthquake Emergency .

(drop position) In libraries: (i) Move away from where books and bookshelves may fall. move with it and stay under. stairways or places where no cover exists: (i) Move to interior wall (be careful of lockers). staff and students should evacuate the building. In halls. 3. 7. continue to the first school and seek advice. (ii) Remove overhead objects and place under seats or in the aisles. advise the hospital authorities ahead of time. continue to the nearest phone and contact the transportation supervisor for assistance. (iii) Remain in their seats and hold on. If unable to continue. and inhalator. WHEN IN DOUBT. police. (e) Arrangements should be made with the school nurse to have a well-stocked portable first aid kit on hand.If indoors: (i) Stay indoors. File necessary reports (accident. Summon emergency personnel immediately . 5. if necessary. Designate a person to take charge of the situation. If the injured party is to be transported to a hospital. once it is over. fire department. and cover side of head with arms. In urgent cases. face away from glass. (iii) Take appropriate cover. Once outdoors. 4. the family doctor or dentist (this information must be on file and readily accessible). Workers' Compensation Board. Once the quake is over the driver should. (iii) Take cover under table or desk or against inside wall or doorway. SHOUT! Staff members will have to use their best judgment regarding such things as first aid and substituting private transportation for regular emergency vehicles. if on the way to school. 2. (d) At the beginning of each school year. students and staff should report to predetermined areas and remain there until notified that they may re-enter the buildings or pupils have been picked up by parents or other authorized persons. recognized by the Workmen's Compensation Board who may be called in emergency situations to offer assistance. bridge. (ii) Move away from windows or other potential hazards. (ii) Assume drop position until quake is over. when things settle down. Other Emergencies 1. overpasses. buildings and trees). The consent of a teacher as a surrogate parent in such circumstances is not acceptable to the authorities and should not be offered. . 6. continue to school and report to their designated area. if delivering students home. the driver should contact the transportation supervisor and wait for assistance. Notify parents or guardians and. and school district reports). Generally speaking. they should continue home once the quake is over. In laboratories: (i) Extinguish all burners (if possible).ambulance. place head close to knees. (ii) Take appropriate cover. the consent of the parent or guardian is required to provide hospital or emergency treatment. trees. clasp hands behind neck. There should be a person on staff with a qualified first aid certificate. (ii)Kneel with back to wall. After the initial shock. medical personnel will usually perform "heroic measures" without such consent. they should. Evacuate the area of school if necessary. If shelter moves. If on the school bus: (i) Drivers should stop the bus away from hazards (power-lines. (iv) Remain quietly in position until earthquake is over and/or until further instructions are given. If on the way home. (ii) Stay well clear of hazardous chemicals. power-lines and other hazards). Notify the principal or designate-in-charge. parents should be advised of the school's emergency plan and the procedures the school expects parents to follow with respect to earthquakes. Students should be instructed that if they were on their way to school or at school when the earthquake occurred. If outdoors: (i) Move to an open space (away from buildings. The teacher should take with him/her the class register.

REFERENCE http://environment.com/environment/natural-disasters/earthquake-safety-tips/ . and the construction of buildings that sway rather than break under the stress of an earthquake and likewise regarding fire. usually in the form of small tremors. Loss of life can be avoided through emergency planning.nationalgeographic. also called temblors. education.SUMMARY Earthquakes. can be so tremendously destructive. it’s hard to imagine they occur by the thousands every day around the world.