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Ta p o w d e r s w i t h 30at% A1 were

subjected to rod milling to produce
amorphous powders. The powders were
characterized and were shown to have low
levels of contamination and to have high
thermal stability.

MECHANICAL ALLOYING (MA)
SPREADS ITS WINGS
JJ. Fischer, J.H. Weber, (Inco Alloys International, USA), Advanced Materials and
Processes, Vol 138, No 4, 1990, 48-50.
The process of MA is reviewed with
respect to its range of applications. Oxide
dispersion strengthened (ODS) Al alloys
and Ni base superalloys for ~ e
and
gas turbine uses are considered. Future
developments for M A materials are
discussed. E x a m p l e s given include
metastable phases, amorphous materials,
cermets and materials with non-metallic
matrices.

PREPARATION OF METASTABLE
YTTRIUM AND DYSPROSIUM
SULPHIDES BY MECHANICAL
ALLOYING (MA) AND MECHANICAL
MILLING
S.H. Han et al, (Iowa State Unlv, Ames,
Iowa, USA), Scripta Metallurgica Materbzlia, Vol 24, 1990, 295-298.
The use of MM and MA to prepare
metastable 7Y2Ss and Dy2Ss, for application
as t h e r m o e l e c t r i c
m a t e r i a l s , for
temperature measurement and control, is
described.

95.1% and the carbon and oxygen contents
were 0.001% and 0.03wt% respectively.
DURING BALL MILLING

Mlsc~bneous
N. Merk, L.E. Tanner, (L. Berkeley I~boratory, Berkeley, California, USA), Scr/pta
MetaUu~ica Matfcialia, Vol 24, 1990, 309313.
Mixtures of Ni-25at%Ta and Ni-50%'ra
elemental powders were subjected to high
energy ball milling in a planetary mill in
argon for 20 hours using WC-Co crushing
bodies. The powders were characterized to
determine the extent of amorphization and
contamination. Severe contamination from
the crushing balls was found and this was
attributed to the low ductility of the WC-Co.

Metal injection moulding
BINDER EXTRACTION AND
SINTERING OF METAL INJECTION
MOULDING (MIM) OF STAINLESS
STEEL PARTS
K. Saitoh, Y. Kaneko, (Ritsumeikan Univ,
Kyoto, Japan), J. Soc. Matez~ls Science of
Japan, Vol 39, No 442, 1990, 844-846, (In
Japanese).
316L stainless steel powder was mixed
with a binder consisting of polyetbyiene
(PE), polypropylene (PP) and sesame oil
(SO) and injection moulded. The SO was
removed from the green compact by
immersion in tetrahydrofuran at 50°C for
2 hours. The polymers were removed by
heating in N2 and the bebound parts were
vacuum sintered at 1320°C for 1 hour. The
relative density of the sintered parts was

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IIIII

EFFECTS OF PHYMCO-CHEMICAL
FACTORS ON M
DISTRIBUTION OF
FINE METAL PARTICLES IN EPOXY
RESIN MATRIX
M.M. Kkvorov et al, Poroshkovaya Metallu~tiya, No 1, 1991, 89-93, (In Russian).
The distribution of metal powders, Fe, Ni
and Cu, in a solidified epoxy resin matrix
has been determined as a function of
process variables. It was shown that
modification of the metal powder surfaces
resulted in a more uniform structure and
more stable metal/epoxy resin composite.
THE DYNAMICS OF POWDER
METALLURGY
D.G. White, (MPIF/AMPI, Princeton, New
Jersey, USA), Industrial Heating, Vol 57,
No 8, 1990, 32-33.
A forecast is made that the PM industry
is likely to expand by 6 to 10% as increased
use is made of P M parts in engineering,
particularly the automotive industry.
Technological developments axe discussed.
Greater increase in the use of ferrous,
rather than non-ferrous, materials is
predicted and the use of new processes,
such as metal injection moulding, is also
expected to increase. It was reported that a
P M stainless steel, 316L, has been given
approval by the U S National Association of
Corrosion Engineers.

1991 AMPI/MPIF P o w d e r Metallurgy Conference.
The f o l l o w i n g abstracts are o f papers p r e s e n t e d at the c o n f e r e n c e held in Chicago, Illinois, USA, 9 to 12 June,
1991. A further s e l e c t i o n will b e included in the n e x t issue.

POWDEN PMODUCIrION
INFLUENCE OF ALIA)YING ON THE

PROPERTIES OF WATER ATOMIZED
COPPER POWDERS
JJ. Dunkley et al, (Davy McKee (Sheffield)
Ltd, Sheffield, UK).
Results of the determination of the
effects of various alloy additions, in the
range 0 to 10%, on the properties of water
atomized Cu alloy powders, size and size
distribution, particle shape and 0 content
were presented. The results were analysed
in the light of earlier work.

FUNDAMENTAL8 OF HIGH PRESSURE
GAS ATOMIZATION
I.E. Anderson, R.S. Flgiola, (Iowa State
Unlv, Iowa, USA).

The p a p e r p r e s e n t e d r e s u l t s of
measurements of gas and molten metal
fluid dynamics in high pressure gas
atomization, particularly close to the melt
tube orifice. Various sensor a c t u a t o r
combinations were suggested for on-line
m e a s u r e m e n t s and control of process
parameters. Aspects of atomizer system
design considered included powder
transport, separation and collection.
ADVANCED SENSORS AND PROCESS
CONTROL FOR GAS ATOMIZATION
S.D. Riddler et al, (National Inst of
Standards and Technology, USA).
T h e intelligent control of gas
atomization was discussed with regard to
parameters which relate to process control
including fluid dynamics and particle size
s e n s i n g and e x p e r i m e n t a l work was
described. A modular process control
system incorporating the results of the
studies was described.

METALLURGICAL EXAMINATION OF
NEW STEEL POWDERS
S.M. Kaufman, S.E. LeBeau, (Phoenix
Metals Corp, Plymouth, Michigan, USA).
An investigation of the properties of
mechanically ground steel powder was
described. Results for loose powders and
final dimensions, strength and hardness of
a range of powder blends, sintered under a
range of c o n d i t i o n s , were reported.
Micrographs of powders and sintered
materials were shown. The properties of
the steel powders were compared with
those of ordinary iron powder.

PRODUCTION OF HIGH QUALITY IRON
POWDER FROM SYI)VARANGER IRON
ORE
J.H. Ulvensoen et al, (SINTEF Metallurgy,
Norw~).

MPR July/August 1991 59