You are on page 1of 16

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN

ISRAELI VEGETABLE EXPORTS TO


MAIN EUROPEAN MARKETS

CARMEL lorry travelling between settlements in the Jordan Valley. CARMEL AGREXCO is the largest
exporter of Settler's produce grown on stolen Palestinian land to European markets.

REPORT

Spring 2008
Introduction

This   report   aims   to   provide   an   overview   of   the   most   recent   data   available   regarding   Israeli 
vegetable exports to the EU. It is based on and limited to figures provided by the Israeli Central 
Bureau of Statistics that do not distinguish between settlement and non­settlement produce.

The   report   examines   trade   relations   between   Israel   and   its   main   export   partners   in   Europe 
(Germany, UK, Belgium and Italy), within the larger context of the European market as a whole.

In addition to providing the latest figures on vegetable exports, the dynamics within the exporting 
season, and the general increase in Israeli exports to the EU and its member states, this paper 
highlights developments in Israel's trade deficit with some of its partners, explains the importance 
of the diamond trade, and presents statistics on flower exports into the EU.

I. Trade relations between the EU and Israel

The EU is Israel's most important trading partner. Within the EU, Israel's largest export markets 
are Germany (21%), the UK (18%), the Netherlands and Italy (both 11%), and France (10%).
When the diamond trade is included in Israel’s global exports, this ranking changes: Belgium leads 
with 6%, ahead of Germany (4.8%), and the UK (4.3%).

The legal framework of Israeli external trade relations

Free and preferential trade agreements are of vital importance to Israeli exporters. Tariffs and non­
tariff barriers are partially or totally abolished on goods entering the partner's market on the basis 
of reciprocity.

The   history   of   economic   relations   between   Israel   and   European   countries   shows   dynamics   of 
ever­closer integration. Israel signed its first free­trade agreement with the European Community 
as early as 1964.  At that stage, the EC had only  6 members. With the EC­Israel Free Trade 
Agreement   of   1975,   economic   cooperation   went   far   beyond   normal   levels,   and   included 
cooperation in scientific matters intended to facilitate the transfer of technological know­how. In 
2000,   the   EC­Israel   Association   Agreement   came   into   force,   providing   Israeli   exporters   with 
privileged access to Europe’s ‘Common Market’, and to EU funds.

Israel has also signed free trade agreements with the United States (signed in 1985, fully effective 
since 1995), the European Free Trade Association (EFTA, effective since 1993), Turkey, Mexico, 
Canada   (1997),   Jordan,   and   Egypt,   and   on   18   December   2007,   became   the   first   non­Latin 
American country to sign a free trade agreement with Mercosur.

Israel is the only country in the world to have free trade agreements with both the European Union 
and the U.S.

What is Israel exporting?

Israel's main exports are weapons, diamonds, manufactured goods and software. In 2006, Israeli 
exports grew by 11% to just over $29 billion; the hi­tech sector accounted for $14 billion, 
a 20% increase over the previous 
year.   The   IT   sector   makes   up  a 
substantial   portion   of   Israel’s 
export   of   services.   In   1997,   this 
share (20.1%) was second only to 
Japan   (24%),   and   much   higher 
than   the   OECD   average   of 
12.5%. Israel is one of the world's 
major   exporters   of   military 
equipment, accounting for 10% of 
the world total in 2007.

In   2004,   diamonds   polished   and 


cut   by   Israeli   companies 
constituted   close   to   3%   of   total 
Israeli exports to Germany; close 
to 4% of total exports to Italy, and 
roughly 14% of exports to the UK.  DIAMOND EXPORTS: Trade history of today's main Israeli export
The   main   destinations   for   Israeli  commodity. Israeli diamond exports 1988-2007 (million US$ per month).

diamond   exports,   however, 


remain Belgium and the Netherlands. In 2006, 66% of total Israeli exports to Belgium consisted of 
diamonds.

What is Israel importing?

Israel imports military equipment, investment goods, rough diamonds, fuels, and consumer goods, 
mainly from the United States (18.6%), Belgium (9.9%), Germany (7.5%), UK (7.6%), Italy (4.8%), 
and Japan (3.3%), according to 2000 figures.

Trade balance

Israel has traditionally run a large external trade deficit (i.e. imports exceeded exports). The cost of 
Israel's  imports  has  largely   been  offset   by   cash  grants   from   the  U.S.   government   and   Zionist 
“charitable” organizations and individuals abroad.

Trade balance 1988-2005 (million US$):


The Israeli trade deficit with the EU is steadily shrinking.
The Israeli trade deficit in detail: European exports to the Israeli
market (blue) and Israeli exports into the EU 1988-2005 (million US$)

Vegetable exports into the EU

“Made   in   Israel”   vegetables   sold   in   European   supermarkets   can   have   various   origins.   Some 
originate from what is often referred to as Israel­proper (i.e. the area of Palestine largely ethnically 
cleansed by Zionist militias in 1948 when the 
State of Israel was created). Others are grown 
in the West Bank or in Syria’s Golan Heights, 
which were both occupied by the Israeli army 
in   1967   (huge   agricultural   plantations   have 
been   installed   on   stolen   Palestinian   land   by 
Israeli settlers).
Given   that   Israel   does   not   acknowledge 
Palestinian   sovereignty,   even   produce 
originating in the West Bank is almost without 
exception labeled as “made in Israel”; likewise, 
official   Israeli   statistics   on   agricultural 
production,   vegetable   and   flower   exports 
conflate   settlement   and   non­settlement 
products. Israeli authorities are aware that all  Medjoul dates grown by settlers on stolen
Palestinian land in the Jordan Valley, sold as "made
settlements   in   the   occupied   Palestinian  in Israel" in European supermarkets.
territories   are   illegal   under   international   law, 
and that settlement’ produce is similarly illegal.  It 
is therefore crucial to them to blur  the difference between products originating from within the 
Green Line and settlement produce.

Flower exports into the EU

Flower   exports have  remained   a stable  source  of  income   for   the  Israeli  economy   over   recent 
years. Due to Valentine's day, February is the peak month within the exporting season (November 
to May).
Flowers "made in Israel" exported to global markets from 1988-2007 (million US$) .

In recent years, Israeli global flowers exports each February reached between US$ 30 and US$ 
40 million.

Global Israeli flower exports in detail: 2002-2007 (million US$).


II. Trade relations between the UK and Israel

The UK is one of Israel's top trading partners within the European Union. In 2007, Britain sold 
products worth US$ 2681.2 million on the Israeli market, while Israeli exports to the UK amounted 
to US$ 1954.3 million. Vegetable products made up 11% of Israeli exports to the UK in 2007. The 
UK is among the main destinations for Israeli­processed diamonds. In 2004, diamonds made up 
almost 14% of all Israeli exports to the UK.

Israeli vegetable exports to Britain

The UK's vegetable market has been one of the most reliable ones for Israeli exporters within the 
European Union. A steady increase of vegetable exports into the UK was registered from 1995 
onwards.  Although   record exports  occurred  first  in  the  winter   season  of  1998/1999,  2007   has 
proved the most successful year yet, with vegetable products worth US$ 221.2 million sold in UK 
supermarkets. The all­time monthly record of vegetable exports was reached in March 2007 (US$ 
29.0 million). December 2007 vegetable export levels of US$ 26 million compare to US$ 19 million 
in December 2006.

 
Monthly vegetable export to the UK 2002-2007 (million US$)

The main exporting season lasts 4 months, from December to March, with export peaks usually 
reached in February/March. Since 2004, however, even off­season vegetable exports are on the 
rise, providing the Israeli agricultural industry with a more steady revenue.

Trade balance

The UK is one of the most important trading partners for Israel within the EU. While for many 
years, Israel's trade deficit with the UK was enormous, recent years have seen a sharp increase in 
Israeli exports to the UK.
Trade balance Israel – UK: Total of Israeli exports (orange) to
and imports from Britain (blue) 1988-2007 (million US$).

To date, monthly Israeli exports have managed to reverse the trade balance on two occasions. 
While in April 2003 this was due to a historical low in UK exports to Israel, in November 2007 
record Israeli exports where able to exceed the value of “normal“ levels of UK imports for the first 
time.

The Israeli trade deficit with the UK 2002-2007 in detail. It has been entirely reversed in
April 2003 and November 2007 (million US$).
Although UK exports to Israeli markets are still growing, Israeli companies' booming sales to the 
UK are growing even more. Since 2002 the surplus of UK exports to Israel over imports from Israel 
has been steadily shrinking: in 2001 Israeli exports to the UK were 45% lower than the value of UK 
exports to the Israeli market; in 2007 this gap was only 27%.

Amount of British Annual Export surplus
1600

1400
in million US$ per year

1200

1000

800

600

400

200

1995­2007

III. Israel's trade relations with Belgium

Due to its size and population, it may be expected that Belgium would be only a minor trading 
partner of Israel within the EU; Germany is well know for being Israel’s main European trading 
partner. In fact, total Israeli exports to Belgium amounted to US$ 4070.6 million in 2007—twice the 
level of its exports to Germany in that year.

The reason for Belgium’s crucial role in Israel’s foreign economic relations is its central role in 
diamond trade. Israeli cutting­centers export huge amounts of polished diamonds  to while rough 
material is imported via the Belgium market. In 2006, US$ 2.01 billion out of total Israeli exports to 
Belgium worth US$ 3.06 billion consisted of cut and polished diamonds; in the same year, Israel 
imported US$ 2.22 billion worth of rough diamonds from Belgium.

Belgium's role in Israeli diamond trade
Diamonds made up two­thirds of Israeli exports to Belgium in 2006. Including the diamond trade, 
Belgium is even outrunning Germany as major European trade partner, being the destination of 
9.9% of global Israeli exports, while Germany was receiving 7.5%, according to figures of 2000. In 
2007 Israeli exports to Belgium including diamonds have been more than twice as high (4070.6 
million US$) as exports to Germany (1920.5 million US$). 

Other trade sectors

In other trade sectors as well, exchanges between Belgium and Israel remain significant. Belgian 
products marketed in Israel include: Côte d’Or chocolate; Fruibel chocolate and fruit preparations; 
Callebaut   Chocolate;   Leffe   Beers;   Hoegaarden   Beers;   Stella   Beers;   chemical   products   of 
Lambiotte;   Caterpillar   machinery;   and   Gyproc   materials.   Barco,   a   major   Belgian   high­tech 
company has a marketing office based in Tel Aviv. The Belgium Telindus Group, offering network­
based IT solutions, is also based in the country.

Most   of   Israel’s   big   companies   like  Tadmor  air   conditioning   systems,  Check   Point  software 
(offering the fire wall “Zone Alarm” as a free download),  Iskar  products and logistics,  MultiLock 
(manufacturing locking devices) and Ahava (beauty & care products) export to Belgium.

In 2005, Israel was the 15th most important supplier of goods and services to Belgium, ahead of 
countries such as Finland, Switzerland and Brazil. At the same time Israel was the 13th biggest 
customer for Belgian goods and services, ahead of countries such as China, Japan and Poland.

Israeli vegetable exports to Belgium

In 2007, Israel exported vegetable products worth US$ 70.3 million to Belgium. After the signing of 
the   Oslo   Agreement   in   1994,   Israeli   vegetable   exports   to   Belgium   registered   quite   different 
dynamics compared to developments in other European countries—there was a steady decline in 
vegetable export value from 1995 onwards, after exports to Belgium had reached their all time 
high in 1995. This tendency however, was reversed in 2002. Like in other European countries, 
Israeli vegetable exports have seen a steady increase from 2002 onwards and a steep incline in 
the winter season of 2005/2006.

Israeli vegetable exports to Belgium 1995-2007 (million US$).

Another  characteristic worth noting of Belgium  is the extraordinarily  long export season. While 


vegetable exports to other Israeli trade partners in Europe is limited to 2 or 3 months of high export 
volumes, the exporting season to Belgium stretches over 6 months. December to May are strong 
exporting   months,   with   peaks   reached   in   February   and   March.   December   2007   was   a   record 
month with exports worth US$ 9 million compared to US$ 5.7 million in December 2006. As far as 
Israeli exporters are concerned, Belgium is a success story.
Vegetable exports to Belgium in detail: An extraordinarily long exporting  
season of 6 months makes Belgium an attractive partner for Israeli vegetable 
exports. (Exports in million US$;2002­2007)

Trade balance with Belgium

In   its   attempts   to   overcome   the 


trade   deficit   with   its   European 
partners,   Israel   has   been 
particularly successful with Belgium. 

There   is   still   a   slight   surplus   in 


favour   of   Belgium,   but   the   race 
between   Belgian   exports   to   the 
Israeli market and Israeli goods sold 
in Belgium is getting ever closer. 

In 2005, peak Israeli exports outran 
the   maximum   levels   reached   by 
Belgian exporters in 2004. While in 
2005,   Israel   managed   to   reverse  Trade balance Israel – Belgium: Total of Israeli exports (orange)
to and imports from Belgium (blue) 1988-2007 (million US$)
the trade balance during 2 months, 
in   2007   it   did   so   in   3   of   the   12 
months. That year’s Israeli exports to Belgium totaled US$ 4070.6 million while US$ 4455 million 
worth of goods left Belgium for the Israeli market. 

Belgium is a shining example of the Europe­wide trend of a shrinking Israeli trade deficit with its 
partners. In fact, the Belgian economy is struggling to keep up with the pace of growing Israeli 
exports to European markets. 
Trade balance Israel-Belgium in detail: Belgium exporters are struggling to keep up with
the pace of growing Israeli exports to Belgium. (Orange: Israeli exports to Belgium; million US$)

IV. Israeli trade relations with Germany

Germany is Israel's main economic partner within the European Union. In 2007, it sold products  
worth   US$   3484.1   million   on   the   Israeli   market,   while   Israeli   exports   to   the   German   market  
amounted to US$ 1920.5 million.

Israeli vegetable exports to Germany

Germany   is   the   most   important   destination   for   Israeli   vegetables   in   the   EU.   In   2007,   annual 
vegetable  exports to  Germany  exceeded  those  to  the  UK by   more than  5  times  (US$ 1401.8 
million compared to US$ 221.2 million). 

Annual Israeli vegetable exports to 
main partners in Europe ­ 2007
1600

1400

1200
million US$

1000

800

600

400

200

0
Italy Belgium UK Germany
The   share   of   vegetable   products   among   Israeli   exports   to   Germany   is   extraordinarily   high. 
According to the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics, these exports made up 73% of all Israeli 
exports to Germany in 2007. 

Thus the Israeli economy relies heavily on the sales of vegetable, fruit and flowers in German 
supermarkets and florists.

1600

1400

1200
million US$/year

1000

800

600

400

200

Annual vegetable exports (1995­2007)

After a decline between 2000­2002, there has been a steep increase in Israeli vegetable exports 
to Germany from 2003 onwards. While this trend is Europe­wide, the massive jump in vegetable 
exports to Germany in 2007 compared to 2006 is exceptional. 

Main exporting months

The   main   export   season   is   the   winter,   reaching   peaks   in   January,   February   and   March.   In 
December 2007 the Central Bureau of Statistics announced record sales worth US$ 171.1 million. 
This is an all time export high for December and an increase of more than 50% compared to 
December 2006. The total exports in the winter season Dec 2006 – March 2007 amounted to US$ 
630.2 million.  The all time monthly export record, however,  was  reached in March 2007 (US$ 
187.1 million).

Monthly vegetable exports to Germany 1995-2007 (10 million US$/month)


Trade balance with Germany

One of Israel's main concerns regarding trade with its European allies is its trade deficit. As with its 
trading relations with other European nations, Israel is closing the gap between its exports to and 
its imports from Germany. 

Trade balance Israel – Germany: Total of Israeli exports (orange) to and


imports (blue) from Germany 1998-2007 (million US$)

Recently, there have been exceptional months that produced trade surpluses rather than deficits. 
In   May   2006,   Israeli   goods   worth   US$   295.1   million   were   sold   to   Germany,   while   Germany 
exported goods worth “only” US$ 292.4 million to the Israeli market.

The Israeli trade deficit in detail. Shrinking in tendency it has been entirely reversed by
Israeli record sales to Germany in May 2006. (Orange: Israeli exports to Germany; million US$)
V. Israeli trade relations with Italy

In 2007, Italy sold products worth US$ 2302.1 million on the Israeli market, while Israel's exports  
to Italy amounted to US$ 1316.0 million, making Italy one of Israel's 5 most important trading  
partners within the EU. It is worth noting that Israeli diamond exports amounted to only 4% of  
overall Israeli exports to Italy in 2004, and vegetables accounted for less then 4% of exports in  
2007. Thus, Israeli exports are strong in other sectors.

Israeli vegetable exports to Italy

Even though their share of total Israeli exports to Italy is small, agricultural exports to the Italian 
market still provide a stable source of revenue. Between the signing of the Oslo Agreements and 
the outbreak of the 2nd intifada (2000), vegetable exports to Italy were relatively stable with annual 
totals of approximately US$ 30 million. 

Israeli vegetable exports to Italy
55

45

35
million US$

25

15

­5

Vegetable exports 1995­2007

After   3   years   of   decline,   a   steep   rise   in   vegetable   export   to   Italy   was   registered   from   2003  
onward ­ a trend confirmed by many other national European markets. The massive 33% jump in 
vegetable exports to Italy in 2007 compared to 2006 produced an all­time record of US$ 48.9 
million.

Main exporting months

While in other European countries the winter export season follows a stable pattern, the situation 
on the Italian market is slightly different and irregular. October is normally the strongest export 
month, followed by November and December. An all­time high for monthly exports was reached in 
October 2007 (US$ 9.8 million, compared to US$ 7.1 million in Oct 2006).
Fluctuation in export peaks within the winter season.
Monthly Israeli vegetable export to Italy 1995-2007 (million US$).

Trade balance with Italy

Compared to Israel's other European trading partners, Italy seems to cope better with keeping its 
export   surplus.   While   Italian   exports   to   Israeli   markets   achieved   new   records   in   2007,   Israeli 
exports are growing steadily as well.

Trade balance Italy-Israel: Total of Israeli goods exported to Italy (orange) compared to
Italian exports to the Israeli market (blue) 1988-2007 (million US$).
Still, the trade balance has not been reversed in a single month: 

Montly trade balance Italy-Israel 2002-2007 (million US$).

Nevertheless,   the   trend   of   ever­shrinking   European   export   surpluses   over   Israeli   imports   is 
confirmed even in Italy: the1996 Italian surplus of US$ 1720.9 million was reduced to a third of that 
sum by 2003. Since 2003 however, Italian exports have recovered and have grown at a faster 
pace than Israeli exports.

Italian export surplus over Israeli imports
2000

1800

1600
million US$/year

1400

1200

1000

800

600

400

200

Annual Italian export surplus 1995­2007