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Newbridge, the Newbridge logo and MainStreet are registered trademarks of Newbridge Networks Corporation.
Copyright 1997 Newbridge Networks Corporation.
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Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Table of Contents
Foreword

16. Getting Started


16.1

How to Use Operations and Configuration


16.1.1
16.1.2

16.2

Who Should Use this Manual ...................................................................... 16.1-1


How the Manual is Organized ...................................................................... 16.1-1
Getting Started ......................................................................................... 16.1-1
Node Parameters ..................................................................................... 16.1-1
Redundancy ............................................................................................. 16.1-1
System Cards .......................................................................................... 16.1-2
PRI Cards ................................................................................................ 16.1-2
Voice Interface Cards .............................................................................. 16.1-2
Data Interface Cards ................................................................................ 16.1-2
DSP Cards and IMCs ............................................................................... 16.1-2
DCP Cards ............................................................................................... 16.1-2
Frame Relay Services .............................................................................. 16.1-2
36120 MainStreet X.25 Service ............................................................... 16.1-2
BRI S/T Cards .......................................................................................... 16.1-2
CPCs ........................................................................................................ 16.1-3
HSA Cards ............................................................................................... 16.1-3

Running a Node Management Session


16.2.1

16.2.2

16.2.3

Table of Contents

Understanding Node Management Sessions .............................................. 16.2-1


Major nodes ............................................................................................. 16.2-2
Minor nodes ............................................................................................. 16.2-3
Active and inactive nodes ........................................................................ 16.2-3
Management Stations .................................................................................. 16.2-4
Network managers ................................................................................... 16.2-4
Craft Interface node manager .................................................................. 16.2-4
ASCII (VT100) terminal ............................................................................ 16.2-5
Connecting to System Serial Ports .............................................................. 16.2-6
Card faceplate serial ports ....................................................................... 16.2-7
Default configuration ................................................................................ 16.2-8
Pinouts ..................................................................................................... 16.2-8

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16.3

Working with Node Management Sessions


16.3.1

16.3.2

16.3.3

16.3.4

16.3.5

16.3.6

16.4

Beginning a Node Management Session .................................................... 16.3-1


4601, 4602 and 46020 network managers .............................................. 16.3-1
Craft Interface .......................................................................................... 16.3-1
ASCII terminal .......................................................................................... 16.3-1
Screen Layout .............................................................................................. 16.3-2
Header line ............................................................................................... 16.3-2
Data area ................................................................................................. 16.3-3
Command line .......................................................................................... 16.3-4
Diagnostics line ........................................................................................ 16.3-4
Softkey area ............................................................................................. 16.3-4
Status line ................................................................................................ 16.3-4
Refreshing the display ............................................................................. 16.3-4
Softkeys ....................................................................................................... 16.3-4
Softkey menus ......................................................................................... 16.3-5
Selecting softkeys .................................................................................... 16.3-5
Instructions ............................................................................................... 16.3-6
Toggle softkeys ........................................................................................ 16.3-6
Softkey groups ......................................................................................... 16.3-6
Display-related softkeys ........................................................................... 16.3-6
Undoing a selection (CANCEL) ............................................................... 16.3-6
Returning to the main menu (QUIT) ......................................................... 16.3-7
To execute an instruction (PROCEED) .................................................... 16.3-7
To log off .................................................................................................. 16.3-7
Keyboard Entries ......................................................................................... 16.3-8
Keyboard entry formats ............................................................................ 16.3-8
To end a keyboard entry .......................................................................... 16.3-8
Trying a Sample Session ............................................................................. 16.3-9
To configure a card slot ........................................................................... 16.3-9
To configure a card slot using a tree form ............................................. 16.3-11
Programming Automatic Log-off ................................................................ 16.3-11
To program automatic log-off ................................................................. 16.3-12

Using Identifiers
16.4.1
16.4.2

16.4.3
16.4.4

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About Identifiers ........................................................................................... 16.4-1


Shelf Identifiers ............................................................................................ 16.4-5
Switching shelf identifiers ......................................................................... 16.4-5
Locally controlled and peripheral shelf identifiers .................................... 16.4-6
HSPS identifiers ....................................................................................... 16.4-6
Shelf Numbers ............................................................................................. 16.4-6
Slot Numbers ............................................................................................... 16.4-7
Switching shelf ......................................................................................... 16.4-8
Locally controlled and peripheral shelves ................................................ 16.4-9
HSPS ..................................................................................................... 16.4-10
HSPS2 ................................................................................................... 16.4-11

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16.5

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Displaying Configuration Information


16.5.1

16.5.2

Displaying Slot Information .......................................................................... 16.5-1


To view the switching shelf summary display .......................................... 16.5-1
To display the locally controlled, enhanced locally controlled,
peripheral shelf or DS-3 or E3 card summary .................................. 16.5-2
To display a detailed summary of a locally controlled, enhanced
locally controlled or peripheral shelf ................................................. 16.5-4
Displaying Card Information ........................................................................ 16.5-5
To display the Switching card summary .................................................. 16.5-5
To display a locally controlled, peripheral, DS-3 or E3 card
summary .......................................................................................... 16.5-6
To display summary information for an enhanced locally controlled
shelf .................................................................................................. 16.5-7
To display Control card module information for an enhanced locally
controlled shelf ................................................................................. 16.5-8
To display a circuit or connection summary ............................................. 16.5-9
To display a channel unit summary ....................................................... 16.5-11

17. Node Parameters


17.1

Circuit Connections
17.1.1
17.1.2
17.1.3

17.1.4
17.1.5
17.1.6
17.1.7

17.2

Understanding Connections ........................................................................ 17.1-1


Configuring Basic Circuit Connections ........................................................ 17.1-2
Using General Circuit Operations ................................................................ 17.1-3
To display circuit configuration information .............................................. 17.1-3
To name circuits ....................................................................................... 17.1-5
To copy circuit configuration .................................................................... 17.1-5
Configuring Simple Bidirectional Connections ............................................. 17.1-6
To configure simple bidirectional connections ......................................... 17.1-7
Configuring Simple Unidirectional Connections ........................................... 17.1-7
To configure simple unidirectional connections ....................................... 17.1-8
Configuring Broadcast Unidirectional Connections ..................................... 17.1-8
To configure broadcast unidirectional connections .................................. 17.1-9
Configuring TS0 Cross-connections ............................................................ 17.1-9
To configure TS0 cross-connections ....................................................... 17.1-9

Configuring Timing and Synchronization


17.2.1
17.2.2

17.2.3

17.2.4

Table of Contents

Understanding Timing and Synchronization ................................................ 17.2-1


Timing sources ............................................................................................ 17.2-1
Locally controlled shelf ............................................................................. 17.2-2
3600+ MainStreet enhanced locally controlled shelf ............................... 17.2-3
Peripheral shelf ........................................................................................ 17.2-4
Switching shelf ......................................................................................... 17.2-4
Synchronization methods ............................................................................ 17.2-5
Standalone ............................................................................................... 17.2-5
ANS .......................................................................................................... 17.2-7
Configuring Timing and Synchronization ................................................... 17.2-11

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17.2.5

17.2.6

17.2.7

17.2.8
17.2.9

17.3

Configuring ANS Node Parameters ........................................................... 17.2-13


Configuring the zone .............................................................................. 17.2-13
To enable and disable ANS on a node .................................................. 17.2-13
Configuring ANS Link Parameters ............................................................. 17.2-14
To display ANS links .............................................................................. 17.2-14
Enabling and disabling ANS on a link .................................................... 17.2-15
Link failure threshold .............................................................................. 17.2-16
Link failure recovery time ....................................................................... 17.2-16
SSU failure threshold ............................................................................. 17.2-17
SSU failure recovery time ...................................................................... 17.2-17
To configure ANS links .......................................................................... 17.2-18
Configuring Timing Sources ...................................................................... 17.2-18
Programmable external sources ............................................................ 17.2-19
Programmable derived sources ............................................................. 17.2-19
Internal source ....................................................................................... 17.2-19
Identifying a timing source ..................................................................... 17.2-19
To display the timing sources ................................................................ 17.2-20
Timing source parameters ..................................................................... 17.2-22
Timing source failures ............................................................................ 17.2-23
External timing frequency ...................................................................... 17.2-25
To configure timing sources for locally controlled shelves ..................... 17.2-28
To configure timing sources for switching shelves ................................. 17.2-29
To configure timing sources for peripheral shelves ............................... 17.2-30
To configure timing sources for enhanced locally controlled
shelves ........................................................................................... 17.2-31
To configure an external input timing source for the enhanced
locally controlled shelf .................................................................... 17.2-32
To configure timing output for an external timing receiver for
the enhanced locally controlled shelf ............................................. 17.2-32
Configuring Synchronization Status Messaging ........................................ 17.2-32
To configure synchronization status messaging .................................... 17.2-33
Configuring Synchronization Status Message Transmission ..................... 17.2-33
To configure synchronization status message transmission .................. 17.2-34

Serial and Ethernet Ports


17.3.1

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Understanding the Ports .............................................................................. 17.3-1


Location of backplane and bulkhead serial ports ..................................... 17.3-1
3600+ MainStreet Control card serial ports ............................................. 17.3-2
3600, 3645, 3664 and 36120 MainStreet Control cards serial ports ........ 17.3-3
CPCs ........................................................................................................ 17.3-4
DS-3 II, E3, DCP, FRS, FRE and PE cards ............................................. 17.3-4
Ethernet port ............................................................................................ 17.3-4

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17.3.2

17.3.3

17.4

Configuring Serial Ports ............................................................................... 17.3-4


Device type .............................................................................................. 17.3-6
Baud rate ................................................................................................. 17.3-8
Flow control .............................................................................................. 17.3-9
Configuring CPSS cost on serial ports ................................................... 17.3-10
To configure Control card ports ............................................................. 17.3-10
To configure FRS, FRE and DCP card ports ......................................... 17.3-11
To configure FRE and PE card ports ..................................................... 17.3-11
To configure CPC ports ......................................................................... 17.3-12
To configure DS-3 II card ports .............................................................. 17.3-12
Configuring the Ethernet Port .................................................................... 17.3-12
Configuring the Ethernet port ................................................................. 17.3-15

Date, Time, and Node Name


17.4.1

17.5

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring the Date, Time, and Node Name .............................................. 17.4-1


Date ......................................................................................................... 17.4-2
Time ......................................................................................................... 17.4-2
Node name .............................................................................................. 17.4-3
To configure the date, time, and node name ........................................... 17.4-3

Access Levels and Passwords


17.5.1
17.5.2
17.5.3

17.5.4

Table of Contents

Understanding Access Levels and Passwords ............................................ 17.5-1


Setting Access Levels and Passwords ........................................................ 17.5-1
Setting Access Levels .................................................................................. 17.5-2
Level 5 ..................................................................................................... 17.5-2
Levels 1 to 4 ............................................................................................. 17.5-3
Suggested definitions for levels 1 to 4 ..................................................... 17.5-4
Level 0 ..................................................................................................... 17.5-7
To define access levels 1 to 4 .................................................................. 17.5-8
To set level 0 access ............................................................................... 17.5-8
Setting Passwords ....................................................................................... 17.5-8
To set access-level passwords ................................................................ 17.5-9

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Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

17.6

CPSS Configuration
17.6.1

17.6.2
17.6.3

17.6.4

17.6.5

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Understanding CPSS Configuration ............................................................ 17.6-1


Shared CPSS circuits .............................................................................. 17.6-1
Dedicated CPSS circuits .......................................................................... 17.6-2
Backplane CPSS circuits ......................................................................... 17.6-2
FASTbus CPSS circuits ........................................................................... 17.6-2
CPSS cross-connections ......................................................................... 17.6-3
CPSS versions ......................................................................................... 17.6-3
Router version 2 ....................................................................................... 17.6-4
Domains ................................................................................................... 17.6-4
Enhanced network layer services ............................................................ 17.6-5
CPSS link cost ......................................................................................... 17.6-5
Master/slave protocol ............................................................................... 17.6-7
Upgrading to CPSSv2 .............................................................................. 17.6-8
CPSS status information ........................................................................ 17.6-10
CPSS grooming ..................................................................................... 17.6-10
Channel limitations ................................................................................. 17.6-11
Configuring CPSS ...................................................................................... 17.6-12
Configuring CPSS Node Parameters ........................................................ 17.6-14
Node number ......................................................................................... 17.6-15
NOC number .......................................................................................... 17.6-16
Domain number ..................................................................................... 17.6-16
CPSS connection type ........................................................................... 17.6-16
Router version ........................................................................................ 17.6-17
Router version 2 FRS, FRE and PE card restrictions ............................ 17.6-17
Cost of shared CPSS ............................................................................. 17.6-17
To configure node parameters ............................................................... 17.6-18
To configure the CPSS connection type ................................................ 17.6-18
To configure FRS, FRE and PE card router version .............................. 17.6-18
Configuring CPSS Options ........................................................................ 17.6-18
Dedicated CPSS cost ............................................................................ 17.6-19
Interface speed ...................................................................................... 17.6-19
Satellite delay ......................................................................................... 17.6-19
Signalling Restrictions ............................................................................ 17.6-20
To configure Control, DS-3 II and E3 card CPSS options ..................... 17.6-20
To configure DCP card CPSS options ................................................... 17.6-20
Configuring 64 kb/s CPSS Channels ......................................................... 17.6-20
To connect a Control, DS-3 II or E3 card CPSS channel ...................... 17.6-21
To connect a DCP card CPSS channel ................................................. 17.6-22

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17.6.6

17.6.7

17.6.8

17.6.9
17.6.10

17.6.11

17.7

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring CPSS over FDL and TS0 ....................................................... 17.6-22


T1 cards ................................................................................................. 17.6-23
E1 cards ................................................................................................. 17.6-23
X.21 and V.35 PRI cards ....................................................................... 17.6-24
MPA cards ............................................................................................. 17.6-24
To enable or disable CPSS over FDL on Dual T1 cards ....................... 17.6-25
To enable or disable CPSS over TS0 for Dual E1 cards ....................... 17.6-25
To enable CPSS over TS0 for Dual E1-2 cards ..................................... 17.6-25
To disable CPSS over TS0 for Dual E1-2 cards .................................... 17.6-25
To configure CPSS over TS0 for MPA cards ......................................... 17.6-25
To disable CPSS over TS0 for MPA cards ............................................ 17.6-26
To configure CPSS over TS0 for X.21 or V.35 cards ............................. 17.6-26
To connect or disconnect a Control card CPSS channel on
FDL or TS0 ..................................................................................... 17.6-26
To connect or disconnect a DCP card CPSS channel on
FDL or TS0 ..................................................................................... 17.6-26
Configuring Subrate CPSS Channels ........................................................ 17.6-27
To configure a Control card CPSS channel ........................................... 17.6-30
To configure a 4 kb/s DCP card CPSS channel .................................... 17.6-31
To configure an 8 to 56 kb/s DCP card CPSS channel (no SRMs) ....... 17.6-31
To configure an 8 to 56 kb/s DCP card CPSS channel (SRMs) ............ 17.6-32
Network Manager CPSS Connections ....................................................... 17.6-33
Connecting to the serial ports on the backplane .................................... 17.6-33
Connecting to the PSTN and modems .................................................. 17.6-33
FRS Card CPSS Connections ................................................................... 17.6-33
CPSS rerouting after fault detection in a frame relay network ............... 17.6-34
FASTbus CPSS Connections .................................................................... 17.6-35
To connect FASTbus CPSS circuits ...................................................... 17.6-36
To configure CPSS timers ..................................................................... 17.6-37
CPSS Routing Protocol ............................................................................. 17.6-37
To configure CPSS routing protocol ...................................................... 17.6-38

Backplane Card Communications


17.7.1
17.7.2
17.7.3

Overview ...................................................................................................... 17.7-1


Backplane Card Communication Types ...................................................... 17.7-1
To configure backplane card communications ......................................... 17.7-2
Fault Handling .............................................................................................. 17.7-2
Standard mode ........................................................................................ 17.7-2
Enhanced mode ....................................................................................... 17.7-2
To configure fault handling ....................................................................... 17.7-5

18. Redundancy
18.1

Control Redundancy
18.1.1
18.1.2

Table of Contents

Understanding Control Redundancy ............................................................ 18.1-1


3600+ MainStreet Control card ................................................................ 18.1-2
Configuring Control Redundancy ................................................................. 18.1-2

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18.1.3

18.1.4

18.1.5

18.1.6

18.1.7

18.1.8
18.1.9

18.2

Configuring Control Redundancy Parameters ............................................. 18.1-4


Configuring 3600, 3645, 3664 and 36120 MainStreet Control
cards for redundancy ....................................................................... 18.1-5
To configure 3600, 3645, 3664 and 36120 MainStreet Control
cards for redundancy ....................................................................... 18.1-5
Configuring 3600+ MainStreet Control card redundancy ......................... 18.1-5
To configure 3600+ MainStreet Control card redundancy ....................... 18.1-6
Configuring DS-3 II and E3 card redundancy .......................................... 18.1-6
To configure DS-3 II and E3 card redundancy ......................................... 18.1-7
To display control redundancy information .............................................. 18.1-7
Configuring Standby Modes ........................................................................ 18.1-8
Hot standby .............................................................................................. 18.1-8
Partitioned ................................................................................................ 18.1-9
To configure standby mode ................................................................... 18.1-10
Displaying System Demerits ...................................................................... 18.1-10
To display system demerits for a locally controlled or enhanced
locally controlled shelf .................................................................... 18.1-12
To display system demerits for a locally controlled, enhanced locally
controlled, switching or peripheral shelf, DS-3 II or E3 card .......... 18.1-12
To display system demerits for a Control card ....................................... 18.1-12
Configuring an Activity Switch ................................................................... 18.1-12
Alarms .................................................................................................... 18.1-13
Database reconciliation .......................................................................... 18.1-13
To force an activity switch ...................................................................... 18.1-14
Configuring Fast Protection Switching ....................................................... 18.1-15
Protection switching options .................................................................. 18.1-15
To configure DS-3 II fast protection switching ....................................... 18.1-17
To configure E3 fast protection switching .............................................. 18.1-17
Configuring Automatic Activity Switching ................................................... 18.1-17
To configure automatic activity switching ............................................... 18.1-18
Replacing a Control, DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 Card ......................................... 18.1-18
To replace a Control, DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 card ..................................... 18.1-18

Protection Switching
18.2.1
18.2.2
18.2.3

18.2.4

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Understanding Protection Switching ............................................................ 18.2-1


Configuring Protection Circuits .................................................................... 18.2-3
Designing Protecting Circuits ....................................................................... 18.2-3
Automatic override ................................................................................... 18.2-3
Circular protection .................................................................................... 18.2-4
Super-rate protection ............................................................................... 18.2-4
Using different cards ................................................................................ 18.2-4
Compatibility ............................................................................................ 18.2-4
Activity Qualified Access .......................................................................... 18.2-5
Configuring Protecting Connections ............................................................ 18.2-6
To configure protecting connections ........................................................ 18.2-7
To configure TTC2M cards as a protecting connection ........................... 18.2-7
To disconnect the protecting TTC2M card connection ............................ 18.2-7

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18.3

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

PRI Redundancy
18.3.1
18.3.2
18.3.3
18.3.4

18.3.5

18.3.6

18.3.7

Understanding PRI Redundancy ................................................................. 18.3-1


Hardware requirements ........................................................................... 18.3-1
Configuring PRI Redundancy ...................................................................... 18.3-2
Configuring PRI Redundancy Parameters ................................................... 18.3-3
To configure PRI redundancy .................................................................. 18.3-3
Handling Failures ......................................................................................... 18.3-3
Operating rules ........................................................................................ 18.3-4
Link faults ................................................................................................. 18.3-5
Forcing an Activity Switch ............................................................................ 18.3-6
Ones density on T1 links .......................................................................... 18.3-6
To force an activity switch ........................................................................ 18.3-6
Alarms ...................................................................................................... 18.3-6
Handling Fault Processing ........................................................................... 18.3-7
To clear outstanding demerit points ......................................................... 18.3-8
Example ................................................................................................... 18.3-8
Clearing Card Failures ................................................................................. 18.3-8
Alarms ...................................................................................................... 18.3-9
To clear card failures ............................................................................... 18.3-9

19. System Cards


19.1

Understanding System Card Configuration


19.1.1

19.1.2

19.2

Understanding System Cards ...................................................................... 19.1-1


Control cards ............................................................................................ 19.1-1
Expander card .......................................................................................... 19.1-1
Switching card .......................................................................................... 19.1-1
Common Carrier card .............................................................................. 19.1-2
Test card .................................................................................................. 19.1-2
GFC3 ....................................................................................................... 19.1-2
Configuring System Cards ........................................................................... 19.1-2
Control card parameters and options ....................................................... 19.1-2
Expander card parameters and options ................................................... 19.1-3
Switching card parameters and options ................................................... 19.1-3
Common Carrier card parameters and options ........................................ 19.1-3
Test card configuration parameters and options ...................................... 19.1-3
GFC3 configuration parameters and options ........................................... 19.1-6

Understanding GFC3 Card Operation


19.2.1

Table of Contents

GFC3 Card Operations ................................................................................ 19.2-1


To configure GFC3 card operations ......................................................... 19.2-2

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19.3

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System Card Slots


19.3.1

19.3.2
19.3.3
19.3.4
19.3.5
19.3.6

19.3.7

19.3.8

Understanding System Card Slots ............................................................... 19.3-1


3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers .......................................... 19.3-1
3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager ................................................... 19.3-1
Configuring the SCC3(8+) Card Slot ........................................................... 19.3-2
To configure the SCC3(8+) card slot ....................................................... 19.3-2
Configuring the Expander Card Slot ............................................................ 19.3-3
To configure the Expander card slot ........................................................ 19.3-3
Configuring the Switching Card Slot ............................................................ 19.3-4
To configure the Switching card slot ........................................................ 19.3-4
Configuring the Common Carrier Card Slot ................................................. 19.3-4
To configure the Common Carrier card slot ............................................. 19.3-4
Configuring the Test Card Slot .................................................................... 19.3-5
To configure the Test card slot ................................................................ 19.3-5
To configure the Test card for the Test module ....................................... 19.3-5
Configuring 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager System
Card Slots ........................................................................................... 19.3-5
Configuring the Narrowband and Broadband Switching modules ........... 19.3-5
To configure Control card modules .......................................................... 19.3-6
Configuring the General Facilities Card Slot ................................................ 19.3-7
To configure the GFC or GFC2 slot ......................................................... 19.3-7
To configure the GFC3 slot ...................................................................... 19.3-7

20. Primary Rate Interface Cards


20.1

Understanding PRI Card Configuration


20.1.1

20.1.2

xx

Understanding PRI Cards ............................................................................ 20.1-1


T1 cards ................................................................................................... 20.1-1
E1 cards ................................................................................................... 20.1-2
Optical Extension Cards .......................................................................... 20.1-2
T1, E1 and Optical Extension card modules ............................................ 20.1-2
MPA cards ............................................................................................... 20.1-4
TTC2M cards ........................................................................................... 20.1-5
X.21 and V.35 PRI cards ......................................................................... 20.1-5
DS-3 cards ............................................................................................... 20.1-5
E3 cards ................................................................................................... 20.1-5
Data interfaces ......................................................................................... 20.1-5
Configuring PRI Cards ................................................................................. 20.1-6

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.2

PRI Card Slots


20.2.1
20.2.2

20.2.3

20.3

20.3.3
20.3.4

Understanding E1-to-T1 Conversion ........................................................... 20.3-1


Configuring the CCM ................................................................................... 20.3-2
To enable or disable companding conversion on a T1 or E1 card ........... 20.3-2
Configuring the SAM .................................................................................... 20.3-2
To configure the SAM .............................................................................. 20.3-5
Enabling or Disabling Companding Conversion on the TTC2M Card ......... 20.3-5
To enable or disable companding conversion on the TTC2M card ......... 20.3-5

Voice Compression
20.4.1
20.4.2

20.4.3

20.5

Understanding PRI Card Slots ..................................................................... 20.2-1


Configuring T1, E1, Optical Extension, MPA, TTC2M, X.21 or
V.35 Card Slots ................................................................................... 20.2-1
To configure PRI card slots ...................................................................... 20.2-3
To configure T1 and E1 card slot options ................................................ 20.2-4
To configure Dual T1, Dual E1, Dual E1-2 and Optical Extension card
slot options ....................................................................................... 20.2-4
To configure Dual T1-2 card slot options ................................................. 20.2-4
To configure ISDN and IFM link options for Dual E1 and Optical
Extension cards ................................................................................ 20.2-4
To configure ISDN on Dual T1-2 and Dual E1-2 card links ..................... 20.2-4
To configure Unidirectional cards ............................................................ 20.2-5
Configuring E3 Card Slots ........................................................................... 20.2-5
To configure E3 card slots ....................................................................... 20.2-5

E1-to-T1 Conversion
20.3.1
20.3.2

20.4

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Understanding Voice Compression ............................................................. 20.4-1


Viewing Compressor Connections ............................................................... 20.4-4
To view compressor connections ............................................................. 20.4-4
To view sub-channel connections ............................................................ 20.4-5
Configuring Voice Compression .................................................................. 20.4-6
To configure the DS0 that carries the compressed channels .................. 20.4-7
To set the compressor type as delta or transitional signalling ................. 20.4-7
To connect the subframe to a DS0 .......................................................... 20.4-8
To connect a voice channel to the VCM .................................................. 20.4-8

Timeslot 24 Signalling
20.5.1
20.5.2

Table of Contents

Understanding Timeslot 24 Signalling on Dual T1 and Dual T1-2 Cards .... 20.5-1
Configuring Timeslot 24 Signalling on Dual T1 and Dual T1-2 Cards ......... 20.5-2
To configure the DRM for a Dual T1-2 card ............................................. 20.5-2
To configure a Dual T1-2 link for timeslot 24 signalling ........................... 20.5-2
To configure a Dual T1 card for timeslot 24 signalling ............................. 20.5-2

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20.6

Framing
20.6.1
20.6.2

20.6.3

20.6.4

20.7

20.7.2

20.8.2

Understanding Zero Code Suppression ...................................................... 20.8-1


Transparent framing ................................................................................. 20.8-1
Binary 8-zero suppression framing .......................................................... 20.8-2
Jam bit 7 framing ..................................................................................... 20.8-2
Configuring Zero Code Suppression ........................................................... 20.8-2
To configure zero code suppression for T1 cards .................................... 20.8-2
To configure zero code suppression for DS-3 or DS-3 II cards ............... 20.8-3

Trunk Conditioning
20.9.1

20.9.2

xxii

Configuring Line Length for a T1 Card ........................................................ 20.7-1


T1 card with a DSX-1 module or LIM ....................................................... 20.7-1
T1 card with a CSU or CSU2 module ...................................................... 20.7-1
To configure the line length for a T1 card ................................................ 20.7-2
Configuring Line Length for a DS-3 or DS-3 II Card .................................... 20.7-2
To configure line length for a DS-3 or DS-3 II card .................................. 20.7-2

Zero Code Suppression


20.8.1

20.9

Understanding Framing for PRI Cards ........................................................ 20.6-1


Configuring Framing for T1 and DS-3 or DS-3 II Cards ............................... 20.6-1
Transmit as received (AUTO) framing ..................................................... 20.6-1
M13 framing ............................................................................................. 20.6-2
C-bit parity framing ................................................................................... 20.6-2
D4 framing ............................................................................................... 20.6-2
ESF framing ............................................................................................. 20.6-2
To configure the DS-3 framing format for DS-3 or DS3 II cards .............. 20.6-3
To configure the DS-1 framing format for T1, Dual T1 and
DS-3 or DS-3 II cards ....................................................................... 20.6-3
To configure the DS-1 framing format for Dual T1-2 cards ...................... 20.6-3
Configuring Framing for E1, E3 and Optical Extension Cards ..................... 20.6-3
CAS framing ............................................................................................. 20.6-5
CCS framing ............................................................................................ 20.6-5
31 channels framing ................................................................................. 20.6-5
X.21 NTU framing .................................................................................... 20.6-5
To configure framing for E1 and E3 cards ............................................... 20.6-6
To configure framing for Dual E1, Dual E1-2 and Optical
Extension cards ................................................................................ 20.6-6
Configuring Framing for X.21 PRI-2 Cards .................................................. 20.6-7
To configure framing for X.21 PRI-2 cards .............................................. 20.6-7

Line Length
20.7.1

20.8

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Understanding Trunk Conditioning for PRI Cards ....................................... 20.9-1


One-way trunk conditioning ..................................................................... 20.9-2
Two-way trunk conditioning ..................................................................... 20.9-5
Disabling trunk conditioning ..................................................................... 20.9-6
To disable trunk conditioning for PRI cards ............................................. 20.9-6
Trunk Conditioning Configuration Overview ................................................ 20.9-7

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.9.3

20.9.4
20.9.5

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring One-way or Two-way Trunk Conditioning ................................ 20.9-7


To select one-way or two-way trunk conditioning for Dual E1-2 and
Dual T1-2 cards ................................................................................ 20.9-7
To select one-way or two-way trunk conditioning for MPA cards ............ 20.9-7
To set other PRI cards for one-way or two-way trunk conditioning .......... 20.9-8
Understanding Fault Class Trunk Conditioning ........................................... 20.9-8
Enabling or Disabling Fault Classes for PRI Cards ................................... 20.9-10
Disabling trunk conditioning using fault classes ..................................... 20.9-10
To set fault classes for MPA cards ........................................................ 20.9-10
To set fault classes for TTC2M cards .................................................... 20.9-10
To set fault classes for other PRI cards ................................................. 20.9-11

20.10 Fault Signalling


20.10.1

20.10.2

Understanding Fault Signalling for PRI Cards ........................................... 20.10-1


Disabling fault signalling for PRI cards .................................................. 20.10-3
Fault signalling codes for PRI cards ...................................................... 20.10-3
3664 MainStreet E1 and T1 cards ......................................................... 20.10-4
Configuring Fault Signalling for PRI Cards ................................................ 20.10-4
Restrictions ............................................................................................ 20.10-4
To configure fault signalling for PRI cards ............................................. 20.10-5
To configure fault signalling for TTC2M cards ....................................... 20.10-5
To configure fault signalling for DS0-DP channel units .......................... 20.10-5
To configure unused channels in 3664 MainStreet T1 and E1 cards .... 20.10-5
To disable trunk conditioning on PRI card circuits ................................. 20.10-6

20.11 Custom Trunk Conditioning


20.11.1
20.11.2

Understanding Custom Trunk Conditioning ............................................... 20.11-1


Configuring Custom Trunk Conditioning for PRI Cards ............................. 20.11-3
To configure custom trunk conditioning for PRI cards ........................... 20.11-3
To configure custom trunk conditioning for TTC2M cards ..................... 20.11-3
To configure unused channels in 3664 MainStreet T1 and E1 cards .... 20.11-4

20.12 PRI Signalling


20.12.1

20.12.2

Table of Contents

Understanding Signalling for PRI Cards .................................................... 20.12-1


Signalling types for PRI cards ................................................................ 20.12-1
Compatible PRI signalling types ............................................................ 20.12-2
PLAR D3 signalling ................................................................................ 20.12-3
R2 digital signalling ................................................................................ 20.12-4
RBS ........................................................................................................ 20.12-4
Configuring Signalling forT1, DS-3 and DS-3 II Cards .............................. 20.12-5
To enable signalling for T1, DS-3 and DS-3 II cards ............................. 20.12-5
To enable or disable RBS for T1, DS-3 and DS-3 II cards .................... 20.12-5
To create clear channels for T1 and DS-3 or DS-3 II cards ................... 20.12-6

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20.12.3

20.12.4

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Configuring Signalling for E1, MPA, Optical Extension, X.21 and


V.35 PRI, E3 and 64 kb/s Codirectional Cards ................................. 20.12-6
Unidirectional circuits ............................................................................. 20.12-6
64 kb/s Codirectional card bidirectional circuits ..................................... 20.12-7
64 kb/s Codirectional unidirectional circuits ........................................... 20.12-7
MPA card signalling channels ................................................................ 20.12-7
To configure signalling type for E1, MPA, X.21 and V.35 PRI,
E3 and 64 kb/s Codirectional cards ............................................... 20.12-8
Signalling for the TTC2M Card .................................................................. 20.12-8

20.13 Inversion
20.13.1
20.13.2

Understanding Inversion for PRI Cards ..................................................... 20.13-1


Configuring Inversion of PRI Card Circuits ................................................ 20.13-1
To configure inversion of PRI card circuits ............................................ 20.13-2
To configure inversion of TTC2M card circuits ...................................... 20.13-2

20.14 Loopback Detection


20.14.1
20.14.2
20.14.3
20.14.4
20.14.5
20.14.6

Understanding Loopback Detection for PRI Cards .................................... 20.14-1


CPSS Loopback Detection for PRI Cards ................................................. 20.14-3
To establish CPSS loopback detection for PRI cards ............................ 20.14-4
Establishing TS24 Loopback Detection for PRI Cards .............................. 20.14-4
Establishing On-fault Loopback Detection for PRI Cards .......................... 20.14-5
Establishing In-band Signature Loopback Detection ................................. 20.14-6
Configuring Loopback Detection for PRI Cards ......................................... 20.14-6
To configure loopback detection on the Dual E1-2 card ........................ 20.14-7
To configure loopback detection on the MPA card ................................ 20.14-7
To configure loopback detection for other PRI cards ............................. 20.14-8

20.15 Super-rate Circuits


20.15.1

20.15.2

20.15.3
20.15.4

xxiv

Understanding Super-rate Circuits for PRI Cards ...................................... 20.15-1


Contiguous super-rate circuits ............................................................... 20.15-2
Non-contiguous super-rate circuits ........................................................ 20.15-2
Equidistant super-rate circuits ................................................................ 20.15-3
Delay equalization .................................................................................. 20.15-4
Protecting super-rate circuits ................................................................. 20.15-4
Configuring Super-rate Circuits for PRI Cards ........................................... 20.15-4
To configure a bidirectional tandem super-rate circuit ........................... 20.15-6
To configure a unidirectional tandem super-rate circuit ......................... 20.15-6
Connecting Tandem Super-rate Circuits ................................................... 20.15-7
To connect tandem super-rate circuits ................................................... 20.15-8
Connecting Unidirectional Super-rate Broadcast Circuits .......................... 20.15-8
To connect the unidirectional super-rate broadcast source ................... 20.15-9
To add multiple broadcast destinations to the super-rate
broadcast circuit ............................................................................. 20.15-9
To disconnect the unidirectional super-rate broadcast
connection .................................................................................... 20.15-10
To disconnect a broadcast destination from the broadcast
connection .................................................................................... 20.15-10
To view all broadcast destinations ....................................................... 20.15-10

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

20.16 24 DS0 Super-rate Circuit Protection


20.16.1
20.16.2

20.16.3

Understanding 24 DS0 Super-rate Circuit Protection for Dual T1-2 Cards 20.16-1
TS24 Frame Fault Signalling ..................................................................... 20.16-1
Normal operation ................................................................................... 20.16-1
TS24 frame fault signalling .................................................................... 20.16-2
Access and Tandem fault signalling ...................................................... 20.16-2
Fault recovery ........................................................................................ 20.16-3
Configuring 24 DS0 Circuit Protection for Dual T1-2 Cards ...................... 20.16-4
To configure the DRM for TS24 signalling ............................................. 20.16-4
To configure the link ............................................................................... 20.16-4
To connect two 24 DS0 super-rate circuits ............................................ 20.16-5

20.17 Link Monitoring and Error Thresholds


20.17.1
20.17.2

20.17.3

20.17.4
20.17.5

Understanding Link Monitoring and Error Thresholds ............................... 20.17-1


Configuring Link Monitoring for Dual T1 and Dual T1-2 Cards .................. 20.17-2
Errored seconds threshold for links on Dual T1 and Dual T1-2 card ..... 20.17-3
To configure link monitoring for Dual T1-2 cards ................................... 20.17-4
To configure link monitoring for Dual T1 cards ...................................... 20.17-4
Configuring Link Monitoring for Dual E1-2 Cards ...................................... 20.17-4
To view link monitoring thresholds ......................................................... 20.17-6
To configure link monitoring thresholds ................................................. 20.17-6
Configuring SES Limit for Dual T1 and Dual T1-2 Cards .......................... 20.17-7
To set the SES limit for Dual T1 cards ................................................... 20.17-7
Configuring SES and DGM Limits for the MPA card ................................. 20.17-8
To set the SES and DGM limits for MPA cards ..................................... 20.17-8

20.18 E1, E3 and Optical Extension Card Parameters


20.18.1
20.18.2

20.18.3

20.18.4

20.18.5

Table of Contents

Understanding E1, E3 and Optical Extension Card Parameters ............... 20.18-1


Configuring the NU bit for E1, E3 and Optical Extension Cards ................ 20.18-2
Single and Dual E3 cards ...................................................................... 20.18-2
To configure the NU bits for Single and Dual E3 cards ......................... 20.18-2
To read the received NU bits for Single and Dual E3 cards .................. 20.18-2
Dual E1and Dual E1-2 cards ................................................................. 20.18-2
To enable or disable NU bit cross-connections for
Dual E1 cards ................................................................................. 20.18-3
To enable or disable NU bit cross-connections for
Dual E1-2 cards ............................................................................. 20.18-3
Configuring Signal or Chassis Ground for E1 and Optical
Extension cards ................................................................................ 20.18-4
To configure signal ground for the E1 and Dual E1 cards ..................... 20.18-4
To configure signal or chassis ground for the Dual E1-2 card ............... 20.18-4
Configuring SES Limit for Dual E1 and Dual E1-2 ..................................... 20.18-5
To configure SES limit for the Dual E1 card .......................................... 20.18-6
To configure SES limit for the Dual E1-2 card ....................................... 20.18-6
Configuring BER for Dual E1 and Dual E1-2 Cards .................................. 20.18-6
To configure SA4 and BER Alarm for the Dual E1 card ........................ 20.18-8
To configure BER Alarm for the Dual E1-2 card .................................... 20.18-8
To configure the SA4 Bit for the Dual E1-2 card .................................... 20.18-8

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Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

20.18.6

20.18.7

20.18.8
20.18.9

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Configuring the E-bit for Dual E1 and Dual E1-2 Cards ............................ 20.18-9
To configure the E-bit for the Dual E1 card .......................................... 20.18-10
To configure the E-bit for the Dual E1-2 card ...................................... 20.18-10
Configuring CRC4 Reframing for Dual E1 and Dual E1-2 Cards ............ 20.18-10
To configure CRC4 reframing for the Dual E1 card ............................. 20.18-10
To configure the CRC4 reframing for the Dual E1-2 card .................... 20.18-11
Configuring Equalization for E3 Cards ..................................................... 20.18-11
To configure equalization for E3 cards ................................................ 20.18-11
Configuring E1 Link Quality Monitoring for E3 Cards .............................. 20.18-11

20.19 X.21 and V.35 PRI Card Parameters


20.19.1
20.19.2

20.19.3
20.19.4
20.19.5
20.19.6

Understanding X.21 and V.35 PRI Card Parameters ................................ 20.19-1


Configuring Bandwidth Utilization for X.21 and V.35 PRI Cards ............... 20.19-1
Number of circuits for X.21 and V.35 PRI cards .................................... 20.19-1
Number of circuits with signalling for X.21 and V.35 PRI cards ............. 20.19-2
To configure bandwidth utilization for X.21 and V.35 PRI cards ............ 20.19-3
Configuring the Supervisory Channel for X.21 and V.35 PRI Cards ......... 20.19-4
To configure the supervisory channel for X.21 and V.35 PRI cards ...... 20.19-5
Configuring the Clocking Source for X.21 and V.35 PRI Cards ................. 20.19-6
To configure the clocking source for X.21 and V.35 PRI cards ............. 20.19-6
Configuring Clock Inversion for X.21 Cards ............................................... 20.19-6
To configure clock inversion for X.21 cards ........................................... 20.19-8
Configuring the Slip Buffer for X.21 and V.35 PRI Cards .......................... 20.19-8
To configure the slip buffer for X.21 and V.35 PRI cards ....................... 20.19-8

20.20 MPA Card Parameters


20.20.1
20.20.2

General Configuration Overview ................................................................ 20.20-1


Configuring the Interface Type .................................................................. 20.20-3
To configure the interface type .............................................................. 20.20-4
20.20.3 Configuring Device Gender ....................................................................... 20.20-4
To configure the device gender ............................................................. 20.20-4
20.20.4 Configuring Channels on the Interface ...................................................... 20.20-4
Restrictions ............................................................................................ 20.20-6
To set the number of channels on the interface ..................................... 20.20-6
To set the number of signalling channels on the interface ..................... 20.20-7
To set the voice or data channel on the interface .................................. 20.20-7
20.20.5 Configuring Transport Bandwidth .............................................................. 20.20-7
To set transport bandwidth .................................................................... 20.20-8
20.20.6 Configuring HCM Framing Type for TS0 ................................................... 20.20-8
To configure HCM framing type for TS0 ................................................ 20.20-9
20.20.7 Configuring TS0 Framing Bit Positions ...................................................... 20.20-9
To set the aggregate link framing A-bit position ................................... 20.20-10
To change the F-bit position on HCM1 and HCM2 framed TS0 .......... 20.20-11
20.20.8 Configuring an SRM HCM Data Circuit on TS0 ....................................... 20.20-11
20.20.9 Configuring Control Signals and Lead Initiated Loopbacks ..................... 20.20-12
To configure control lead signals ......................................................... 20.20-14
To configure OOS conditioning ............................................................ 20.20-15
To enable or disable lead-initiated local loopbacks ............................. 20.20-15
20.20.10 Configuring Clock Inversion ..................................................................... 20.20-15
To configure clock inversion ................................................................ 20.20-16

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

20.20.11 Configuring the Slip or Doppler Buffer ..................................................... 20.20-16


To configure the slip buffer size ........................................................... 20.20-16
To set the number of slips .................................................................... 20.20-16
To enable or disable the doppler buffer ............................................... 20.20-16

21. Voice Interface Cards


21.1

Understanding Voice Interface Card Configuration


21.1.1

21.1.2

21.2

Voice Interface Card Slots


21.2.1

21.2.2

21.3

Understanding Voice Interface Cards .......................................................... 21.1-1


4WTO Line card ....................................................................................... 21.1-1
E&M cards and channel units .................................................................. 21.1-1
LGE cards and channel units ................................................................... 21.1-2
LGS cards and channel units ................................................................... 21.1-2
4WDX channel unit .................................................................................. 21.1-2
MRD channel unit .................................................................................... 21.1-2
Configuring Voice Interface Cards ............................................................... 21.1-2

Understanding Voice Interface Card Slots ................................................... 21.2-1


Voice interface cards ............................................................................... 21.2-1
Voice interface channel units ................................................................... 21.2-1
Companding laws .................................................................................... 21.2-2
Configuring Voice Interface Cards and Channel Units ................................ 21.2-3
To configure voice interface card slots .................................................... 21.2-4
To configure voice interface channel unit slots ........................................ 21.2-4
To configure the E&M and LGS CU companding law .............................. 21.2-5

Voice Interface Signalling


21.3.1

21.3.2

21.3.3

Table of Contents

Configuring E&M Signalling ......................................................................... 21.3-1


E&M signalling mode ............................................................................... 21.3-1
E&M signalling type ................................................................................. 21.3-1
To configure E&M card signalling ............................................................ 21.3-4
To configure E&M channel unit signalling ................................................ 21.3-4
Configuring LGE and LGS Signalling .......................................................... 21.3-4
LGE and LGS signalling types ................................................................. 21.3-6
To configure LGE signalling type ............................................................. 21.3-7
To configure LGS signalling type ............................................................. 21.3-7
Configuring 4WDX Signalling ...................................................................... 21.3-7
4WDX signalling mode ............................................................................. 21.3-8
To configure 4WDX signalling mode ........................................................ 21.3-9

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Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

21.4

Audio Wires
21.4.1
21.4.2

21.5

21.5.3

21.6.2

21.7.2

Understanding Line Balance for Voice Interface Cards and


Channel Units ..................................................................................... 21.7-1
Configuring Line Balance for Voice Interface Cards and
Channel Units ..................................................................................... 21.7-1
To configure line balance for E&M cards ................................................. 21.7-1
To configure line balance for LGE cards .................................................. 21.7-1
To configure line balance for LGS cards .................................................. 21.7-2
Line balance for channel units ................................................................. 21.7-2
To configure line balance for channel units ............................................. 21.7-3

Voice Interface Fault Signalling


21.8.1
21.8.2

xxviii

Understanding Line Impedance for Voice Interface Cards and


Channel Units ..................................................................................... 21.6-1
Configuring Line Impedance for Voice Interface Cards and
Channel Units ..................................................................................... 21.6-2
Configuring line impedance for E&M cards .............................................. 21.6-2
To configure line impedance for E&M cards ............................................ 21.6-2
Configuring line impedance for LGE and LGS cards ............................... 21.6-2
To configure line impedance for LGE and LGS cards ............................. 21.6-3
Configuring line impedance for channel units .......................................... 21.6-3
To configure line impedance for channel units ........................................ 21.6-3
Configuring line impedance for 4WDX channel units ............................... 21.6-3
To configure line impedance for 4WDX channel units ............................. 21.6-4

Line Balance
21.7.1

21.8

Understanding TLPs for Voice Interface Cards and Channel Units ............. 21.5-1
Configuring TLP Levels for Voice Interface Cards and Channel Units ........ 21.5-2
To select TLP levels for voice interface cards and channel units ............ 21.5-7
Configuring TLP Ranges for Voice Interface Cards ..................................... 21.5-7
To select a TLP range for the E&M card .................................................. 21.5-7
To select a TLP range for the LGE and LGS card ................................... 21.5-8

Line Impedance
21.6.1

21.7

Understanding Audio Wires for E&M Cards and Channel Units .................. 21.4-1
Configuring Audio Wires for E&M Cards and Channel Units ....................... 21.4-1
To configure audio wires for E&M cards .................................................. 21.4-1
To configure audio wires for E&M channel units ...................................... 21.4-1

TLPs
21.5.1
21.5.2

21.6

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Understanding Fault Signalling for Voice Interface Cards and


Channel Units ..................................................................................... 21.8-1
Configuring Fault Signalling for Voice Interface Cards and
Channel Units ..................................................................................... 21.8-1
To configure fault signalling for voice interface cards and
channel units .................................................................................... 21.8-1

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Table of Contents

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

21.9

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Tx Mute
21.9.1
21.9.2

Understanding Tx Mute for Voice Interface Channel Units .......................... 21.9-1


Enabling and disabling Tx mute for voice interface channel units ............... 21.9-2
Tx mute restrictions .................................................................................. 21.9-2
To enable and disable Tx mute for voice interface channel units ............ 21.9-2

21.10 Loop Balance


21.10.1
21.10.2

Understanding Loop Balance for 4WDX Channel Units ............................ 21.10-1


Configuring Loop Balance for 4WDX Channel Units ................................. 21.10-1
To configure loop balance for 4WDX channel units ............................... 21.10-2

21.11 Equalization
21.11.1
21.11.2

Understanding Equalization for 4WDX Channel Units ............................... 21.11-1


Configuring Equalization for 4WDX Channel Units .................................... 21.11-1
To configure equalization for 4WDX channel units ................................ 21.11-2

22. Data Interface Cards


22.1

Understanding Data Interface Card Configuration


22.1.1

22.1.2
22.1.3

22.1.4

22.2

Understanding Data Interface Cards ........................................................... 22.1-1


Direct Connect cards ............................................................................... 22.1-1
2B1Q, 27LC2 and DNIC Line cards ......................................................... 22.1-2
64 kb/s Codirectional card ....................................................................... 22.1-3
2B1Q channel unit ................................................................................... 22.1-4
4WTO channel unit .................................................................................. 22.1-5
DS0-DP channel unit ............................................................................... 22.1-5
OCU-DP channel unit .............................................................................. 22.1-5
Configuring DCCs and Line Cards .............................................................. 22.1-6
Connecting DTUs ........................................................................................ 22.1-6
Connecting 2600 and 2700 MainStreet series DTUs ............................... 22.1-6
Connecting a 2606 MainStreet DTU ........................................................ 22.1-7
Connecting a 2608 MainStreet DTU ........................................................ 22.1-7
To connect 2610 MainStreet DTU CPSS PAD ........................................ 22.1-8
Configuring Data Interface Cards ................................................................ 22.1-8

Data Interface Card Slots


22.2.1
22.2.2
22.2.3
22.2.4

Table of Contents

Understanding Data Interface Card Slots .................................................... 22.2-1


Configuring DCC slots ................................................................................. 22.2-1
To configure DCC slots ............................................................................ 22.2-2
Configuring Line Card Slots ......................................................................... 22.2-2
To configure line card slots ...................................................................... 22.2-3
Configuring 64 kb/s Codirectional Card Slots .............................................. 22.2-4
To configure 64 kb/s Codirectional card slots .......................................... 22.2-4

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22.2.5

22.3

Configuring Data Interface Channel Unit Slots ............................................ 22.2-4


To configure data interface channel unit slots ......................................... 22.2-5
To configure unit applications for a 2B1Q channel unit ........................... 22.2-5

Data Interface Circuits


22.3.1
22.3.2
22.3.3
22.3.4
22.3.5
22.3.6
22.3.7

22.3.8

22.3.9
22.3.10
22.3.11
22.3.12
22.3.13

22.3.14

xxx

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Understanding Data Interface Circuit Parameters ....................................... 22.3-1


Configuring Interface Type .......................................................................... 22.3-1
To configure interface type ...................................................................... 22.3-1
Configuring Device Mode ............................................................................ 22.3-2
To configure device mode ........................................................................ 22.3-2
Configuring Device Gender ......................................................................... 22.3-2
To configure device gender ..................................................................... 22.3-3
Configuring Duplex Method ......................................................................... 22.3-3
To configure duplex method .................................................................... 22.3-3
Configuring RTS/CTS Delay ........................................................................ 22.3-4
To configure RTS/CTS delay ................................................................... 22.3-4
Configuring Control Signals ......................................................................... 22.3-4
Enabling or disabling LL and RL control leads ......................................... 22.3-5
Configuring control signals ....................................................................... 22.3-5
To configure control signals ..................................................................... 22.3-7
Configuring OOS conditioning ................................................................. 22.3-7
To configure OOS conditioning ................................................................ 22.3-8
Configuring Clocking .................................................................................... 22.3-8
Transmit clock .......................................................................................... 22.3-9
Clock locked or independent .................................................................... 22.3-9
RS-422 DCC clocking ............................................................................ 22.3-10
Configuration limitations ......................................................................... 22.3-11
Configuring transmit clock ...................................................................... 22.3-12
Receive clock inversion ......................................................................... 22.3-13
To configure clocking ............................................................................. 22.3-13
Configuring Character Length, Stop Bits and Parity .................................. 22.3-13
To configure character length, stop bits and parity ................................ 22.3-14
Configuring Inversion ................................................................................. 22.3-14
To configure inversion ............................................................................ 22.3-14
Configuring SBM Depth ............................................................................. 22.3-15
To configure SBM depth ........................................................................ 22.3-15
Configuring Multidrop Master and Slave Devices ...................................... 22.3-15
To configure multidrop master and slave devices .................................. 22.3-15
Configuring Signal Propagation ................................................................. 22.3-16
Configuring RTS propagation ................................................................ 22.3-16
To propagate RTS ................................................................................. 22.3-16
To disable propagation .......................................................................... 22.3-16
Configuring control signal propagation .................................................. 22.3-16
To configure control signal propagation ................................................. 22.3-17
Configuring Super-rate DCC circuits ......................................................... 22.3-17
Transport bandwidth .............................................................................. 22.3-17
Valid interface speeds ............................................................................ 22.3-18
Clocking ................................................................................................. 22.3-21
To configure super-rate DCCs ............................................................... 22.3-21

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22.3.15

22.3.16

22.3.17
22.3.18
22.3.19
22.3.20
22.3.21
22.3.22
22.3.23
22.3.24
22.3.25

22.3.26

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring Super-rate Line Card Circuits ................................................. 22.3-22


Configuration summary .......................................................................... 22.3-23
Setting up and connecting the DTU ....................................................... 22.3-23
To configure the DTU ............................................................................. 22.3-24
To connect the DTU to super-rate circuits ............................................. 22.3-24
Configuring DTU Port Redundancy ........................................................... 22.3-24
To configure the 2715 MainStreet DTU for redundant or
standalone operation ...................................................................... 22.3-25
To configure mate settings ..................................................................... 22.3-25
Activity switching .................................................................................... 22.3-25
To configure the debounce synchronization timer ................................. 22.3-27
Forced activity switching ........................................................................ 22.3-27
To force an activity switch ...................................................................... 22.3-28
Configuring a V.35 DCC Circuit for AQA ................................................... 22.3-28
To configure a V.35 DCC circuit for AQA ............................................... 22.3-28
Configuring 8 kHz Timing .......................................................................... 22.3-29
To configure 8 kHz timing ...................................................................... 22.3-29
Configuring the AIS .................................................................................... 22.3-29
To configure the AIS .............................................................................. 22.3-29
Configuring Interface Speed ...................................................................... 22.3-29
To configure interface speed ................................................................. 22.3-30
Configuring Error Correction ...................................................................... 22.3-30
To configure error correction .................................................................. 22.3-30
Configuring a Secondary Channel Operation ............................................ 22.3-31
To configure a secondary channel operation ......................................... 22.3-31
Configuring Switched 56 kb/s Operation ................................................... 22.3-31
To configure switched 56 kb/s operation ............................................... 22.3-31
Configuring Sealing Current ...................................................................... 22.3-32
To configure sealing current .................................................................. 22.3-32
Configuring a 2B1Q Channel Unit for ISDN Loop Extension ..................... 22.3-32
ISDN basics ........................................................................................... 22.3-32
ISDN loop extension .............................................................................. 22.3-33
3DS0 format ........................................................................................... 22.3-34
5DS0 format ........................................................................................... 22.3-34
2B1Q channel unit circuits ..................................................................... 22.3-35
To configure 2B1Q channel unit circuits ................................................ 22.3-36
To configure 3DS0 circuits ..................................................................... 22.3-36
To configure 5DS0 circuits ..................................................................... 22.3-36
Connecting 2B1Q channel unit circuits .................................................. 22.3-36
Connection example .............................................................................. 22.3-37
Complying with the 5DS0 format ........................................................... 22.3-37
Enabling or Disabling eoc for the 27LC2 Line Card ................................... 22.3-38
To enable or disable eoc on the 27LC2 line card .................................. 22.3-38

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22.4

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

DCC/Line Card Rate Adapted, SRM & Branch Channel


22.4.1
22.4.2

Understanding Rate Adaption, SRMs and Branch Channels ...................... 22.4-1


Configuring SRMs and Rate Adaption ......................................................... 22.4-3
Configuring DCCs for subrate multiplexing .............................................. 22.4-3
To configure DCCs for subrate multiplexing ............................................ 22.4-3
Configuring Line cards for rate adaption .................................................. 22.4-3
To configure Line cards for rate adaption ................................................ 22.4-4
To configure HCM and transparent rate adaption .................................... 22.4-4
To configure DDS and X.50 rate adaption ............................................... 22.4-5
To configure HCM and transparent SRMs ............................................... 22.4-6
To configure DDS SRMs .......................................................................... 22.4-6

23. DSP Cards and IMCs


23.1

Understanding DSP Card and IMC Configuration


23.1.1
23.1.2

23.2

Configuring Card Slots for DSP Cards and the IMC


23.2.1

23.3

Configuring Card Slots for the IMC and DSP Cards .................................... 23.2-1
Card type ................................................................................................. 23.2-1
Number of DSP card circuits .................................................................... 23.2-2
Hub identification ..................................................................................... 23.2-2
DSP card applications .............................................................................. 23.2-2
IMC BONDING timers .............................................................................. 23.2-3
To configure DSP card slots .................................................................... 23.2-3
To configure IMC slots ............................................................................. 23.2-5

Voice Compression
23.3.1
23.3.2
23.3.3
23.3.4
23.3.5

23.3.6

xxxii

Understanding DSP Cards and the IMC ...................................................... 23.1-1


Configuring DSP Cards and IMCs ............................................................... 23.1-2
DSP card configurable parameters .......................................................... 23.1-2
DSP card connection types ...................................................................... 23.1-7
IMC configurable parameters ................................................................... 23.1-8

Understanding Voice Compression ............................................................. 23.3-1


Voice Compression Using DSP Cards ........................................................ 23.3-1
Configuring the DSP Card Voice Compression Type .................................. 23.3-2
Configuring the Signalling Type for DSP Cards ........................................... 23.3-2
To configure signalling types ................................................................... 23.3-3
Configuring Rate Adaption Parameters for DSP Cards ............................... 23.3-4
Transparent rate adaption ........................................................................ 23.3-4
HCM rate adaption ................................................................................... 23.3-5
To configure the rate adaption parameters for DSP cards ...................... 23.3-5
Configuring the Companding Law for DSP Cards ....................................... 23.3-7
To configure the companding law for the DSP cards ............................... 23.3-8

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

23.3.7

23.3.8

23.4

23.4.2

Understanding PCM Multidrop Data Bridges ............................................... 23.4-1


PCM multidrop data bridge features ........................................................ 23.4-2
PCM multidrop data bridge sample application ....................................... 23.4-2
Antistreaming ........................................................................................... 23.4-3
Antistreaming timeout .............................................................................. 23.4-3
ADI ........................................................................................................... 23.4-4
Configuring PCM Multidrop Data Bridges .................................................... 23.4-4
To configure the card for PCM multidrop ................................................. 23.4-5
To configure the circuit for PCM multidrop ............................................... 23.4-5
To connect to the master circuit ............................................................... 23.4-5
To connect to the branch circuit ............................................................... 23.4-5
To configure master circuits ..................................................................... 23.4-5
To configure branch circuits ..................................................................... 23.4-5

Voice Conference Bridges


23.5.1
23.5.2

23.5.3

23.6

Configuring the Voice Compression Parameters ......................................... 23.3-9


Echo cancellation ..................................................................................... 23.3-9
Echo cancellation return loss threshold ................................................. 23.3-10
Echo clipping .......................................................................................... 23.3-10
6 dB attenuation pad .............................................................................. 23.3-10
AC15 tone detection .............................................................................. 23.3-11
LD-CELP post filter ................................................................................ 23.3-11
To configure voice compression parameters on the DSP cards ............ 23.3-11
Connecting Circuits for Voice Compression .............................................. 23.3-12
Valid input connections .......................................................................... 23.3-13
Valid output connections ........................................................................ 23.3-13
To connect the circuits for voice compression ....................................... 23.3-14

PCM Multidrop Data Bridges


23.4.1

23.5

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Understanding Voice Conference Bridges ................................................... 23.5-1


VCB Restrictions ...................................................................................... 23.5-3
Configuring Voice Conference Bridges ........................................................ 23.5-3
To configure the card for VCB ................................................................. 23.5-3
To configure the circuit for VCB ............................................................... 23.5-4
VCB conference parameters .................................................................... 23.5-4
To configure VCB inputs .......................................................................... 23.5-6
Broadcast mode ....................................................................................... 23.5-6
To configure broadcast mode .................................................................. 23.5-6
To configure the broadcaster ................................................................... 23.5-6
Connecting Voice Conference Bridges ........................................................ 23.5-7
To connect a VCB .................................................................................... 23.5-7
To connect a cascading bridge ................................................................ 23.5-8

Rate Adaption and SRMs


23.6.1

Table of Contents

Understanding Rate Adaption ...................................................................... 23.6-1


About transparent rate adaption .............................................................. 23.6-1
About HCM rate adaption ........................................................................ 23.6-3
About DDS rate adaption ......................................................................... 23.6-4
About X.50 rate adaption ....................................................................... 23.6-11

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23.6.2

23.6.3

23.6.4

23.6.5

23.6.6

23.6.7

23.6.8

23.6.9
23.6.10
23.6.11

23.6.12

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


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Understanding SRMs ................................................................................. 23.6-16


Transparent SRMs ................................................................................. 23.6-16
HCM SRMs ............................................................................................ 23.6-17
DDS SRMs ............................................................................................. 23.6-19
Cards supporting SRMs ......................................................................... 23.6-22
Understanding Branch Channels ............................................................... 23.6-26
Composite inputs ................................................................................... 23.6-27
User-reserved branch channels ............................................................. 23.6-27
Line cards .............................................................................................. 23.6-28
DSP cards .............................................................................................. 23.6-29
Understanding Transport Bandwidth ......................................................... 23.6-34
Transparent rate adaption ...................................................................... 23.6-34
HCM rate adaption ................................................................................. 23.6-35
Available data bandwidth ....................................................................... 23.6-36
Pointers for setting transport bandwidth ................................................ 23.6-36
Understanding Transport Position ............................................................. 23.6-37
Transparent rate adaption ...................................................................... 23.6-37
HCM rate adaption ................................................................................. 23.6-38
Understanding Signalling ........................................................................... 23.6-38
S-bit signalling ........................................................................................ 23.6-39
H-bit Signalling ....................................................................................... 23.6-39
Understanding Interface Speed ................................................................. 23.6-40
Transparent rate adaption ...................................................................... 23.6-40
HCM rate adaption ................................................................................. 23.6-40
DDS/X.50 rate adaption ......................................................................... 23.6-42
Understanding HCM Parameters ............................................................... 23.6-42
Setting the HCM frame bandwidth ......................................................... 23.6-42
Placing the HCM frame bandwidth ........................................................ 23.6-43
Setting the HCM data position ............................................................... 23.6-43
Understanding Subframe Position ............................................................. 23.6-43
Understanding Continuity Checking .......................................................... 23.6-45
Configuring Rate Adaption and SRMs ....................................................... 23.6-46
To configure the card for rate adaption and SRMs ................................ 23.6-47
To configure the rate adaption method .................................................. 23.6-47
To configure HCM and transparent SRMs ............................................. 23.6-48
To configure DDS SRMs ........................................................................ 23.6-48
To configure HCM and transparent branch channels ............................ 23.6-49
To configure DDS and X.50 branch channels ........................................ 23.6-49
Making SRM Connections ......................................................................... 23.6-50
DDS rules ............................................................................................... 23.6-50
X.50 rules ............................................................................................... 23.6-51
Making SRM connections ...................................................................... 23.6-51
To make SRM connections automatically .............................................. 23.6-51
To make SRM connections manually .................................................... 23.6-51

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

23.7

Multidrop Data Bridges and MJUs


23.7.1

23.7.2
23.7.3

23.7.4

23.8

Understanding Multidrop Data Bridges and MJUs ....................................... 23.7-1


Multidrop Data Bridges ............................................................................ 23.7-1
Circuit configuration ................................................................................. 23.7-2
DDS SRMs ............................................................................................... 23.7-2
MJUs ........................................................................................................ 23.7-3
Antistreaming ........................................................................................... 23.7-3
Configuring Multidrop Data Bridges ............................................................. 23.7-3
To configure multidrop data bridges ........................................................ 23.7-4
Configuring MJUs ........................................................................................ 23.7-4
To configure the card for SRMs ............................................................... 23.7-5
To configure the circuit for SRMs ............................................................. 23.7-5
To configure the composite branch channel ............................................ 23.7-5
To configure the SRM .............................................................................. 23.7-5
Configuring MJU Antistreaming ................................................................... 23.7-6
To configure antistreaming parameters ................................................... 23.7-7
To enable and disable an MJU branch .................................................... 23.7-7

Fax and Modem Data Transmission


23.8.1
23.8.2

23.9

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring DSP Cards for Fax and Modem Data Transmission ................ 23.8-1
Configuring DSP Circuits for Data Transmission ......................................... 23.8-1
Enabling and disabling G3 fax relay ........................................................ 23.8-1
Enabling and disabling V.32 modem relay ............................................... 23.8-2
Data transmission rate ............................................................................. 23.8-2
Data bandwidth ........................................................................................ 23.8-3
NSF frame handling mode ....................................................................... 23.8-3
Data transmit level ................................................................................... 23.8-4
Automatic gain control ............................................................................. 23.8-4
To configure data transmission parameters for the DSP4 card ............... 23.8-5
To configure data transmission parameters for the DSP5 card ............... 23.8-5
To configure data transmission parameters for the DSP5H card ............ 23.8-6

Subrate Switching
23.9.1
23.9.2

23.9.3

23.9.4

Table of Contents

Understanding SRS ..................................................................................... 23.9-1


SRS display ............................................................................................. 23.9-2
Configuring SRS .......................................................................................... 23.9-3
To specify set identifiers .......................................................................... 23.9-4
To configure a DSP4 card for subrate switching ...................................... 23.9-5
To copy and change sets ......................................................................... 23.9-5
Creating Subrate Sets ................................................................................. 23.9-6
Transparent and HCM sets ...................................................................... 23.9-6
DDS and X.50 sets .................................................................................. 23.9-7
CPSS sets ................................................................................................ 23.9-7
To create sets .......................................................................................... 23.9-8
Configuring DS0 Ports ................................................................................. 23.9-9
Copying circuit configuration .................................................................... 23.9-9

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23.9.5

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Making SRS Connections ............................................................................ 23.9-9


Making SRS connections ....................................................................... 23.9-10
To connect to an SRS DS0 port ............................................................. 23.9-10
To connect a transparent set ................................................................. 23.9-10
To connect an HCM set ......................................................................... 23.9-10
To connect a DDS or X.50 set ............................................................... 23.9-11
To connect a 4 kb/s CPSS circuit .......................................................... 23.9-11

23.10 BONDING
23.10.1

23.10.2

23.10.3

Understanding BONDING .......................................................................... 23.10-1


Using BONDING .................................................................................... 23.10-2
BONDING operation .............................................................................. 23.10-3
Configuring BONDING ............................................................................... 23.10-4
To configure BONDING ......................................................................... 23.10-4
Configuring BONDING call setup ........................................................... 23.10-4
To configure BONDING call setup ......................................................... 23.10-5
Making BONDING Connections ................................................................ 23.10-6
To connect the user side to the DSP ..................................................... 23.10-6
To connect the DSP to the network side ................................................ 23.10-6

23.11 Super Tandem Operation


23.11.1
23.11.2

Understanding Super Tandem Operation .................................................. 23.11-1


Configuring Super Tandem Operation for DSP Cards ............................... 23.11-2
To configure super tandem parameters on the DSP4 card ................... 23.11-3
To configure super tandem parameters on the DSP5H and
DSP5 cards .................................................................................... 23.11-3

23.12 Combined Voice Compression, Fax and Modem Operations


23.12.1
23.12.2

Understanding Combined Operations ....................................................... 23.12-1


Configuring Combined Operations ............................................................ 23.12-2
To configure the DSP4 card for combined operation ............................. 23.12-3

24. DCP Cards


24.1

Understanding DCP Card Configuration


24.1.1
24.1.2

24.2

DCP Card Slots


24.2.1
24.2.2

xxxvi

Understanding DCP Cards .......................................................................... 24.1-1


Configuring DCP Cards ............................................................................... 24.1-1

Understanding DCP Card Slots ................................................................... 24.2-1


Configuring DCP Card Slots ........................................................................ 24.2-1
To configure DCP card slots .................................................................... 24.2-2

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

25. Frame Relay Services


25.1

Understanding Frame Relay Configuration


25.1.1

25.1.2

25.2

FRS, FRE and PE Card Slots


25.2.1
25.2.2

25.3

Understanding FRS, FRE and PE Card Slots ............................................. 25.2-1


Configuring FRS, FRE and PE Slots ........................................................... 25.2-1
To configure FRS, FRE and PE slots ...................................................... 25.2-2

Frame Relay Switch Congestion Parameters


25.3.1
25.3.2

25.4

Understanding Frame Relay on FRS, FRE and PE Cards .......................... 25.1-1


Frame streams ......................................................................................... 25.1-2
Data link connections ............................................................................... 25.1-2
Permanent virtual circuits ......................................................................... 25.1-3
Bandwidth use ......................................................................................... 25.1-3
Class-of-service parameters .................................................................... 25.1-4
Congestion management ......................................................................... 25.1-5
Link management protocol support ........................................................ 25.1-11
PVC management auto discovery protocol ............................................ 25.1-14
Configuration Overview ............................................................................. 25.1-15

Understanding Frame Relay Switch Congestion ......................................... 25.3-1


Configuring Frame Relay Switch Congestion Parameters .......................... 25.3-1
Frame switch congestion thresholds ........................................................ 25.3-3
Filtering .................................................................................................... 25.3-3
Clear time ................................................................................................. 25.3-4
Raise time ................................................................................................ 25.3-4
Report type .............................................................................................. 25.3-5
To configure switch congestion parameters ............................................ 25.3-5

FASTbus Configuration
25.4.1

25.4.2

Table of Contents

Understanding FASTbus Configuration ....................................................... 25.4-1


FASTbus topology ................................................................................... 25.4-1
FASTbus fault tolerance .......................................................................... 25.4-2
Viewing FASTbus station status .............................................................. 25.4-3
Configuring the FASTbus ............................................................................ 25.4-4
Viewing FASTbus parameters ................................................................. 25.4-4
Cable name .............................................................................................. 25.4-6
36120 ID .................................................................................................. 25.4-7
Station ID ................................................................................................. 25.4-7
FASTbus congestion thresholds .............................................................. 25.4-7
Filtering .................................................................................................... 25.4-8
Clear time ................................................................................................. 25.4-8
Raise time ................................................................................................ 25.4-9
Report type .............................................................................................. 25.4-9
To configure the FASTbus parameters .................................................. 25.4-10

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25.5

Creating Frame Streams


25.5.1

25.5.2

25.5.3

25.6

25.6.2

25.7.3

Understanding Data Link Connections ........................................................ 25.7-1


Viewing DLC Status Information .................................................................. 25.7-2
To view DLC status by frame stream ....................................................... 25.7-3
To view FASTbus DLC status .................................................................. 25.7-4
Configuring Data Link Connections ............................................................. 25.7-4
Configuring local DLCs ............................................................................ 25.7-5
To connect local DLCs ............................................................................. 25.7-6
Configuring card-to-card DLCs across the backplane ............................. 25.7-6
To connect card-to-card DLCs across the backplane .............................. 25.7-7
Configuring FASTbus DLCs ..................................................................... 25.7-7
To connect FASTbus DLCs ................................................................... 25.7-10

Class-of-service Parameters
25.8.1

xxxviii

Understanding Frame Stream Configuration ............................................... 25.6-1


Viewing frame stream status information ................................................. 25.6-1
To view frame stream status information ................................................. 25.6-3
Configuring Frame Stream Parameters ....................................................... 25.6-3
Frame stream congestion thresholds ....................................................... 25.6-5
Maximum frame size ................................................................................ 25.6-6
Flags between frames .............................................................................. 25.6-6
Protocol type ............................................................................................ 25.6-6
Heartbeat ................................................................................................. 25.6-7
Status rate ................................................................................................ 25.6-8
Timeout .................................................................................................... 25.6-8
Filtering .................................................................................................... 25.6-9
Clear time ................................................................................................. 25.6-9
Raise time .............................................................................................. 25.6-10
Report type ............................................................................................ 25.6-10
To configure frame stream parameters .................................................. 25.6-11

Data Link Connections


25.7.1
25.7.2

25.8

Understanding Frame Stream Creation ....................................................... 25.5-1


Local frame stream .................................................................................. 25.5-1
Card-to-card frame stream ....................................................................... 25.5-1
Configuring FRS, FRE and PE Circuits as Streams .................................... 25.5-2
Application ............................................................................................... 25.5-3
Transport bandwidth ................................................................................ 25.5-3
Interface speed ........................................................................................ 25.5-3
To configure an FRS, FRE or PE circuit as a stream .............................. 25.5-4
Connecting Frame Streams ......................................................................... 25.5-4
To connect a frame stream to a primary rate or data circuit .................... 25.5-5
To connect two frame stream circuits in the same node .......................... 25.5-6

Frame Stream Configuration


25.6.1

25.7

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Understanding Class-of-service Parameters ............................................... 25.8-1


Symmetric and asymmetric class-of-service ............................................ 25.8-1
Card-to-card DLCs ................................................................................... 25.8-1
DLCs over the FASTbus .......................................................................... 25.8-2

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


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25.8.2

25.9

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring Class-of-service Parameters and Rate Enforcement ............... 25.8-3


Class-of-service display ........................................................................... 25.8-3
Rate enforcement state ............................................................................ 25.8-4
Committed information rate ...................................................................... 25.8-5
Committed burst size ............................................................................... 25.8-5
Excess burst size ..................................................................................... 25.8-5
To configure class-of-service parameters and rate enforcement ............. 25.8-6

FRS Subrate Multiplexing


25.9.1

25.9.2

25.9.3

25.9.4

25.9.5

Understanding Subrate Multiplexing on the FRS Card ................................ 25.9-1


Interface speeds and protocols ................................................................ 25.9-1
Connections ............................................................................................. 25.9-2
SRIM configurable parameters ................................................................ 25.9-2
Configuring SRIM Card Options .................................................................. 25.9-4
Rate adaption ........................................................................................... 25.9-4
Speed range ............................................................................................ 25.9-5
Loopback detection .................................................................................. 25.9-5
A-bit handling ........................................................................................... 25.9-5
To configure the SRIM card options ........................................................ 25.9-5
Configuring Rate Adaption Circuits .............................................................. 25.9-6
To configure the rate adaption method .................................................... 25.9-7
To configure HCM circuits ........................................................................ 25.9-7
To configure DDS circuits ........................................................................ 25.9-7
Configuring Subrate Circuits ........................................................................ 25.9-8
To configure the rate adaption method .................................................... 25.9-9
To configure HCM streams ...................................................................... 25.9-9
To configure DDS and X.50 streams ..................................................... 25.9-10
To configure the circuit application ........................................................ 25.9-10
Connecting Subrate Streams ..................................................................... 25.9-10
To connect subrate streams .................................................................. 25.9-11

25.10 Frame Relay Encapsulation


25.10.1

25.10.2

25.10.3
25.10.4

25.10.5

Table of Contents

Understanding Frame Relay Encapsulation .............................................. 25.10-1


LAPB Annex G encapsulation ................................................................ 25.10-2
LAPB RFC 1490 encapsulation ............................................................. 25.10-3
Transparent HDLC encapsulation .......................................................... 25.10-5
Creating Frame Relay Encapsulation Circuits ........................................... 25.10-5
To create frame relay encapsulation circuits ......................................... 25.10-5
To create subrate frame relay encapsulation circuits ............................ 25.10-6
Viewing Encapsulation Circuit Parameters ................................................ 25.10-6
To view encapsulation circuit parameters .............................................. 25.10-8
Configuring Encapsulation Circuit Parameters .......................................... 25.10-8
Encapsulation circuit congestion thresholds .......................................... 25.10-8
Encapsulated protocol maximum frame size ......................................... 25.10-9
Encapsulation type ................................................................................. 25.10-9
To configure encapsulation circuit parameters .................................... 25.10-10
Connecting Encapsulation Circuits .......................................................... 25.10-10
To connect super-rate encapsulation circuits ...................................... 25.10-10
To connect subrate encapsulation circuits ........................................... 25.10-11

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

25.11 Switched Access to Frame Relay PVCs


25.11.1

25.11.2

Understanding Switched Access to Frame Relay PVCs ........................... 25.11-1


Example configuration ........................................................................... 25.11-2
T1 Signalling Termination ...................................................................... 25.11-3
Newbridge system support .................................................................... 25.11-3
Central office switch requirements ......................................................... 25.11-3
Limitations and restrictions .................................................................... 25.11-4
Configuring Switched Access to Frame Relay PVCs ................................ 25.11-4
To provision switched access ................................................................ 25.11-5

26. Frame Relay SVC Service


26.1

Frame Relay Switched Virtual Circuits


26.1.1

26.1.2

26.1.3

26.2

SVC Signalling Channel Management


26.2.1
26.2.2
26.2.3

xl

Overview of Frame Relay SVCs .................................................................. 26.1-1


Physical requirements .............................................................................. 26.1-2
Call processing ........................................................................................ 26.1-2
Configuration Summary ............................................................................... 26.1-6
Setting up nodes at the edge of the network ........................................... 26.1-6
Setting up nodes within the network ........................................................ 26.1-6
Frame Relay SVC Configuration Example .................................................. 26.1-7
To configure the parameters for node e1613 through the
Control card .................................................................................... 26.1-10
To configure the parameters for node e1613 through the
FRE card ........................................................................................ 26.1-10
To configure the parameters for node e1594 through the
Control card .................................................................................... 26.1-11
To configure the parameters for node e1594 through the
FRE card ........................................................................................ 26.1-11
To configure the parameters for node e1416 through the
Control card .................................................................................... 26.1-12
To configure the parameters for node e1416 through the
FRE card ........................................................................................ 26.1-13

Understanding Signalling Channel Management ........................................ 26.2-1


Signalling Channel Connection and Disconnection ..................................... 26.2-1
To view and connect or disconnect a signalling channel ......................... 26.2-2
Signalling Channel Parameters ................................................................... 26.2-3
Name ....................................................................................................... 26.2-3
Signalling channel administrative status .................................................. 26.2-3
Signalling channel operational status ...................................................... 26.2-3
Associated signalling profile attribute ....................................................... 26.2-3
Prefix passing or stripping ........................................................................ 26.2-4
To set the signalling channel parameters ................................................ 26.2-5

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26.2.4

26.3

Signalling Profiles ........................................................................................ 26.2-5


Profile name ............................................................................................. 26.2-5
Signalling protocol attribute ...................................................................... 26.2-5
To set the profile name and its protocol ................................................... 26.2-6
Network layer protocol timers .................................................................. 26.2-6
To set the network layer timers ................................................................ 26.2-6
Q.922 link layer protocol parameters ....................................................... 26.2-7
To set the link layer timers and counters ................................................. 26.2-7

SVC User Management


26.3.1
26.3.2

26.3.3

26.3.4

26.4

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Understanding User Management ............................................................... 26.3-1


Switch Address Prefix Management ............................................................ 26.3-1
Absolute and relative addresses .............................................................. 26.3-1
Prefix types .............................................................................................. 26.3-2
To assign and view the prefix value ......................................................... 26.3-2
User Configuration ....................................................................................... 26.3-2
Name ....................................................................................................... 26.3-2
User address ............................................................................................ 26.3-3
Physical access (frame stream) ............................................................... 26.3-3
Default user .............................................................................................. 26.3-3
User administrative status ........................................................................ 26.3-3
User operational status ............................................................................ 26.3-3
To view one or all user configurations ..................................................... 26.3-4
To set the user configuration parameters ................................................ 26.3-5
User Screening ............................................................................................ 26.3-5

SVC Connection Management


26.4.1
26.4.2

26.4.3

26.4.4

Table of Contents

Understanding Connection Management .................................................... 26.4-1


Allocation of Signalling Identifiers ................................................................ 26.4-3
DLCI allocation ......................................................................................... 26.4-3
Call reference allocation .......................................................................... 26.4-4
Call identification allocation ...................................................................... 26.4-4
To allocate the signalling identifiers ......................................................... 26.4-4
CIR and Booking Factor .............................................................................. 26.4-4
CIR ........................................................................................................... 26.4-4
Booking factor .......................................................................................... 26.4-4
To set CIR and the booking factor ........................................................... 26.4-5
Connection Admission Control .................................................................... 26.4-5
Class-of-service guarantee ...................................................................... 26.4-5
To set the COS guarantee ....................................................................... 26.4-6

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26.5

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

SVC Routing
26.5.1
26.5.2
26.5.3
26.5.4

Understanding SVC Routing ........................................................................ 26.5-1


Remote Address Table ................................................................................ 26.5-2
To create or change a remote address table ........................................... 26.5-4
Route Selection for a Call Setup .................................................................. 26.5-4
Route Failure Handling ................................................................................ 26.5-4
Crankback ................................................................................................ 26.5-5
Alternate path routing ............................................................................... 26.5-5
Call clearing ............................................................................................. 26.5-6

27. X.25 Service


27.1

Understanding the 36120 MainStreet X.25 Service


27.1.1
27.1.2

27.1.3

27.1.4

27.2

Internal Network Operation


27.2.1
27.2.2

27.2.3

xlii

X.25 Protocol Overview ............................................................................... 27.1-1


36120 MainStreet X.25 Overview ................................................................ 27.1-1
36120 MainStreet X.25 basic functional components .............................. 27.1-2
36120 MainStreet X.25 terminology ......................................................... 27.1-2
36120 MainStreet X.25 Protocol Subsystems ............................................. 27.1-3
Link layer .................................................................................................. 27.1-3
Network layer ........................................................................................... 27.1-3
Reliable Transfer Protocol ....................................................................... 27.1-4
Generic Frame Router ............................................................................. 27.1-4
End-to-end function of the protocol subsystems ...................................... 27.1-4
User Access to the Network ........................................................................ 27.1-5
Direct X.25 access ................................................................................... 27.1-5
Encapsulated access over frame relay .................................................... 27.1-6
Encapsulated access for basic rate and super-rate devices .................... 27.1-6
Encapsulated access for subrate devices ................................................ 27.1-7

Internal Network Architecture ...................................................................... 27.2-1


Understanding the Reliable Transfer Protocol ............................................. 27.2-3
Implementation of Q.2110 functions in the RTP ...................................... 27.2-3
RTP virtual connections ........................................................................... 27.2-4
Congestion management ......................................................................... 27.2-7
GFR load balancing support .................................................................... 27.2-9
Packet Segmenting and Combining .......................................................... 27.2-10
Restrictions for packet segmenting and combining ............................... 27.2-10
Tables 6-1 and 6-2 of Recommendation X.25 ....................................... 27.2-11
Conditions for packet segmenting and combining ................................. 27.2-11
No flow control negotiation subscription at the calling and
called DTEs .................................................................................... 27.2-13
Flow control negotiation subscription only at the calling DTE ................ 27.2-14
Flow control negotiation subscription only at the called DTE ................. 27.2-17
Flow control negotiation subscription at called DTEs ............................ 27.2-18

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27.3

Standards Compliance
27.3.1
27.3.2
27.3.3

27.4

27.4.2
27.4.3
27.4.4

Understanding X.25 Configuration ............................................................... 27.4-1


Node management terminal interface ...................................................... 27.4-1
Using the node management interfaces .................................................. 27.4-2
Understanding Identifiers and Entering Data ............................................... 27.4-3
How to Use Configuration Information ......................................................... 27.4-4
Summary of X.25 Configurable Parameters ................................................ 27.4-6

X.25 Switch-wide Parameters


27.5.1
27.5.2

27.5.3

27.6

36120 MainStreet X.25 Compliance to ITU-T Recommendation X.2


(1988) ................................................................................................. 27.3-1
36120 MainStreet X.25 Compliance to ITU-T Recommendation X.2
(1992) ................................................................................................. 27.3-3
36120 MainStreet X.25 Compliance to ITU-T Recommendation X.35
(1993) ................................................................................................. 27.3-5
Compliance to sections 0 and 1 ............................................................... 27.3-6
Conformance ........................................................................................... 27.3-6

X.25 Configuration Overview


27.4.1

27.5

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Understanding X.25 Switch-wide Parameters ............................................. 27.5-1


Global switch resources ........................................................................... 27.5-1
Viewing X.25 Switch-wide Parameters ........................................................ 27.5-1
Viewing global switch resources .............................................................. 27.5-2
To view X.25 switch-wide parameters ..................................................... 27.5-4
To view global switch resources .............................................................. 27.5-4
Configuring the X.25 Switch-wide Parameters ............................................ 27.5-4
Number of XACs ...................................................................................... 27.5-4
Number of Trunk Circuits ......................................................................... 27.5-5
Restrictions and interdependencies ......................................................... 27.5-5
Change impact and activation .................................................................. 27.5-5
To configure the X.25 switch-wide parameters ........................................ 27.5-5

GFR Configuration
27.6.1

27.6.2

Table of Contents

Understanding Network Topologies ............................................................. 27.6-1


Network routing domains ......................................................................... 27.6-1
GFR routing concepts .............................................................................. 27.6-5
Hub domain dynamic routing ................................................................... 27.6-6
GFR addresses ........................................................................................ 27.6-7
Aliases ..................................................................................................... 27.6-7
Load balancing ......................................................................................... 27.6-8
Automatic FASTbus trunks ...................................................................... 27.6-9
Understanding the Generic Frame Router ................................................... 27.6-9
Route builder ............................................................................................ 27.6-9
Forwarding function ............................................................................... 27.6-10
Frame relay encapsulation ..................................................................... 27.6-10
How the GFR routes frames .................................................................. 27.6-12
Forwarding principles ............................................................................. 27.6-13
Redundant routing ................................................................................. 27.6-15
How the switch handles trunk failures .................................................... 27.6-16

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27.6.3
27.6.4

27.7

Viewing the GFR Parameters .................................................................... 27.6-17


To view GFR parameters ....................................................................... 27.6-17
Configuring the GFR Parameters .............................................................. 27.6-17
GFR address .......................................................................................... 27.6-17
Redundant routing ................................................................................. 27.6-18
Load balancing ....................................................................................... 27.6-19
Hub domain dynamic routing ................................................................. 27.6-19
Delta value ............................................................................................. 27.6-20
List of aliases ......................................................................................... 27.6-20
GFR transit cost ..................................................................................... 27.6-21
Rate enforcement state .......................................................................... 27.6-21
Aggregate committed information rate ................................................... 27.6-21
Aggregate committed burst size ............................................................ 27.6-21
Restrictions and limitations .................................................................... 27.6-22
Change impact and activation ................................................................ 27.6-22
To configure the GFR parameters ......................................................... 27.6-23

Call Routing
27.7.1

27.7.2
27.7.3

27.7.4

27.7.5

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


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Understanding Call Routing ......................................................................... 27.7-1


Global Address Table .............................................................................. 27.7-1
Link status updates .................................................................................. 27.7-8
Local Address Table ................................................................................ 27.7-9
Basic Routing ............................................................................................. 27.7-10
How basic routing occurs in a virtual call setup ..................................... 27.7-12
Gateway Routing ....................................................................................... 27.7-16
Network-wide hunt groups ..................................................................... 27.7-16
Gateway routing examples .................................................................... 27.7-16
Gateway routing process ....................................................................... 27.7-19
How gateway routing occurs in a virtual call setup ................................ 27.7-21
Viewing Call Routing Tables ...................................................................... 27.7-25
To view the GAT .................................................................................... 27.7-25
To view the LAT ..................................................................................... 27.7-26
Configuring the GAT .................................................................................. 27.7-26
Address prefix ........................................................................................ 27.7-26
GFR address .......................................................................................... 27.7-27
XAC ........................................................................................................ 27.7-27
Type ....................................................................................................... 27.7-27
Priority .................................................................................................... 27.7-28
Weight .................................................................................................... 27.7-28
Restrictions and interdependencies ....................................................... 27.7-29
Change impact and activation ................................................................ 27.7-29
To configure the GAT ............................................................................. 27.7-30

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27.8

Trunk Circuits
27.8.1

27.8.2
27.8.3

27.8.4

27.8.5

27.9

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Understanding Backbone Trunks ................................................................ 27.8-1


Trunk circuits ............................................................................................ 27.8-1
Packet size considerations ...................................................................... 27.8-1
Viewing Trunk Circuit Configuration Information ......................................... 27.8-2
To view trunk circuit configuration information ......................................... 27.8-3
Configuring Trunk Circuits ........................................................................... 27.8-3
Cost .......................................................................................................... 27.8-3
Poll Timer ................................................................................................. 27.8-4
Restrictions and interdependencies ......................................................... 27.8-4
Change impact and activation .................................................................. 27.8-4
To configure trunk circuits ........................................................................ 27.8-5
Connecting Trunk Circuits ........................................................................... 27.8-5
To connect trunk circuits to frame stream-DLCIs ..................................... 27.8-5
To connect trunk circuits to FASTbus circuit-DLCIs ................................ 27.8-6
Provisioning Backbone Trunks .................................................................... 27.8-6
To provision backbone trunks over primary rate links .............................. 27.8-7
To provision backbone trunks over the FASTbus .................................... 27.8-8

NUI Validation Subsystem


27.9.1

27.9.2

27.9.3
27.9.4

Table of Contents

Understanding NUIs .................................................................................... 27.9-1


NUI validation servers .............................................................................. 27.9-1
NUI subscription ....................................................................................... 27.9-2
NUI override ............................................................................................. 27.9-2
How the switch handles NUIs .................................................................. 27.9-3
NUI formats .............................................................................................. 27.9-4
Understanding the NUI Validation Subsystem ............................................. 27.9-6
NUI server agent and XAC ...................................................................... 27.9-6
XACs for the validation servers ................................................................ 27.9-7
CUG considerations ................................................................................. 27.9-8
Viewing the NUI Server Agent Parameters ................................................. 27.9-9
To view NUI server agent parameters ..................................................... 27.9-9
Configuring the NUI Server Agent Parameters .......................................... 27.9-10
Primary NUI Server Address .................................................................. 27.9-10
Secondary NUI Server Address ............................................................. 27.9-10
Maximum Allowed Validation Period ...................................................... 27.9-11
Restrictions and interdependencies ....................................................... 27.9-11
Change impact and activation ................................................................ 27.9-11
To configure the NUI server agent parameters ...................................... 27.9-12
To configure a NUI agent XAC .............................................................. 27.9-12

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

27.10 Accounting Generation Subsystem


27.10.1

27.10.2
27.10.3
27.10.4

Understanding Virtual Circuit Accounting .................................................. 27.10-1


Accounting segments ............................................................................. 27.10-2
Collection intervals ................................................................................. 27.10-3
Accounting records ................................................................................ 27.10-3
Paced generation of accounting records ............................................... 27.10-9
Accounting record storage in NVM ...................................................... 27.10-10
Transfer of accounting records to the data collector ............................ 27.10-10
Understanding Accounting Generation Parameters ................................ 27.10-15
Viewing the Accounting Generation Parameters ..................................... 27.10-17
To view accounting generation parameters ......................................... 27.10-17
Configuring the Accounting Generation Parameters ............................... 27.10-17
Generate Accounting Records ............................................................. 27.10-18
Generate Accounting Records on Unsuccessful Calls ........................ 27.10-18
Accounting Segment Size .................................................................... 27.10-19
Collection Interval ................................................................................ 27.10-20
Intermediate Record Interval ................................................................ 27.10-20
Periodic Record Interval ....................................................................... 27.10-21
Optional User Defined Data Length ..................................................... 27.10-21
Time Zone ............................................................................................ 27.10-22
Accounting NVM Buffer Size ................................................................ 27.10-22
Restrictions and interdependencies ..................................................... 27.10-22
Change impact and activation .............................................................. 27.10-23
To configure the accounting generation parameters ........................... 27.10-23

27.11 Data Collector Agent Subsystem


27.11.1

27.11.2
27.11.3
27.11.4

xlvi

Understanding the Data Collector Agent ................................................... 27.11-1


Accounting generation subsystem ......................................................... 27.11-1
Data collector agent ............................................................................... 27.11-1
Data collector agent XAC ....................................................................... 27.11-1
Data collector interface XACs ................................................................ 27.11-2
Data collector ......................................................................................... 27.11-3
GDI protocol ........................................................................................... 27.11-3
Data Collector Agent Parameters .............................................................. 27.11-4
Viewing the Data Collector Agent Parameters .......................................... 27.11-5
To view data collector agent parameters ............................................... 27.11-5
Configuring the Data Collector Agent Parameters ..................................... 27.11-5
Primary Data Collector Address ............................................................. 27.11-5
Secondary Data Collector Address ........................................................ 27.11-6
Transfer Block Size ................................................................................ 27.11-6
Maximum Time Between Transfers ....................................................... 27.11-7
Transfer Block Retransmission Timer .................................................... 27.11-7
Transfer Block Retransmission Count ................................................... 27.11-7
Restrictions and interdependencies ....................................................... 27.11-8
Change impact and activation ................................................................ 27.11-8
To configure the data collector agent parameters ................................. 27.11-8
To configure a data collector agent XAC ............................................... 27.11-9

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Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

27.12 Accounting Subsystem Configuration


27.12.1

Configuration Overview ............................................................................. 27.12-1

27.13 Circuits for X.25 Access Lines


27.13.1

27.13.2
27.13.3

27.13.4

27.13.5
27.13.6
27.13.7

27.13.8

27.13.9

Table of Contents

Understanding X.25 Access Methods ........................................................ 27.13-1


Direct LAPB access ............................................................................... 27.13-1
Encapsulated access over frame relay .................................................. 27.13-2
LAPB Annex G encapsulation ................................................................ 27.13-2
LAPB RFC 1490 encapsulation ............................................................. 27.13-3
Frame relay encapsulation on the X.25 switch ...................................... 27.13-4
Frame relay encapsulation on the FRS card ......................................... 27.13-6
Configuring Direct Circuits ......................................................................... 27.13-7
To configure direct circuits ..................................................................... 27.13-8
Configuring Frame Relay Encapsulation Circuits ...................................... 27.13-8
To create frame relay encapsulation circuits ......................................... 27.13-8
To create subrate frame relay encapsulation circuits ............................ 27.13-9
Configuring the parameters for encapsulation circuits ........................... 27.13-9
Encapsulation circuit congestion thresholds ........................................ 27.13-11
Encapsulated Protocol Maximum Frame Size ..................................... 27.13-11
Encapsulation type ............................................................................... 27.13-11
Restrictions and interdependencies ..................................................... 27.13-12
To configure encapsulation circuit parameters .................................... 27.13-14
Viewing FRS circuit information ........................................................... 27.13-14
Configuring the Parameters for Frame Stream Circuits ........................... 27.13-15
Maximum frame size ............................................................................ 27.13-15
Congestion thresholds ......................................................................... 27.13-15
Link protocol type ................................................................................. 27.13-16
Configuring Connections for X.25 Access Lines ...................................... 27.13-16
Connecting Direct Circuits ....................................................................... 27.13-17
To connect direct circuits ..................................................................... 27.13-17
Connecting Encapsulation Circuits .......................................................... 27.13-17
Super-rate encapsulation circuits ......................................................... 27.13-18
To connect super-rate encapsulation circuits ...................................... 27.13-18
Subrate encapsulation circuits ............................................................. 27.13-19
To connect subrate encapsulation circuits ........................................... 27.13-20
Connecting XACs .................................................................................... 27.13-21
To connect XACs to direct circuits ....................................................... 27.13-21
To connect XACs to frame stream-DLCIs or
FASTbus station-DLCIs ............................................................... 27.13-21
Configuring Class-of-service Parameters for Encapsulated Access ....... 27.13-22
Non-statistical multiplexing approach .................................................. 27.13-22
Statistical multiplexing approach .......................................................... 27.13-22

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

27.14 XAC Parameters


27.14.1
27.14.2
27.14.3
27.14.4
27.14.5

27.14.6

27.14.7

xlviii

Understanding XACs ................................................................................. 27.14-1


Configuration overview .............................................................................. 27.14-1
Understanding Link Layer Parameters ...................................................... 27.14-2
Viewing Link Layer Parameters ................................................................. 27.14-2
To view link layer parameters ................................................................ 27.14-3
Configuring Link Layer Parameters ........................................................... 27.14-3
Link Layer Interface Type ...................................................................... 27.14-3
Frame Sequence Numbering ................................................................. 27.14-4
Maximum Frame Window Size .............................................................. 27.14-4
Retransmission Count (N2) .................................................................... 27.14-4
Frame Response Timer (T1) .................................................................. 27.14-4
Response Delay Timer (T2) ................................................................... 27.14-5
Inactivity Timer (T3) ............................................................................... 27.14-5
Congestion Timer ................................................................................... 27.14-6
Maximum Information Frame Size ......................................................... 27.14-6
Restrictions and interdependencies ....................................................... 27.14-6
Change impact and activation ................................................................ 27.14-6
To configure link layer parameters ......................................................... 27.14-7
Understanding Network Layer Parameters ................................................ 27.14-7
Packet sequence numbering ................................................................. 27.14-8
Virtual circuits and logical channels ....................................................... 27.14-8
Network layer timers ............................................................................ 27.14-10
Negotiation facilities ............................................................................. 27.14-11
Addressing options .............................................................................. 27.14-11
Maximum packet size .......................................................................... 27.14-12
To ensure packet and frame size compatibility .................................... 27.14-12
Viewing Network Layer Parameters ........................................................ 27.14-13
To view network layer parameters ....................................................... 27.14-13

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

27.14.8

Configuring Network Layer Parameters ................................................... 27.14-13


Service Type ........................................................................................ 27.14-14
Packet Layer Interface Type ................................................................ 27.14-14
X.25 Version ........................................................................................ 27.14-14
Packet Sequence Numbering .............................................................. 27.14-15
Base LCN ............................................................................................. 27.14-15
Number of LCNs .................................................................................. 27.14-15
Number of PVCs .................................................................................. 27.14-16
Number of Outgoing SVCs .................................................................. 27.14-16
Two-way SVCs .................................................................................... 27.14-17
Number of Incoming SVCs .................................................................. 27.14-17
Packet Layer Restart Timer (T10/T20) ................................................ 27.14-18
Packet Layer Call Timer (T11/T21) ...................................................... 27.14-18
Reset Timer (T12/T22) ......................................................................... 27.14-18
Clear Timer (T13/T23) ......................................................................... 27.14-18
Window Timer (T24) ............................................................................ 27.14-19
Inactivity Timer ..................................................................................... 27.14-19
Flow Control Timer ............................................................................... 27.14-20
Incoming Maximum Address Length Allowed ...................................... 27.14-20
Suppress Called Address .................................................................... 27.14-21
Suppress Calling Address .................................................................... 27.14-21
Local Address Validation ..................................................................... 27.14-22
Default NPI ........................................................................................... 27.14-22
Address Translation Table Entry .......................................................... 27.14-23
Allowable Packet Sizes ........................................................................ 27.14-23
Flow Control Negotiation ...................................................................... 27.14-23
Throughput Class Negotiation ............................................................. 27.14-24
Throughput Class Negotiation Format ................................................. 27.14-24
Generate Cause Codes in DTE Format ............................................... 27.14-24
Enhanced Diagnostics Codes .............................................................. 27.14-25
Generate Alarms .................................................................................. 27.14-25
Restrictions and interdependencies ..................................................... 27.14-25
Change impact and activation .............................................................. 27.14-26
To configure network layer parameters ............................................... 27.14-28
27.14.9 Understanding Address Translation and Screening Parameters ............. 27.14-29
How addressing works in a 36120 MainStreet X.25 network ............... 27.14-29
Address translation .............................................................................. 27.14-30
Wildcard characters ............................................................................. 27.14-35
Call screening ...................................................................................... 27.14-36
27.14.10 Viewing Address Translation and Screening Parameters ...................... 27.14-36
To view the address translation table .................................................. 27.14-37
To view address translation and screening parameters ...................... 27.14-37

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Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

27.14.11

27.14.12

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Configuring Address Translation and Screening Parameters ................. 27.14-37


Entry Number ....................................................................................... 27.14-38
External Translation Prefix ................................................................... 27.14-38
Internal Translation Prefix .................................................................... 27.14-38
Direction ............................................................................................... 27.14-39
Which Address ..................................................................................... 27.14-39
Trap Incoming Calling .......................................................................... 27.14-40
Trap Incoming Called ........................................................................... 27.14-40
Trap Outgoing Calling .......................................................................... 27.14-40
Trap Outgoing Called ........................................................................... 27.14-41
Trap Action Clear Call .......................................................................... 27.14-41
Trap Action Cause Alarm ..................................................................... 27.14-41
Restrictions and interdependencies ..................................................... 27.14-41
Change impact and activation .............................................................. 27.14-43
To configure address translation and screening parameters ............... 27.14-44
Resetting XACs ...................................................................................... 27.14-44
To reset an XAC .................................................................................. 27.14-44

27.15 NUA Parameters


27.15.1
27.15.2
27.15.3
27.15.4

27.15.5

27.15.6

Understanding NUAs ................................................................................. 27.15-1


Configuration Overview ............................................................................. 27.15-2
Viewing Basic NUA Parameters ................................................................ 27.15-2
To view basic NUA parameters ............................................................. 27.15-3
Configuring Basic NUA Parameters .......................................................... 27.15-3
Network User Address ........................................................................... 27.15-3
Allocated XAC Number .......................................................................... 27.15-3
User Defined Data ................................................................................. 27.15-4
Accounting Activation ............................................................................. 27.15-4
Periodic Accounting Activation ............................................................... 27.15-5
Hot Billing ............................................................................................... 27.15-5
Restrictions and interdependencies ....................................................... 27.15-5
Change impact and activation ................................................................ 27.15-6
To define basic NUA parameters ........................................................... 27.15-6
Understanding NUA Subscription Options ................................................. 27.15-7
Charging facilities ................................................................................... 27.15-7
Fast Select and Fast Select Acceptance facilities ................................. 27.15-7
Call Redirection facility ........................................................................... 27.15-8
Viewing NUA Subscription Options ........................................................... 27.15-9
To view NUA subscription options ....................................................... 27.15-10

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

27.15.7

27.15.8
27.15.9
27.15.10

27.15.11
27.15.12
27.15.13

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring NUA Subscription Options .................................................... 27.15-10


Reverse Charge Acceptance ............................................................... 27.15-10
Local Charge Prevention ..................................................................... 27.15-11
Charging Information Subscription ....................................................... 27.15-11
Charging Information Request Allowed ............................................... 27.15-11
Incoming Fast Select Acceptance ........................................................ 27.15-12
Outgoing Restricted Fast Select Allowed ............................................. 27.15-12
Outgoing Unrestricted Fast Select Allowed ......................................... 27.15-12
Default NUA ......................................................................................... 27.15-13
TOA/NPI Address Format .................................................................... 27.15-13
Clear on Calling Address Failure ......................................................... 27.15-14
Redirection Address ............................................................................. 27.15-14
Signal CRN .......................................................................................... 27.15-14
Signal CLAMN ..................................................................................... 27.15-15
Call Deflection ...................................................................................... 27.15-15
NUI Subscription .................................................................................. 27.15-15
NUI Validation Required ...................................................................... 27.15-16
Default NUI Format .............................................................................. 27.15-16
Non-standard NUI Coding Method ....................................................... 27.15-17
Non-standard NUI First Subfield .......................................................... 27.15-17
Non-standard NUI First Subfield Length .............................................. 27.15-17
Restrictions and interdependencies ..................................................... 27.15-18
Change impact and activation .............................................................. 27.15-18
To configure NUA subscription options ................................................ 27.15-19
Understanding CUGs ............................................................................... 27.15-20
Viewing CUG Parameters ........................................................................ 27.15-21
To view CUG parameters .................................................................... 27.15-22
Configuring CUGs ................................................................................... 27.15-22
CUG Index ........................................................................................... 27.15-22
Interlock Code ...................................................................................... 27.15-22
Barring ................................................................................................. 27.15-23
Preferential CUG .................................................................................. 27.15-23
CUG with Incoming Access ................................................................. 27.15-24
CUG with Outgoing Access ................................................................. 27.15-24
Signal Preferential CUG ....................................................................... 27.15-24
Restrictions and interdependencies ..................................................... 27.15-25
Change impact and activation .............................................................. 27.15-25
To configure CUGs .............................................................................. 27.15-25
Understanding Flow Control and Throughput Class Parameters ............ 27.15-26
Viewing Flow Control and Throughput Class Parameters ...................... 27.15-26
To view flow control and throughput class parameters ........................ 27.15-27
Configuring Flow Control and Throughput Class Parameters ................ 27.15-27
Default Receive Packet Size ................................................................ 27.15-27
Default Send Packet Size .................................................................... 27.15-27
Default Receive Window Size .............................................................. 27.15-28
Default Send Window Size .................................................................. 27.15-28
Default Receive Throughput Class ...................................................... 27.15-28
Default Send Throughput Class ........................................................... 27.15-29
Restrictions and interdependencies ..................................................... 27.15-29
Change impact and activation .............................................................. 27.15-30
To configure flow control and throughput class parameters ................ 27.15-30

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

27.16 Copying XAC Configurations


27.16.1
27.16.2

Understanding the Copy Capability ........................................................... 27.16-1


Using the Copy Capability ......................................................................... 27.16-1
Restrictions and interdependencies ....................................................... 27.16-2
Change impact and activation ................................................................ 27.16-3
To use the COPY command .................................................................. 27.16-3

27.17 X.25 PVCs


27.17.1

27.17.2

27.17.3

Understanding X.25 PVCs ......................................................................... 27.17-1


How the network establishes PVCs ....................................................... 27.17-1
Packet size dependencies ..................................................................... 27.17-2
Packet sequence numbering ................................................................. 27.17-2
Viewing X.25 PVCs .................................................................................... 27.17-3
Viewing all PVCs or a group of PVCs .................................................... 27.17-3
To view all PVCs or a group of PVCs .................................................... 27.17-4
Viewing PVC parameters ....................................................................... 27.17-4
To view X.25 PVC parameters ............................................................... 27.17-5
Configuring X.25 PVCs .............................................................................. 27.17-5
To prepare XACs for PVCs .................................................................... 27.17-5
Local Address ........................................................................................ 27.17-6
Local LCN .............................................................................................. 27.17-6
Remote Address .................................................................................... 27.17-7
Remote LCN .......................................................................................... 27.17-7
Accounting Activation ............................................................................. 27.17-7
Periodic Accounting Activation ............................................................... 27.17-8
D-Bit Allowed ......................................................................................... 27.17-8
Local Send Packet Size ......................................................................... 27.17-8
Local Receive Packet Size .................................................................... 27.17-9
Remote Send Packet Size ..................................................................... 27.17-9
Remote Receive Packet Size .............................................................. 27.17-10
Send Window Size ............................................................................... 27.17-10
Receive Window Size .......................................................................... 27.17-10
Send Throughput Class ....................................................................... 27.17-11
Receive Throughput Class ................................................................... 27.17-11
Originating End .................................................................................... 27.17-12
Restrictions and interdependencies ..................................................... 27.17-12
Change impact and activation .............................................................. 27.17-12
To configure the X.25 PVC parameters ............................................... 27.17-13
To delete X.25 PVCs ........................................................................... 27.17-14

27.18 Hunt Groups


27.18.1

27.18.2

lii

Understanding Hunt Groups ...................................................................... 27.18-1


Switch-wide hunt groups ........................................................................ 27.18-1
Network-wide hunt groups ..................................................................... 27.18-2
Hunt group addresses ............................................................................ 27.18-2
Redirection addresses ........................................................................... 27.18-2
Viewing Hunt Group Information ................................................................ 27.18-3
To view hunt group information .............................................................. 27.18-4

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

27.18.3

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring Hunt Groups ........................................................................... 27.18-4


Hunt group configuration overview ........................................................ 27.18-4
Hunt Group Address .............................................................................. 27.18-5
Redirection Address ............................................................................... 27.18-5
Hunt Group Member NUA ...................................................................... 27.18-5
Restrictions and interdependencies ....................................................... 27.18-6
Change impact and activation ................................................................ 27.18-6
To add and delete hunt group addresses .............................................. 27.18-6
To add and delete hunt group members ................................................ 27.18-7

27.19 Provisioning X.25 User Access


27.19.1
27.19.2

Direct X.25 Access .................................................................................... 27.19-1


To provision direct access lines ............................................................. 27.19-1
Encapsulated Access ................................................................................ 27.19-3
To provision encapsulated access to the X.25 switch ........................... 27.19-3
To provision subrate encapsulated access to the X.25 switch .............. 27.19-6

27.20 X.25 to Frame Relay Service Interworking


27.20.1

27.20.2

27.20.3

27.20.4

27.20.5
27.20.6

Table of Contents

Understanding the X.25 to frame relay service interworking ..................... 27.20-1


Service interworking ............................................................................... 27.20-1
Network interworking ............................................................................. 27.20-2
End-to-end protocol stack ...................................................................... 27.20-3
Frame loss ............................................................................................. 27.20-3
X.25 to Frame Relay Service Interworking Components ........................... 27.20-4
X.25 to frame relay service interworking XAC ....................................... 27.20-4
Frame relay permanent virtual circuit connection .................................. 27.20-4
X.25 virtual circuits ................................................................................. 27.20-4
Call Management ....................................................................................... 27.20-5
Call setup ............................................................................................... 27.20-5
Call routing ............................................................................................. 27.20-6
Data transfer .......................................................................................... 27.20-6
Connection management ....................................................................... 27.20-7
Link Management Interface ................................................................... 27.20-7
Flow control ............................................................................................ 27.20-8
Congestion level monitoring ................................................................... 27.20-8
Accounting ............................................................................................. 27.20-9
X.25 to frame relay service interworking features .................................. 27.20-9
X.25 to frame relay service interworking restrictions ........................... 27.20-10
X.25 to Frame Relay Service Interworking Parameters ........................... 27.20-10
Mild congestion threshold .................................................................... 27.20-10
Severe congestion threshold ............................................................... 27.20-10
Absolute congestion threshold (ACT) .................................................. 27.20-11
Frame relay reconnect timer ................................................................ 27.20-11
Viewing service interworking parameters ............................................ 27.20-11
To view service interworking parameters ............................................. 27.20-12
Network User Address Parameters ......................................................... 27.20-12
To view NUA parameters ..................................................................... 27.20-13
Configuring X.25 to frame relay service interworking .............................. 27.20-14
To configure X.25 to frame relay service interworking ......................... 27.20-14

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

28. X.75 Gateway Service


28.1

Understanding the X.75 Gateway Service


28.1.1
28.1.2
28.1.3

28.1.4
28.1.5
28.1.6

28.1.7
28.1.8
28.1.9
28.1.10

28.2

X.75 XAC Parameters


28.2.1
28.2.2
28.2.3

28.2.4

liv

Overview of the X.75 Gateway Service ....................................................... 28.1-1


Understanding X.75 ..................................................................................... 28.1-1
X.75 Utilities ................................................................................................. 28.1-2
Call identifier ............................................................................................ 28.1-2
Throughput class indication ..................................................................... 28.1-2
Window size indication ............................................................................. 28.1-3
Packet size indication .............................................................................. 28.1-3
Fast select indication ............................................................................... 28.1-4
Reverse charge indication ....................................................................... 28.1-4
Called line address modification notification ............................................ 28.1-4
Transit network identification code ........................................................... 28.1-5
Clearing network identification code ........................................................ 28.1-5
Internetwork closed user group indication ............................................... 28.1-5
Internetwork closed user group with outgoing access indication ............. 28.1-5
X.75 Gateway Call Routing .......................................................................... 28.1-5
IPVCs ........................................................................................................... 28.1-6
Internetwork Closed User Groups ............................................................... 28.1-6
Mode of operation .................................................................................... 28.1-6
ICUG mapping tables ............................................................................... 28.1-7
X.75 Accounting ........................................................................................... 28.1-8
Diagnostic Code Mapping ............................................................................ 28.1-9
X.75 Gateway Service Configuration Overview ......................................... 28.1-10
Summary of X.75 Configurable Parameters .............................................. 28.1-11

X.75 Access Circuit Configuration Overview ............................................... 28.2-1


X.75 Link Layer Parameters ........................................................................ 28.2-1
To view X.75 link layer parameters .......................................................... 28.2-2
Configuring X.75 Link Layer Parameters ..................................................... 28.2-2
LAPB Address Assignment ...................................................................... 28.2-2
Frame Sequence Numbering ................................................................... 28.2-3
Maximum Frame Window Size ................................................................ 28.2-3
Retransmission Count (N2) ...................................................................... 28.2-3
Frame Response Timer (T1) .................................................................... 28.2-4
Response Delay Timer (T2) ..................................................................... 28.2-4
Inactivity Timer (T3) ................................................................................. 28.2-4
Congestion Timer ..................................................................................... 28.2-5
Maximum Information Frame Size (N1) ................................................... 28.2-5
Restrictions and interdependencies ......................................................... 28.2-5
Change impact and activation .................................................................. 28.2-5
To configure X.75 link layer parameters .................................................. 28.2-6
X.75 Network Layer Parameters .................................................................. 28.2-7
To view X.75 network layer parameters ................................................... 28.2-8

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28.2.5

28.2.6

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring X.75 Network Layer Parameters .............................................. 28.2-8


Service Type ............................................................................................ 28.2-8
X.75 Logical Channel Number Selection ................................................. 28.2-9
Version ..................................................................................................... 28.2-9
Packet Sequence Numbering .................................................................. 28.2-9
Base LCN ............................................................................................... 28.2-10
Number of LCNs .................................................................................... 28.2-10
Number of PVCs .................................................................................... 28.2-10
Number of Outgoing SVCs .................................................................... 28.2-11
Two-way SVCs ...................................................................................... 28.2-11
Number of Incoming SVCs .................................................................... 28.2-12
Restart Timer (T30) ................................................................................ 28.2-12
Call Request Timer (T31) ....................................................................... 28.2-13
Reset Timer (T32) .................................................................................. 28.2-13
Clear Timer (T33) ................................................................................... 28.2-13
Window Timer (T24) .............................................................................. 28.2-14
Inactivity Timer ....................................................................................... 28.2-14
Flow Control Timer ................................................................................. 28.2-15
Incoming Maximum Address Length Allowed ........................................ 28.2-15
Default NPI ............................................................................................. 28.2-16
Allowable Packet Sizes .......................................................................... 28.2-16
Incoming Transit Calls Allowed .............................................................. 28.2-17
Throughput Class Negotiation Format ................................................... 28.2-17
Diagnostic Code Mapping ...................................................................... 28.2-17
Generate Alarms .................................................................................... 28.2-18
Status Monitoring ................................................................................... 28.2-18
Gateway TNIC/CNIC .............................................................................. 28.2-18
Insert TNIC ............................................................................................. 28.2-19
Signal TNIC ............................................................................................ 28.2-19
Signal CNIC ........................................................................................... 28.2-19
Restrictions and interdependencies ....................................................... 28.2-20
Change impact and activation ................................................................ 28.2-20
To configure X.75 network layer parameters ......................................... 28.2-22
Configuring X.75 Address Translation Parameters ................................... 28.2-23
External Translation Prefix ..................................................................... 28.2-23
Internal Translation Prefix ...................................................................... 28.2-23
Translate Calling Address ...................................................................... 28.2-24
Translate Called Address ....................................................................... 28.2-24
Translate Incoming Packets ................................................................... 28.2-24
Translate Outgoing Packets ................................................................... 28.2-25
Trap Incoming Calling ............................................................................ 28.2-25
Trap Incoming Called ............................................................................. 28.2-25
Trap Outgoing Calling ............................................................................ 28.2-26
Trap Outgoing Called ............................................................................. 28.2-26
Trap Action: Clear Call ........................................................................... 28.2-26
Restrictions and interdependencies ....................................................... 28.2-27
Change impact and activation ................................................................ 28.2-27
To configure X.75 address translation parameters ................................ 28.2-27

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28.3

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

X.75 NUA Parameters


28.3.1
28.3.2
28.3.3

Understanding NUAs ................................................................................... 28.3-1


Viewing X.75 NUA Parameters .................................................................... 28.3-1
To view X.75 NUA parameters ................................................................ 28.3-2
Configuring X.75 NUA Parameters .............................................................. 28.3-2
Network User Address ............................................................................. 28.3-2
Allocated XAC Number ............................................................................ 28.3-2
Accounting Activation ............................................................................... 28.3-3
Signal CLAMN ......................................................................................... 28.3-3
Signal CRN .............................................................................................. 28.3-4
Reverse Charge Acceptance ................................................................... 28.3-4
Default Receive Window Size .................................................................. 28.3-4
Default Send Window Size ...................................................................... 28.3-5
Default Receive Throughput Class .......................................................... 28.3-5
Default Send Throughput Class ............................................................... 28.3-5
Default Receive Packet Size .................................................................... 28.3-6
Default Send Packet Size ........................................................................ 28.3-6
Outgoing Fast Select Allowed .................................................................. 28.3-6
Incoming Restricted Fast Select Allowed ................................................. 28.3-7
Incoming Unrestricted Fast Select Allowed ............................................. 28.3-7
TOA/NPI Address Format ........................................................................ 28.3-7
Clear On Calling Address Failure ............................................................ 28.3-8
Periodic Accounting Activation ................................................................. 28.3-8
Restrictions and interdependencies ......................................................... 28.3-8
Change impact and activation .................................................................. 28.3-9
To configure X.75 NUA parameters ....................................................... 28.3-10

29. BRI S/T Cards


29.1

Understanding BRI S/T Card Configuration


29.1.1

29.1.2

29.2

BRI S/T Card Slots


29.2.1
29.2.2

lvi

Understanding BRI S/T Cards ..................................................................... 29.1-1


ISDN basics ............................................................................................. 29.1-1
ISDN application ..................................................................................... 29.1-2
BRI S/T cards ........................................................................................... 29.1-2
Applications .............................................................................................. 29.1-2
Configuring BRI S/T Cards .......................................................................... 29.1-3

Understanding BRI S/T Card Slots .............................................................. 29.2-1


Configuring BRI S/T Card Slots ................................................................... 29.2-1
To configure BRI S/T card slots ............................................................... 29.2-1

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29.3

Non-ISDN Applications
29.3.1

29.3.2

29.3.3

29.3.4

29.4

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Understanding Non-ISDN Applications ........................................................ 29.3-1


Leased lines ............................................................................................. 29.3-1
ISDN loop extension ................................................................................ 29.3-3
Configuring BRI S/T Interfaces in a Non-ISDN Application ......................... 29.3-4
Interface type ........................................................................................... 29.3-4
Interface mode ......................................................................................... 29.3-4
Layer 1 standard ...................................................................................... 29.3-4
T3 timer .................................................................................................... 29.3-5
Bus configuration ..................................................................................... 29.3-5
To configure BRI S/T interfaces in a non-ISDN application ..................... 29.3-6
Configuring BRI S/T Circuits in a Non-ISDN Application ............................. 29.3-6
B-channel inversion type .......................................................................... 29.3-6
Tandem super-rate .................................................................................. 29.3-7
Automatic loopback on physically unconnected BRI circuits ................... 29.3-8
To configure B1 channels ........................................................................ 29.3-9
To configure B2 channels ........................................................................ 29.3-9
D-channel 3DS0 transport ....................................................................... 29.3-9
D-channel transport position .................................................................. 29.3-10
To configure D channels ........................................................................ 29.3-10
Making BRI Connections ........................................................................... 29.3-11
BRI channel connections ....................................................................... 29.3-11
To make connections ............................................................................. 29.3-12

ISDN Applications
29.4.1
29.4.2
29.4.3

29.4.4

Understanding the ISDN Backup Application .............................................. 29.4-1


Understanding the ISDN Channel Search Facility ....................................... 29.4-2
Configuring BRI S/T Interfaces in an ISDN Application ............................... 29.4-3
Interface type ........................................................................................... 29.4-3
Interface mode ......................................................................................... 29.4-3
Layer 1 standard ...................................................................................... 29.4-3
T3 timer .................................................................................................... 29.4-3
Forced activation ...................................................................................... 29.4-4
To configure BRI S/T interfaces in an ISDN application .......................... 29.4-4
Configuring BRI S/T Circuits in an ISDN Application ................................... 29.4-4

30. CPCs
30.1

Understanding CPC Configuration


30.1.1
30.1.2

30.2

Understanding CPCs ................................................................................... 30.1-1


Configuring CPCs ........................................................................................ 30.1-1

CPC Card Slots


30.2.1

Table of Contents

Understanding CPC Card Slots ................................................................... 30.2-1


To configure CPC slots ............................................................................ 30.2-1

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30.3

CPC Circuit Configuration


30.3.1
30.3.2
30.3.3

30.3.4

30.4

Understanding ISDN Indices on CPC Circuits ............................................. 30.4-1


Configuring Indices on CPC Circuits ........................................................... 30.4-1
Directory number ..................................................................................... 30.4-1
Bearer capability ...................................................................................... 30.4-4
Verification ............................................................................................... 30.4-5
Number of retries ..................................................................................... 30.4-5
Dial or non-dial ......................................................................................... 30.4-5
Dial delay ................................................................................................. 30.4-5
Number of channels ................................................................................. 30.4-6
To configure indices on CPC circuits ....................................................... 30.4-7

CPC Connections
30.5.1

30.5.2

lviii

Understanding ISDN Backup ....................................................................... 30.3-1


Understanding ISDN Channel Search ......................................................... 30.3-2
Configuration Process for the ISDN Backup and
Channel Search Applications .............................................................. 30.3-2
To configure the ISDN applications ......................................................... 30.3-2
Interface and channel numbering ............................................................ 30.3-3
Configuring CPC Circuits ............................................................................. 30.3-3
Interface type ........................................................................................... 30.3-4
Interface standard .................................................................................... 30.3-4
Number of B channels ............................................................................. 30.3-4
B-channel search order ............................................................................ 30.3-5
PCM encoding ......................................................................................... 30.3-5
Call status information reporting .............................................................. 30.3-5
Bearer service .......................................................................................... 30.3-5
BRI initialization ....................................................................................... 30.3-6
Bus configuration ..................................................................................... 30.3-6
To configure CPC circuits ........................................................................ 30.3-7

ISDN Indices
30.4.1
30.4.2

30.5

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Understanding CPC Connections for the ISDN Applications ....................... 30.5-1


CPSS ....................................................................................................... 30.5-1
Super-rate ................................................................................................ 30.5-1
Non super-rate ......................................................................................... 30.5-2
Making the Connections to Set Up the ISDN Applications .......................... 30.5-2
To connect D channels ............................................................................ 30.5-2
To configure preferred connections ......................................................... 30.5-2
To connect protecting connection ............................................................ 30.5-2

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

31. HSA Cards


31.1

SONET/SDH and 3600+ MainStreet System Applications


31.1.1

31.1.2

31.2

Understanding High-speed Aggregate Card Configuration


31.2.1
31.2.2

31.3

Understanding HSA Card Slots ................................................................... 31.3-1


Configuring HSA Card Slots ........................................................................ 31.3-1
To configure an HSA slot card type ......................................................... 31.3-2
To configure HSA card name ................................................................... 31.3-2

HSA Card Traffic Protection


31.4.1

31.4.2

31.4.3

31.5

Understanding High-speed Aggregate Cards .............................................. 31.2-1


HSA card configurable parameters .......................................................... 31.2-1
SONET or SDH Service Configuration ....................................................... 31.2-6

HSA Card Slots


31.3.1
31.3.2

31.4

Understanding SONET and SDH Basics ..................................................... 31.1-1


SONET and SDH Data Transmission Rates and Structures ................... 31.1-1
Multiplexing .............................................................................................. 31.1-2
3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager Applications ................................... 31.1-3
High-density time-division multiplexing .................................................... 31.1-3
Linear add/drop multiplexing and signal termination ................................ 31.1-3
Ring multiplexing ...................................................................................... 31.1-4

Understanding Traffic Protection ................................................................. 31.4-1


Traffic protection mode ............................................................................ 31.4-1
Protection switching options .................................................................... 31.4-2
1+1 mode line protection switching .......................................................... 31.4-5
Ring mode path protection switching ....................................................... 31.4-8
Configuring Traffic Protection Switching Options ...................................... 31.4-10
Protection switching options for 1+1 and ring modes ........................... 31.4-10
To configure HSA card traffic protection mode ...................................... 31.4-11
To configure 1+1 traffic protection options ............................................. 31.4-11
To configure ring traffic protection options ............................................. 31.4-12
Protection Switching Commands ............................................................... 31.4-12
Card or circuit lockout ............................................................................ 31.4-12
Forced switch ......................................................................................... 31.4-12
Manual switch ........................................................................................ 31.4-13
Clear command ...................................................................................... 31.4-13
To issue protection switching commands .............................................. 31.4-13

OC-3 and STM-1 Card Port Synchronization


31.5.1

Table of Contents

Understanding OC-3 or STM-1 Card Port Synchronization ......................... 31.5-1


Synchronization sources .......................................................................... 31.5-1
Slot options for port synchronization ........................................................ 31.5-1
To configure OC-3 or STM-1 card port synchronization .......................... 31.5-2

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31.6

Broadband Circuits
31.6.1

31.6.2

31.6.3

31.6.4

31.6.5

31.7

Configuring the OC-3 or STM-1 Card Section DCC .................................... 31.8-1


To configure the OC-3 card DCC ............................................................. 31.8-1
To configure the STM-1 card DCC .......................................................... 31.8-1

Broadband Circuit Connections


31.9.1

31.9.2

31.9.3

31.9.4

lx

Understanding Broadband Signal Labels .................................................... 31.7-1


Configuring Broadband Signal Labels ......................................................... 31.7-1
To configure the OC-3 card STS-1 signal label ....................................... 31.7-2
To configure the STM-1 card AU-3 signal label ....................................... 31.7-2
To configure the STM-1 card AU-4 signal label ....................................... 31.7-2
To configure a VT-1.5 card VT- 1.5 circuit signal label ............................ 31.7-2
To configure a TU-12 card TU-12 circuit signal label ............................... 31.7-2

SONET and SDH Data Communication Channels


31.8.1

31.9

Understanding Broadband Circuits .............................................................. 31.6-1


OC-3 and STM-1 card broadband circuits ............................................... 31.6-1
VT-1.5 and TU-12 mapper card broadband circuits ................................. 31.6-2
Configuring OC-3 Card Circuit Structure ..................................................... 31.6-2
To configure an STS-1 as a link or circuit ................................................ 31.6-3
To configure STS-1 link VT structure ....................................................... 31.6-3
Configuring STM-1 Card Circuit Structure ................................................... 31.6-4
To configure SDH mode .......................................................................... 31.6-6
To configure an AU-3 as a link or circuit .................................................. 31.6-6
To configure TUG-3 structure .................................................................. 31.6-6
To configure TUG-3 or AU-3 TUG-2 structure ......................................... 31.6-6
Configuring Mapper Card Broadband Circuits ............................................. 31.6-7
Configuring broadband circuit provisioning .............................................. 31.6-7
To configure mapper card broadband circuit provisioning ....................... 31.6-7
Copying and Naming Circuits ...................................................................... 31.6-7
Copying and naming circuits .................................................................... 31.6-7
To copy or name circuits .......................................................................... 31.6-8

Broadband Signal Labels


31.7.1
31.7.2

31.8

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Understanding Broadband Connections ...................................................... 31.9-1


Viewing circuit connections ...................................................................... 31.9-2
To view circuit connection information ..................................................... 31.9-3
Bidirectional Broadband Circuit Connections .............................................. 31.9-3
To configure simple bidirectional or terminal add-drop connections ........ 31.9-4
To disconnect a bidirectional circuit ......................................................... 31.9-4
Pass-through Connections .......................................................................... 31.9-4
To configure a pass-through connection .................................................. 31.9-5
To disconnect a pass-through connection ............................................... 31.9-5
UPSR add-drop connections ....................................................................... 31.9-5
To configure a UPSR add-drop connection ............................................. 31.9-6
To disconnect all circuits in a UPSR add-drop connection ...................... 31.9-6
To disconnect a UPSR add-drop connection from a single ring .............. 31.9-6

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

31.10 Mapper Card Super-rate Circuits


31.10.1

31.10.2

Understanding Super-rate Circuits for Mapper Cards ............................... 31.10-1


Contiguous super-rate circuits ............................................................... 31.10-1
Non-contiguous super-rate circuits ........................................................ 31.10-2
Equidistant super-rate circuits ................................................................ 31.10-2
Protecting super-rate circuits ................................................................. 31.10-3
Configuring Super-rate Circuits for Mapper Cards .................................... 31.10-4
To configure a tandem super-rate circuit ............................................... 31.10-5
To deconfigure a super-rate bundle ....................................................... 31.10-5

31.11 Zero Code Suppression for Narrowband Ports


31.11.1

Understanding Zero Code Suppression for VT-1.5 Card Narrowband


T1 Ports ............................................................................................ 31.11-1
Transparent framing ............................................................................... 31.11-1
Jam Bit 7 framing ................................................................................... 31.11-2
To configure zero code suppression for narrowband DS1 ports ............ 31.11-2

31.12 Narrowband Port Trunk Conditioning


31.12.1

31.12.2
31.12.3

31.12.4
31.12.5

Understanding Trunk Conditioning for Mapper Cards ............................... 31.12-1


One-way trunk conditioning ................................................................... 31.12-2
Two-way trunk conditioning ................................................................... 31.12-4
Disabling trunk conditioning ................................................................... 31.12-5
Trunk Conditioning Configuration Overview .............................................. 31.12-6
Configuring One-way or Two-way Trunk Conditioning .............................. 31.12-6
To select one-way or two-way trunk conditioning for
mapper cards ................................................................................. 31.12-6
Understanding Fault Class Trunk Conditioning ......................................... 31.12-6
Enabling or Disabling Fault Classes for Mapper Cards ............................. 31.12-8
Disabling trunk conditioning using fault classes ..................................... 31.12-8
To set mapper card fault classes ........................................................... 31.12-8

31.13 Narrowband Port Framing


31.13.1
31.13.2

31.13.3

Table of Contents

Understanding Framing for Narrowband Ports .......................................... 31.13-1


Configuring Framing for VT-1.5 Cards ....................................................... 31.13-1
D4 framing ............................................................................................. 31.13-1
ESF framing ........................................................................................... 31.13-2
To configure framing format on the narrowband DS-1 port ................... 31.13-2
Configuring Framing for TU-12 Cards ....................................................... 31.13-3
CAS framing ........................................................................................... 31.13-3
CCS framing .......................................................................................... 31.13-4
31 channels framing ............................................................................... 31.13-4
To configure framing for TU-12 card narrowband ports ......................... 31.13-4

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

31.14 Narrowband Circuit Fault Signalling


31.14.1

31.14.2

Understanding Fault Signalling for Mapper Cards ..................................... 31.14-1


Disabling fault signalling for mapper cards ............................................ 31.14-2
Fault signalling codes for mapper cards ................................................ 31.14-2
Configuring Fault Signalling for Mapper Cards .......................................... 31.14-2
Restrictions ............................................................................................ 31.14-3
To configure fault signalling for mapper cardprimary rate circuits ......... 31.14-3

31.15 Mapper Card PRI Signalling


31.15.1

31.15.2

31.15.3

Understanding Signalling for mapper cards ............................................... 31.15-1


Signalling types for mapper cards .......................................................... 31.15-1
Compatible mapper and PRI card signalling types ................................ 31.15-2
PLAR D3 signalling ................................................................................ 31.15-3
R2 digital signalling ................................................................................ 31.15-3
RBS ........................................................................................................ 31.15-3
Configuring Signalling for VT-1.5 Cards .................................................... 31.15-4
To enable signalling for VT-1.5 card narrowband port circuits ............... 31.15-4
To enable or disable VT-1.5 card narrowband port circuits ................... 31.15-4
To create clear channels on VT-1.5 card narrowband ports .................. 31.15-5
Configuring Signalling for TU-12 Card Circuits .......................................... 31.15-5
To configure signalling type for TU-12 cards ......................................... 31.15-6

31.16 Mapper Card Narrowband Circuit Inversion


31.16.1
31.16.2

Understanding Inversion for VT-1.5 and TU-12 Cards .............................. 31.16-1


Configuring Inversion for Card Narrowband Port Circuits .......................... 31.16-1
To configure inversion for mapper card narrowband port circuits .......... 31.16-1

31.17 TU-12 Card NU Bits Configuration


31.17.1

Configuring the NU bits for TU-12 Cards ................................................... 31.17-1


To configure NU bits for TU-12 cards .................................................... 31.17-1
To view the received NU bits for TU-12 cards ....................................... 31.17-1

31.18 TU-12 Card CRC-4 Reframing and Link Quality Monitoring


31.18.1
31.18.2
31.18.3

Understanding CRC-4 Reframing and Link Quality Monitoring ................. 31.18-1


Configuring CRC-4 Reframing ................................................................... 31.18-1
To configure narrowband E1 port CRC-4 reframing .............................. 31.18-1
Configuring CRC-4 or FAS Link Quality Monitoring ................................... 31.18-2
To select CRC-4 or FAS error detection ................................................ 31.18-2

31.19 Narrowband Circuit Custom Trunk Conditioning


31.19.1
31.19.2

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Understanding Custom Trunk Conditioning ............................................... 31.19-1


Configuring Custom Trunk Conditioning for Mapper Cards ....................... 31.19-2
To configure custom trunk conditioning for mapper cards ..................... 31.19-3

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

31.20 Mapper Card Narrowband Port Loopback Detection


31.20.1
31.20.2
31.20.3

Understanding Loopback Detection for Mapper Cards .............................. 31.20-1


CPSS Loopback Detection for Mapper Cards ........................................... 31.20-2
Establishing CPSS Loopback Detection for Mapper Cards ....................... 31.20-2
To configure loopback detection on mapper cards ................................ 31.20-2

List of Figures
Figure

Title

16.2-1
16.2-2
16.2-3
16.2-4
16.2-5
16.2-6
16.2-7
16.2-8
16.2-9

Node Management Session Nodes .......................................................................... 16.2-2


Serial Port Pinouts for a Class A Locally Controlled Shelf System ........................... 16.2-9
Serial Port Pinouts for a Class A Switching Shelf System ...................................... 16.2-10
Serial Port Pinouts for a Class B or 23-inch Locally Controlled or
Peripheral Shelf System ................................................................................... 16.2-11
Serial Port Pinouts for a Class B or 23-inch Switching Shelf System ..................... 16.2-12
Serial Port Pinout for CPC and FRS Card Faceplates ............................................ 16.2-13
Serial Port Pinout for DCP Card Faceplates ........................................................... 16.2-13
Serial Port Pinout for DS-3, E3, FRE and PE Card Faceplates .............................. 16.2-13
Serial Port Pinout for Control Card Faceplates ....................................................... 16.2-14

16.3-1
16.3-2

Header Line Fields .................................................................................................... 16.3-2


Main Menu for the MainStreet Node ......................................................................... 16.3-5

16.4-1
16.4-2
16.4-3
16.4-4
16.4-5

Peripheral Shelf and HSPS Card Shelf Numbering .................................................. 16.4-7


Slot Numbers for the Switching Shelf ....................................................................... 16.4-8
Slot Numbers for the Locally Controlled or Peripheral Shelf ................................... 16.4-10
Slot Numbers for the HSPS .................................................................................... 16.4-11
Slot Numbers for the HSPS2 .................................................................................. 16.4-12

16.5-1
16.5-2
16.5-3
16.5-4
16.5-5
16.5-6
16.5-7
16.5-8
16.5-9

Switching Shelf Display ............................................................................................ 16.5-2


Summary Display for a Typical Conguration ........................................................... 16.5-3
SHOW_A Display ...................................................................................................... 16.5-4
Switching Card Information Display .......................................................................... 16.5-6
Card Information Display .......................................................................................... 16.5-7
3600+ MainStreet Control Card Information Display ................................................ 16.5-8
Control Card Module Information Display ................................................................ 16.5-9
Switching Shelf Connection Display ....................................................................... 16.5-10
Peripheral Shelf Connection Display ...................................................................... 16.5-10

17.1-1
17.1-2

CONFIG CONNECT Display (Peripheral Shelf) ....................................................... 17.1-4


CONFIG CONNECT Display (Switching Shelf) ........................................................ 17.1-4

17.2-1
17.2-2

Locally Controlled Shelf Timing Source Display ....................................................... 17.2-3


Enhanced Locally Controlled Shelf Timing Source Display Status
Message Mode ................................................................................................... 17.2-3
Peripheral Shelf Timing Source Display .................................................................... 17.2-4
Switching Shelf Timing Source Display .................................................................... 17.2-5

17.2-3
17.2-4

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.2-5
17.2-6
17.2-7
17.2-8
17.2-9

Example of an ANS Network .................................................................................... 17.2-9


ANS Zones ............................................................................................................. 17.2-10
ANS Links Display .................................................................................................. 17.2-15
Timing Source Display ............................................................................................ 17.2-20
DDS Composite Clock Display ............................................................................... 17.2-27

17.3-1
17.3-2

Jumper W4 Location on the 3600+ MainStreet Control Card .................................. 17.3-3


3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager HOUSE Display ........................................ 17.3-13

17.4-1

Header Line Fields .................................................................................................... 17.4-1

17.5-1

CONFIG SLOT Access Level Denition .................................................................... 17.5-4

17.6-1
17.6-2
17.6-3
17.6-4
17.6-5
17.6-6
17.6-7
17.6-8
17.6-9
17.6-10
17.6-11
17.6-12
17.6-13

CPSS Cost Example ................................................................................................. 17.6-6


CPSS Master/Slave Protocol - Switching Shelf Controlled System .......................... 17.6-7
CPSS Master/Slave Protocol - Locally Controlled System ....................................... 17.6-7
Example of Upgrade from Release 4 ........................................................................ 17.6-9
CPSS Grooming Application ................................................................................... 17.6-12
CPSS Node Parameter Display .............................................................................. 17.6-15
4 kb/s CPSS Channel with Framing Bit at F0-B7 .................................................... 17.6-28
4 kb/s CPSS Channel with Framing Bit at F0-B4 .................................................... 17.6-28
16 kb/s CPSS Channel with Framing Bit at F0-B5 .................................................. 17.6-29
48 kb/s CPSS Channels with Framing Bit at F0-B6 ................................................ 17.6-30
CPSS Rerouting ..................................................................................................... 17.6-34
FASTbus CPSS Connections ................................................................................. 17.6-35
CONFIG CONNECT CPSSx NMTI Screen ........................................................... 17.6-36

18.2-1
18.2-2
18.2-3
18.2-4

Terminology for Protecting Connections ................................................................... 18.2-1


Out-of-Service Signalling for Tandem Nodes ............................................................ 18.2-2
Preferred Connection Available ................................................................................ 18.2-4
Activity Qualied Access ........................................................................................... 18.2-5

18.3-1

Operating Rules for Redundant Primary Rate Pair ................................................... 18.3-4

20.4-1
20.4-2
20.4-3
20.4-4
20.4-5
20.4-6
20.4-7

M48 Transitional Signalling ....................................................................................... 20.4-1


M60 Transitional Signalling ....................................................................................... 20.4-2
Delta (M44/M55) ADPCM Subframe ........................................................................ 20.4-3
Transitional (M48/M60) ADPCM Subframe ............................................................... 20.4-4
Viewing Compressor Connections ............................................................................ 20.4-5
Viewing Sub-channel Connections ........................................................................... 20.4-6
Connecting a Compressed Channel ......................................................................... 20.4-9

20.5-1

TSM Timeslot Assignment ........................................................................................ 20.5-1

20.6-1
20.6-2

D4 Framing Format ................................................................................................... 20.6-2


ESF Framing Format ................................................................................................ 20.6-3

20.9-1
20.9-2
20.9-3

One-way Trunk Conditioning (Group 1) ..................................................................... 20.9-4


One-way Trunk Conditioning (Group 2) ..................................................................... 20.9-5
Two-way Trunk Conditioning ..................................................................................... 20.9-6

20.10-1

Fault Signalling ....................................................................................................... 20.10-1

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Issue 1, November 1997

20.11-1

Connection Path with Custom Trunk Conditioning .................................................. 20.11-1

20.12-1
20.12-2

Example of Signalling Type Conguration .............................................................. 20.12-3


TS0 Bits for the TTC2M Card ................................................................................. 20.12-9

20.14-1
20.14-2
20.14-3
20.14-4
20.14-5

Loopback Detection ................................................................................................ 20.14-2


CPSS Loopback Detection Path ............................................................................. 20.14-4
TS24 Loopback Detection Path .............................................................................. 20.14-5
On-fault Loopback Detection Path .......................................................................... 20.14-5
NMTI Display for Loopback Detection .................................................................... 20.14-7

20.15-1

Equidistant Super-rate DS0s on E1 Links .............................................................. 20.15-3

20.16-1

24 DS0 Super-rate Connection RAPID Switch to an Alternative Path .................... 20.16-2

20.17-1
20.17-2
20.17-3

Conguration Link Options Display ......................................................................... 20.17-3


Errored Second Threshold Equation ....................................................................... 20.17-3
Dual E1-2 Card Link Monitoring Performance Thresholds Display ......................... 20.17-6

20.18-1
20.18-2
20.18-3

E1 Links Used for Access and Network Termination .............................................. 20.18-5


The E1 Multi-frame Showing the SA4 Bit ............................................................... 20.18-7
Dual E1 and Dual E1-2 Card E-bits ........................................................................ 20.18-9

20.19-1
20.19-2

Supervisory Channel Showing Signalling Bits ........................................................ 20.19-4


X.21 PRI Screen Display ........................................................................................ 20.19-5

20.20-1
20.20-2
20.20-3
20.20-4
20.20-5

Slot Display for an MPA Card Link .......................................................................... 20.20-3


Default Backplane Channel Assignments on a Double Bandwidth Shelf ............... 20.20-5
Default Backplane Channel Assignments on a Single Bandwidth Shelf ................. 20.20-6
Example TS0 Framed with HCM3, HCM4 or HCM5 ............................................. 20.20-10
Example SRM Data on TS0 Framed with HCM1 or HCM2 ................................... 20.20-11

21.3-1
21.3-2

E&M Signalling ......................................................................................................... 21.3-3


4WDX Signalling Interface ........................................................................................ 21.3-8

21.5-1

Transmission Level Points ......................................................................................... 21.5-1

21.9-1
21.9-2
21.9-3

Audio Loop Singing ................................................................................................... 21.9-1


Tx Mute ..................................................................................................................... 21.9-1
Tx Mute Display ........................................................................................................ 21.9-2

21.11-1

CONFIG CIRCUIT EQUALIZER NMTI Display ...................................................... 21.11-2

22.3-1
22.3-2
22.3-3
22.3-4
22.3-5
22.3-6
22.3-7
22.3-8
22.3-9

Transmit and Receive Clocks .................................................................................... 22.3-8


RS-422 DCC Hardware Genders ........................................................................... 22.3-10
DCC/DTU Clocking Applications ............................................................................ 22.3-12
Calculating the multiplier ......................................................................................... 22.3-17
Maximum Super-rate Interface Speeds .................................................................. 22.3-20
2B1Q, 27LC2 and DNIC Line Card Super-rate Connections .................................. 22.3-22
Port Activity Switching Display ................................................................................ 22.3-28
Basic ISDN Reference Model ................................................................................. 22.3-33
ISDN Loop Extension ............................................................................................. 22.3-33

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

22.3-10
22.3-11
22.3-12
23.3-1
23.3-2

3DS0 ISDN Loop Extension Application ................................................................. 22.3-34


5DS0 ISDN Loop Extension Application ................................................................. 22.3-35
2B1Q Channel Unit Connection Display ................................................................. 22.3-38
Transparent 8 kb/s and 16 kb/s Compressed Voice Circuits ..................................... 23.3-4
HCM 16 kb/s Compressed Voice Circuit ................................................................... 23.3-5

23.4-1
23.4-2
23.4-3
23.4-4

PCM Multidrop Bridges ............................................................................................. 23.4-1


Cascading PCM Multidrop Data Bridges .................................................................. 23.4-2
Master and Slave Bridging Application ..................................................................... 23.4-3
ADI Application ......................................................................................................... 23.4-4

23.5-1
23.5-2
23.5-3
23.5-4
23.5-5
23.5-6
23.5-7

VCB Conference Conguration ................................................................................. 23.5-1


VCB Broadcast Conguration ................................................................................... 23.5-2
Large VCBs ............................................................................................................... 23.5-2
Invalid Loop Types .................................................................................................... 23.5-3
Gain Examples ......................................................................................................... 23.5-5
VCB Example ........................................................................................................... 23.5-7
Cascading VCB Example .......................................................................................... 23.5-7

23.6-1
23.6-2
23.6-3
23.6-4
23.6-5
23.6-6
23.6-7
23.6-8
23.6-9
23.6-10
23.6-11
23.6-12
23.6-13
23.6-14
23.6-15
23.6-16
23.6-17
23.6-18
23.6-19
23.6-20
23.6-21
23.6-22
23.6-23
23.6-24
23.6-25
23.6-26
23.6-27
23.6-28
23.6-29
23.6-30
23.6-31
23.6-32
23.6-33

Transparent Channel ................................................................................................ 23.6-2


Enhanced Transparent Rate Adaption Supervisory Circuit .................................... 23.6-3
Enhanced Transparent Rate Adaption Transparent Synchronous Signalling ......... 23.6-3
HCM Frame .............................................................................................................. 23.6-4
DDS DS0-A and DS0-B Frame Structure ................................................................. 23.6-6
DS0-A Format for 56 kb/s DDS Channel .................................................................. 23.6-7
DS0-A Format for 9.6 kb/s DDS Channel ................................................................. 23.6-8
DS0-A Format for 4.8 kb/s DDS Channel ................................................................. 23.6-8
DS0-A Format for 2.4 kb/s DDS Channel ................................................................. 23.6-9
DS0-A Format for 19.2 kb/s DDS Channel ............................................................. 23.6-10
X.50 Framing Structure ........................................................................................... 23.6-12
X.50 Division 3 Framing Pattern ............................................................................. 23.6-13
Branch Channels and Aggregate Channels ........................................................... 23.6-16
Transparent SRM Default Conguration ................................................................. 23.6-17
Transparent SRM Conguration Examples ............................................................. 23.6-17
HCM SRM Default Conguration ............................................................................ 23.6-18
HCM SRM Conguration Examples ....................................................................... 23.6-18
DS0-B Format for 9.6 kb/s and 19.2 kb/s DDS Channels ....................................... 23.6-19
DS0-B Format for 4.8 kb/s DDS Channel ............................................................... 23.6-20
DS0-B Format for 2.4 kb/s DDS Channel ............................................................... 23.6-21
19.2 kb/s Channels on a DS0-B_9.6 SRM ............................................................. 23.6-21
Transparent or HCM SRMs on a DCC .................................................................... 23.6-24
Transparent or HCM SRMs on a Line Card ............................................................ 23.6-24
DDS or X.50 SRMs on a Line Card ........................................................................ 23.6-24
DDS Access or X.50 Telco SRMs on a Line Card .................................................. 23.6-25
Transparent or HCM SRMs on a DSP Card ........................................................... 23.6-25
DDS or X.50 SRMs on a DSP Card ........................................................................ 23.6-26
Channels on Line Card Transparent and HCM SRMs ............................................ 23.6-28
Channels on Line Card DDS or X.50 SRMs ........................................................... 23.6-29
Channels on Line Card DDS Access or X.50 Telco SRMs ..................................... 23.6-29
Channels on Two-circuit DSP Card Transparent and HCM SRMs .......................... 23.6-30
Channels on Six-circuit DSP Card Transparent and HCM SRMs ........................... 23.6-31
Channels on DSP5H Card Transparent and HCM SRMs ....................................... 23.6-32

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Issue 1, November 1997

23.6-34
23.6-35
23.6-36
23.6-37
23.6-38
23.6-39
23.6-40
23.6-41
23.6-42

Channels on Two-circuit DSP Card DDS or X.50 SRMs ......................................... 23.6-33


Channels on Six-circuit DSP Card DDS Access or X.50 Telco SRMs .................... 23.6-33
Channels on Six-circuit DSP Card DDS Core SRMs .............................................. 23.6-34
Transparent Transport Bandwidth ........................................................................... 23.6-35
HCM Transport Bandwidth ...................................................................................... 23.6-36
Bit Numbering Conventions .................................................................................... 23.6-36
H-bit Signalling Results for 2612, 2613 and 2715 MainStreet DTUs ...................... 23.6-39
Continuity Checking on DS0-B SRMs .................................................................... 23.6-45
Continuity Checking on DS0-A SRMs and MJUs ................................................... 23.6-46

23.7-1
23.7-2

SRM Creating a Multidrop Data Bridge .................................................................... 23.7-1


Multijunction Units and Branch Identication Numbers ............................................ 23.7-3

23.9-1
23.9-2

SRS Connections ..................................................................................................... 23.9-2


HCM SRS Display Example ..................................................................................... 23.9-3

23.10-1
23.10-2
23.10-3
23.10-4
23.10-5

Data Transmission without BONDING .................................................................... 23.10-1


Data Transmission with BONDING ......................................................................... 23.10-2
BONDING Application ............................................................................................ 23.10-2
BONDING in the 3600 MainStreet System ............................................................. 23.10-3
IMC BONDING Display ........................................................................................... 23.10-6

23.12-1

G3 Fax Example ..................................................................................................... 23.12-2

25.1-1
25.1-2
25.1-3
25.1-4
25.1-5
25.1-6
25.1-7

Frame Relay Network Example ................................................................................ 25.1-4


Class-of-service Parameters .................................................................................... 25.1-5
Congestion Thresholds ............................................................................................. 25.1-7
Congestion Filtering .................................................................................................. 25.1-8
FECN and BECN Bits ............................................................................................. 25.1-10
Congestion Avoidance and Recovery Procedures ................................................. 25.1-11
Link Management Protocol Support ....................................................................... 25.1-12

25.3-1
25.3-2

Switch Congestion Thresholds Display ..................................................................... 25.3-2


Switch Congestion Notication Parameters Display ................................................. 25.3-2

25.4-1
25.4-2
25.4-3
25.4-4
25.4-5

FASTbus Topology .................................................................................................... 25.4-1


FASTbus Fault Recovery .......................................................................................... 25.4-2
FASTbus Station Status Display ............................................................................... 25.4-3
FASTbus Parameters Display ................................................................................... 25.4-5
FASTbus Congestion Parameters Display ................................................................ 25.4-5

25.6-1
25.6-2
25.6-3

Frame Stream Status Display ................................................................................... 25.6-2


Frame Stream Conguration Display ........................................................................ 25.6-3
Frame Stream Congestion Parameters Display ........................................................ 25.6-4

25.7-1
25.7-2
25.7-3
25.7-4
25.7-5

Stream DLC Status Display ...................................................................................... 25.7-2


FASTbus DLC Status Display ................................................................................... 25.7-3
Local DLC Example .................................................................................................. 25.7-5
Backplane DLC Connection Example ....................................................................... 25.7-6
FASTbus DLC Connection Example ......................................................................... 25.7-8

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

25.8-1
25.8-2
25.8-3

Card-to-card Class-of-service Conguration Example ............................................. 25.8-2


FRE Class-of-Service Conguration Example .......................................................... 25.8-2
Class-of-Service Conguration Display .................................................................... 25.8-3

25.9-1
25.9-2

Subrate Multiplexing HCM Streams ........................................................................ 25.9-11


Subrate Multiplexing DDS Streams ........................................................................ 25.9-12

25.10-1
25.10-2
25.10-3
25.10-4
25.10-5
25.10-6
25.10-7

LAPB Encapsulation Example ................................................................................ 25.10-2


Transparent HDLC Encapsulation Example ........................................................... 25.10-2
Annex G Encapsulation .......................................................................................... 25.10-3
RFC 1490 Encapsulation of LAPB Frames ............................................................. 25.10-4
Parameters for Frame Relay Encapsulation Circuits .............................................. 25.10-7
Connections for Super-rate Encapsulation Circuits .............................................. 25.10-11
Connections for Subrate Encapsulation Circuits ................................................... 25.10-12

25.11-1
25.11-2

Switched Access to Frame Relay PVCs ................................................................. 25.11-1


Switched Access over ISDN or Switched 56 Networks .......................................... 25.11-2

26.1-1
26.1-2
26.1-3
26.1-4
26.1-5

A Frame Relay SVC Network ................................................................................... 26.1-2


Frame Relay SVC Functionality ................................................................................ 26.1-3
Routing through a Frame Relay SVC Network ......................................................... 26.1-5
A Sample Frame Relay SVC Network ...................................................................... 26.1-8
A Map of Circuit-switched Connections .................................................................... 26.1-9

26.2-1
26.2-2

Default Conguration for Signalling Channel Parameters ......................................... 26.2-2


Display Screen for Signalling Channels .................................................................... 26.2-4

26.3-1

User Congurations .................................................................................................. 26.3-4

26.4-1

Connection Management Functionality .................................................................... 26.4-2

26.5-1
26.5-2

Remote Address Table .............................................................................................. 26.5-3


An Example of a Crankback ..................................................................................... 26.5-5

27.1-1
27.1-2
27.1-3
27.1-4
27.1-5

36120 MainStreet X.25 Protocol Subsystems .......................................................... 27.1-3


End-to-end Protocol .................................................................................................. 27.1-5
Direct X.25 Access ................................................................................................... 27.1-6
Encapsulated Access for Basic Rate and Super-rate Devices ................................. 27.1-7
Encapsulated Access for Subrate Devices ............................................................... 27.1-7

27.2-1
27.2-2
27.2-3
27.2-4

Internal Network Topology ........................................................................................ 27.2-2


RTP Virtual Connection ............................................................................................ 27.2-5
Mapping Virtual Circuits to VCons and PVCs ........................................................... 27.2-6
Example of No Flow Control Negotiation Where the Destination
Switch Segments and Combines Packets ........................................................ 27.2-13
Example of No Flow Control Negotiation Where the Originating
Switch Segments and Combines Packets ........................................................ 27.2-13
Example of Flow Control Negotiation at the Calling DTE Where
Packet Segmenting and Combining Does Not Occur ....................................... 27.2-15
Example of Flow Control Negotiation at the Calling DTE Where the
Originating Switch Segments and Combines Packets ..................................... 27.2-15

27.2-5
27.2-6
27.2-7

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27.2-8
27.2-9
27.2-10

Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

Example of Flow Control Negotiation at the Called DTE Where the


Destination Switch Segments and Combines Packets ..................................... 27.2-17
Example of Flow Control Negotiation at the Called DTE Where the
Call is Cleared .................................................................................................. 27.2-17
Example of Flow Control Negotiation Where Packet Segmenting and
Combining is Avoided ....................................................................................... 27.2-19

27.4-1
27.4-2

Main Menu for the X.25 FRE NMTI ........................................................................... 27.4-1


Mandatory X.25 Conguration Activities ................................................................... 27.4-5

27.5-1
27.5-2

X.25 Switch-wide Parameters Display ...................................................................... 27.5-2


X.25 Global Resources Display ................................................................................ 27.5-3

27.6-1
27.6-2
27.6-3
27.6-4
27.6-5
27.6-6
27.6-7
27.6-8
27.6-9
27.6-10

High-speed, Non-redundant, Fully-meshed Network Topology ................................ 27.6-2


Network Routing Topology ........................................................................................ 27.6-3
A Three-tier Routing Topology .................................................................................. 27.6-4
High-fanout, Low-volume, Non-redundant Network Topology ................................... 27.6-5
Trunk Requirement Comparison ............................................................................... 27.6-6
Redundant Network Topology ................................................................................... 27.6-8
GFR Information Frame Format .............................................................................. 27.6-11
Example of Hub Domain Dynamic Routing ............................................................ 27.6-13
Successful Routing Using Frame Reversal ............................................................. 27.6-16
GFR Parameter Conguration Display .................................................................... 27.6-17

27.7-1
27.7-2
27.7-3
27.7-4
27.7-5
27.7-6
27.7-7
27.7-8
27.7-9
27.7-10
27.7-11
27.7-12
27.7-13
27.7-14
27.7-15

Global Address Table Display ................................................................................... 27.7-2


Multiple Address Prexes on a Link .......................................................................... 27.7-5
Example of How Priorities Are Used ......................................................................... 27.7-6
Load Sharing Using Different Weights ...................................................................... 27.7-7
Route Redundancy Using Priorities .......................................................................... 27.7-8
Local Address Table Display ..................................................................................... 27.7-9
Call Routing Process at the Originating Switch: Basic and Gateway ...................... 27.7-13
Basic Routing at the Originating Switch .................................................................. 27.7-14
Basic Routing at the Destination Switch ................................................................. 27.7-15
Shared DNICs ......................................................................................................... 27.7-17
Network Migration Scenario Using Networks with Shared DNICs .......................... 27.7-18
Use of Priorities and Weights During X.75 Routing ................................................ 27.7-19
Gateway Routing at the Originating Switch ............................................................ 27.7-23
Gateway Routing at the Destination Switch ............................................................ 27.7-24
Re-routing or Retrying Calls ................................................................................... 27.7-25

27.8-1
27.8-2

CONFIG TRUNK SHOW_ALL Display ...................................................................... 27.8-2


Provisioning Backbone Trunks .................................................................................. 27.8-7

27.9-1
27.9-2
27.9-3
27.9-4
27.9-5
27.9-6
27.9-7
27.9-8
27.9-9

NUI Validation System .............................................................................................. 27.9-2


NUI Validation Process ............................................................................................. 27.9-4
Standardized NUI Format (ITU-T Recommendation X.25 1992, Appendix VI) ......... 27.9-5
Reversed NUI Format ............................................................................................... 27.9-5
Fixed-length NUI and Password Format ................................................................... 27.9-5
Bellcore NUI Format ................................................................................................. 27.9-6
NUI Validation Subsystem Components and Interfaces ........................................... 27.9-6
Redundant NUI Validation Server Interfaces ............................................................ 27.9-8
NUI Server Agent Parameters Display ..................................................................... 27.9-9

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

27.10-1
27.10-2
27.10-3
27.10-4
27.10-5
27.10-6
27.10-7
27.10-8
27.10-9

Typical X.25 Accounting Application ....................................................................... 27.10-1


Components of the X.25 Accounting Subsystem ................................................... 27.10-2
Collection Intervals, Interval Reports and Usage Counts ....................................... 27.10-3
Example of an Intermediate Record ....................................................................... 27.10-4
Example of an End Record ..................................................................................... 27.10-5
Relationship Between an Intermediate Record and an End Record ...................... 27.10-6
Example of a Periodic Record ................................................................................ 27.10-7
NTP Time Initialization Display ............................................................................... 27.10-8
Accounting Generation Parameters Display ......................................................... 27.10-17

27.11-1
27.11-2

Data Collector Agent XACs and Data Collector Interface XACs ............................. 27.11-2
Data Collector Agent Parameters Display .............................................................. 27.11-5

27.12-1

Example Accounting Subsystem Conguration ...................................................... 27.12-2

27.13-1
27.13-2
27.13-3
27.13-4
27.13-5
27.13-6
27.13-7
27.13-8
27.13-9
27.13-10
27.13-11
27.13-12
27.13-13
27.13-14

Direct LAPB Access ................................................................................................ 27.13-2


Annex G Encapsulation of LAPB Frames ............................................................... 27.13-3
RFC 1490 Encapsulation of LAPB Frames ............................................................. 27.13-4
Frame Relay Encapsulation Methods ..................................................................... 27.13-5
Encapsulated Access Using a PAD/FRAD ............................................................. 27.13-5
Encapsulated Access Using the FRS Card ............................................................ 27.13-6
Encapsulated Access for Subrate Devices ............................................................. 27.13-7
Parameters for Frame Relay Encapsulation Circuits ............................................ 27.13-10
Conguring Packet and Frame Sizes for an Encapsulation Circuit ....................... 27.13-13
FRS Circuit Conguration Display ........................................................................ 27.13-15
Valid X.25 Super-rate Connections ....................................................................... 27.13-17
Connections for Super-rate Encapsulation Circuits .............................................. 27.13-18
Connections for Subrate Encapsulation Circuits ................................................... 27.13-19
Subrate Encapsulation Circuit Connection ........................................................... 27.13-20

27.14-1
27.14-2
27.14-3
27.14-4
27.14-5
27.14-6
27.14-7

Link Layer Parameters Display ............................................................................... 27.14-2


Logical Channels and Virtual Circuits ..................................................................... 27.14-9
LCN Allocation ...................................................................................................... 27.14-10
Network Layer Parameters Display ....................................................................... 27.14-13
Internal and External Address Formats ................................................................ 27.14-30
Address Translation Table Display ........................................................................ 27.14-31
Address Translation Entry Display ........................................................................ 27.14-37

27.15-1
27.15-2
27.15-3
27.15-4
27.15-5
27.15-6
27.15-7

X.121 and E.164 Address Formats ......................................................................... 27.15-1


Basic NUA Parameters Display .............................................................................. 27.15-2
Call Redirection Example ....................................................................................... 27.15-8
Charging Parameters Display ............................................................................... 27.15-10
CUG Example ....................................................................................................... 27.15-20
Closed User Group Display .................................................................................. 27.15-21
Default Flow Control and Throughput Class Display ............................................ 27.15-26

27.16-1

COPY Command NMTI Display .............................................................................. 27.16-2

27.17-1
27.17-2

X.25 PVCs SHOW_ALL Display ............................................................................. 27.17-3


X.25 PVCs Parameters Display .............................................................................. 27.17-4

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Issue 1, November 1997

27.18-1
27.18-2

Hunt Group Addresses Display .............................................................................. 27.18-3


Hunt Group Members Display ................................................................................ 27.18-4

27.19-1
27.19-2
27.19-3

Direct X.25 Access ................................................................................................. 27.19-2


Encapsulated Access ............................................................................................. 27.19-4
Subrate Encapsulated Access ................................................................................ 27.19-7

27.20-1
27.20-2
27.20-3
27.20-4
27.20-5
27.20-6
27.20-7
27.20-8

Example of Service Interworking ............................................................................ 27.20-2


Example of Network Interworking ........................................................................... 27.20-3
End-to-end Protocol Stack ...................................................................................... 27.20-3
End-to-end Call Path ............................................................................................... 27.20-5
XFR Header Conversion ......................................................................................... 27.20-6
Example of Service Interworking Using LMI ........................................................... 27.20-8
XFR Conguration Parameters ............................................................................. 27.20-12
NUA Parameters NMTI ......................................................................................... 27.20-13

28.1-1
28.1-2
28.1-3
28.1-4

X.75 Link ................................................................................................................... 28.1-1


X.75 and X.35 Interconnection Possibilities .............................................................. 28.1-2
Use of the ICUG Mapping Table ............................................................................... 28.1-8
Rules Governing the Generation of Accounting Records for X.75 ............................ 28.1-9

28.2-1
28.2-2

X.75 Link Layer Parameters Display ......................................................................... 28.2-2


X.75 Network Layer Parameters Display .................................................................. 28.2-8

28.3-1

NUA Parameters Display .......................................................................................... 28.3-1

29.1-1
29.1-2

Basic ISDN Reference Model ................................................................................... 29.1-1


BRI S/T Card Application .......................................................................................... 29.1-2

29.3-1
29.3-2
29.3-3

Leased Line Application ............................................................................................ 29.3-1


Leased Line Connections ......................................................................................... 29.3-2
ISDN Loop Extension ............................................................................................... 29.3-3

29.4-1
29.4-2

ISDN Backup Application .......................................................................................... 29.4-1


ISDN Backup Connections ....................................................................................... 29.4-2

30.3-1
30.3-2

ISDN Backup Protection ........................................................................................... 30.3-1


D-channel Connections ............................................................................................ 30.3-2

31.1-1
31.1-2

Example of Linear Add/Drop Multiplexing and


Signal Termination Applications ......................................................................... 31.1-4
Example of a Ring Application .................................................................................. 31.1-5

31.4-1
31.4-2
31.4-3
31.4-4
31.4-5
31.4-6
31.4-7

Ring Trafc Protection mode conguration screen ................................................... 31.4-2


1+1 Trafc Protection Mode Conguration Display ................................................... 31.4-3
1+1 Trafc Protection Mode ...................................................................................... 31.4-5
1+1 Trafc protection Line Fault ................................................................................ 31.4-6
Bidirectional Switching Mode Reaction ..................................................................... 31.4-7
Unidirectional Switching Mode Reaction .................................................................. 31.4-7
Ring Mode ................................................................................................................ 31.4-9

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

31.6-1
31.6-2
31.6-3

OC-3 Card Circuit Structure ...................................................................................... 31.6-3


STM-1 Card AU-3 Mode ........................................................................................... 31.6-4
STM-1 Card AU-4 Mode ........................................................................................... 31.6-5

31.9-1
31.9-2
31.9-3
31.9-4

Circuit Connection Display ........................................................................................ 31.9-2


Simple Bidirectional Connections ............................................................................. 31.9-3
Pass -through Connection ........................................................................................ 31.9-5
UPSR Add-Drop Connection .................................................................................... 31.9-6

31.10-1

Equidistant Super-rate DS0s on TU-12 Card Narrowband Ports ............................ 31.10-3

31.12-1
31.12-2
31.12-3

One-way Trunk Conditioning (Group 1) ................................................................... 31.12-3


One-way Trunk Conditioning (Group 2) ................................................................... 31.12-4
Two-way Trunk Conditioning ................................................................................... 31.12-5

31.13-1
31.13-2

D4 Framing Format ................................................................................................. 31.13-2


ESF Framing Format .............................................................................................. 31.13-2

List of Tables
Table

Title

16.2-1
16.2-2
16.2-3
16.2-4

System Serial Ports .................................................................................................. 16.2-6


Serial Port Device Connections ................................................................................ 16.2-7
Control Card and Backplane or Bulkhead Serial Ports ............................................. 16.2-7
System Serial Port Configuration .............................................................................. 16.2-8

16.3-1

Generic Release Numbers and Long Names ........................................................... 16.3-3

16.4-1
16.4-2

Shelf, Slot, Link and Circuit Identifier Formats .......................................................... 16.4-2


Locally Controlled and Peripheral Shelf UCS Access .............................................. 16.4-9

16.5-1
16.5-2

Heading Information for Summary Display ............................................................... 16.5-3


SHOW_A Display Information .................................................................................. 16.5-5

17.1-1
17.1-2
17.1-3

Connection Types ..................................................................................................... 17.1-2


Circuit Configuration Procedures .............................................................................. 17.1-2
CONFIG CONNECT Display Symbols ..................................................................... 17.1-5

17.2-1
17.2-2
17.2-3
17.2-4
17.2-5
17.2-6

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers Synchronization Sources ................. 17.2-2


Synchronization Status Messages ............................................................................ 17.2-6
Translation Table Default Values .............................................................................. 17.2-7
Timing and Synchronization Configuration Parameters and Options ..................... 17.2-11
Timing and Synchronization Configuration Procedures .......................................... 17.2-12
Timing Source Status ............................................................................................. 17.2-21

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17.3-1
17.3-2
17.3-3

Control Card and Backplane or Bulkhead Serial Ports ............................................. 17.3-4


Serial Port Configuration Parameters and Options .................................................. 17.3-5
HOUSE Display field Descriptions .......................................................................... 17.3-14

17.4-1

Node Configuration Parameters and Options ........................................................... 17.4-2

17.5-1
17.5-2
17.5-3

Access Level and Password Configuration Parameters and Options ..................... 17.5-2
Suggested Access Level Definitions for Control Card Sessions .............................. 17.5-5
Suggested Access Level Definitions for FRS, FRE and PE Card Sessions ............. 17.5-6

17.6-1
17.6-2
17.6-3
17.6-4

CPSS Path Cost Values ........................................................................................... 17.6-6


CPSS Configuration Parameters and Options ........................................................ 17.6-13
CPSS Connection Configuration Procedures ......................................................... 17.6-14
CPSS Timers .......................................................................................................... 17.6-37

18.1-1
18.1-2
18.1-3
18.1-4
18.1-5
18.1-6
18.1-7
18.1-8

Control Redundancy ................................................................................................. 18.1-1


Control Redundancy Configuration Parameters and Options ................................... 18.1-2
Control Redundancy Configuration Procedures ....................................................... 18.1-3
Redundancy Modes for DS-3 II and E3 Cards ......................................................... 18.1-7
Field Descriptions for Control Redundancy .............................................................. 18.1-8
Conditions Contributing to System Demerits .......................................................... 18.1-11
DS-3 II Fast Protection Switching Options .............................................................. 18.1-15
E3 Fast Protection Switching Options .................................................................... 18.1-16

18.2-1

Protection Switching Configuration Parameters and Options ................................... 18.2-3

18.3-1
18.3-2
18.3-3
18.3-4
18.3-5

PRI Redundancy Configuration Parameter and Options .......................................... 18.3-2


PRI Redundancy Configuration Procedures ............................................................. 18.3-2
Alarms for Declaring Beginning and End of Link Faults ........................................... 18.3-5
Reason Codes for Card Activity Change Alarm ........................................................ 18.3-7
Fault Processing Demerit Points .............................................................................. 18.3-8

19.1-1
19.1-2
19.1-3
19.1-4
19.1-5
19.1-6
19.1-7

Control Card Configuration Parameters and Options ............................................... 19.1-2


Expander Card Configuration Parameter and Options ............................................. 19.1-3
Switching Card Configuration Parameters and Options ........................................... 19.1-3
Common Carrier Card Configuration Parameter and Option .................................... 19.1-3
Test Card Configuration Parameters and Options .................................................... 19.1-4
Test Module Configuration Parameters and Options ................................................ 19.1-4
GFC3 Configuration Parameters and Options .......................................................... 19.1-6

19.3-1

Expander Card Configuration Options ...................................................................... 19.3-3

20.1-1
20.1-2
20.1-3

Modules Supported by the T1, E1 and Optical Extension Cards .............................. 20.1-3
T1 PRI Card Configuration Parameters and Options ............................................... 20.1-6
E1 PRI Card and Optical Extension Card
Configuration Parameters and Options .............................................................. 20.1-9
MPA Card Configuration Parameters and Options ................................................. 20.1-12
TTC2M Card Configuration Parameters and Options ............................................. 20.1-14
X.21 and V.35 PRI Card Configuration Parameters and Options ........................... 20.1-15
DS-3 and DS-3 II Card Configuration Parameters and Options ............................. 20.1-17
E3 Card Configuration Parameters and Options .................................................... 20.1-19

20.1-4
20.1-5
20.1-6
20.1-7
20.1-8

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20.2-1
20.2-2

Application Modules Supported by PRI Cards .......................................................... 20.2-2


ISDN Link Default Configuration ............................................................................... 20.2-2

20.3-1

Super-rate Timeslot-to-Circuit Correlation ................................................................ 20.3-4

20.4-1
20.4-2

VCM Requirements .................................................................................................. 20.4-2


Restrictions on Transitional Signalling Connections ................................................. 20.4-7

20.6-1
20.6-2
20.6-3
20.6-4

T1 and DS-3 Card Framing Options ......................................................................... 20.6-1


E1 and E3 Card Framing Options ............................................................................. 20.6-4
Timeslot-to-Circuit Designation for E1 and E3 Cards ............................................... 20.6-5
E1 and E3 Card Super-rate Connections and Frame Types .................................... 20.6-6

20.8-1

Zero Code Suppression Options .............................................................................. 20.8-1

20.9-1
20.9-2
20.9-3
20.9-4
20.9-5
20.9-6

Aggregate Interface Card Trunk Conditioning .......................................................... 20.9-1


One-way Trunk Conditioning Link Faults .................................................................. 20.9-3
One-way Trunk Conditioning Signalling and Information Path Codes ...................... 20.9-4
Two-way Trunk Conditioning Signalling and Information Path Codes ...................... 20.9-5
Fault Class Descriptions for PRI Cards .................................................................... 20.9-9
Configuring Fault Classes for PRI Cards ................................................................ 20.9-10

20.10-1
20.10-2

Fault Signalling for PRI Cards ................................................................................ 20.10-2


Fault Signalling Codes OOS A, B and C for PRI Cards .......................................... 20.10-3

20.11-1

Fault Signalling Codes Seized and Idle for PRI Cards ........................................... 20.11-2

20.12-1
20.12-2
20.12-3
20.12-4

PRI Signalling Types .............................................................................................. 20.12-2


Compatible PRI Signalling Types ........................................................................... 20.12-3
Signalling Conversion Table for the TTC2M Card .................................................. 20.12-9
TTC2M Card Frame Format ................................................................................. 20.12-10

20.13-1

TTC2M Card Circuit Inversion Types ..................................................................... 20.13-2

20.14-1
20.14-2
20.14-3

PRI Loopback Detection ......................................................................................... 20.14-1


PRI CPSS Connections .......................................................................................... 20.14-3
CPSS Resources and Connection Types ............................................................... 20.14-3

20.17-1
20.17-2

Performance Threshold Statistics and Threshold Ranges ..................................... 20.17-5


Dual T1 and Dual T1-2 Card SES Threshold Configuration ................................... 20.17-7

20.18-1
20.18-2
20.18-3
20.18-4
20.18-5
20.18-6
20.18-7

E1 and E3 Card Parameters ................................................................................... 20.18-1


E3 NU Bits .............................................................................................................. 20.18-2
Threshold Selection ................................................................................................ 20.18-5
SA4 and BER Alarm Options .................................................................................. 20.18-7
SA4-bit Error Thresholds ........................................................................................ 20.18-8
E-bit States for CRC4 Status Indication .................................................................. 20.18-9
Usage of Bits on TS0 ............................................................................................ 20.18-12

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Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

20.19-1
20.19-2
20.19-3
20.19-4

X.21 and V.35 PRI Card Parameters ...................................................................... 20.19-1


Number of Circuits .................................................................................................. 20.19-2
Number of Circuits With Signalling ......................................................................... 20.19-3
Clock Inversion Settings for the X.21 PRI Card ...................................................... 20.19-7

20.20-1
20.20-2
20.20-3
20.20-4
20.20-5

First General Procedure Tasks ............................................................................... 20.20-1


MPA Card Optional Configuration Tasks ................................................................ 20.20-2
MPA Card Control Signals in DCE/DTE Modes ................................................... 20.20-12
MPA Card Interface Control Signal Correlations .................................................. 20.20-13
Default MPA Card Control Signal Configuration (DTE) ........................................ 20.20-13

21.1-1
21.1-2
21.1-3
21.1-4
21.1-5
21.1-6
21.1-7
21.1-8
21.1-9

4WTO Line Card Configuration Parameters and Options ........................................ 21.1-2


E&M Card Configuration Parameters and Options ................................................... 21.1-3
LGE Card Configuration Parameters and Options ................................................... 21.1-4
LGS Card Configuration Parameters and Options ................................................... 21.1-5
4WDX Channel Unit Configuration Parameters and Options ................................... 21.1-6
E&M Channel Unit Configuration Parameters and Options ...................................... 21.1-7
LGE Channel Unit Configuration Parameters and Options ...................................... 21.1-8
LGS Channel Unit Configuration Parameters and Options ...................................... 21.1-9
MRD Channel Unit Configuration Parameters and Options ................................... 21.1-11

21.2-1
21.2-2

E&M Channel Unit Variants ...................................................................................... 21.2-2


LGS Channel Unit Variants ....................................................................................... 21.2-2

21.3-1
21.3-2
21.3-3
21.3-4
21.3-5

E&M Signalling ......................................................................................................... 21.3-2


E&M Signalling Options ............................................................................................ 21.3-2
LGE and LGS Signalling ........................................................................................... 21.3-5
LGE and LGS Signalling Options ............................................................................. 21.3-6
4WDX Signalling ....................................................................................................... 21.3-9

21.5-1
21.5-2
21.5-3
21.5-4
21.5-5
21.5-6
21.5-7
21.5-8

TLP Levels and Line Impedance for 4WTO Line Card ............................................. 21.5-2
TLP Levels and Line Impedance for E&M Cards ...................................................... 21.5-2
TLP Levels and Line Impedance for LGE Cards ...................................................... 21.5-3
TLP Levels and Line Impedance for LGS Cards ...................................................... 21.5-4
TLP Levels and Line Impedance for E&M Channel Units ......................................... 21.5-5
TLP Levels and Line Impedance for LGE and LGS Channel Units .......................... 21.5-5
TLP Levels and Line Impedance for the 4WDX Channel Unit .................................. 21.5-6
TLP Levels and Line Impedance for MRD Channel Units ........................................ 21.5-6

21.6-1

Line Impedance Options ........................................................................................... 21.6-1

21.7-1

Balanced Impedance for E&M/LGS Channel Units .................................................. 21.7-2

21.10-1

Loop Balance Options for the 4WDX Channel Unit ................................................ 21.10-1

21.11-1

Equalization Options for the 4WDX Channel Unit .................................................. 21.11-1

22.1-1
22.1-2
22.1-3
22.1-4
22.1-5

DNIC, 2B1Q and 27LC2 Line Card Functions .......................................................... 22.1-2


2600 MainStreet Series DTU Types ......................................................................... 22.1-2
2700 MainStreet Series DTU Types ......................................................................... 22.1-3
64 kb/s Codirectional Card Functions ....................................................................... 22.1-4
DCC and Line Card Configuration Process .............................................................. 22.1-6

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22.1-6
22.1-7
22.1-8
22.1-9
22.1-10
22.1-11
22.1-12

DCC Configuration Parameters and Options ............................................................ 22.1-8


Line Card Configuration Parameters and Options .................................................. 22.1-12
64 kb/s Codirectional Card Configuration Parameters and Options ....................... 22.1-15
DS0-DP Channel Unit Configuration Parameters and Options .............................. 22.1-16
OCU-DP Channel Unit Configuration Parameters and Options ............................. 22.1-17
4WTO Channel Unit Configuration Parameters and Options ................................. 22.1-17
2B1Q Channel Unit Configuration Parameters and Options .................................. 22.1-18

22.3-1
22.3-2
22.3-3
22.3-4
22.3-5
22.3-6
22.3-7
22.3-8
22.3-9
22.3-10

Control Signals ......................................................................................................... 22.3-4


Control Signal Input and Output Defaults ................................................................. 22.3-6
Transmit Clock Options ............................................................................................ 22.3-9
RS-422 DCC Clocking Configurations .................................................................... 22.3-11
DCC/DTU Clocking ................................................................................................. 22.3-12
Valid Super-rate Interface Speed Rules ................................................................. 22.3-19
Super-rate Circuit Speed Configuration .................................................................. 22.3-20
Line Cards and DTUs Supporting Super-rate Connections .................................... 22.3-23
Target Circuit Connection Requirements ................................................................ 22.3-24
Port Activity Check Failures .................................................................................... 22.3-27

22.4-1
22.4-2

Data Interface Circuit Parameters and Rate Adaption .............................................. 22.4-1


Rate Adaption, SRM and Branch Channel Parameters ............................................ 22.4-2

23.1-1
23.1-2
23.1-3
23.1-4

DSP Card and IMC Applications ............................................................................... 23.1-1


DSP Card Configuration Parameter and Options ..................................................... 23.1-3
DSP Card Connection Types .................................................................................... 23.1-7
IMC Configuration Parameter and Options ............................................................... 23.1-8

23.3-1

E1 and T1 Signalling Types ...................................................................................... 23.3-2

23.6-1
23.6-2
23.6-3
23.6-4
23.6-5
23.6-6
23.6-7
23.6-8
23.6-9
23.6-10
23.6-11
23.6-12
23.6-13
23.6-14

Data Card Interface Speeds for DDS Rate Adaption ................................................ 23.6-7
X.50 Division 2 Phases and Frames ....................................................................... 23.6-12
X.50 DSP Applications ............................................................................................ 23.6-14
Transparent and HCM SRM Support ...................................................................... 23.6-22
DDS SRM Support .................................................................................................. 23.6-23
X.50 and X.50 Telco SRM Support ......................................................................... 23.6-23
Transport Bandwidth and Transport Position for
Transparent Rate Adaption .............................................................................. 23.6-38
End-to-End H-bit Signalling Configurations ............................................................ 23.6-40
HCM Interface Speeds ........................................................................................... 23.6-41
X.50 Interface Speeds ............................................................................................ 23.6-42
Valid Subframe Positions for DDS .......................................................................... 23.6-44
Valid Subframe Positions for X.50 .......................................................................... 23.6-44
Configuration Process ............................................................................................ 23.6-46
Rate Adaption and SRM Parameters ..................................................................... 23.6-47

23.7-1

Multidrop Bridge and MJU Configuration Process .................................................... 23.7-4

23.8-1

Possible Data Bandwidth Configurations .................................................................. 23.8-3

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Table of Contents
Issue 1, November 1997

23.9-1
23.9-2
23.9-3
23.9-4

SRS Display Symbol Definitions ............................................................................... 23.9-3


Configuration Process .............................................................................................. 23.9-4
Set Identifiers for DDS and X.50 ............................................................................... 23.9-5
SRS Circuit Format Conversions ............................................................................ 23.9-10

23.12-1

Applications Eligible for Use in Combined Operations ........................................... 23.12-1

24.1-1

DCP Card Configuration Parameter and Options ..................................................... 24.1-1

25.1-1
25.1-2
25.1-3
25.1-4
25.1-5
25.1-6

Frame Relay Platforms ............................................................................................. 25.1-1


FRS, FRE and PE Card DLCs and DLCIs ................................................................ 25.1-3
FRS, FRE and PE Card Congestion Thresholds ...................................................... 25.1-6
Link Management Protocols ................................................................................... 25.1-13
Additional Configurable Frame Relay Parameters ................................................. 25.1-15
FRS, FRE and PE Card Configuration Parameters and Options ........................... 25.1-15

25.3-1

Frame Switch Configuration Fields ........................................................................... 25.3-3

25.4-1
25.4-2

FASTbus Station Status Fields ................................................................................. 25.4-4


FASTbus Parameters ............................................................................................... 25.4-6

25.5-1

FRS, FRE and PE Card Bandwidth and Circuits ...................................................... 25.5-2

25.6-1
25.6-2

Frame Stream Status Fields ..................................................................................... 25.6-2


Frame Stream Notification Configuration Fields ....................................................... 25.6-4

25.7-1
25.7-2
25.7-3
25.7-4

Available DLCs and DLCIs ....................................................................................... 25.7-2


DLC Status Display Fields ........................................................................................ 25.7-3
Local DLC Connection Rules .................................................................................... 25.7-5
FASTbus DLC Connection Rules ............................................................................. 25.7-9

25.8-1

Class-of-Service Configuration Fields ...................................................................... 25.8-4

25.9-1
25.9-2
25.9-3
25.9-4
25.9-5
25.9-6
25.9-7

Subrate Speeds and Protocols ................................................................................. 25.9-1


SRIM Configurable Parameters ................................................................................ 25.9-2
Circuit Configuration Parameters .............................................................................. 25.9-6
DDS Subframe Positions .......................................................................................... 25.9-6
Stream Configuration Parameters ............................................................................ 25.9-8
Interface Speeds ....................................................................................................... 25.9-8
DDS and X.50 Subframe Positions ........................................................................... 25.9-9

25.10-1
25.10-2
25.10-3
25.10-4

Packet and Frame Sizes for Annex G .................................................................... 25.10-3


Packet and Frame Sizes for RFC 1490 .................................................................. 25.10-4
Encapsulation Circuit Information Fields ................................................................ 25.10-7
Configurable Encapsulation Circuit Parameters ..................................................... 25.10-8

25.11-1

Support for T1 Signalling Termination .................................................................... 25.11-3

26.2-1
26.2-2

Network Layer Protocol Timers ................................................................................ 26.2-6


Link Layer Timers and Counters ............................................................................... 26.2-7

26.3-1

User Screening ......................................................................................................... 26.3-5

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26.5-1
26.5-2

Error and Caution Messages for Routing ................................................................. 26.5-3


Cause Values for Call Clearing ................................................................................. 26.5-6

27.2-1
27.2-2
27.2-3
27.2-4
27.2-5

Rules From Table 6-1 in Recommendation X.25 .................................................... 27.2-11


Rules From Table 6-2 in Recommendation X.25 .................................................... 27.2-11
Scenarios Where the Network Avoids Segmenting and Combining Packets ......... 27.2-12
Scenarios Where the Network Segments and Combines Packets ......................... 27.2-12
Possible Packet Size Combinations When Neither DTE Subscribes to
Flow Control Negotiation .................................................................................. 27.2-14
Possible Packet Size Combinations When the Calling DTE Subscribes to
Flow Control Negotiation .................................................................................. 27.2-16
Possible Packet Size Combinations When the Called DTE Subscribes to
Flow Control Negotiation .................................................................................. 27.2-18
Possible Packet Size Combinations When Both the Calling and
Called DTEs Subscribe to Flow Control Negotiation ........................................ 27.2-20

27.2-6
27.2-7
27.2-8

27.3-1
27.3-2
27.3-3

Compliance to X.2 (1988) ......................................................................................... 27.3-1


Compliance to X.2 (1992) ......................................................................................... 27.3-3
Compliance to X.35 (1993) ....................................................................................... 27.3-7

27.4-1
27.4-2
27.4-3
27.4-4
27.4-5
27.4-6
27.4-7
27.4-8
27.4-9
27.4-10
27.4-11
27.4-12
27.4-13

PE and X.25 FRE NMTI Identifiers ........................................................................... 27.4-3


How Configuration Information is Organized ............................................................ 27.4-4
X.25 Switch-wide Parameters ................................................................................... 27.4-6
GFR Parameters ....................................................................................................... 27.4-6
Trunk Circuit Parameters .......................................................................................... 27.4-6
NUI Server Agent Parameters .................................................................................. 27.4-7
XAC Link Layer Parameters ..................................................................................... 27.4-7
XAC Network Layer Parameters ............................................................................... 27.4-7
XFR Service Interworking ......................................................................................... 27.4-9
XAC Address Translation and Screening Parameters .............................................. 27.4-9
NUA Parameters ..................................................................................................... 27.4-10
X.25 PVC Parameters ............................................................................................ 27.4-12
Hunt Group Parameters .......................................................................................... 27.4-12

27.5-1

X.25 Global Switch Resources ................................................................................. 27.5-3

27.6-1
27.6-2
27.6-3

Forwarding Table for Hub 10-0 ............................................................................... 27.6-13


GFR Address Assignment ...................................................................................... 27.6-18
Alias Assignment .................................................................................................... 27.6-21

27.7-1

Example of How Weights Are Used .......................................................................... 27.7-7

27.8-1

Packet and Frame Size Dependencies .................................................................... 27.8-2

27.10-1
27.10-2
27.10-3

X.25 and X.75 Accounting Record Fields ............................................................. 27.10-11


Time Change Record ............................................................................................ 27.10-15
Accounting Generation Parameters ...................................................................... 27.10-16

27.11-1

Data Collector Agent Parameters ........................................................................... 27.11-4

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27.13-1
27.13-2
27.13-3
27.13-4

Packet and Frame Sizes for Annex G .................................................................... 27.13-3


Packet and Frame Sizes for RFC 1490 .................................................................. 27.13-4
Encapsulation Circuit Information Fields .............................................................. 27.13-10
Packet and Frame Size Dependencies for Annex G ............................................ 27.13-12

27.14-1
27.14-2
27.14-3
27.14-4
27.14-5

Network Layer Timers ........................................................................................... 27.14-10


External and Internal Address Formats ................................................................ 27.14-30
Typical X.121 Address Translation Example ........................................................ 27.14-33
Examples of the Address Translation Process ..................................................... 27.14-34
Address Translation Examples ............................................................................. 27.14-36

27.16-1

Formats for Copying XAC Values ........................................................................... 27.16-1

27.17-1

Remotely-Switched PVC Configuration Example ................................................... 27.17-6

27.20-1

XFR NUA Parameters .......................................................................................... 27.20-13

28.1-1
28.1-2
28.1-3
28.1-4
28.1-5

Diagnostic Code Mapping for Clear Request Packet ............................................. 28.1-10


X.75 Link Layer Parameters ................................................................................... 28.1-11
X.75 Network Layer Parameters ............................................................................. 28.1-12
X.75 Address Translation Parameters .................................................................... 28.1-13
X.75 NUA Parameters ............................................................................................ 28.1-14

29.1-1
29.1-2

BRI S/T Card Configuration Parameters and Options for


Non-ISDN Applications ....................................................................................... 29.1-3
BRI S/T Card Configuration Parameters and Options for ISDN Applications ........... 29.1-4

29.3-1

BRI S/T Channel Connections ................................................................................ 29.3-11

30.1-1

CPC Card Configuration Parameters and Options ................................................... 30.1-1

30.4-1

CPC Index Table with Defined Hunt Groups ............................................................ 30.4-3

31.1-1
31.1-2

SONET STS-n and SDH STM-n Line Rates ............................................................. 31.1-2


VT and TU Line Rates .............................................................................................. 31.1-2

31.2-1

HSA Card Configurable Parameters ......................................................................... 31.2-1

31.4-1
31.4-2

1+1 Protection Card and Line Faults ........................................................................ 31.4-6


Protection Switching Options .................................................................................. 31.4-10

31.7-1

Signal Label Options ................................................................................................. 31.7-2

31.9-1
31.9-2

Valid Broadband Circuit Connections ....................................................................... 31.9-1


Circuit Connection Display Symbols ......................................................................... 31.9-2

31.11-1

Zero Code Suppression Options ............................................................................ 31.11-1

31.12-1
31.12-2
31.12-3
31.12-4

One-way Trunk Conditioning Link Faults ................................................................ 31.12-2


One-way Trunk Conditioning Signalling and Information Path Codes .................... 31.12-3
Two-way Trunk Conditioning Signalling and Information Path Codes .................... 31.12-4
Fault Class Descriptions for Mapper Cards ............................................................ 31.12-7

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31.12-5

Configuring Fault Classes for Mapper Cards .......................................................... 31.12-8

31.13-1

Timeslot-to-Circuit Designation for TU-12 Cards .................................................... 31.13-3

31.14-1
31.14-2

Fault Signalling for PRI Cards ................................................................................ 31.14-1


Fault Signalling Codes OOS A, B and C for PRI Cards .......................................... 31.14-2

31.15-1
31.15-2

Mapper Card PRI Signalling Types ........................................................................ 31.15-1


Compatible Mapper and PRI Card Signalling Types .............................................. 31.15-2

31.18-1

Usage of Bits on TS0 .............................................................................................. 31.18-2

31.19-1

Fault Signalling Codes Seized and Idle for VT-1.5 and TU-12 Cards .................... 31.19-2

31.20-1

CPSS Resources and Connection Types ............................................................... 31.20-2

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Foreword
Issue 1, November 1997

Foreword
The Foreword outlines the systems and services described in the 3600 MainStreet
Bandwidth Manager Family Technical Practices, and lists the software generics that
support these systems and services. It briefly describes what is contained in each
volume of the Technical Practices and the special text conventions used, and
provides a list of suggested reading material.

System Support
This release of the 3600 MainStreet Bandwidth Manager Family Technical Practices
provides information required for the installation, operation and configuration, and
maintenance of the systems and services listed in Table 1.
Table 1: System and Services Support
Release (1)

System or Service

Software Generic

3600 MainStreet Bandwidth Manager

7.0 F

1117

3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager

7.0 F

S1117

3645 MainStreet High Capacity Bandwidth


Manager

7.0 F

C117/D117/H117/E117

3664 MainStreet Fractional Access


Multiplexer

7.0 F

Q117

36120 MainStreet Packet Transfer


Exchange, locally controlled system

7.0 F

1117

36120 MainStreet Packet Transfer


Exchange, switching shelf controlled
system

7.0 F

C117/D117/H117/E117

36120 MainStreetFrame Relay service

3.0 H

P412 (FRE card)


P114 (FRS card)

36120 MainStreet X.25 service

1.2 F

PA11 (X.25 FRE card)


P611 (PE card)

Notes
1. H indicates hardened product release.
F indicates field trial release.

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Feature support
Some systems do not have all the components and features described in the
Technical Practices. The components and features that Newbridge supports are
determined by the type of system, the revision level of the installed cards, the generic
release of the installed system software, and the generic release of the Craft Interface,
4601 MainStreet Network Manager, 4601A MainStreet Auxiliary Network Manager,
4602 MainStreet Intelligent NetworkStation or MainStreetXpress 46020 Network
Manager software in use. If a feature is configured for an installed card that does not
support the feature, the card or affected circuit is busied out and a revision/feature
mismatch alarm is raised for that slot. For information on alarms, see Maintenance.

Node management
The node management procedures described in the Technical Practices are done
through a node management session initiated from any of the 4601 MainStreet
Network Manager, 4601A MainStreet Auxiliary Network Manager, 4602 MainStreet
Intelligent NetworkStation or MainStreetXpress 46020 Network Manager, the Craft
Interface node manager or an ASCII (VT100-type) terminal.
If you are using a 4601 MainStreet Network Manager, 4601A MainStreet Auxiliary
Network Manager, 4602 MainStreet Intelligent NetworkStation or MainStreetXpress
46020 Network Manager, see the appropriate documentation for instructions on
how to install and commission your network manager and how to manage your
node. The 4601 MainStreet Network Manager, 4601A MainStreet Auxiliary Network
Manager, 4602 MainStreet Intelligent NetworkStation or MainStreetXpress 46020
Network Manager documentation refers to the Technical Practices when necessary.
If you are using the Craft Interface, refer to your Craft Interface documentation for
instructions on how to install and commission your node manager. Refer to the
Technical Practices for instructions on how to manage your node.
If you are using an ASCII terminal, see Technical Overview for instructions on how to
install and commission your node management terminal. See the remainder of the
Technical Practices for instructions on managing your node.

Technical Practices Contents


The following subsections describe the contents of the Technical Practices.

Technical Overview
Technical Overview provides an introduction to the MainStreet family of bandwidth
managers.

Installation
Installation provides the procedures required to install all 3600 MainStreet series
bandwidth manager systems.

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Foreword
Issue 1, November 1997

Operations and Configuration


Operations and Configuration provides the procedures to configure system and
interface operating parameters, one- and two-way connections, and redundancy.

Maintenance
Maintenance provides the procedures required to monitor system operation, isolate
faults, service failed components, and perform system upgrades.

Reference documents
It is recommended that you read the following documents:

MainStreet Craft Interface node manager documentation


4601 MainStreet Network Manager, 4601A MainStreet Auxiliary Network

Manager, 4602 MainStreet Intelligent NetworkStation and MainStreetXpress


46020 Network Manager documentation
2600 MainStreet series DTU and 2700 MainStreet series DTU Data Termination
Unit documentation
distribution panel installation documentation

Conventions
This section describes the text conventions used throughout the Technical Practices.

Special information
These conventions are used to draw your attention to special information:
Danger
Danger means that the described activity or situation may cause personal injury.

Warning
A warning means that the described activity or situation may or will cause
equipment damage.

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Caution
A caution means that the described activity or situation may or will cause service
interruption.

Note
A note provides special information.

Table entry conventions


Table 2 lists the conventions used to describe node management session operations
and procedures.
Table 2: Node Management Session Documentation Conventions
Convention

Description

Example

<Key>

Indicates a particular keyboard character.

<Esc>

<variable>

Indicates that you enter an allowable value represented by


the variable.

<sn>

<LITERAL>

Indicates that you enter the string exactly as it appears.

<CPSS>

Step procedure conventions


Step procedures provide instructions to perform a task. Step procedures may consist
of options and substeps. The following example outlines step procedure
conventions.
1.

2.

Steps are denoted by arabic numerals and describe actions that must be
performed. Complete each step in order. This step has substeps.
i.

Substeps are denoted by roman numerals and detail the actions involved
in a complex step. Complete each substep in order.

ii.

At least two substeps appear.

This step has options.


a.

lxxxiv

Options are denoted by letters and are conditional actions that depend on
your system requirements. Perform only the applicable option.
i.

Options may contain substeps.

ii.

At least two substeps appear.

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Foreword
Issue 1, November 1997

Softkey tree conventions


In the Technical Practices, a series of softkey selections and keyboard entries is
shown in a tree form. The tree begins with a single line containing selections and
entries with long dashes between them. The return key is shown as . When you
have a choice between two different keys, the tree branches into a second line.
Further choices result in further branches.

Softkey tree example


CONFIG SLOT <sn> TYPE VOICE E+M

MuLaw*

ALaw
SK000002

Asterisks (*) in the tree show default values for softkeys.

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16. Getting Started

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

16.1

16.1 How to Use Operations and Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

How to Use Operations and


Configuration
This chapter describes:

who should use this manual


how the manual is organized
conventions used in the manual

16.1.1

Who Should Use this Manual


This manual provides the procedures required to configure system and interface
operating parameters, one- and two-way connections and redundancy options for
the 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers.
This manual is intended for people responsible for system configuration and
day-to-day operation. Before using the manual, you should be:

familiar with the Technical Overview


trained to telephone company standards (or equivalent)

16.1.2

How the Manual is Organized


The manual is organized into the following volumes.

Getting Started
Explains how to use the manual, how to run a node management session and how
to display information about the system configuration.

Node Parameters
Explains how to configure parameters that apply to a node as a whole, or to all the
cards installed in the system; explains general circuit connections, CPSS
configuration and network synchronization.

Redundancy
Explains how to configure control redundancy, protection switching and PRI
redundancy.

Getting Started

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16.1-1

16.1 How to Use Operations and Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

System Cards
Describes the system cards and provides configuration procedures for the Control,
Expander, Switching, Common Carrier, Test and General Facilities cards.

PRI Cards
Describes the PRI cards and explains how to configure T1, E1, MPA, TTC2M, X.21
PRI, X.21 ESI PRI, V.35 PRI, DS-3 and E3 cards.

Voice Interface Cards


Describes the voice interface cards and provides the configuration procedures for
4WTO Line card, E&M, LGE and LGS cards, and 4WDX, E&M, LGE, LGS and MRD
channel units.

Data Interface Cards


Describes super-rate and rate adaption applications and explains how to configure
DCCs, DNIC, 2B1Q and 27LC2 Line cards, 64 kb/s Codirectional cards, DS0-DP and
OCU-DP, 4WTO and 2B1Q channel units.

DSP Cards and IMCs


Describes special applications (such as voice compression, echo cancellation,
multidrop data bridges, VCBs and fax-to-voice conversion) and SRS and explains
how to configure DSP cards and IMCs.

DCP Cards
Describes DCP cards and explains how to configure them.

Frame Relay Services


Describes frame relay switching and explains how to configure the FRS, FRE and PE
cards.

36120 MainStreet X.25 Service


Describes the 36120 MainStreet X.25 service and explains how to configure the PE
and X.25 FRE cards.

BRI S/T Cards


Describes ISDN and non-ISDN applications for the card and explains how to
configure BRI S/T cards.

16.1-2

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16.1 How to Use Operations and Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

CPCs
Describes the ISDN backup application and explains how to configure CPCs.

HSA Cards
Describes the SONET and SDH applications and explains how to configure HSA
cards.
Note
For instructions on trouble shooting, viewing alarms, using the GFC, GFC2, GFC3
and Test cards and servicing failed components, see Maintenance.

Getting Started

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16.1-3

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16.2

16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

Running a Node Management


Session
This chapter describes how to communicate with 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth
managers through a node or network management station session. It also describes
how to connect a management station to a system serial port.

16.2.1

Understanding Node Management Sessions


A node management session is the time in which you use the menu-driven user
interface to communicate with 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers. You can
access a session from an ASCII (VT100) terminal or a MainStreet network or node
management station connected to a MainStreet system serial port (directly or
through modems). This user interface, also called the NMTI, is used to do the
configuration, operation and maintenance procedures described in the 3600
MainStreet Bandwidth Manager Family Technical Practices.
Note
The 3645 MainStreet node supports NMTI circuit connection management through
ASCII (VT100) terminals. Prior to Release 7.0, circuit connections could only be
configured for 3645 MainStreet systems through a Craft Interface session.

All MainStreet functions are software-driven and all configurable parameters are
stored in a non-volatile configuration database. You can access all functions and
parameters during a node management session by reading from and writing to the
configuration database. A node management session is conducted using the CPSS
protocol. CPSS is Newbridges proprietary X.25-based management protocol (for
more information on CPSS, see chapter 17.6).
Figure 16.2-1 shows the nodes with which you can have a node management session.

Getting Started

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16.2-1

16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 16.2-1: Node Management Session Nodes

Switching
shelf

Control card in active shelf


Control card in inactive shelf
Active Control card

Node
management
session

Locally controlled
switching shelf

Inactive Control card


FRS, FRE card

High speed
peripheral shelf

Active DS-3/E3 card


Inactive DS-3/E3 card
4759

For the purposes of node management, a node is defined as anything with a


configuration database. There are two kinds of nodes:

major nodes
minor nodes
Major nodes
The major nodes are:

Control cards
HSPS DS-3 or DS-3II cards
HSPS2 SE3 and DE3 cards
A major node is assigned a CPSS address. The configuration database of a locally
controlled, enhanced locally controlled or peripheral shelf contains all system and
card-specific parameters and functions for all cards installed in the shelf (except for
minor nodes). The configuration database of a switching shelf Control card contains
all DCS connections configured for all the peripheral shelves, HSPSs and HSPS2s
connected to it. Each HSPS and HSPS2 card configuration database contains all
system and card-specific parameters required by the card.

16.2-2

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16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

Minor nodes
The minor nodes are:

CPC
DCC
DCP card
DSP5 and DSP5H cards
DTUs
Dual E1 card
Dual E1-2 card
Dual T1 card
Dual T1-2 card
FRE card
FRS card
MPA card
PE card

A minor node does not have a CPSS address. It is identified by the CPSS address of
the major node and by the slot it occupies in the major node. The configuration
database of a minor node includes all card-specific parameters and functions. All
general system parameters are configured through a node management session with
the major node.

Active and inactive nodes


For control-redundant switching shelves, you can initiate a node management
session with the active or inactive locally controlled or peripheral shelf Control card.
For control-redundant locally controlled, enhanced locally controlled or peripheral
shelves, you can initiate a node management session with the active or inactive
locally controlled, enhanced locally controlled or peripheral shelf Control card.
For HSPS or HSPS2 cards configured as redundant card pairs, you can initiate a
node management session with the active or inactive HSPS or HSPS2 card.
Any configuration change you make during a node management session with the
active card is applied to the system immediately. Any configuration change you
make in a session with the inactive card is applied when an activity switch occurs.
For more information on activity switches, see chapter 18.1. Configuration options
are limited for an inactive 3600+ MainStreet Control card that is in hot standby mode.

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16.2-3

16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

16.2.2

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


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Management Stations
You can initiate a node management session from any of the following management
stations:

4602 MainStreet Intelligent NetworkStation


MainStreetXpress 46020 Network Manager
4601 MainStreet Network Manager
Craft Interface
ASCII (VT100) terminal

You can do all configuration and operation procedures in a node management


session initiated from the 4601 MainStreet Network Manager, 4602 MainStreet
Intelligent NetworkStation, MainStreetXpress 46020 Network Manager or Craft
Interface. Node management sessions initiated from an ASCII (VT100) terminal can
not support software downloading or database backup and restore functionality.

Network managers
The network managers are the preferred tools for network management and remote
node management. The 4602 MainStreet Intelligent NetworkStation,
MainStreetXpress 46020 Network Manager and 4601 MainStreet Network Manager
are network managers. They are connected to the network to manage the network
and any node on the network.
The 4602 MainStreet Intelligent NetworkStation and MainStreetXpress 46020
Network Manager are Sun-based software programs designed for large networks.
They can configure and operate all 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers and
provide an advanced graphical user interface in addition to the NMTI. The graphical
user interface is used to simplify network and node configuration and operation
procedures. You can do all configuration and operation procedures through the
NMTI.
The 4601 MainStreet Network Manager is a PC-based software program designed
for small- to medium-sized networks; it can configure and operate all
3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers. It provides a graphic user interface to
simplify connections to remote nodes. You can do all configuration and operation
procedures through the NMTI.
If you are using a network manager, see the appropriate network management
documentation to install and commission your network manager and manage your
node. The network management documentation describes how to initiate a node
management session with a node and refers you to the 3600 MainStreet Bandwidth
Manager Family Technical Practices when necessary.

Craft Interface node manager


The Craft Interface is the preferred tool for local node management. It is connected
(usually by a direct physical connection) to a single node for the purpose of
managing that node only. (When used with a switching shelf controlled system, the
Craft Interface is always connected to the switching shelf.)

16.2-4

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16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

The Craft Interface is a PC-based software program designed for node installation
and initial configuration or on-site trouble shooting. It provides NMTI access to all
MainStreet nodes (major and minor). You can do all configuration and operation
procedures through the Craft Interface.
If you are using the Craft Interface, see your Craft Interface documentation to install
and commission your node manager and to initiate a node management session. See
the 3600 MainStreet Bandwidth Manager Family Technical Practices to manage your
node.

ASCII (VT100) terminal


Any ASCII (VT100) terminal (or PC-based terminal emulation software) can be used
to initiate a node management session with the Control, FRS, FRE or PE card. All
other nodes (major and minor) require the Craft Interface, 4601, 4602 or 46020
network manager. Node management session initiated from an ASCII (VT100)
terminal can not support software downloading or database backup and restore
functionality.
The ASCII terminal should be configured for:

eight data bits


one stop bit
no parity
no local echo
9600 baud

The 3600+ MainStreet system has the automatic baud rate matching feature enabled
by default. For information about setting the baud rate, see chapter 17.3.

Getting Started

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16.2-5

16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

16.2.3

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Connecting to System Serial Ports


You can connect a management station to one of two RS-232 ALAPB system serial
ports. As indicated in Table 16.2-1, the ports are accessible on the backplane or
bulkhead of all MainStreet systems and on the faceplates of some cards.
SP1 is a simple 3-wire interface that supports TxD, RxD and GND. SP2 supports the
CTS or RTS and DSR or DTR control leads, and TxD, RxD and GND.
To connect external devices to either of the system serial ports, use the DCE and DTE
connection types as listed in Table 16.2-2.
Note
Hardware flow control is supported on SP2 only. For SP1 only, RTS is connected to
CTS and DTR is connected to DSR by the backplane.

Table 16.2-1: System Serial Ports


System

SP1

SP2

Connector
Type

Figure

Class A locally controlled shelf

RJ45

16.2-2

Class A switching shelf

RJ45

16.2-3

Class B or 23-inch locally controlled shelf

DB25
(female)

16.2-4

Class B or 23-inch switching shelf

DB25
(female)

16.2-5

RJ45

16.2-9

Backplane Location

Bulkhead Location

Faceplate Location

16.2-6

Control cards

CPC

RJ45

16.2-6

DCP card

RJ45

16.2-7

DS-3 II card

RJ45

16.2-8

E3 card

RJ45

16.2-8

FRE and PE cards

RJ45

16.2-8

FRS card

RJ45

16.2-6

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16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 16.2-2: Serial Port Device Connections


Connection

Connection Type

From SP1(DCE) to device (DTE)

Normal (straight through)

From SP2 (DTE) to device (DTE)

Null modem

From SP1 (DCE) to device (DCE)

Null modem

From SP2 (DTE) to device (DCE)

Normal (straight through)

Card faceplate serial ports


You can also access SP1 from the Control card faceplate to initiate a node
management session with the active or inactive Control card. Only one of the two
serial ports (backplane or bulkhead or Control card faceplate) in a system is active at
a time.
For the 3600, 3645, 3664 and 36120 MainStreet Control cards, serial port availability
depends on the system configuration (see Table 16.2-3).
Table 16.2-3: Control Card and Backplane or Bulkhead Serial Ports
Shelf

Backplane or
Bulkhead Serial
Port 1

Single- or dual-shelf, non-control-redundant


system

Control Card
Faceplate Serial
Port

Class A

Class B

Class A

Class B

(1)

(1)

Inactive

Inactive

Active

Active

Single-shelf, control-redundant system

Active

Active

Inactive

Inactive

Shelf with the active Control card in dual-shelf,


control-redundant system

Active

Active

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Active

Active

Shelf with the inactive Control card in dual-shelf,


control-redundant system)

Notes
1. In a dual-shelf, non-control-redundant system, the Control card uses the backplane or bulkhead SP1
connector of the shelf in which it is installed. The backplane or bulkhead SP1 connector of the shelf
without a Control card is not used.

Note
For an NMTI session in a dual-shelf, control-redundant system, connect the
management station to backplane or bulkhead SP1 on both shelves using a Y-cable.
This ensures a connection to the active Control card no matter which shelf is the
active shelf.

Getting Started

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16.2-7

16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

For the active 3600+ MainStreet Control card, insertion of jumper W4 enables SP1 on
the faceplate while disabling SP1 on the bulkhead. See chapter 17.3 for more
information about serial ports and W4 jumper insertion. Access to the inactive
Control card faceplate serial port is available only if W4 is inserted and the node
management station is directly connected.
Several other cards provide faceplate serial ports. These serial ports act as extensions
of the system serial ports in the active shelf only. They provide an alternate
connection point for a management station. Table 16.2-1 lists the system serial ports
supported on 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth manager systems and the pinout
figure number for each.

Default configuration
System serial ports have the default configuration listed in Table 16.2-4. Only port
type, CPSS cost and baud rate are configurable (see chapter 17.3).
Table 16.2-4: System Serial Port Configuration
Serial Port

Port Type (1)

CPSS
Cost

Data
Bits

Stop
Bits

Parity

Baud
Rate (2)

Gender (3)

VT100

Normal

None

9600

DCE

CPSS_MODEM

Normal

None

1200

DTE

Notes
1. Port type is configurable only on backplane or bulkhead and Control, DS-3 II and E3 card serial ports.
For most other card faceplate serial ports, port type is CPSS. For the CPC, port type is VT100.
2. For CPC and DCP faceplate serial ports, the default baud rate for both serial ports is 9600. For all
other faceplate serial ports, the default baud rates are as shown in the table.
3. For CPC, DCP, FRS, FRE and PE card faceplate serial ports, the gender of both serial ports is DCE.
For all other faceplate serial ports, the gender is listed in the table.

Pinouts
Figures 16.2-2 through 16.2-9 show the pinouts for all system serial ports.

16.2-8

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16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 16.2-2: Serial Port Pinouts for a Class A Locally Controlled Shelf System
SP1
P5

P6

P7

P8

P9

P10

P11

P12

SP2
CTRL A

CTRL B

Serial port 1
(DCE)

Serial port 2
(DTE)

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

CTS
RTS
RXD
TXD
Signal GND
DTR
DSR
Chassis GND

CTS
RTS
RXD
TXD
Signal GND
DTR
DSR
Chassis GND
4798

Note
Hardware flow control is supported on SP2 only. For SP1 only, RTS is connected to
CTS and DTR is connected to DSR by the backplane.

Getting Started

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16.2-9

16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 16.2-3: Serial Port Pinouts for a Class A Switching Shelf System

SP1

SP2

J29A

J29B

J30A

J30B

Serial port 1
(DCE)

Serial port 2
(DTE)

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

CTS
RTS
RXD
TXD
Signal GND
DTR
DSR
Chassis GND

CTS
RTS
RXD
TXD
Signal GND
DTR
DSR
Chassis GND
4799

Note
Hardware flow control is supported on SP2 only. For SP1 only, RTS is connected to
CTS and DTR is connected to DSR by the backplane.

Warning
Do not make connections to pins identified as n/c in Figure 16.2-4.

16.2-10

(400)

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 16.2-4: Serial Port Pinouts for a Class B or 23-inch Locally Controlled or
Peripheral Shelf System

n/c
TXD
RXD
RTS
CTS
DSR
GND
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
DTR
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c

n/c
TXD
RXD
RTS
CTS
DSR
GND
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c

J16 Serial port 1 (DCE)


DB25 Female connector

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
DTR
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c

J15 Serial port 2 (DTE)


DB25 Female connector

Class B locally controlled


or peripheral shelf

23-inch Locally controlled


or peripheral shelf
4790

Note
Hardware flow control is supported on SP2 only. For SP1 only, RTS is connected to
CTS and DTR is connected to DSR by the backplane.

Warning
Do not make connections to pins identified as n/c in Figure 16.2-5.

Getting Started

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16.2-11

16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 16.2-5: Serial Port Pinouts for a Class B or 23-inch Switching Shelf System

n/c
TXD
RXD
RTS
CTS
DSR
GND
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
DTR
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c

n/c
TXD
RXD
RTS
CTS
DSR
GND
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c

J16 Serial port 1 (DCE)


DB25 Female connector

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
DTR
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c
n/c

J15 Serial port 2 (DTE)


DB25 Female connector

Class B switching shelf

23-inch Switching shelf


4816

Note
Hardware flow control is supported on SP2 only. For SP1 only, RTS is connected to
CTS and DTR is connected to DSR by the backplane.

Warning
Do not make connections to pins identified as n/c in Figures 16.2-6 through 16.2-9.

16.2-12

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 16.2-6: Serial Port Pinout for CPC and FRS Card Faceplates
Serial port 1 (DCE)
Chassis GND
+12V
n/c
Signal GND
TXD
RXD
n/c
+12V

Serial port 2 (DTE)

8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1

Chassis GND
DSR
DTR
Signal GND
TXD
RXD
+12V
n/c

8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
8022

Figure 16.2-7: Serial Port Pinout for DCP Card Faceplates


Serial port 1 (DCE)
Chassis GND
DSR
DTR
Signal GND
TXD
RXD
RTS
+12V

Serial port 2 (DCE)

8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1

Chassis GND
+12V
n/c
Signal GND
TXD
RXD
n/c
+12V

8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
8021

Figure 16.2-8: Serial Port Pinout for DS-3, E3, FRE and PE Card Faceplates
Serial port 1 (DCE)
Chassis GND
+12V
n/c
Signal GND
TXD
RXD
n/c
+12V

8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
8023

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16.2-13

16.2 Running a Node Management Session


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 16.2-9: Serial Port Pinout for Control Card Faceplates

Serial port 1 (DCE)


Chassis GND
DSR
DTR
Signal GND
TXD
RXD
RTS
+12V

8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
9698

16.2-14

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16.3

16.3 Working with Node Management Sessions


Issue 1, November 1997

Working with Node Management


Sessions
This chapter helps you become familiar with the following elements of the node
management session user interface:

screen layout
softkeys
keyboard entries
It also provides a sample node management session and explains how to program
automatic log-off.

16.3.1

Beginning a Node Management Session


Beginning a node management session varies, depending on the management
station you use.

4601, 4602 and 46020 network managers


To initiate a node management session from a network manager, see the appropriate
network manager documentation.

Craft Interface
To initiate a node management session from a Craft Interface node manager, see
your Craft Interface documentation.

ASCII terminal
To initiate a node management session from an ASCII (VT100) terminal:

make sure that the ASCII terminal is connected to a system serial port
power on the terminal
configure the terminal to match the selected system serial port
press a few times

After you initiate it, the node management session user interface is the same for all
Newbridge nodes regardless of the management station used.

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16.3 Working with Node Management Sessions


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16.3.2

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Screen Layout
The node management session provides a screen 78 characters wide by 24 lines long;
the screen has six functional areas, as shown in Figure 16.3-1. As you make selections
or enter information, the areas of the screen change to display relevant information.
Figure 16.3-1: Header Line Fields
Product

Generic_Release

F1-CONFIG
F6-

long_name

F2-HOUSE
F7-

F3-MAINT
F8-

Alarms

F4-STATS
F9-QUIT

Date

Time

F5-ALARMS
F0-

Header line
The information displayed in the header line (from left to right) depends on the node
with which you are having a node management session.
Product
The type of node to which you are connected, for example the 3600 MainStreet node.
Generic release
The node software version number of the node to which you are connected.
Table 16.3-1 lists the software version numbers of each type of node.
Long name
This field describes which shelf you are connected to and varies depending on the
type of node to which you are connected. Table 16.3-1 lists the long names associated
with each type of node.

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Issue 1, November 1997

Alarms
The number of unacknowledged alarms in the Major/Prompt alarm queue. For a
session with a major node, the number refers only to the queue of the major node.
For a session with a minor node, the number refers only to the queue of the minor
node.
Date
The date set for the shelf Control card (even for sessions with a minor node). If no
date has been set, No Date appears.
Time
The time set for the shelf Control card (even for sessions with a minor node). Time
is displayed in hours, minutes and seconds in 12- or 24-hour format (hh:mm:ssA, P or
H). If the time has not been set, the number of hours, minutes and seconds since the
last system reset is displayed (hh:mm:ssR).
Table 16.3-1: Generic Release Numbers and Long Names
Node

Generic Release

Long Name

Enhanced locally controlled shelf Control card

S1117-ab-cd

NMTI Control:s (2)

Locally controlled shelf Control card

x117-ab-cd (1)

NMTI shelf:s (2)

Switching shelf Control card

C117-ab-cd

NMTI shelf:SWs (3)

Peripheral shelf Control card

D117-ab-cd

NMTI shelf:Pns (4)

HSPS DS-3 or DS-3 II card

H117-ab-cd

NMTI shelf:Pns (4)

HSPS2 E3 card

E117-ab-cd

NMTI shelf:Pns (4)

FRS card

P114-ab-cd

node_name:sn (5)

FRE card

P412-ab-cd

node_name:sn (5)

PE card

P611-ab-cd

node_name:sn (5)

Notes
1. where x is 1 for the 3600 MainStreet node or x is Q for the 3664 MainStreet node
2. where s is the shelf identifier (A or B)
3. where s is the shelf identifier (1 or 2)
4. where n is the number of the Switching card to which this peripheral shelf or DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 card
is connected (1 to 8) and where s is the peripheral shelf or DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 card identifier (A or B)
5. where node_name is the name configured for the Control card of the major node and where sn is the
shelf and slot identifier of the slot occupied by the minor node (s = A or B; n = 1 to 8)

Data area
This area displays information associated with the current menu item.

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Command line
This line displays softkey selections and keyboard entries.

Diagnostics line
This line displays prompts, error messages and information about the valid range
for numeric entries.

Softkey area
This area displays softkeys associated with function keys <F1> through <F10> (or
number keys <1> to <9> and <0>).

Status line
The status line appears only when you use the Craft Interface. See your Craft
Interface documentation for a description of the information on the status line.

Refreshing the display


Refresh the screen display by pressing <Esc> <R>. Refreshing the screen is useful in
the following situations:

if you are monitoring time-sensitive displays (such as system alarms or statistics)

16.3.3

and want to update the display


if you are examining the signalling leads
if a transmission error or other event corrupts the displayed information

Softkeys
A softkey is a key that is associated with different functions (commands) at different
times. The softkeys available at any time depend on previous softkey selections.
Selecting a softkey selects the function associated with it at that time.
Softkeys are described according to the name of the function displayed for that
softkey. Function names are usually upper case (for example, HOST). They may
contain underscores (HELLO_TIME), hyphens (END-TO-END), or obliques
(RTS/CTS). In this manual, the term softkey is used to describe both the key
associated with a particular function and the function itself.
The softkey area displays the available softkeys. Each softkey is associated with a
function key (<F1> through <F10>) or number key (<1> through <9> and <0>) on
the keyboard.
In the 3600 MainStreet Bandwidth Managers Family Technical Practices, softkeys are
written as they appear on the screen.

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16.3 Working with Node Management Sessions


Issue 1, November 1997

Softkey menus
A menu is a group of softkeys displayed at one time.
The main menu is the group of six softkeys displayed after you have logged on to a
node.

Selecting softkeys
There are two ways to select a softkey.

Press the function key (<F1> through <F10>) associated with the softkey.
Press the <Esc> key and then press the number key (<1> through <9> and <0>)
associated with the softkey.
Number keys <1> to <9> are associated with function keys <F1> to <F9>. Number
key <0> is associated with function key <F10>.
For example, in Figure 16.3-2, you can select the CONFIG softkey from the main
menu with either of the following key sequences:
<F1> or <Esc> <1>
Softkeys are added to the command line as you select them (exceptions are MORE,
CANCEL, QUIT, PROCEED and display-related softkeys such as SHOW_SLOTS).
Figure 16.3-2: Main Menu for the MainStreet Node
3600 MainStreet

F1-CONFIG
F6-

Getting Started

1117-H1-00

Toronto:A

F2-HOUSE
F7-

F3-MAINT
F8-

(400)

Alarms:1

11-May-1997

F4-STATS
F9-QUIT

8:35a

F5-ALARMS
F0-

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Instructions
An instruction is a sequence of softkey selections and keyboard input that results in
an action or change of state. The instruction takes effect only after the PROCEED
softkey is displayed and selected. See the subsection To execute an instruction
(PROCEED).

Toggle softkeys
You use a toggle softkey to select one of two mutually exclusive commands
associated with one softkey.
When you select a toggle softkey, the activity governed by the softkey (and the
softkey label) changes to the alternative option, usually opposite to the original.
For example, when you select MAINT DIAG, the softkey associated with function
key <F3> (DISABLE/ENABLE) is a toggle softkey. When you select DISABLE,
background diagnostic tests are disabled and the softkey changes to read ENABLE.
When you select ENABLE, background diagnostic tests are enabled and the softkey
changes to read DISABLE.

Softkey groups
Some softkeys are grouped so that you can select only one softkey in a group. The
selected function is added to the command line or displayed in the data area and
removed from the softkey area.
For example, when you select HOUSE SER_PORT_1 BAUD_RATE, five baud
rates are displayed. The sixth (currently selected) baud rate appears in the data area
but not in the softkey area. If you select a new baud rate, it is removed from the
softkey area and replaces the old baud rate displayed in the data area. The old baud
rate now appears in the softkey area.

Display-related softkeys
Some softkeys are used to display information while you are entering an instruction.
These softkeys change the display in the data area without interrupting the
instruction. Display softkeys are SHOW_A, SHOW_B, SHOW_SLOTS,
SHOW_GROUP/SHOW_CCT, SHOW_CUR and SHOW_LIST.

Undoing a selection (CANCEL)


Selecting CANCEL undoes the current part of an instruction. It removes the last
selected softkey from the command line and displays the menu as it was before that
softkey was selected. CANCEL is always associated with function key <F8>.

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16.3 Working with Node Management Sessions


Issue 1, November 1997

Returning to the main menu (QUIT)


The result of selecting QUIT depends on the menu from which it is selected.

From the main menu, QUIT logs you off the node and displays the management

station main menu.


From any other menu, QUIT displays the node management session main menu.

QUIT is always associated with function key <F9>.

To execute an instruction (PROCEED)


To execute an instruction when you have finished entering it, select PROCEED.
The softkey area displays the PROCEED softkey only when you need it. The session
interface prompts you to select PROCEED with this message on the diagnostics line:
Press PROCEED to confirm change. All softkeys except CANCEL, QUIT and
PROCEED disappear. PROCEED is always associated with function key <F10>.
After you select PROCEED, all softkeys disappear briefly and the diagnostics line
displays a message indicating that the instruction is being executed.
When execution is complete, the menu that you are most likely to use for the next
operation appears. Part of the instruction remains on the command line to save you
from having to re-enter it.
To avoid repetition, PROCEED is not included in the procedures of 3600 MainStreet
Bandwidth Manager Family Technical Practices unless selecting it causes something to
occur in addition to executing the instruction.

To log off
To log off (terminate the node management session), select QUIT (<F9>) until you
see the main menu; then, from the main menu, select QUIT again.
The node management session ends and the management station main menu (if any)
appears.
Note
Depending on the configuration specified by your site planner, you may or may not
have access to all of the softkeys. For example, if a particular level of access does not
allow configuration, the CONFIG softkey on the main menu will be inaccessible. For
more information on access levels, see chapter 17.5.

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Keyboard Entries
You make keyboard entries using the alphanumeric keys on the keyboard. For
example, you must enter circuit identifiers, node names, or interface speeds. The
node management session user interface indicates that a keyboard entry is required
in three ways.

On the command line, it displays a series of question marks or periods in

quotation marks, for example ??-?? or ....


On the diagnostics line, it displays a prompt beginning with Enter; for
example, Enter the interface speed.
It removes all softkeys except CANCEL, QUIT and display-related softkeys.

As you enter information, your entry replaces the prompt on the command line. Use
the <Delete> or <Backspace> key to correct typing errors.
In this manual, keyboard entries are indicated by text in angle brackets (< >). A
description of the keyboard entry is given using italics surrounded by angle
brackets, for example <number> and <sn-cc>.

Keyboard entry formats


Most keyboard entries have specific formats for entering the information.
Sometimes the required format is indicated by the prompt on the command line or
diagnostics line.
For example, you must enter the date in the format <dd-MMM-yy>, where dd
represents the day of the month, MMM represents the first three letters of the month
and yy represents the last two digits of the year. You must also enter the hyphens.
September 30, 1997 is entered as <30-SEP-97>.
In many cases, the format is a mixture of specific letters and variable information.
For example, in a format like <Ff-Bb>, you must enter F and B as is and information
to replace variables f and b. You must also enter the hyphen. A valid entry in this
format is <F0-B7>.

To end a keyboard entry


To indicate that you have finished a keyboard entry, press .
Note
Node management stations can store up to 100 characters in a keyboard buffer,
allowing you to type in commands or other key sequences before being prompted
for them. You can clear the buffer by holding down <Control> and pressing <X>. All
unexecuted commands are cancelled when the buffer is cleared.

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16.3.5

16.3 Working with Node Management Sessions


Issue 1, November 1997

Trying a Sample Session


This example shows you how to use the management station. To get the most out of
it, carry out the steps on your management station as you read.
The example shows you how to configure card slot 3 on locally controlled or
peripheral shelf A for a North American E&M card. The explanations associated
with each step include references to the display area of the node management
session screen (see Figure 16.3-1).

To configure a card slot


1.

Initiate a node management session with the locally controlled or peripheral


shelf.
a.

If you are using a network manager, see the appropriate network manager
documentation.

b.

If you are using the Craft Interface node manager, see your Craft Interface
documentation.

c.

If you are using an ASCII (VT100) terminal, make sure that the ASCII
terminal is connected to a system serial port, powered on and configured
to match the selected system serial port; then press a few times.
The system prompts for your access level.

2.

Enter the level (press one of <1> to <5>).


The system prompts for the password configured for the selected access level.

3.

Enter the password (the system is not case sensitive; you can enter the
password in upper or lower case or any combination of upper and lower case).
The default password is <mainstreet>.
The main menu appears (see Figure 16.3-2).
Note

For more information on levels and passwords, see chapter 17.5.

4.

Select CONFIG by pressing the <F1> or <1> key.


CONFIG appears on the command line and the main menu is replaced by
another menu.

5.

Select SLOT by pressing the <F1> or <1> key.


SLOT is added to the command line after CONFIG. The management station
prompts you for a keyboard entry by displaying ?? on the command line,
displaying the prompt Enter Slot Number on the diagnostics line and
removing all softkeys except display softkeys (SHOW_A and SHOW_SLOTS),
CANCEL and QUIT.

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6.

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Enter the slot identifier for slot A3 (<A3>).


If you do not enter a shelf identifier, the management station assumes an A.
The slot identifier replaces the ??.
Note

To select CANCEL or QUIT, enter <Esc> <8> or <Esc> <9>, respectively; if you are
using function keys F8 or F9, you do not need to press <Esc> first. If you simply
entered <8> or <9>, the management station would assume that the number was
part of the slot identifier (a keyboard entry) and add it to the command line.

7.

Press to indicate the end of the keyboard entry.


Information about slot A3 appears in the data area and the menu changes.

8.

Select TYPE (press the <F1> or <1> key).


TYPE is added to the command line after 3 and the menu changes.

9.

Select VOICE (press the <F3> or <3> key).


VOICE is added to the command line after TYPE and the menu changes.

10. Select E+M (press the <F1> or <1> key).


E+M is added to the command line after VOICE and the menu changes.
11. Select MuLaw (press the <F1> or <1> key).
MuLaw is added to the command line after E+M. The PROCEED softkey
appears beside the <F10> or <0> key in the softkey area and the prompt Press
PROCEED to confirm change appears on the diagnostics line. The only other
softkeys available are CANCEL and QUIT. This indicates the end of an
instruction.
If you realize at this point that you have selected the wrong type of card, select
CANCEL to return to step 7.
12. Select PROCEED (press the <F10> or <0> key).
The message Now changing slot configuration appears on the diagnostics
line. When the change is complete, the data area is updated with the default
settings for a North American E&M card. If a card other than an E&M card is
installed in slot A3, an alarm is raised.
The command line still displays CONFIG SLOT 3 and the word OPTIONS
has appeared beside the <F3> or <3> key in the softkey area, enabling you to
configure the options for that slot.
13. To exit from this node management session, select QUIT (press the <F9> or <9>
key) until you see the main menu. From the main menu, select QUIT again.
The node management session ends and the management station main menu
(if any) appears.

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16.3 Working with Node Management Sessions


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure a card slot using a tree form


CONFIG SLOT <sn> TYPE VOICE E+M

MuLaw*

ALaw
SK000003

In this manual, a series of softkey selections and keyboard entries is shown in a tree
form. The tree begins with a single line containing selections and entries with long
dashes between them. The return key is shown as . When you have a choice
between two different keys, the tree branches into a second line. Further choices
result in further branches. For example, this procedure would be shown as:
The softkey PROCEED (used to execute the instruction) is not included because the
management station prompts for it.

16.3.6

Programming Automatic Log-off


You can program the length of time after which the node management terminal logs
off if there has been no activity. This prevents an unattended terminal from being
used by unauthorized users.
Five options are available:

5_MIN for 5 min


10_MIN for 10 min
15_MIN for 15 min
30_MIN for 30 min (default)
NONE for no automatic log off

To program automatic log-off, select the shelf or card and choose SESSN_TIME. If
there is an automatic log-off programmed, the system displays it on the screen. To
select the new automatic log-off time, press the appropriate number key.
If you select NONE, the terminal stays logged on to the system until you log off
manually by selecting QUIT from the main menu.

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To program automatic log-off


HOUSE MORE SESSN_TIME

5_MIN

10_MIN

15_MIN

30_MIN*

NONE
SK000004

Note 1
You do not need to select MORE for FRS, FRE or PE cards.
Note 2
The automatic log-off setting is not preserved during a database backup or restore.
When the backup or restore is complete, the automatic log off time is set to the
default (30 min).

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16.4

16.4 Using Identifiers


Issue 1, November 1997

Using Identifiers
This chapter describes the node management session identifiers used for shelves,
slots and links, and circuits.

16.4.1

About Identifiers
You do configuration procedures on specific items such as card slots, links, or
circuits, each of which has a specific type of identifier. Table 16.4-1 lists the
identifiers.

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16.4 Using Identifiers


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Table 16.4-1: Shelf, Slot, Link and Circuit Identifier Formats


Slot Identifiers
Universal cards
Control card
GFCs
Expander card
HSA cards
HSA card subslots

<sn>
<CTL>
<GFC>
<EXP>
<Hn>
<Hn-ss>

<A1> <B7>
<CTL>
<GFC>
<EXP>
<H1>
<H1-A> <H1-B>

Dual T1, Dual T1-2, Dual E1 and Dual E1-2

<sn-l>

<A6-B> <B6-A>

MPA card

<sn-l>

<A6-1> <A6-2> <A6-3>


<A6-4>

T1, E1, TTC2M, X.21 PRI, X.21 ESI PRI, V.35 PRI,
4WTO, E+M, LGE, LGS, RS-232 DCC, X.21 DCC,
V.35 DCC, RS-422 DCC, 27LC2, DSP, DCP, 64 kb/s
Codirectional and Common Carrier cards

<sn-cc>

<B3-12>

4WDX, 4WTO, E+M, LGE, LGS, MRD, DS0-DP and


OCU-DP channel units

<sn-cc-1>

<A3-3-1> <B5-1-1>

2B1Q channel unit in DTU mode

<sn-cc-p>

<A2-1-A> <B3-4-B>

2B1Q channel unit in 3DS-0 or 5DS-0 mode

<sn-cc-1>
<sn-cc-2>
<sn-cc-D>

<A5-1-1> <A5-1-2>
<A2-1-D>

Dual T1, Dual T1-2, Dual E1, Dual E1-2 and MPA

<sn-l-cc>

<B3-A-5> <A8-1-7> (1)

DNIC, 2B1Q and 27LC2

<sn-cc-p>

<A3-11-A> <B3-4-B>

DSP5H, DSP5

<sn-dsp-1>
<sn-dsp-2>

<A1-4-1> <A1-4-2>

BRI S/T card 2B+D interfaces

<sn-i>

<A1-2> <A3-6>

BRI S/T card 2B+D channels

<sn-i-h>

<A1-2-1> <A1-2-2>
<A1-2-D>

Branch channels on DSP cards, DNIC, 2B1Q and


27LC2 Line cards

<sn-cc-Bbb>

<A4-3-B2>

SRMs on DCCs

<sn-Mmm>

<B1-M6> <A6-M2>

SRMs on DSP cards, DNIC,


2B1Q and 27LC2 Line cards

<sn-cc-Mmm>

<B1-3-M6>
<A6-11-M2>

VCBs on DSPs

<sn-cc-BRr>

<A1-1-BR3>

VCB Inputs on DSPs

<sn-cc-Ikk>

<B2-2-I5>

SRS on DSPs

<sn-SRS-dd>

<A3-SRS-4>

Compressed voice channels on T1 and E1 cards

<sn-Scc-vv>

<B2-S3-1>
<A3-S6-2>

Voice compressors on Dual T1 and Dual E1 cards

<sn-Xt>

<A7-X3> <B2-X5>

DS3 identifier
DS1 identifier
DS0s on DS-3 or DS-3 II cards

<DS-3>
<n>
<n-cc>

DS-3
<3>
<5-15>

Link Identifiers

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16.4 Using Identifiers


Issue 1, November 1997

E3 identifier
E2 identifier
E1 identifier
DS0s on E3 cards

<E3id>
<E3id-E2id>
<E3id-E1id>
<E3id-E1id-cc>

<1>
<2-B>
<1-14>
<2-12-27>

Order Wire on GFC3

<OW>

<OW>

DS0 on GFC3

<DS0>

<DS0>

Test Port on GFC3

<TP>

<TP>

Tone Tester on GFC3

<TT-cc>

<TT-1>

BERT on GFC3

<BT-cc>

<BT-1>

<Hn-ss-pa>
<Hn-ss-AU4>
<Hn-ss-pa>
<Hn-ss-pa-gr>
<Hn-ss-pa-gr>
<Hn-ss-pa-gr-vs>
<Hn-ss-pa-gr-vs>
<Hn-ss-Vvs>
<Hn-ss-Tvs>

<H1-A-1>
<H1-A-AU-4>
<H1-A-1>
<H1-A-1-3>
<H1-A-1-3>
<H1-A-1-3-1>
<H1-A-1-1-1>
<H1-A-V1>
<H1-A-T2>

<Hn-ss-c>
<Hn-c-d>

<H1-A-5>
<H1-A-2>

<Scc>
<Scc>
<Scc>
<Fnn>

<S22>
<S22>
<S22>
<F63>

<Scc-dlci>
<Scc-dici>
<Scc-dici>
<Fnn-dici>

<S22-768>
<S22-768>
<S22-768>
<F63-2127>

<sn-cc-Ixx>

<A1-1-I2>

HSA Card Broadband Circuit Identifiers


AU3s on an STM-1 card
AU-4s on an STM-1 card
STS-1s on OC-3 cards
VT groups on OC-3 cards
TU groups on STM-1 cards
VTs on OC-3 cards
TUs on STM-1 card
VTs on VT-1.5 cards
TUs on TU-12 cards
HSA Card Narrowband Port and Circuit Identifiers
Narrowband port on VT-1.5 or TU-12 cards
Narrowband DS0 circuit on VT-1.5 or TU-12 cards
Stream Identifiers
FRS card
FRE card
PE card
FASTbus
DLC Identifiers
FRS card
FRE card
PE card
FASTbus
ISDN Index Identifiers
CPC

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bb = a 1- or 2-digit branch channel. Ranges:


DNIC Line cards: 1 to 6, or 12
DSPs: 1 to 6, 10 or 12
2B1Q Line card: 1 to 6
27LC2 Line card: 1 to 6
c = a VT-1.5 or TU-12 card narrowband port: 1 to 16
cc = a 1- or 2-digit circuit number. Ranges:
T1, DUAL_T1: 1 to 24
T1, DUAL_T1 on 3664 MainStreet: 1 to 12
E1, DUAL_E1: 1 to 31
E1, DUAL_E1 on 3664 MainStreet: 1 to 15, 31
X21_PRI, V35_PRI: 1 to 30
TTC2M: 1 to 30
4WTO: 1 to 12
E+M: 1 to 6
LGE: 1 to 8
LGS: 1 to 12
MPA: 1 to 30
RS-232_DCC: 1 to 6
X.21_DCC: 1 to 4 or 6
V.35_DCC: 1 to 3 or 6
RS-422_DCC: 1 to 4
DNIC: 1 to 3, 6 or 12
DSP: 1 or 2 or 6
DCP: 1 to 31
FRS: 1 to 31
2B1Q: 1 to 6
27LC2 Line card: 1 to 6
64 kb/s Codirectional: 1 to 4
Common Carrier card: 1 to 4
Channel units: 1 to 4 (except the 4WDX channel unit: 1 to 3)
FRS card circuit connected to a primary rate or data circuit: 1 to 30
FRE card circuit connected to a primary rate or data circuit: 1 to 62
PE card circuit connected to a primary rate or data circuit: 1 to 62
FASTbus stream identifier 1 to 64
Tone tester on GFC3: 1 or 2
BERT on GFC3: 1 or 2
D = the D channel in BRI or PRI interfaces, or the D+ channel in 3DS0 mode or the D+CV channel in 5DS0 mode 2B1Q channel
units.
d = a 1- or 2-digit VT-1.5 or TU-12 card DS0 number. Ranges:
VT-1.5: 1 to 24
TU-12: 1 to 31
dd = a DS0 number. Ranges:
1 to 30 (without double bandwidth)
1 to 48 (with double bandwidth)
dlci = data link connection identifier. Ranges:
16 to 1007 (local DLC cross-connections)
2000 to 3983 (FASTbus DLC cross-connections)
dsp = a DSP resource identifier (1 to 10)
E1id = a 1- or 2-digit E1 identifier (1 to 16)
E2id = a 1-character E2 identifier (A to D)
E3id = a 1-digit E3 number (1 or 2 for DE3 cards, 1 for SE3 cards)
gr = a VT-Group number (0 to 7) for an OC-3 card, TUG-2 number (1 to 7) for an STM-1 card in AU-3 or AU-4 mode
h = a BRI interface channel number (1, 2 or D)
i = a BRI S/T card interface number (1 to 4 for 4-circuit BRI S/T cards, 1 to 8 for 8-circuit BRI S/T cards)
kk = a 1- or 2-digit input number (1 to 14)
l = a link indicator: A or B on the Dual T1 and Dual E1 cards, 1 to 4 on the MPA card

16.4-4

(400)

Getting Started

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

16.4 Using Identifiers


Issue 1, November 1997

lxx = a CPC index. Ranges:


BRI interfaces: 1 or 2
T1 PRI interfaces: 1 to 23
E1 PRI interfaces: 1 to 30
mm = a 1- or 2-digit SRM number. Ranges:
DCCs: 1 to 3
DNIC Line cards: 1 to 6, 8 or 12
DSPs: 1 to 4, 6 or 12
2B1Q Line card: 1 to 6
27LC2 Line card: 1 to 6
n = a 1-digit slot number (1 through 8) for a switching, locally controlled or peripheral shelf
= a 1- or 2-digit number (1 to 28) for DS-3 or DS-3 II cards
= a 1-digit
= a 1-digit HSA slot number (1 to 3) for an enhanced locally controlled shelf
p = a port indicator (A or B)
pa = a broadband circuit number (1 to 3) which can indicate: an STS-1 number for an OC-3 card, a TUG-3 number for an STM-1
card in AU-4 mode, or AU-3 number for an STM-1 card in AU-3 mode
pr = a slot pair indicator (A or B)
r = a bridge number (1 to 4)
s = a shelf indicator (A or B)
ss = an HSA subslot (A or B), optional for certain parameters
t = a 1-digit compressor number, 1 to 5 for delta voice compression and 1 to 32 for transitional voice compression
vs = a VT number (1 to 4 for an OC-3 card, or 1 to 16 for a VT-1.5 card)
= a TU number (1 to 4 for an STM-1 card or 1 to 16 for a TU-12 card)
vv = a 1- or 2-digit compressed voice channel (1 to 11)
x = a shelf number (for peripheral shelf, DS-3 or E3 cards)
Notes
1. The MPA card link identifier is an integer from 1 through 4. For the Dual T1 and E1 cards, the link identifier can be either the
letter A or the letter B.

16.4.2

Shelf Identifiers
The identifiers used with switching, locally controlled or peripheral and HSPS are
determined by shelf-select jumpers set during initial installation or intershelf
connections (see Installation, Task 0500 and Task 0600).
Note
In all configurations, if you enter no shelf identifier, the management station
assumes it to be 1 for a switching shelf, or A for a locally controlled, peripheral or
HSPS card.

Switching shelf identifiers


For a single-shelf configuration, the management station identifies the switching
shelf as 1. The backplane shelf-select jumper must be in position 1.

Getting Started

(400)

16.4-5

16.4 Using Identifiers


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

For a shelf-redundant configuration, the management station identifies the


switching shelves as switching shelf 1 and switching shelf 2 according to the
backplane shelf-select jumpers.

Locally controlled and peripheral shelf identifiers


In a single-shelf configuration, the management station identifies the locally
controlled or peripheral shelf as A. The backplane shelf-select jumper must be in
position A.
In a dual-shelf, non-control-redundant configuration, the management station
identifies the locally controlled or peripheral shelf with the Control card as A and
the other shelf as B. The shelf-select jumpers in each shelf must be set accordingly.
In a control-redundant configuration, each locally controlled or peripheral shelf has
a Control card. The management station identifies the shelves as A and B according
to the backplane shelf-select jumpers.

HSPS identifiers
HSPS cards (DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 cards) are identified as either card A or B depending
on the slot they are installed in. When installed in an odd-numbered slot (1, 3, 5 or 7),
the card is identified as card A. When installed in an even-numbered slot (2, 4, 6
or 8), the card is identified as card B.

16.4.3

Shelf Numbers
Each peripheral shelf and each HSPS card is also identified by the number of the
switching shelf slot occupied by the Switching card to which the peripheral shelf or
HSPS card is connected. For example, in Figure 16.4-1, the peripheral shelf
connected to the Switching card in switching shelf slot 1 is identified by a 1. The
HSPS2 card connected to the Switching card in switching shelf slot 5 is identified by
a 5, and so on.
This number, called the shelf number, is displayed in the NMTI header and used
when you log onto the switching shelf to configure connections; for example:
CONFIG CONNECT <x-sn-cc> TO_CIRCUIT <x-sn-cc>
where x is the shelf number (1 to 8) of a peripheral shelf or HSPS card
When you log onto a peripheral shelf or HSPS card, the shelf number is not required,
for example:
CONFIG CIRCUIT <sn-cc> NAME <name>

16.4-6

(400)

Getting Started

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

16.4 Using Identifiers


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 16.4-1: Peripheral Shelf and HSPS Card Shelf Numbering


Switching shelf

3645 MainStreet

Switching
card #5

Switching
card #1

Switching
card #6

5 6

3645 MainStreet

This card is
identified as
peripheral shelf
#5.

This shelf is identified as


peripheral shelf #1.

This card is
identified as
peripheral shelf
#6.
4800

16.4.4

Slot Numbers
The card slots are numbered from left to right on the switching, locally controlled
and peripheral shelves, and HSPSs.

Getting Started

(400)

16.4-7

16.4 Using Identifiers


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Switching shelf
As Figure 16.4-2 shows, the use of the slots in the switching shelf is as follows:

slots 1 through 8: Switching cards


slot 9: Clock card (no configurable parameters)
slot 10: Control card (no configurable parameters)
Figure 16.4-2: Slot Numbers for the Switching Shelf
Class A

Class B

Critical Alarm

Critical Alarm

3645 MainStreet

NEWBRIDGE

3645 MainStreet

Major Alarm
Minor Alarm

PS1
5A

PS2
5A

Alarm

Alarm

Power

Power

NEWBRIDGE

Major Alarm
Minor Alarm

PS1
5A

PS2
5A

Alarm

Alarm

Power

Power

slots 1 to 8

9 10

slots 1 to 8

9 10

Switching
section

Common
Control
section

Switching
section

Common
Control
section

Class B
23-inch
3645 MainStreet
High Capacity Bandwidth Manager

Critical Alarm
Major Alarm
Minor Alarm

Power Supply
Card
0VR
-BATT
+5
-5
+12
-12
GND
Alarm
Status

Power Supply
Card
0VR
-BATT
+5
-5
+12
-12
GND
Alarm
Status

slots 1 to 8

9 10

Switching
section

Common
Control
section
5393

16.4-8

(400)

Getting Started

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

16.4 Using Identifiers


Issue 1, November 1997

Locally controlled and peripheral shelves


As Figure 16.4-3 shows, locally controlled or peripheral shelf slots are used as
follows.

Slots 1 through 8, called UCSs, contain any type of interface or application card.
Slot 9 contains the Control card (no configurable parameters).
Slot 10 contains the Expander card in a locally controlled shelf, or a Switching

Interface card in a peripheral shelf (no configurable parameters).


Slot 11 contains the Balanced Transceiver cards (no configurable parameters).
Slot 12 contains the GFC, GFC2 or GFC3. The GFC and GFC2 have no
configurable parameters, whereas the GFC3 is NMTI configurable. The GFC,
GFC2 and GFC3 perform maintenance functions that are controlled through the
node manager. For details, see Maintenance, chapter 36.4.

The type of Expander card or Switching Interface card in slot 10 determines which
UCSs can be configured and which offer double-bandwidth capability (as listed in
Table 16.4-2). For more information, see Technical Overview, chapters 4.7 and 4.10.
Table 16.4-2: Locally Controlled and Peripheral Shelf UCS Access
Card in Slot 10

Accessible UCSs

Double Bandwidth UCSs

No card installed

A1-A6

None

Expander 6+2

A1-A8

A7 and A8 (1)

Expander 6+6

A1-A6 and B1-B6

None

Expander 8+8

A1-A8 and B1-B8

A7, A8, B7 and B8 (1)

Expander 16+

A1-A8 and B1-B8

A1-A8 and B1-B8

Switching Interface card

A1-A8 and B1-B8

A1-A8 and B1-B8

Notes
1. All UCSs are single bandwidth if the 4602 MainStreet Intelligent NetworkStation or MainStreetXpress
46020 Network Manager is used. UCS 7 and 8 provide double bandwidth if the 4602 or 46020
network manager is not used.

Getting Started

(400)

16.4-9

16.4 Using Identifiers


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 16.4-3: Slot Numbers for the Locally Controlled or Peripheral Shelf
Class A

Class B

Critical Alarm

Bandwidth Manager

Bandwidth Manager

PS1
5A

Major Alarm
Minor Alarm

PS2
5A

NEWBRIDGE

NEWBRIDGE

PS1
5A

PS2
5A

Alarm

Alarm

Power

Power

slots 1 to 8

9 to 12

slots 1 to 8

9 to 12

Interface
section

Common
control
section

Interface
section

Common
control
section

Class B
23-inch
Bandwidth Manager

Critical Alarm
Major Alarm
Minor Alarm

Power Supply
Card
0VR
- BATT
+5
-5
+ 12
- 12
GND
Alarm
Status

Power Supply
Card
0VR
- BATT
+5
-5
+ 12
- 12
GND
Alarm
Status

slots 1 to 8

9 to 12

Interface
section

Common
control
section
4758

HSPS
As Figure 16.4-4 shows, the use of the slots in an HSPS is as follows:

slots 1a through 4b are reserved for DS-3 or DS-3 II cards


the remaining slots are reserved for future use

16.4-10

(400)

Getting Started

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

16.4 Using Identifiers


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 16.4-4: Slot Numbers for the HSPS

Critical Alarm

3645 MainStreet

Major Alarm
Minor Alarm

NEWBRIDGE

PS1
5A

PS2
5A

Alarm

Alarm

Power

Power

1a 1b 2a 2b 3a 3b 4a 4b

Switching
section

Reserved
for future
use
5343

HSPS2
As Figure 16.4-5 shows, slots 1a through 4b in the HSPS2 are reserved for SE3 and
DE3 cards.

Getting Started

(400)

16.4-11

16.4 Using Identifiers


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 16.4-5: Slot Numbers for the HSPS2

1a

1b

E3 card
interface section
2a 2b 3a 3b

4a

4b

5390

16.4-12

(400)

Getting Started

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

16.5

16.5 Displaying Configuration Information


Issue 1, November 1997

Displaying Configuration
Information
This chapter explains how to display information about slots, circuit connections
and configuration.

16.5.1

Displaying Slot Information


You can display detailed information or a summary about slots and cards in the
locally controlled, enhanced locally controlled, switching, peripheral shelves and
HSPS.
Note
Table 16.4-1 in chapter 16.4 explains the formats of the identifiers in the procedures.

To view the switching shelf summary display


Select the switching shelf and enter:
CONFIG SLOT

Figure 16.5-1 shows a typical switching shelf display.

Getting Started

(400)

16.5-1

16.5 Displaying Configuration Information


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 16.5-1: Switching Shelf Display

3645 MainStreet
#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
CTL
CLK

C117-H1-00

Configured

Toronto:SWA

Installed

SC
SC
Empty
Empty
Empty
Empty
Empty
Empty

Status

SC
SC
Empty
Empty
Empty
Empty
Empty
Empty

Control
Clock

Alarms:1
Name

Ok
Ok
Empty
Empty
Empty
Empty
Empty
Empty

Control
Clock

11-May-1997

8:35a

Options
DOUBLE_BW PS NODE 1
DOUBLE_BW PS NODE 2

Ok
Ok

CONFIG SLOT "??"


Enter Slot Number
F1F6-SHOW_SLOTS

F2F7-

F3-CONFIG_ALL
F8-CANCEL

F4F9-QUIT

F5F10-

To display the locally controlled, enhanced locally controlled, peripheral shelf


or DS-3 or E3 card summary
Select the shelf or card, and enter:
CONFIG SLOT SHOW_SLOTS

Figure 16.5-2 shows the display for a typical configuration. Table 16.5-1 lists and
describes the fields on this display.

16.5-2

(400)

Getting Started

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

16.5 Displaying Configuration Information


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 16.5-2: Summary Display for a Typical Configuration


3645 MainStreet
#

D117-H1-00

Configured

A1
A5
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
CTL
GFC

Toronto:P3A

Alarms:1

11-May-1997

8:35a

Installed

Stat

Configured

Installed

Stat

LGS Mu-Law
X.21_DCC 6
E+M Mu-Law
E+M A-Law
LGE Mu-Law
LGE A-Law
E1
DSP

LGS Mu-Law
X.21_DCC 6
E+M Mu-Law
E+M A-Law
E1
E1
DSP

Ok
Ok
Ok
OK
Prob
Prob
OOS
Ok

B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
B8

LGS A-Law
RS-232 DCC
-

X.21 DCC 4
X.21 DCC 6
-

Prob
Prob
Prob
Prob
-

Control
GFC

Control
GFC

Ok
Ok

CONFIG SLOT "??"

F1-SHOW_A
F6-SHOW_SLOTS

F2-SHOW_B
F7-

F3-CONFIG_ALL
F8-CANCEL

F4F9-QUIT

F5F10-PROCEED

Table 16.5-1: Heading Information for Summary Display


Heading

Getting Started

Indicates

Displays the slot identifier (CTL indicates a Control card, EXP indicates an Expander
card and GFC indicates a General Facilities card).

Configured

The type of card for which the slot has been configured through a node manager.

Installed

The type of the card that has been physically installed in the slot.

Status

The status of the card as:


OK: The installed card matches the configured card and no other problems are
apparent.
OOS: The primary rate link for the card is out of service.
: The slot is empty.
Prob: There is a problem with the card. Enter SHOW_A or SHOW_B to display more
detailed problem information.

(400)

16.5-3

16.5 Displaying Configuration Information


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To display a detailed summary of a locally controlled, enhanced locally


controlled or peripheral shelf
Both SHOW_A and SHOW_B appear in the enhanced locally controlled shelf and in
locally controlled or peripheral shelves with dual-shelf configurations. Only the
SHOW_A option appears in locally controlled or peripheral shelves with
single-shelf configurations.
CONFIG SLOT

SHOW_A

SHOW_B
SK000005

Figure 16.5-3 shows a sample display for SHOW_A on a peripheral shelf.


Figure 16.5-3: SHOW_A Display
3645 MainStreet
#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
CTL
SI
GFC

D117-H1-00

Configured
LGS Mu-Law
X.21_DCC 4
E+M Mu-Law
E+M A-Law
LGE Mu-Law
LGE A-Law
E1
DSP

Installed
Empty
X.21_DCC 4
Empty
T1
Empty
Empty
E1
DSP

Control
SI
GFC

Control
SI
GFC

Toronto:P3A

Alarms:1

11-May-1997

Status
Name
Empty
Ok
Empty
Wrong Card
Empty
Empty
Wrong Module
Ok

8:35a

Options

2-WIRE TYPE-I
2-WIRE TYPE-V

CAS

Ok
Ok
Ok

CONFIG SLOT "??"

F1-SHOW_A
F6-SHOW_SLOTS

F2-SHOW_B
F7-

F3-CONFIG_ALL
F8-CANCEL

F4F9-QUIT

F5F10-

Table 16.5-2 lists and describes the fields on this display.

16.5-4

(400)

Getting Started

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

16.5 Displaying Configuration Information


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 16.5-2: SHOW_A Display Information


Heading

Indicates

Displays the slot identifier.

Configured

The type of card for which the slot has been configured.

Installed

The type of card installed in the slot.

Status

The status of the card as:


OK: Installed card is fault-free and matches the slot configuration.
OOS: The primary rate link for the card is out of service.
Empty: The slot is empty.
Wrong Card: The type of card installed in the slot does not match the type of card for
which the slot was configured.
Wrong F/W: A Test module is installed on a Test card that has not been upgraded.
Wrong Module: The type of module on the card does not match the type of module that
was configured.(1)
Fault On Card / Card Dead: A fault has occurred. Check the alarm queue (see
Maintenance, chapter 35.3, for details). If the problem persists, contact your Newbridge
representative.
Bad Card ID: The card is not recognized by the system. If this message appears, contact
your Newbridge representative.
Config Prob: The 3600+ MainStreet Control card cannot be used because the
Narrowband and Broadband Switching modules are configured but not installed on the
card.

Name

Displays the name assigned to the slot.

Options

Displays the configured slot options.

Notes
1. Not applicable to the Bank-B Memory module.

16.5.2

Displaying Card Information


As shown in Figures 16.5-4 and 16.5-5, you can display card information for
switching, peripheral, locally controlled and enhanced locally controlled shelf card
slots and for DS-3 and E3 cards. This information is useful when you are describing
your system to Newbridge technical support staff. For control-redundant systems,
the system demerits value for both shelves (1 and 2, or A and B) appear with the
Control card information.

To display the Switching card summary


Select the switching shelf, and enter:
MAINT ON_SLOT <n>
where n is the slot identifier of the Switching card you want to display

Getting Started

(400)

16.5-5

16.5 Displaying Configuration Information


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 16.5-4 shows a typical card information display. This display also describes
the status of the peripheral shelf connected to the specified Switching card.
Figure 16.5-4: Switching Card Information Display
3645 MainStreet

C117-H1-00

Card Type: SC
Card ID: $2
Card Variant ID:
Slot Status: OK
Peripheral Stat:
Configured Node:
Installed Type:
SI Cables: 1A:
1B:
2A:
2B:

F1F6-

$0

Toronto:SWA

Alarms:1

11-May-1997

8:35a

Module Type: DOUBLE_BW


Module ID: $0
Module Variant ID: $0

Peripheral In Service
1
Installed Node: 1
Peripheral Shelf
OK (Active)
Fault
---------------------

F2F7-MORE

F3F8-CANCEL

F4F9-QUIT

F5F10-

To display a locally controlled, peripheral, DS-3 or E3 card summary


Select the shelf or card, and enter:
MAINT ON_SLOT

<n>

<CTL>

<EXP>

<GFC>
SK000006

Figure 16.5-5 shows a typical card information display.

16.5-6

(400)

Getting Started

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

16.5 Displaying Configuration Information


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 16.5-5: Card Information Display


3645 MainStreet

Card
Card
Card
Slot

D117-H1-00

Type
ID
Variant ID
Status

:
:
:
:

Empty
None
None
Empty

Toronto:P3A

Alarms:1

Module Type
Module ID
Module Variant ID

:
:
:

11-May-1997

8:35a

None
None
None

MAINT ON_SLOT 1-4A

F1F6-

F2F7-

F3F8-CANCEL

F4F9-QUIT

F5F10-

To display summary information for an enhanced locally controlled shelf


MAINT ON_SLOT

<n>

<CTL>

<TIM>
SK000910

Figure 16.5-6 shows a 3600+ MainStreet Control card information display.

Getting Started

(400)

16.5-7

16.5 Displaying Configuration Information


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 16.5-6: 3600+ MainStreet Control Card Information Display


3600+ MainStreet

S1117-H1-00

Card Type
: Control
Card ID
: $1
Card Variant ID : $0
Active Bank
: A
Slot Status
: Ok
NarrowBand Module Status
BroadBand Module Status
Memory Module Status

Toronto:A

Alarms:1

Card Revision
Card Serial No.
Card Part No.

11-May-1997

8:35a

: 01
: 123456
: 90-0001-01-00-0000

: Ok
: Ok
: Ok

MAINT ON_SLOT CTL

1-SW_GENERIC
6-RESET_CARD

2-NBAND_MOD
7-

3-BBAND_MOD
8-CANCEL

4-MEMORY_MOD
9-QUIT

50-

DIAG_INFO

For a description of the fields in this display, see Maintenance, chapter 33.3.

To display Control card module information for an enhanced locally controlled


shelf
MAINT ON_SLOT <CTL>

NBAND_MOD

BBAND_MOD

MEMORY_MOD
SK000909

Figure 16.5-7 shows a 3600+ MainStreet Control card module information display
for the Narrowband module. The displays for the Broadband and the Bank-B
Memory modules are similar.

16.5-8

(400)

Getting Started

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

16.5 Displaying Configuration Information


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 16.5-7: Control Card Module Information Display


3600+ MainStreet

S1117-H1-00

NarrowBand Module
Module Type
Module ID
Module Variant ID
Module Revision
Module Serial No.
Module Part No.
Module Status

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

Toronto:A

Alarms:1

11-May-1997

8:35a

8k_X_8k_SW
$30
01
01
123456
90-0002-01-00-0000
Ok

MAINT ON_SLOT CTL NBAND_MOD

16-

27-

38-CANCEL

49-QUIT

50-

To display a circuit or connection summary


For locally controlled, enhanced locally controlled, switching or peripheral shelves,
DS-3 or E3 cards, enter:
CONFIG CONNECT <sn-cc> or <x-sn-cc> SHOW_GROUP/SHOW_CCT*

Note
To view circuit connection information for the enhanced locally controlled shelf, see
chapter 31.6.

Figure 16.5-8 shows a typical switching shelf display. If you have configured a
protecting connection, this display also appears.

Getting Started

(400)

16.5-9

16.5 Displaying Configuration Information


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 16.5-8: Switching Shelf Connection Display


3645 MainStreet
Circuit

C117-H1-00
Name

1-A4-01
1-A4-02

F1-SHOW_CCT
F6-PROTECTING

Toronto:SWA

Alarms:1

Type

Circuit

LGS_EC
LGS_EC

1-A7-13
1-A7-06

F2-DISCONNECT
F7-

F3-TO_CIRCUIT
F8-CANCEL

11-May-1997
Name

8:35a
Type
E1-LGE_EC
E1-LGE_EC

F4F9-QUIT

F5- PROT_BY
F10-

Figure 16.5-9 shows a typical peripheral shelf display. The circuits that are connected
appear with an asterisk. If you have configured a protecting connection, it also
appears.
Figure 16.5-9: Peripheral Shelf Connection Display

3645 MainStreet
Circuit

D117-H1-00
Name

1-A1-01

* = Active connect;

Toronto:P3A

Alarms:1

Type

Circuit

T1_SIG

3-A1-02

11-May-1997
Name

8:35a
Type

T1_SIG

! = Maintenance connect

CONFIG CONNECT A1-1

F1-SHOW_CCT
F6-PROTECTING

16.5-10

F2-DISCONNECT
F7-

F3-TO_CIRCUIT
F8-CANCEL

(400)

F4F9-QUIT

F5- PROT_BY
F10-

Getting Started

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

16.5 Displaying Configuration Information


Issue 1, November 1997

To display a channel unit summary


Select the locally controlled, enhanced locally controlled or peripheral shelf and
enter:
CONFIG SLOT <sn-cc> SHOW_UNITS

Getting Started

(400)

16.5-11

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17. Node Parameters

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.1

17.1 Circuit Connections


Issue 1, November 1997

Circuit Connections
This chapter introduces the types of connections and explains how to do general
circuit operations. It explains how to configure the following types of connections:

17.1.1

simple bidirectional
simple unidirectional
broadcast unidirectional
TS0 NU bit

Understanding Connections
This chapter gives you an overview of the types of connections and describes basic
types that apply to many different situations. Specialized connections are described
in other sections as part of a larger topic, such as CPSS messages, voice compression,
or subrate multiplexing.
You do circuit connections from a locally controlled or switching shelf during a Craft
Interface or NMTI session. With the exception of CPSS connections, if you try to
make a circuit connection from a peripheral shelf, a warning message appears.
Note
The 3645 MainStreet node supports NMTI circuit connection management. Prior to
Release 7.0, circuit connections could only be configured for 3645 MainStreet
systems through a Craft Interface session.

The two basic types of connections are:

bidirectional connections that provide two identical paths between source and

destination devices: data and signals pass back and forth between the source and
destination devices
unidirectional connections that provide a single path between a source and
destination device: data and signals pass in a single direction only (these
connections are available on PRI cards in 3645 MainStreet peripheral shelves)
Caution

DET cards in 3645 MainStreet peripheral shelves can be configured for


unidirectional or bidirectional operation. If the mode of operation is changed, any
existing cross-connections are lost and must be reconnected.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.1-1

17.1 Circuit Connections


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table 17.1-1 lists the most common types of connections.


Table 17.1-1: Connection Types
Connection Type

Chapter

Bidirectional
Simple

17.1

TS0 NU bit

17.1

Protecting (protection switching)

18.2

CPSS

17.6

Voice compression

23.3

Rate adaption and subrate multiplexing

23.6

Multidrop data bridges

23.7

Super-rate

20.15

Unidirectional

17.1.2

Simple

17.1

Broadcast

17.1

Super-rate

20.15

Configuring Basic Circuit Connections


The procedures in this chapter explain how to make basic circuit connections.
Table 17.1-2 lists the locations of the procedures.
Table 17.1-2: Circuit Configuration Procedures
Control
Card

DS-3
Card

E3
Card

E1
Card

Bidirectional connections

17.1.4

Broadcast unidirectional connections

17.1.6

Circuit copy

17.1.3

Circuit display

17.1.3

Circuit names

17.1.3

Range copy

17.1.3

TS0 cross-connections

17.1.7

Unidirectional connections

17.1.5

17.1-2

Section

Configuration Procedure

(400)

Node Parameters

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.1 Circuit Connections


Issue 1, November 1997

Note
Table 16.4-1 in chapter 16.4 explains the formats of the identifiers in the procedures.

17.1.3

Using General Circuit Operations


The general circuit operations are:

displaying connection or circuit information


naming circuits
copying circuit configuration
copying ranges

To display circuit configuration information


To display circuit configuration information from the locally controlled shelf,
peripheral shelf, DS-3 or DS-3 II card, or E3 card, you select SHOW_CCT or
SHOW_GROUP. SHOW_CCT is the default display. If you have configured a
protecting connection, it also appears. SHOW_GROUP displays a group of circuits
adjacent to the specified circuit.
CONFIG CONNECT <sn-cc> or <x-sn-cc> SHOW_GROUP/SHOW_CCT*

Figure 17.1-1 shows a display for a peripheral or locally controlled shelf.


Note
Prior to Release 7.0, 3645 MainStreet peripheral units displayed a generic switching
interface identifier (such as SI-0076) in place of the actual connected circuit.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.1-3

17.1 Circuit Connections


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 17.1-2 shows a display for a switching shelf. Table 17.1-3 lists and describes
the symbols on these displays.
Figure 17.1-1: CONFIG CONNECT Display (Peripheral Shelf)
3600 MainStreet
Circuit
2-A1-01

1117-H1-00

Name

Toronto:A

Type
T1_SIG

* = Active connect;

Alarms:1

Circuit
3-A1-02

Name

11-May-1997

8:35a

Type
T1_SIG

Conv

! = Maintenance connect

CONFIG CONNECT A2-1


F1-SHOW_CCT
F6-PROTECTING

F2F7-

F3-TO_CIRCUIT
F8-CANCEL

F4F9-QUIT

F5- PROT_BY
F10-

Figure 17.1-2: CONFIG CONNECT Display (Switching Shelf)


3645 MainStreet

Circuit
1-B8-A-22

C117-H1-00

17.1-4

Type
DE1_Sig

Alarms:1

Circuit
-> *6-A7-B-12
<B *3-B1-4
1-B8-A-23
DE1_Sig
--1-B8-A-24
DE1_NoSig
B> *2-A1-A-1
B> 6-A7-B-13
B> *4-B3-B-7
B> *3-B1-1
<- *4-B3-B-7
1-B8-A-25
DE1_Sig
-> *5-A2-A-11
<- *6-A7-B-12
1-B8-A-26
DE1_Sig
<- *6-A7-B-12
1-B8-A-27
DE1_Sig
*5-A2-A-12
* = Active connect; ! = Maintenance connect
CONFIG CONNECT 1-B8-A-22

F1-ONE_WAY_TO
F6-

Name

Toronto:SWA

F2-BROADCAST
F7-

F3-RMV_BCAST
F8-CANCEL

(400)

Name

11-May-1997

Type
DE1_Sig
64CO_Sig

8:35a

Conv

DE1_NoSig
DE1_NoSig
DE1_NoSig
64CO_NoSig
DE1_NoSig
DE1_Sig
DE1_Sig
DE1_Sig
DE1_Sig

F4-PREV_BCAST
F9-QUIT

F5-NEXT_BCAST
F10-

Node Parameters

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.1 Circuit Connections


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 17.1-3: CONFIG CONNECT Display Symbols


Symbol

Description

blank

There is no connection or it is a bidirectional connection.

>

The circuit listed to the right of the symbol is the destination circuit in a one-way
unidirectional connection.

<

The circuit listed to the right of the symbol is the source circuit in a one-way
unidirectional connection.

B>

The circuit listed to the right of the symbol is a destination circuit in a broadcast
unidirectional connection.

<B

The circuit listed to the right of the symbol is the source circuit in a broadcast
unidirectional connection.

The circuit is physically connected.

To name circuits
You can assign a name to any circuit in the locally controlled shelf, peripheral shelf,
DS-3 or DS-3 II card, or E3 card, using the NAME softkey. To delete a circuit name
without assigning another one, select NAME and press .

To copy circuit configuration


If you want to configure many circuits to be the same, you can configure one, then
copy its parameters (all but name and connection) to each other circuit in turn using
the COPY_TO softkey.
For circuits using transparent, HCM, DDS or X.50 rate adaption, use COPY_ADJ.
(COPY_ADJ varies in each case. See chapter 23.6 for rate adaption information.) Do
not use COPY_ADJ when you are configuring a multidrop data bridge.
For the DS-3 or DS-3 II and E3 cards, you can copy circuit parameters to more than
one other circuit in one operation, by specifying the first and last circuits of a range,
using the COPY_RANGE softkey.
CONFIG CIRCUIT <sn-cc>

NAME

COPY_TO

<name>

COPY_ADJ

<sn-cc>

COPY_RANGE
<sn-cc>
TO
<sn-cc>
SK000007

where
name is up to 8 alphanumeric characters (no spaces)
the first sn-cc is the source circuit identifier
the second sn-cc is the identifier of the destination circuit or the first circuit of the destination range
the third sn-cc is the last circuit of the destination range

Node Parameters

(400)

17.1-5

17.1 Circuit Connections


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Note
Do not use COPY_TO or COPY_ADJ if either circuit is connected.

17.1.4

Configuring Simple Bidirectional Connections


When no protection switching, voice compression or subrate multiplexing is
involved, do a simple bidirectional connection between primary rate circuits, voice
circuits or data circuits. Simple bidirectional connections provide two identical paths
between source and destination devices: one transmit path and one receive path.
Data and signalling (if applicable) pass back and forth between the source and
destination devices.
To connect circuits from the locally controlled or switching shelf, you select the
CONNECT softkey, enter the circuit identifier, then select TO_CIRCUIT and enter
the connecting circuit identifier. After you enter the circuit identifier, the connection
information for that circuit appears in the data area.
If the first circuit is already connected, a warning appears after you select
TO_CIRCUIT, but you can proceed. After you enter the identifier of the second
circuit, a warning appears if that circuit is already connected.
If one of the circuits in the connection is on a T1 or E1 card that has a CCM, two
softkeys appear: COMP_CONV and NO_CONV. These softkeys indicate whether or
not companding conversion should be done on that connection (the default is no
conversion or NO_CONV). The data area display indicates whether or not
companding conversion is being done for a connection by displaying Y for yes or
N for no under the heading Conv.
Select the DISCONNECT softkey. The DISCONNECT softkey appears only when
the first circuit is cross-connected to another circuit or the CPSS. Selecting
DISCONNECT breaks the existing connection without defining another one.
If the selected circuit has both a preferred and a protecting connection defined, the
softkeys PREFERRED and PROTECTION appear when you select DISCONNECT.

17.1-6

(400)

Node Parameters

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.1 Circuit Connections


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure simple bidirectional connections


CONFIG CONNECT <sn-cc > or <x-sn-cc>

DISCONNECT

TO_CIRCUIT
<sn-cc> or <x-sn-cc>

COMP_CONV

PREFERRED

PROTECTION

NO_CONV
SK000008

where
the first sn-cc or x-sn-cc is the source circuit identifier
the second sn-cc or x-sn-cc is the destination circuit identifier

17.1.5

Configuring Simple Unidirectional Connections


In 3645 MainStreet systems, cards that support simple unidirectional connections
provide a single path between a source and destination device: data and signalling
pass in one direction only. Simple unidirectional connections may be 64 kb/s or
super-rate (see chapter 20.15). Unidirectional connections cannot be protected.
A single circuit can be involved in two simple unidirectional connections at the same
time: as the source in one connection and as the destination in another. The circuit
configured as a source may be completely different from its configuration as a
destination, so one connection can be disconnected without affecting the other.
Note
You must configure the PRI card slot for unidirectional operation before you can
make unidirectional connections (see chapter 20.2). You do not need to configure the
card slot for unidirectional 64 kb/s Codirectional cards.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.1-7

17.1 Circuit Connections


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To configure simple unidirectional connections


CONFIG CONNECT <x-sn-cc> or <x-sn-l-cc>

MORE

DISCONNECT

ONE_WAY_TO
<x-sn-cc> or <x-sn-l-cc>
SK000009

where
the first x-sn-cc or x-sn-l-cc is the source circuit identifier
the second x-sn-cc or x-sn-l-cc is the destination circuit identifier

17.1.6

Configuring Broadcast Unidirectional Connections


In 3645 MainStreet systems, cards that support broadcast unidirectional connections
provide a single path between a source and one or more destination devices: data
and signals pass in a single direction only. A single broadcast source can be
connected to up to 250 destinations. The paths may be 64 kb/s or super-rate (see
chapter 20.15). Broadcast unidirectional connections cannot be protected.
A single circuit may be involved in a broadcast and a one-way unidirectional
connection at the same time: as source in one connection and as destination in the
other. The circuit configuration as a source may be completely different from its
configuration as a destination, so one connection can be disconnected without
affecting the other.
This means that one of the destination circuits in a broadcast connection can be
connected back to the source; it is treated as a completely separate connection.
Note
You must configure the DET card slot for unidirectional operation before you can
make unidirectional connections (see chapter 20.2). You do not need to configure the
card slot for unidirectional 64 kb/s Codirectional cards.

Select the BROADCAST softkey. After the first connection is made, the
ADD_BCAST softkey appears for further connections.
Select DISCONNECT and enter the source circuit identifier. To disconnect one of the
broadcast connections, select RMV_BCAST and enter the destination circuit
identifier.

17.1-8

(400)

Node Parameters

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.1 Circuit Connections


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure broadcast unidirectional connections


CONFIG CONNECT <x-sn-cc> or <x-sn-l-cc>

MORE

DISCONNECT

RMV_BCAST

BROADCAST/ADD_BCAST

<x-sn-cc> or <x-sn-l-cc>
SK000010

where
the first x-sn-cc or x-sn-l-cc is the source circuit identifier
the second x-sn-cc or sn-l-cc is the destination circuit identifier

17.1.7

Configuring TS0 Cross-connections


For Dual E1 cards (with a firmware ID of 40 or higher), TS0 can be cross-connected
to any aggregate or transparent data circuit. TS0 can only be cross-connected to
64 kb/s clear channels (channels in which all bits are available for use by user data).
Although TS0 occupies a full 64 kb/s, only NU bits 4 through 8 are transported
(reserved bits 1 through 3 are forced to zero). There are no circuit configuration
options for TS0; it can only be connected or disconnected. For more information on
NU bits, see chapter 20.18.

To configure TS0 cross-connections


The procedure for connecting TS0 is identical to any other connection process,
except that TS0 is the circuit identifier.
CONFIG CONNECT <sn-TS0> or <x-sn-TS0>

TO_CIRCUIT
<sn-cc> or <x-sn-cc>

DISCONNECT

SK000011

where
sn-TS0 or x-sn-TS0 is the TS0 circuit identifier
sn-cc or x-sn-cc is the destination circuit identifier

Node Parameters

(400)

17.1-9

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.2

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring Timing and


Synchronization
This chapter describes timing sources and the standalone, ANS and synchronization
status messaging methods for node synchronization. This chapter describes how to
configure:

17.2.1

standalone and ANS synchronization selection


ANS node parameters
ANS link parameters
timing source parameters

Understanding Timing and Synchronization


In a 3600+ MainStreet system, synchronization is done by the Timing card. External
sources of timing can be connected to the 3600+ MainStreet enhanced locally
controlled shelf through bulkhead connectors.
In all other 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth manager systems, synchronization is
done by the SSU or ISSU. In a locally controlled system, the SSU or ISSU resides on
the Control card. External sources of timing can be connected to the SSU or ISSU
through backplane connectors on the locally controlled shelves. In a switching shelf
controlled system, the SSU or ISSU resides on both the switching shelf Control card
and peripheral shelf. External sources of timing can be connected to the SSU or ISSU
through backplane connectors on the switching shelf or on any of the peripheral
shelves connected to it.
HSPSs do not support external timing connectors. Although a peripheral shelf may
be configured to pass timing signals derived from an external source to the
switching shelf, it is still the switching shelf that processes these signals and supplies
system timing to all peripheral shelves.

17.2.2

Timing sources
The Timing card, SSU or ISSU is driven by a timing source selected from the
programmable timing sources available to the system. Each programmable timing
source can be configured as either external or derived.
If configured as external, the synchronization source is an external device connected
to the backplane or bulkhead BNC or DB-type connectors. Only one external source
may be configured for each node, but a redundant external timing source may be
configured for each 3600+ MainStreet node.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.2-1

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

If configured as derived, the possible synchronization sources and number of


possible sources vary according to system type (see Table 17.2-1).
Table 17.2-1: 3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers Synchronization Sources
System Type

Shelf

Number of Possible
Synchronization
Sources

Possible Synchronization Sources

Locally controlled system

Locally controlled shelf

2B1Q channel unit,


64 kb/s Codirectional card,
BRI S/T card, DCC, E1 card, MPA
card, T1 card, X.21 PRI card, X.21 ESI
PRI card, V.35 PRI card

3600+ MainStreet system

Enhanced locally
controlled shelf

OC-3 card, STM-1 card,


64 kb/s Codirectional card,
2B1Q channel unit, BRI S/T card,
DCC, E1 card, MPA card, T1 card,
X.21 PRI card, X.21 ESI PRI card,
V.35 PRI card

Switching shelf controlled


system

Peripheral shelf
Switching shelf

4
8

2B1Q channel unit,


64 kb/s Codirectional card,
BRI S/T card, DCC, DS-3 card, E1
card, E3 card, MPA card, T1 card,
X.21 PRI card, X.21 ESI PRI card,
V.35 PRI card

A node can be configured to select the current source of synchronization based on a


hierarchy of preferred synchronization sources. For all 3600 MainStreet series
bandwidth managers, preferred synchronization sources can be predefined using a
class system method (class mode). For the 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager,
preferred synchronization sources can also be selected by the node using a quality
level method (status message mode).
In class mode, the node is assigned a class number (1 to 15 for a locally controlled
system, or 1 to 14 for a 3600+ MainStreet system or switching shelf in a switching
shelf controlled system). The source class is a measure of how desirable a source is:
the lower the class number, the more desirable the source.
In status message mode, a synchronization status message received by the
3600+ MainStreet node from the source defines the quality level of the source. The
current source of synchronization is selected based on the source offering the best
quality level.
In both class and status message mode, if two or more sources have the same class
number or quality level (respectively), the source with the highest priority is
selected. Priority is dictated by a source number assigned to the source (lower source
numbers have a higher priority).

Locally controlled shelf


You can build a table of up to four timing sources by configuring synchronization
parameters for the locally controlled shelf. Figure 17.2-1 shows an example of the
table.

17.2-2

(400)

Node Parameters

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 17.2-1: Locally Controlled Shelf Timing Source Display


3600 MainStreet

1117-H1-00

Toronto:A

ANS:DISABLED

Alarms:1

Number

Zone ID:1

1
2
3
4

Source

Recovery

Slot A7
Slot A3
External
Slot B5

Auto
Auto
30 sec
Auto

11-May-1997

Node Class:10

Class

Current Class:1

Threshold

2
1
5
15

8:35a

Status

5
5
5
5

Ready
Current
Ready
Ready

Current source of synchronization is number 2 (A3)


External Clock Frequency: Input = 8kHz
CONFIG SYNCH
1-SRC_NUMBER
6-ANS_NODE

2-MAINT
7-

3-ANS_LINK
8-CANCEL

4-NODE_CLASS
9-QUIT

5-EXT_FREQ
0-

3600+ MainStreet enhanced locally controlled shelf


You can build a table of up to four timing sources by configuring synchronization
parameters for the enhanced locally controlled shelf. Figure 17.2-2 shows an
example of the table in status message mode.
Figure 17.2-2: Enhanced Locally Controlled Shelf Timing Source Display Status
Message Mode
3600+ MainStreet
ANS:DISABLED
Number
1
2
3
4

S1117-H1-00

Zone ID:1

Toronto:A

Alarms:1

11-May-1997

Node Class:14

Node Class:14
Threshold

Source

Recovery

Message

External-A
Slot H1
Slot H2
Slot A1-1

Manual
Manual
Manual
Manual

PRS (1)
ST2 (3)
Disabled (2)
--- (2)

5
5
5
5

8:35a

Current Class:5
Status
Current
Ready
Monitoring
Not Ready (AIS)

Current source of synchronization is number 1 (External-A)


Quality level threshold is ST3
CONFIG SYNCH
1-SRC_NUMBER
6-ANS_NODE

Node Parameters

2-MAINT
7-MORE

3-ANS_LINK
8-CANCEL

(400)

4-NODE_CLASS
9-QUIT

5-EXTERNAL
0-

17.2-3

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Peripheral shelf
For each peripheral shelf, you can build a table of up to four timing sources.
Figure 17.2-3 shows an example for a peripheral shelf.
Figure 17.2-3: Peripheral Shelf Timing Source Display
3645 MainStreet
Number
1
2
3
4

D117-H1-00

Toronto:P3A

Source

Status

Slot A7
Slot A3
External
Slot B5

Ready
Current
Ready
Ready

External Clock Frequency:

Alarms:1

11-May-1997

8:35a

Input = 8kHz

CONFIG SYNCH

1-SRC_NUMBER
6-

27-

38-CANCEL

49-QUIT

5-EXT_FREQ
10-

Switching shelf
For the switching shelf, you can build a table of up to eight timing sources selected
from any of the timing sources provided by the peripheral shelves. Figure 17.2-4
shows an example of the table.

17.2-4

(400)

Node Parameters

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 17.2-4: Switching Shelf Timing Source Display


3645 MainStreet

C117-H1-00

ANS:DISABLED
Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Toronto:SWA
Zone ID:1

Source

Recovery

PS3-1,A7
PS2-2,A3
PS4-4,A1
PS6-1,A2
PS3-2,A7
PS2-4,A3
PS4-2,A1
PS6-3,A2

Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto
Auto

Alarms:1

11-May-1997

Node Class:10
Class
5
2
5
5
5
2
5
5

8:35a

Current Class:2

Threshold
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5

Status
Ready
Current
Ready
Ready
Ready
Ready
Ready
Ready

Current Source of Synchronization number 2 (PS2-2,A3)


External Clock Frequency: Input = 8kHz Output = 8kHz
CONFIG SYNCH
1-SRC_NUMBER
6-ANS_NODE

17.2.3

2-MAINT
7-

3-ANS_LINK
8-CANCEL

4-NODE_CLASS
9-QUIT

5-EXT_FREQ
10-

Synchronization methods
For all 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth manager systems, the programmable
timing source that drives the Timing card, SSU or ISSU can be chosen using one of
two methods: standalone synchronization or ANS.

Standalone
Normally, standalone synchronization is used when a node is used in a single-ended
or point-to-point application. When operating in standalone mode, the node uses
only those timing sources that have been configured at that node.
On all 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth manager systems, preferred standalone
synchronization sources are defined using the class method. For the
3600+ MainStreet system, preferred standalone synchronization sources are defined
using either the class or synchronization status messaging method.
Synchronization status messages are used to determine the current synchronization
source when status message mode is enabled. The timing source offering the best
quality, as indicated by its status message, is selected to be the current source.
Status messages are defined for SONET and SDH interfaces and for external timing
input and output DS1 signals in ESF format. Table 17.2-2 lists the status messages
and their SONET, SDH and DS1 descriptions.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.2-5

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table 17.2-2: Synchronization Status Messages


Status Message

Quality Level

SONET Description

SDH Description

DS1 Description

PRS

Primary reference source


is traceable

Primary reference source


traceable (as defined in
ITU-T G.811)

Primary reference source


traceable

STU

Synchronized
traceability unknown

Synchronized
traceability unknown

Synchronized
traceability unknown

ST2

Traceable Stratum 2
holdover

Traceable to SDH
synchronization unit (as
defined in ITU-T G.812T)

Traceable Stratum 2
holdover

ST3

Traceable Stratum 3
holdover

Traceable to SDH
element clock (as defined
in ITU-T G.812L)

Traceable Stratum 3
holdover

SIC

Traceable SONET clock


self-timed

Traceable to synchronous
equipment timing source
(as defined in ITU-T
G.81s (1))

Traceable SONET clock


self-timed

ST4

DUS

Do not use for


synchronization

Do not use for


synchronization

Traceable Stratum 4
free run
Do not use for
synchronization

A source is initially defined as having a quality level of STU until a valid


synchronization status message is received. This means sources that do not support
or are not enabled for status message reception always have a quality level of STU.
Sources having a current quality level below a configured quality threshold are
treated as unavailable and are not used for synchronization. For example, a source
with a quality level of DUS cannot become the current synchronization source for
the node.
The default value for the quality level threshold is ST3, and the range of valid
messages is PRS to ST3. The Timing card internal Stratum 3 clock has a quality level
of ST3 and is always available regardless of the quality level threshold. The quality
level threshold cannot be set to SIC, ST4 or DUS because the Timing card internal
Stratum 3 clock would be selected as the current source before any source having
these quality levels.
If both ANS and status message modes are used for 3600+ MainStreet node
synchronization, there is no direct method to compare class and quality levels, so a
translation table is used to select the best source of timing. The translation table is
configurable through NMTI. Table 17.2-3 lists the default values for the translation
table.

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 17.2-3: Translation Table Default Values


Quality Level

Status Message

Class

PRS

STU

ST2

11

ST3

14

SIC

ST4

DUS

As an example, assume the best standalone synchronization source has a quality


level of PRS and the best ANS source has a class rating of 3. Using the default values
listed in Table 17.2-3, PRS maps to class 5, so the selected source of synchronization
would be the ANS source that has a class 3 rating.
For definitions of the status messages listed in Table 17.2-3, see Table 17.2-2.

ANS
ANS is used to give each node access to all timing sources in the network. This lets
all nodes receive timing signals from the same source to ensure that network
synchronization is maintained.
ANS uses CPSS to transport synchronization information between ANS nodes
(CPSS is described in chapter 17.6). ANS works with CPSSv1 or CPSSv2, but is not
tied to the topology of the CPSS network. Changes in the CPSS network are
transparent to the ANS network. When the CPSS network heals itself after the failure
of a CPSS link, there is no change in synchronization sources unless the failure
affected the ANS topology.
With ANS you can configure any valid link as an ANS link regardless of the link
CPSS configuration. A valid ANS link may carry no CPSS channels, one CPSS
channel, or more than one CPSS channel.
In a system running CPSSv2, ANS takes advantage of the improved CPSS packet
transmission services that operate at the network layer. These services include better
error detection, larger packets (for higher throughput) and a new datagram service
(for better performance).
ANS nodes can be organized into independently synchronized groups, called zones,
explicitly identified by a zone identifier.
Note
The communication of ANS messages from one zone to another is not supported.

Node Parameters

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ANS links
ANS links are configured between ANS nodes that are one hop away from each
other (a hop is a point-to-point link, free of intermediate nodes, between two pieces
of network equipment).
The node at the far end of an ANS link is called an adjacent node. Each ANS link is
configured with the node number of the adjacent node. Each adjacent node
represents a potential source of synchronization.
Note
If the far end of an ANS link terminates on a switching shelf controlled system, the
adjacent node is always taken to be the switching shelf, even though the link
terminates on a peripheral shelf.
The path used to communicate with an adjacent node is determined by the CPSS
network and does not actually have to be on an ANS link. However, ANS protocol
operation is always based on the ANS network topology, so that hop counts are ANS
links and not CPSS links.

ANS nodes exchange ANS Update Messages to learn about the existence of all
potential timing sources in the network and automatically generate a map of these
timing sources. Whenever a configuration change occurs (for example, if a new node
is brought online or a timing source is reconfigured), the map is updated.
The best source of synchronization in the networkthe one with the lowest class
numberis identified as the ANS master.
Every ANS node derives synchronization from the ANS master through the
least-hop path to the ANS master. The adjacent node that constitutes the first hop
towards the ANS master is called the ANS source of the node. Every adjacent node
is not necessarily an ANS source. An adjacent node is only an ANS source when it
actively provides synchronization to a given node.
Figure 17.2-5 shows an example ANS network with Node C as a stand-alone feeder
node and Node Y as the current ANS master. Node X has two ANS links: link 1-1 to
Node A and link 2-1 to Node B. Link 3-1 is a non-ANS link to feeder Node C, which
uses stand-alone synchronization.
Nodes A and B are adjacent nodes to Node X because they are each at the far end of
a link one hop away. The path to the ANS master through Node A offers a four-hop
path to Node Y and the path through Node B offers a two-hop path. Because Node
B offers the fewer number of hops to the ANS master, Node B is the current ANS
source to Node X and it actively provides synchronization from Node Y to Node X.
Node A is only a potential source of synchronization.

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 17.2-5: Example of an ANS Network


Adjacent
node

1-1

C
3-1

2-1

X
Stand-alone
feeder node

ANS master
Adjacent node
and ANS source
5446

Bidirectional and unidirectional ANS links


The adjacent node must be specifically identified during configuration. A link is
unidirectional when the adjacent node at only one end of the link is specified.
Bidirectional links must be configured from both nodes. Unidirectional and
bidirectional links affect only the direction of synchronization; they do not affect
normal communications between nodes.
In the example network in Figure 17.2-5, there are three possible configurations if
you are logged onto Node X.

If the ANS link between Node X and Node B is configured only from Node X

(Node X identifies Node B as its adjacent node but Node B does not identify
Node X as its adjacent node), the link is unidirectional from Node B to Node X.
Synchronization is always incoming to Node X from Node B.
If the ANS link between Node X and Node B is configured only from Node B
(Node B identifies Node X as its adjacent node), the link is unidirectional from
Node X to Node B. Synchronization is always outgoing to Node B from Node X.
If the ANS link between Node X and Node B is configured from both Node B and
Node X (both nodes identify the other node as adjacent), the link is bidirectional.
Synchronization may be incoming from Node B or it may be outgoing to Node B
from Node X.

Whether an ANS link is unidirectional or bidirectional affects how the ANS network
topology stabilizes. For example, in Figure 17.2-5, if ANS link 2-1 is configured as
unidirectional from Node X to Node B, Node X cannot use Node B as its ANS
source. In this case, the ANS master cannot be reached from Node X through Node B
and Node X must use Node A as its ANS source.
More than one ANS master may be active at the same time. For example, if the
lowest-class number is shared by a number of sources, an ANS node selects the ANS
master that is the fewest number of hops away from it.

Node Parameters

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If an ANS node can reach an ANS master by more than one equal cost path, the node
chooses the path offered by the adjacent node with the lowest CPSS node address.
If the ANS network changes, the ANS network topology adapts to the change and
restabilizes. For example, if a better timing source becomes available or the existing
ANS master fails, a new ANS master is selected and, if necessary, ANS nodes choose
new ANS sources to reach the new ANS master.
ANS zones
Within a network it may be desirable or necessary to define zones that have
independent timing hierarchies. For example, a network that links North America to
Europe would require a North American zone and a European zone to
accommodate the differences between the two timing reference standards.
Figure 17.2-6 shows a network divided into two zones, 1 and 2. Zone 1 could be the
North American zone and Zone 2 the European zone.
Figure 17.2-6: ANS Zones

Node
I
Node
A
Node
C

Intra-zone
links

Node
H

Node
E
Intra-zone
links

Node
D

Inter-zone
link

Node
B

Node
F

Intra-zone
links

Node
J

Zone 2

Node
G

Zone 1
4447

You create zones by assigning zone identifiers to ANS nodes. All ANS nodes with
the same zone identifier belong to the same zone. ANS messages are exchanged only
on intra-zone links between nodes with like zone identifiers. ANS links cannot be
configured on inter-zone links between nodes in different zones.
Note
With CPSSv2, all nodes in a zone must be contained in a single CPSSv2 domain; an
ANS zone cannot span more than one CPSSv2 domain.

In each ANS zone, an ANS master is selected to be the current source of


synchronization for all ANS nodes within that zone. A change in the
synchronization network in one zone is transparent to all other zones.

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


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Note
The node at the far end of an ANS link (an adjacent node) cannot be a stand-alone
synchronized node. This means a feeder node such as the 3612, 3620, 3624, 3630 and
8230 MainStreet nodes or FRS cannot be an adjacent node. A stand-alone
synchronized node can be connected to an ANS node, but not through an ANS link
(see Node C, Figure 17.2-5).

17.2.4

Configuring Timing and Synchronization


You use the procedures in this chapter to configure:

ANS node parameters


ANS links
timing sources
synchronization status messaging

Table 17.2-4 lists the ANS and timing source configuration parameters. Each
parameter has a list of options; default options are marked by an asterisk.
Note
Before configuring ANS, make sure that you have configured the CPSS node
parameters, including the CPSS node number (see chapter 17.6).

Table 17.2-4: Timing and Synchronization Configuration Parameters and Options


3600+
Control
Card

Control
Card

DS-3 and
E3 Card

Parameter

Options

ANS

ANS enable/disable

enabled
disabled*

Enabling or disabling ANS on a link

enabled
disabled

ANS zones

1 to 255

Link failure threshold

0 to 10 (* = 5)

Link failure recovery time

1 to 255 (* = 30)

SSU failure threshold

1 to 5 (* = 1)

SSU failure recovery time

1 to 255 (* = 15)

Node Parameters

(400)

17.2-11

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

3600+
Control
Card

Control
Card

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

DS-3 and
E3 Card

Parameter

Options

Derived and external timing sources

external
derived

Standalone Timing Source

Timing source selection

external
derived
undefined

Timing source enable/disable

enabled
disabled*

Timing source selection

selected
deselected*

Node class number

1 to 14 for enhanced locally


controlled and switching shelves
1 to 15 for a locally controlled shelf

Source failure recovery method

auto
30 s
1 min
10 min
30 min
manual

Source failure threshold

0 to 30 (* = 5)
unlimited

Timing source class number

1 to 14 for enhanced locally


controlled and switching shelves
1 to 15 for a locally controlled shelf

External timing input

8 kHz
2 MHz
1.544 MHz
composite clock

External timing output

8 kHz
2 MHz
1.544 MHz
no clock

Table 17.2-5 lists the locations of the ANS and timing source configuration
procedures.
Table 17.2-5: Timing and Synchronization Configuration Procedures
Configuration Procedure

17.2-12

Section

ANS links display

17.2.6

Timing source identification

17.2.7

Timing source display

17.2.7

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

Note
Table 16.4-1 in chapter 16.4 explains the formats of the identifiers in the procedures.

17.2.5

Configuring ANS Node Parameters


At the node level, you can:

configure the zone


enable or disable ANS
Configuring the zone
ANS nodes are organized into groups called zones. Each zone is independently
synchronized. The zone identifier (ZONE_ID_#) is used to identify the ANS zone to
which this node belongs. Each zone can contain up to 50 ANS nodes. Each locally
controlled shelf and switching shelf is counted as one node.
Note
You cannot change the zone identifier while ANS is enabled on the node. If ANS is
enabled, you must disable it before you change the zone identifier.
The communication of ANS messages from one zone to another is not supported.

To configure the zone identifier, see the procedure To enable and disable ANS on
node.

To enable and disable ANS on a node


After you have completed the link and source configuration and configured ANS
node parameters, you can enable a node for ANS operation. Disabling the ANS
option returns a node to stand-alone synchronization.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.2-13

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


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Note
When you change the method of synchronization for a node, its timing sources
remain as configured. They are not reset to default values.

CONFIG SYNCH ANS_NODE

ENABLE/DISABLE*

ZONE_ID_#
<number>
SK000012

where number is 1 to 255

17.2.6

Configuring ANS Link Parameters


You can configure an ANS link only on a slot or link that is not configured for
stand-alone synchronization. At the link level, you can:

display all the links currently enabled for ANS on an ANS node
enable or disable ANS on the link and identify the adjacent node
configure the link failure threshold and recovery time
configure the Timing card or SSU failure threshold and recovery time
Note

While a slot or link is configured for ANS:

you cannot configure the slot or link as a stand-alone


you cannot change the type configuration of the slot or link
you cannot change the device gender mode of a PRI link
For ANS link configuration, use the Craft Interface for pre-Release 6.1. For
Release 6.1 and newer releases of software, use the NMTI.

To display ANS links


CONFIG SYNCH ANS_LINK

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 17.2-7 shows a sample ANS link display. If there are more ANS links
configured than fit on one screen, use the PREV_PAGE and NEXT_PAGE softkeys
to scroll through the list.
Figure 17.2-7: ANS Links Display
3645 MainStreet
ANS
Link
1-A1-A
1-A1-B
1-B2
1-A2
1-A3
1-A8-A
1-A8-B
2-A1-A
3-A1-B
4-B2
5-A2
6-A1-A
7-A1-B
8-B2

CARD
Type
DUAL_T1
DUAL_T1
DUAL_T1
T1
V35_PRI
DUAL_T1
DUAL_T1
DUAL_T1
DUAL_T1
T1
DUAL_T1
DUAL_T1
DUAL_T1
DUAL_T1

D117-H1-00

Toronto:P3A

CPSS
Far End Node
2
2
3
5
32
34
31
20
59
21
24
25
62
87

Alarms:1

11-May-1997

Link Failure
Threshold
Time (min)
5
30
5
30
5
30
5
30
5
30
5
30
5
30
5
30
5
30
5
30
5
30
5
30
5
30
5
30

8:35a

SSU Failure
Threshold Time (min)
1
60
1
60
1
60
1
60
1
60
1
60
1
60
1
60
1
60
1
60
1
60
1
60
1
60
1
60

CONFIG SYNCH ANS_LINK "??-??"


Enter a Slot Number.
1-PREV_PAGE
6-

2- NEXT_PAGE
7-

38-CANCEL

49-QUIT

50-

Enabling and disabling ANS on a link


Each enhanced locally controlled, locally controlled or peripheral shelf supports up
to 32 ANS links and can be connected to up to 30 adjacent nodes. A switching shelf
controlled system with 8 peripheral shelves supports 256 ANS links. Parallel ANS
links to the same adjacent node are recommended when possible.
You can configure the following links as ANS links:

Single and Dual T1 and DS-3 or DS-3 II links (on a DS1 basis)
Single and Dual E1 and E3 links (on an E1 basis)
V.35 PRI (DTE)
X.21 PRI (DTE)
MPA card link (DTE)
OC-3 and STM-1 card links (the card must be installed in the active HSA subslot)

When ANS is enabled on a link, ANS is no longer configured on CPSS circuits.


Instead, you must identify the links that can be considered as candidates for use as
synchronization sources.

Node Parameters

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17.2-15

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


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Note
ANS cannot be configured on an MPA card link configured as DCE on an X.21 PRI
or a V.35 PRI link.

To enable ANS on a link, you select ANS_LINK and enter a link identifier. The
system displays FAR_END on the command line and prompts for the CPSS address
of the adjacent node at the far end of the link. To disable a link, you enter the link
identifier and select DISABLE.
Note
You cannot use the default node number (1022) or the CPSS address of a peripheral
shelf to identify an adjacent node. If the adjacent node is a peripheral shelf, enter the
CPSS address of its switching shelf.

To enable and disable ANS on a link, see the procedure To configure ANS links.

Link failure threshold


The link failure threshold is the number of times in an hour an ANS link is allowed
to fail. If the link fails more than this number of times, the link is declared unreliable
and is taken out of service as a potential source of synchronization for the node (the
link continues to carry regular user data). An ANS Link Unreliable alarm is
generated.
You can select LINK_RECOV and FAIL_THRES, and define link failure threshold in
the range 0 to 10, or UNLIMITED. When you select UNLIMITED, the link is never
declared unreliable, regardless of the number of failures each hour.
To configure the link failure threshold, see the procedure To configure ANS links.

Link failure recovery time


The link failure recovery time is the number of minutes an out-of-service ANS link
exhibits a failure rate less than the failure threshold before the link returns to service.
You can select LINK_RECOV and FAIL_TIMED, and define link failure recovery
time in the range 1 to 255 minutes or INFINITY. When you select INFINITY, the link
remains out-of-service until manually recovered.
To configure the link failure recovery time, see the procedure To configure ANS
links.

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

SSU failure threshold


The SSU failure threshold is the number of times the Timing card or SSU is allowed
to fail to acquire or maintain lock on the ANS link (for example, because of excessive
jitter or a momentary loss of signal). If the Timing card or SSU fails to synchronize
to the link more than this number of times, the link is declared unreliable and is
taken out-of-service as a potential source of synchronization for the node (the link
continues to carry regular user data).
You can select SSU_RECOV and FAIL_THRES, and define the SSU failure threshold
in the range 1 to 5.
To configure the SSU failure threshold, see the procedure To configure ANS links.

SSU failure recovery time


The SSU failure recovery time is the number of minutes an ANS link remains
out-of-service after exceeding the SSU failure threshold. You can select SSU_RECOV
and FAIL_TIMED, and define SSU failure recovery time in the range 1 to 255
minutes, or INFINITY. When INFINITY is selected, the link remains out-of-service
until manually recovered.
Note
SSU failure parameters apply only when the link is the current source of
synchronization for the node.

To configure the SSU failure recovery time, see the procedure To configure ANS
links.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.2-17

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To configure ANS links


CONFIG SYNCH ANS_LINK <link_id>

<far-end_node>

DISABLE/ENABLE

LINK_RECOV

FAIL_THRES

<threshold>

UNLIMITED

SSU_RECOV

FAIL_TIMED

<time>

INFINITY
SK000013

where
link_id is the slot or link identifier
far-end_node is the CPSS address (1 to 999) of the adjacent node at the far end of this link
threshold is the number of times (0 to 10) the link can fail each hour (5*), or the number of times the SSU
can fail (1*)
time is the number of minutes (1 to 255) the out-of-service link must show a failure rate less than the failure
threshold before the link is returned to service (30*), or the number of minutes (1 to 255) the link remains
out-of-service after exceeding the SSU failure threshold (15*)

Note
The UNLIMITED option applies only to the LINK_RECOV parameter.

17.2.7

Configuring Timing Sources


On a locally controlled or enhanced locally controlled shelf, you can program up to
four timing sources. On each peripheral shelf, you can program up to four timing
sources for use by the switching shelf. On a switching shelf, you can program up to
eight timing sources from among the peripheral shelves.
You can configure each programmable timing source as:

external
derived

17.2-18

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


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Programmable external sources


When a programmable timing source is configured as external, it can obtain a clock
from the following backplane or bulkhead connectors.

For a peripheral shelf, switching shelf, or a locally controlled shelf, a 2.048 MHz

or an 8 kHz timing source can be connected to BNC connector J13 on the


equipment backplane.
For a peripheral shelf or a locally controlled shelf, a 1.544 MHz AMI or DDS
composite clock timing source can be connected to DB15 connector J17 on the
equipment backplane. These signals can be used only if a GFC2 or GFC3 is
installed.
For a 3600+ MainStreet enhanced locally controlled shelf, a 2.048 MHz or an
8 kHz NRZ timing source can be connected to BNC connectors RXA and RXB on
the shelf bulkhead. A DS1 or composite clock timing source can be connected to
the 120 W I/O DB-25 connector on the shelf bulkhead. The 3600+ MainStreet shelf
has redundant input ports (A and B) for each timing source type.

For 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers, you can configure only one source
as external (EXTERNAL) for each node. For 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Managers,
you can configure two sources as external (EXT_PORT_A and EXT_PORT_B) for
each node. External sources may be an input to the node or an output from the node.
For more information about external timing inputs and outputs, see Installation, Task
1500: Connecting External Timing Sources and Receivers.

Programmable derived sources


When you configure a programmable timing source as derived, it can obtain a clock
from any primary rate link or synchronous data circuit (see Table 17.2-1). You can
configure any of the programmable timing sources on a node as derived.

Internal source
In addition to the programmable timing sources, the node has an internal crystal
oscillator that supplies a 2.048 MHz 25 ppm timing signal. Typically, the internal
source class is assigned the highest class number so the node can synchronize to it
only under two conditions:

when all programmable timing sources or ANS links fail


when the current source is lost (in this case, the node switches to holdover
operation and searches for an alternate source)
When synchronized to the internal source, the timing is said to be free-running or in
holdover. Only this default timing source may be internal; none of the
programmable timing sources may be configured as internal.

Identifying a timing source


Source numbers (1 to 4 on an enhanced locally controlled, locally controlled or
peripheral shelf and 1 to 8 on a switching shelf) are used to identify preferred
synchronization sources in the event that sources have the same class or quality
level.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.2-19

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Note
Using the timing source as a reference, the SSU creates a 2.048 MHz clock that
conforms to ITU-T recommendation G.703. This clock is available at J14 on the
equipment backplane.

For timing sources, you can:

display the timing sources


configure an external or derived source
enable and select a source
assign a class number to a timing source or a node
enable synchronization status messaging for a source
configure the source failure threshold and recovery method
specify the frequency of external timing inputs and outputs

To display the timing sources


CONFIG SYNCH

Figure 17.2-8 shows a sample display. Table 17.2-6 lists the fields on this display.
Figure 17.2-8: Timing Source Display
3600 MainStreet

1117-H1-00

ANS:ENABLED
Number
1
2
3
4
ANS

Toronto:A

Zone ID:1
Source
Slot A7
Slot A3
External
Slot B5
N/A

Recovery
Auto
Auto
30 sec
Auto
N/A

Alarms:1

11-May-1997

Node Class:10
Class
2
5
1
15
N/A

8:35a

Threshold
5
5
5
5
N/A

Current Class:1
Status
Ready
Ready
Current
Ready
Ready

Current source of synchronization is number 3 (External)


External Clock Frequency: Input = 8kHz

CONFIG SYNCH

1-SRC_NUMBER
6-ANS_NODE

17.2-20

2-MAINT
7-

3-ANS_LINK
8-CANCEL

(400)

4-NODE_CLASS
9-QUIT

5-EXT_FREQ
0-

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 17.2-6: Timing Source Status


Heading

Description

Number

The number of the programmable timing source.

Source

The source from which the timing is extracted.

Recovery

The method used to resynchronize to the source when it has recovered from a failed
state.

Class
or
Message

The class configured for this source.

Threshold

The maximum number of failures each hour allowed for this source (or alternate source
on the 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager) when it is the current source of
synchronization.

Status

Displays the source status as follows:


Disabled:

The quality of the source as indicated by the received status message.

the source has been deliberately disabled (by selecting DISABLE)


the source is in the default state (never enabled)

Manual Recovery:

the source in timed recovery has failed


the system has failed to recover the source four times in a row
the source has exceeded the permissible failure rate

Not Ready: The source is not available for system timing. If the source is a primary rate
link, there is a primary rate alarm. If the source is a data circuit, the circuit is out of
synchronization.
Ready: The source is available for system timing.
Acquiring: The Timing card, SSU or ISSU is currently trying to synchronize to the source.
Current: The source is providing system timing.
Auto Rec: The source has failed as the current source of synchronization, but will be
available to the system as soon as it has recovered.
Time Rec: The source has failed as the current source of synchronization, but the
system is checking at timed intervals to see if it has recovered.
Cannot Lock: The system is presently unable to take timing from the current source. It
tries to take timing from the source again soon after this state has been entered.
Displays the alternate source as follows:
Validating: The Timing card is currently trying to synchronize to the alternate source.
Monitoring: The alternate source is providing system timing.

Node Parameters

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17.2-21

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Timing source parameters


Using the SRC_NUMBER softkey, you can:

for 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers


configure a source as EXTERNAL or DERIVED
enable and select sources
specify the source CLASS number
for 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Managers
configure a source as EXT_PORT_A, EXT_PORT_B, or DERIVED
enable and select sources
specify the source CLASS number or enable or disable STATUS_MSG
reception for the source
Note 1
Only sources that support synchronization status messaging can be configured for
STATUS_MSG reception. Valid sources are SONET and SDH interfaces and external
timing signals in DS1 framing format. If an invalid source is configured for
STAUS_MSG, the message The specified source does not support synchronization
status messaging. is displayed.
Note 2
Both CLASS and STATUS_MSG cannot be enabled on a 3600+ MainStreet
Bandwidth Manager at the same time. Error messages are displayed indicating the
current mode selected.

For 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers, when you define a DERIVED
source, you must specify the slot and link identifier or the peripheral shelf and
source number where it originates. For 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Managers,
when you define an HSA card as a DERIVED source, the following rules apply:

If the HSA slot is configured for simplex traffic protection, the derived source

must be configured at the HSA slot or HSA subslot A level. If subslot B is


specified, the message That slot cannot be a source of system timing. is
displayed.
If the HSA slot is configured for 1+1 traffic protection, the derived source must
be configured at the HSA slot level. If subslot A or B is specified, the message
That slot is configured for 1+1 protection. Enter an HSA slot. is displayed.
If the HSA slot is configured for ring mode traffic protection, the derived source
must be configured at the HSA subslot level. If the HSA slot is specified, the
message That slot is configured for ring mode. Enter an HSA subslot. is
displayed.

You can also specify a previously defined source as UNDEFINED before redefining
it.
For a timing source to become the current (active) source, it must be enabled and
selected. The system automatically selects the source with the highest quality; this is
indicated by the lowest class number or, if status messaging is selected, it is
indicated by the received status message.

17.2-22

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

When you ENABLE a source, it becomes available to the network as a source of


timing. When an enabled source has a higher quality than the current source of
timing, it is automatically selected as the new source of timing. When you DISABLE
a source, that source becomes unavailable to the network as a source of timing.
Note
You can enable a timing source on a peripheral shelf only from the associated
switching shelf.

The SELECT and DESELECT softkeys are used for maintenance operations. When
you SELECT a source, you force the system to use this source as its current timing
source. This source remains the current source of synchronization until it fails or you
DESELECT it, even if there is another source with a higher-quality value. The status
of the source changes from Ready to Current (see Table 17.2-6). When you
DESELECT a source, normal operation begins again. The source status changes from
Current to Ready (see Table 17.2-6), and the system automatically selects the Ready
source with the highest quality as the current source.
You can assign a class number to each programmable timing source (CLASS) and to
the default internal timing source of the node (NODE_CLASS) to determine source
selection. To increase the preference for a source, assign it a low class number; to
decrease the preference for a source, assign it a high number.
The default node class number is 15 in a locally controlled system and 14 in a
enhanced locally controlled or switching shelf controlled system. A node class
number of 15 or 14 indicates a node that will not normally supply network timing.
The network looks only at the class number when determining the source
hierarchyit makes no distinction between node class numbers and source class
numbers.
Note
The system never uses a source configured with a class number higher than the node
class.

To configure the timing source parameters, see the applicable system procedure:

To configure timing sources for locally controlled shelves


To configure timing sources for switching shelves
To configure timing sources for peripheral shelves
To configure timing sources for enhanced locally controlled shelves

Timing source failures


Timing source failures can either be quality- or link-related.

Node Parameters

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17.2-23

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


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Quality-related failures are caused by exceptional jitter, phase hits and frequency
deviations, causing the SSU to lose synchronization with the timing source. With
quality-related failures, the link is still active and can carry data. You can configure
a source failure threshold to disable a synchronization source when excessive
quality-related failures occur.
Link-related failures are caused by loss of clock signal, loss of frame or excessive bit
errors, causing the SSU to lose synchronization with the timing source. With
link-related failures, the link is down and does not carry data. You can configure a
source failure recovery method for synchronization sources that are disabled due to
link-related failures.
Source failure threshold
The source failure threshold is the number of times in an hour a timing source is
allowed to fail as the current synchronization source. If the source failures exceed the
threshold, the source is automatically disabled until it is manually re-enabled.
Source failure threshold is in the range of 0 to 30 failures each hour or UNLIMITED.
When you select UNLIMITED, the source is never declared disabled, regardless of
the number of failures each hour.
To configure the source failure threshold parameters, see the applicable system
procedure:

To configure timing sources for locally controlled shelves


To configure timing sources for switching shelves
To configure timing sources for enhanced locally controlled shelves
Source failure recovery method
The source failure recovery method determines how and when a previously failed
source is declared ready. These methods apply only to a source that was previously
the current source of synchronization. If a source fails while it is not the current
source of synchronization, it enters the Not ready state.
You can select one of three source failure recovery methods.

AUTO for automatic recovery: If automatic recovery is selected, a failed source

17.2-24

becomes available to the network (enters the ready state, see Table 17.2-4) as soon
as it recovers. The network tries to synchronize to the recovered source if it has a
lower class number than the current source.
30_SEC, 1_MIN, 10_MIN or 30_MIN for a timed recovery: If timed recovery is
selected, the system checks after the specified time interval up to four times to see
if the source has recovered. If the source has recovered, the source becomes
available to the network (enters the ready state) and will become the current
source if its class number is lower than that of the current source. If the source has
not recovered by the end of the fourth check, the system places the source in the
disabled state.
MANUAL for manual recovery: If manual recovery is selected, the system places
the failed source in the disabled state. The source is not used as a source of
synchronization until it is manually enabled.

(400)

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure the source failure recovery method parameters, see the applicable
system procedure:

To configure timing sources for locally controlled shelves


To configure timing sources for switching shelves
To configure timing sources for enhanced locally controlled shelves
External timing frequency
The following subsections explain how to configure external timing input and
external timing output.
External timing input for 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers
Using the EXT_FREQ and INPUT softkeys, you can configure one external timing
input for each node as:

8_kHz if the external timing source has a frequency of 8 kHz (locally controlled,

switching, or peripheral shelf), or 64 kHz or 1.544 MHz (locally controlled or


peripheral shelf)
2_MHz if the external timing source has a frequency of 2 MHz (locally controlled,
switching or peripheral shelf)
COMP_CLOCK if the external timing source has a frequency of 64 kHz
composite clock and if the source of synchronization is an external source
accepted by the GFC2 or GFC3 (locally controlled or peripheral shelf); an ISSU
module on the Control card is required for the COMP _CLOCK functionality to
work
1.5_MHz if the external timing source has a frequency of 1.544 MHz (connected
directly to the switching shelf backplane)

To configure external timing input parameters, see the applicable system procedure:

To configure timing sources for locally controlled shelves


To configure timing sources for peripheral shelves
External timing input for 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Managers
Using the EXTERNAL and INPUT softkeys, you can configure two external timing
inputs for each node as:

NRZ if the external timing source is connected to a bulkhead Rx BNC connector.

Node Parameters

Then, using the OPTION softkey, you can select 8_KHZ or 2048_KHZ if the
external timing source has a frequency of 8 kHz or 2.048 kHz, respectively.
DS1 if the external timing source is connected to the bulkhead 120 W connector.
Then, using the OPTION softkey, you can select D4_FRAME or ESF_FRAME if
the input signal is in D4 or ESF framing format, respectively.
COMP_CLOCK if the external timing source is connected to the bulkhead 120 W
connector and the external timing source has a frequency of 64 kHz. Then, using
the OPTION softkey, you can select FREQ_LOCK to specify that the timing
source signal is not a DDS composite clock signal or PHASE_LOCK if the signal
is a DDS composite clock signal.

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17.2-25

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


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Using the OPTION softkey, you can enable or disable a bridged mode to specify that
the signal of any external input timing source is to electrically terminate on the
active Timing card (BRIDGE_OFF) or that neither the active nor inactive Timing
card is to electrically terminate the input timing signal (BRIDGE_ON).
To configure external timing input parameters, see the procedure To configure an
external input timing source for the enhanced locally controlled shelf.
External timing output for 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers
Using the EXT_FREQ and OUTPUT softkeys, you can configure the frequency of
one external timing output for each switching shelf as:

1.5_MHz for an output frequency of 1.544 MHz


8_kHz for an output frequency of 8 kHz
2_MHz for an output frequency of 2 MHz
NO_CLOCK for no frequency output

To configure external timing output parameters, see the procedure To configure


timing sources for switching shelves.
External timing output for 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Managers
Using the EXTERNAL and OUTPUT softkeys, you can configure the frequency of
two external timing outputs for each enhanced locally controlled shelf as:

NRZ_FREQ if the timing receiver is connected to a bulkhead Tx BNC connector.

Then, you can select 8_KHZ or 2048_KHZ to specify the output signal frequency.
DS1_FRAME if the timing receiver is connected to the bulkhead 120 W connector.
Then, you can select D4_FRAME or ESF_FRAME to specify the framing format
of the output DS1 signal.
PORT_A or PORT_B (or both) to specify to which port the external timing
receiver is connected. Then, you can select SYSTEM or HSA_SLOT to specify that
the source of the timing signal is the Timing card Stratum 3 clock or an OC-3 or
STM-1 card installed in an HSA slot. If HSA_SLOT is configured, the following
rules apply:
If the HSA slot is configured for simplex traffic protection, the derived
source must be configured at the HSA slot or HSA subslot A level. If subslot
B is specified, the message That slot cannot be a source of system timing.
is displayed.

If the HSA slot is configured for 1+1 traffic protection, the derived source
must be configured at the HSA slot level. If subslot A or B is specified, the
message That slot is configured for 1+1 protection. Enter an HSA slot. is
displayed.

If the HSA slot is configured for ring mode traffic protection, the derived
source must be configured at the HSA subslot level. If the HSA slot is
specified, the message That slot is configured for ring mode. Enter an HSA
subslot. is displayed.

17.2-26

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure external timing output parameters, see the procedure To configure


timing output for an external timing receiver for the enhanced locally controlled
shelves.
DDS composite clock
The DDS composite clock provides synchronization for intra-office connections of
DS0 level signals. When you select COMP_CLOCK as an external timing input
source, you are configuring the system for phase lock operation. Phase lock to a
clocking source is referred to as phase or byte synchronization. Phase lock ensures
that the transmitter and the receiver achieve proper alignment by identifying the
beginning and end of a frame or byte.
Note
An ISSU module on the Control card is required for the COMP_CLOCK phase
locking operation. If you attempt to enable the COMP_CLOCK when there is no
ISSU module present on the Control card, the warning message ISSU required for
phase lock appears and a Revision Feature/Mismatch alarm is raised.

COMP_CLOCK must be configured before the external timing source becomes the
current synchronization source for a locally controlled or peripheral shelf. If you try
to configure COMP_CLOCK to enable the phase lock operation after the external
timing source has been locked, the warning message External source has already
been locked by the system appears.
Figure 17.2-9 shows a sample display of a 3600 MainStreet node configured for the
DDS composite clock (and phase lock operation).
Figure 17.2-9: DDS Composite Clock Display
3600 MainStreet

1117-H1-00

ANS:DISABLED
Number
1
2
3
4

Toronto:A

Zone ID: 1
Source
Ext-CC
Slot A2
Undefined
Undefined

Alarms:1

Node Class:15

11-May-1997

8:35a

Current Class:1

Recovery

Class

Threshold

Manual
Manual
Manual
Manual

1
2
15
15

5
5
5
5

Status
Current
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled

Current source of synchronization is number 1 Composite Clock


External Clock Frequency: Input = Composite Clock

CONFIG SYNCH EXT_FREQ INPUT

1-2_MHZ
6-

Node Parameters

27-

3-8_kHZ
8-CANCEL

(400)

49-QUIT

50-

17.2-27

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


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To configure timing sources for locally controlled shelves


CONFIG SYNCH

NODE_CLASS

EXT_FREQ

<class>

INPUT

2_MHZ

8_kHZ

SRC_NUMBER

COMP_CLOCK
<source>

SELECT/
DESELECT*

CLASS

RECOVERY

<class>

AUTO 30_SEC

1_MIN

THRESHOLD

SOURCE

ENABLE/
DISABLE*

<failures> UNLIMITED

10_MIN

30_MIN

MANUAL

EXTERNAL

DERIVED UNDEFINED
<sn> or <sn-l>
SK000014

where
class is 1 to 15
source is 1 to 4
failures is the number of failures (0 to 30) each hour (5*)
sn or sn-l is the slot or slot and link identifier where the derived source of timing originates

17.2-28

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure timing sources for switching shelves


CONFIG SYNCH

NODE_CLASS
<class>

INPUT

8_kHZ

SELECT/
DESELECT*

2_MHZ

CLASS
<class>

AUTO 30_SEC

SRC_NUMBER

EXT_FREQ

OUTPUT

1.5_MHZ

RECOVERY

NO_CLOCK
<source>

SOURCE

THRESHOLD

ENABLE/
DISABLE*

<failures> UNLIMITED

1_MIN 10_MIN 30_MIN

MANUAL

EXTERNAL

DERIVED

UNDEFINED

<p_shelf>
<s_number>
SK000015

where
class is 1 to 14 for a switching shelf
source is 1 to 8 for a switching shelf
failures is the number of failures (0 to 30) each hour (5*)
p_shelf is the peripheral shelf where the derived source of timing originates
s_number is the source number of the derived source

Note
The NO_CLOCK option applies only to OUTPUT.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.2-29

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


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To configure timing sources for peripheral shelves


CONFIG SYNCH

2_MHZ

EXT_FREQ

SRC_NUMBER

INPUT

<source>

8_kHZ

COMP_CLOCK

EXTERNAL

SOURCE

DERIVED

UNDEFINED

<sn> or <sn-l>
SK000016

where
source is 1 to 4 for a peripheral shelf
sn or sn-l is the slot or slot and link identifier where the derived source of timing originates

17.2-30

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure timing sources for enhanced locally controlled shelves


CONFIG SYNCH

MORE

SELECT/
DESELECT*

CLASS

NODE_CLASS

SRC_NUMBER

<class>

<source>

<class>

STATUS_MSG

THRESHOLD

RECOVERY

SOURCE

ENABLE/
DISABLE*

DERIVED

UNDEFINED

<failures> UNLIMITED

RX_ENABLE/
RX_DISABLE
AUTO

EXT_PORT_A

30_SEC

1_MIN

10_MIN

EXT_PORT_B

30_MIN

MANUAL

<sn> or <sn-l> or <Hn> or <Hn-ss>


SK000898

where
class is 1 to 14
source is 1 to 4
failures is the number of failures (0 to 30) each hour (5*)
sn or sn-l is the UCS slot or slot and link identifier where the derived source of timing originates
Hn or Hn-ss is the HSA slot or HSA slot and subslot identifier

Node Parameters

(400)

17.2-31

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To configure an external input timing source for the enhanced locally controlled
shelf
CONFIG SYNCH EXTERNAL INPUT

COMP_CLOCK

FREQ_LOCK

DS1

PHASE_LOCK

NRZ

D4_FRAME

OPTIONS

ESF_FRAME

8_KHZ

2048_KHZ

BRIDGE _ON/
BRIDGE_OFF
SK000833

To configure timing output for an external timing receiver for the enhanced
locally controlled shelf
CONFIG SYNCH EXTERNAL OUTPUT

PORT_A

SYSTEM

PORT_B

HSA_SLOT

DS1_FRAME

D4_FRAME

NRZ_FREQ

ESF_FRAME

8_KHZ

2048_KHZ

<Hn> or <Hn-ss>
SK000834

where Hn or Hn-ss is the HSA slot or HSA slot and subslot identifier

17.2.8

Configuring Synchronization Status Messaging


To configure synchronization status messaging for standalone sources, you must
first select STATUS_MSG mode. Once this mode is enabled, select QUAL_LEVEL to
specify the quality level (PRS, STU, ST2 and ST3) at which a source is deemed
unavailable for synchronization (see Table 17.2-2 for quality level descriptions).
Sources having a status message below the quality level specified cannot become the
current source of synchronization. Alternatively, you can select DISABLED from the
QUAL_LEVEL menu to specify that a source is always available as a possible current
source of synchronization regardless of its quality level.
If ANS is enabled on the node and you have selected STATUS_MSG mode, you must
configure the translation table (TRANS_TABL) to convert the quality level of the
current source of synchronization to the current class of the node (see section 17.2.3).
The node compares the quality and class values to select the current source of
synchronization.

17.2-32

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17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure synchronization status messaging


CONFIG SYNCH MORE

QUAL_LEVEL

PRS

STU

ST2

ST3 DISABLED

MODE

CLASS

TRANS_TABL

STATUS_MSG PRS STU

ST2

ST3

SK000831

17.2.9

Configuring Synchronization Status Message


Transmission
Synchronization status messages can be transmitted on SONET and SDH output
interfaces and on the two external DS1 timing outputs generated by the Timing card.
The message transmitted depends on the quality level of the source from which the
output is derived.
If class mode is configured, STU is output on all interfaces that are configured to
drive system timing and that support the transmission of status messages. If an OC-3
or STM-1 card is the current source of synchronization, the transmitted message is
driven on the output timing port.
If status message mode is configured and the current source of synchronization
supports the transmission of status messages, the message received from that source
is transmitted on all output timing ports; otherwise, STU is transmitted. STU is also
transmitted if the current source of synchronization is an ANS link. If the node is in
holdover or free-run mode, the status message transmitted on all timing outputs is
ST3.
Messages transmitted over the two DS1 external timing ports depend on the framing
type of the DS1 signal selected for the port. If ESF framing is selected, the message is
transmitted over FDL. If D4 framing is selected, AIS is transmitted on the output
timing port when the signal from which it is deriving timing is below the configured
quality threshold.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.2-33

17.2 Configuring Timing and Synchronization


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To configure synchronization status message transmission


CONFIG SYNCH MAINT STATUS_MSG

SYSTEM

EXT_PORT_A

EXT_PORT_B

SLOT
<Hn> or <Hn-ss>

REMOVE_MSG

PRS

INJECT_MSG

STU

ST3

SIC

ST4

MORE
DUS
SK000832

where Hn or Hn-ss is the HSA slot or HSA slot and subslot identifier

17.2-34

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.3

17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

Serial and Ethernet Ports


This chapter describes the serial ports used for node management terminals and
how to configure the following serial port parameters:

type of device connected


baud rate
flow control
CPSS cost

Also documented in the chapter is the 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager


Ethernet port configuration.

17.3.1

Understanding the Ports


The node provides the following serial ports for connection to a node management
station:

backplane or bulkhead serial ports 1 and 2


Control card faceplate serial port
CPC, DCP, DS-3 II, E3, FRS, FRE and PE card faceplate serial ports
The data format for the serial ports is:

eight data bits


one stop bit
no parity
See chapter 16.2 for the location and pinouts of these system serial ports.

Location of backplane and bulkhead serial ports


Two serial ports are located on the backplane of a Class A switching shelf, locally
controlled or peripheral shelf. The location of the two serial ports on the enhanced
locally controlled shelf is on the bulkhead. The two serial ports are located on the
bulkhead of a Class B or 23-inch switching shelf, locally controlled, enhanced locally
controlled or peripheral shelf:

SP1 configured for DCE


SP2 configured for DTE (except in CPCs and FRS cards)
Hardware flow control is supported on SP2 only.

Node Parameters

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17.3-1

17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Note
For SP1 only, RTS is connected to CTS and DTR is connected to DSR by the
backplane.
In dual-shelf, control-redundant systems, the backplane serial ports are inactive in
the shelf with the inactive Control card. In single-shelf, control-redundant systems,
these ports are inactive when the jumper behind the faceplate on the Control card is
installed.

3600+ MainStreet Control card serial ports


Serial ports are used to connect node management stations to initiate node
management sessions with the active or inactive Control card. The active Control
card controls the serial ports on the shelf.
There are at least three serial ports that can be accessed. Two ports, SP1 and SP2, are
located on the bulkhead and the third serial port is located on the active Control card
faceplate.
Only two serial ports are available for use by the system at a time, but they cannot
be used simultaneously. The faceplate serial port on the active Control card is not
available unless a jumper is installed on the card, see Figure 17.3-1. Insert W4 to
disable SP1 on the bulkhead and enable SP1 on the faceplate serial port. In a
control-redundant configuration, only the active Control card faceplate serial port
can be used. Access to the inactive Control card faceplate serial port is available only
if W4 is inserted and the node management station is directly connected.

17.3-2

(400)

Node Parameters

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17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 17.3-1: Jumper W4 Location on the 3600+ MainStreet Control Card

W4

W4

OR
SP1
SP1
faceplate bulkhead
on
on

Bank-B
memory
module

10043

For Control card faceplate serial port pinouts, see section 16.2.3.

3600, 3645, 3664 and 36120 MainStreet Control cards serial ports
The serial port on the Control card faceplate provides access to SP1 of any shelf type.
Only one of the two serial ports of the shelf is active at a time, depending on the shelf
configuration (see Table 17.3-1). This allows a node management session to be
initiated with the inactive Control card.
Note
For a dual-shelf, control-redundant system, connect the node management terminal
to backplane or bulkhead serial ports on both shelves using a Y cable. This ensures
a connection to the active Control card regardless of which shelf is the active shelf.
In a single-shelf, control-redundant Class B shelf, remove the jumper behind the
faceplate on the Control card to enable the faceplate port for a node management
session with the inactive card. (This action disables the backplane port.)

Node Parameters

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17.3-3

17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table 17.3-1: Control Card and Backplane or Bulkhead Serial Ports


Shelf

Backplane or
Bulkhead Serial
Ports

Single- or dual-shelf, non-control-redundant system

Control Card
Faceplate Serial
Port

Class A

Class B

Class A

Class B

(1)

(1)

Inactive

Inactive

Active

Active

Single-shelf, control-redundant system

Active

Active

Inactive

Inactive

Shelf with the active Control card in dual-shelf,


control-redundant system

Active

Active

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Active

Active

Shelf with the inactive Control card in dual-shelf,


control-redundant system

Notes
1. In a dual-shelf, non-control-redundant system, the Control card uses the backplane or bulkhead SP1
connector of the shelf in which it is installed. The backplane or bulkhead SP1 connector of the shelf
without a Control card is not used.

CPCs
CPCs have two serial ports on their faceplates that provide VT100 access. Both ports
are configured for DCE.

DS-3 II, E3, DCP, FRS, FRE and PE cards


DCP and FRS cards have two serial ports on the faceplate that provide ALAPB
access to the CPSS network.
The DS-3 II, FRE and PE cards have one similar serial port on their faceplates. The
FRE card (Release 2) and the PE card (Release 1) provide FASTbus CPSS
connectivity.

Ethernet port
A Dsub-15 connector located on the 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager
bulkhead provides an AUI standard, IEEE 802.3 Ethernet port. This port provides a
means to directly attach a network manager to the shelf and only CPSS data is
supported. The active Control card always controls the Ethernet port.
Note
An external MAU is required for the Ethernet port to connect to 10BaseT, 10Base2 or
10Base5 lines.

17.3.2

Configuring Serial Ports


Serial ports can be configured for device type, baud rate, flow control and CPSS cost.

17.3-4

(400)

Node Parameters

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 17.3-2 lists the serial port configuration parameters. Each parameter has a list
of options with any default option marked with an asterisk. The Control card
referenced in the table applies to all 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers.
Any variance in the options are highlighted in the table notes.
Note
Configuring CPSS cost is described in chapter 17.6 (see Table 17.6-1 for the CPSS
configuration parameters).

Table 17.3-2: Serial Port Configuration Parameters and Options


Control
and
DCP
Cards

CPC

DS-3 II
and E3
Cards

FRS,
FRE and
PE
Cards

Parameter

Options

Device type

VT100
printer
CPSS
CPSS modem
call logger

Baud rate

300
600
1200
2400
4800
9600
19 200
38 400 (1)
auto baud (1)

Flow control

software
hardware
none*

CPSS cost

normal*
bias against
bias toward

Notes
1. These options are only available for the 3600+ MainStreet Control card.

Note
Table 16.4-1 in chapter 16.4 explains the formats of the identifiers in the procedures.

Node Parameters

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17.3-5

17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

These options are normally configured through a node management session.


Alternatively, certain device type and baud rate combinations can be configured
using the pushbutton on the GFC, GFC2, GFC3 or Control card (see Maintenance,
chapter 39.2).

Device type
Depending on the type of device connected to the port, the backplane or bulkhead
serial ports can be configured for a VT100-compatible terminal (or a personal
computer running terminal emulator software), a printer, a call logger or a computer
running Craft Interface or 4601, 4602 or 46020 network management software
connected directly or through a modem.
The DS-3 II, E3, DCP, and FRS, FRE and PE card ports can be connected to a VT100
(or emulator) or a computer running network management software. The CPC ports
can be connected only to a VT100 or emulator.
VT100-compatible terminal
A VT100-compatible ASCII terminal or VT100 terminal emulator is used for node
management sessions. It can be connected to the serial ports directly or indirectly
using auto-answer, Hayes-compatible modems. The device type is VT100.
Printer
A printer can be connected to a serial port to print alarms. The device type is Printer.
For details on printing alarms, see Maintenance, section 35.2.6.

17.3-6

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

Personal computer
A personal computer can be connected to a serial port if it is running terminal
emulation software (for installation), Craft Interface software, communications
software or network management software.

Terminal emulation software:

A computer running terminal emulation software is used during installation to


set up CPSS links. It can be connected to a serial port directly or through
auto-answer Hayes-compatible modems. The device type is VT100. See
Installation for details.
Craft Interface software:
The computer running Craft Interface software is connected to a serial port on the
switching shelf backplane, either directly or indirectly through auto-answer,
Hayes-compatible modems. The device type is VT100 if the Craft Interface is
used for terminal emulation or CPSS (direct connection) or CPSS_MODEM
(modem connection) for normal Craft Interface.
Communications software:
A computer running communications software must be connected directly to a
serial port for the node to perform configuration database activities such as
backing up, verifying and restoring (for details, see Maintenance, chapter 39.1).
The computer can also be connected to a serial port through auto-answer,
Hayes-compatible modems.
network manager software:
A computer running network manager can be connected to a serial port directly
or through Hayes-compatible modems. The port must send information to the
network manager using the CPSS protocol. The device type is CPSS if the
network manager software is connected directly or CPSS_MODEM if it is
connected through a modem.
Note

A network manager connected directly to a node can perform the configuration


database activities of backing up, verifying and restoring. A network manager
connected through a modem can back up and verify, but cannot restore. For more
details, see the appropriate network manager documentation.

From the shelf or card whose serial port you are configuring, you can select the port
and configure the device type as:

VT100 for a VT100-compatible terminal or personal computer running terminal


emulator software (default for SP1)

CPSS for a directly-connected computer running Craft Interface or network

Node Parameters

management software
CPSS_MODEM for a computer connected through a modem (default for SP2)

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17.3-7

17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To configure the device type, see the applicable card procedure:

To configure Control card ports


To configure FRS, FRE and DCP card ports
To configure FRE and PE card ports (for Release 2 FRE cards)
To configure DS-3 II card ports

Baud rate
You can configure the baud rate to match that of the device connected to the serial
port as:

300
600
1200
2400
4800
9600
19200
38400 (3600+ MainStreet only)
AUTO_BAUD (3600+ MainStreet only)

For the 3600+ MainStreet Control card, the automatic baud rate matching option is
the default baud rate for SP1. The default baud rate for SP2 is 9600 b/s. The
maximum baud rate for the 3600+ MainStreet Control card is 38 400 b/s.
The default baud rate of the serial ports on all other 3600 MainStreet series
bandwidth managers cards is 9600 b/s, except for SP2 on the Control card which has
a default baud rate of 1200 b/s. The maximum serial port baud rate is 9600 b/s,
except for the DCP, FRS, FRE and PE cards, which have a maximum serial port baud
rate of 19 200 b/s.
A change to the baud rate takes effect when you execute the instruction (PROCEED)
if the port type is VT100 or PRINTER. You must change the baud rate of the terminal,
computer or printer to match the new setting.
With auto baud, it takes approximately five seconds for the system to automatically
match the speed of the serial port to the speed of the connected device. To function
properly, the attached equipment must send characters to the enhanced locally
controlled shelf. The Control card is unable to send any characters over the serial
port while it is performing the auto baud function. If the attached device performs
auto baud and is able to send characters to the shelf, the baud rate that the two settle
on depends on the attached device. The first speed presented to the serial port that
the 3600+ MainStreet Control card can match is locked.
On a serial port that is configured as VT100 or CPSS with auto baud, the baud rate
is renegotiated whenever the Control card starts-up or whenever an NMTI or CPSS
session on that serial ports ends. The 3600+ MainStreet Control card can begin an
NMTI or CPSS session only after the serial port speed locks onto the baud rate of the
attached device.

17.3-8

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

The following restrictions apply.

Two 3600+ MainStreet bandwidth managers connected together through a serial

port cannot use the auto baud feature to set-up the baud rate of that serial port, a
fixed baud rate must be configured.
A serial port connected to a modem that does not send characters to the Control
card cannot use auto baud, a fixed baud rate must be configured.
Note

CPSS link failure can occur if a modem manages to connect to the RS-232 backplane
serial ports and negotiate a high-speed connection. It may be necessary to disable the
ARQ of the modem or lock the modem RS-232 serial port speed to a Newbridge
supported baud rate.

To configure the baud rate, see the applicable card procedure:

To configure Control card ports


To configure FRS, FRE and DCP card ports
To configure FRE and PE card ports (for Release 2 FRE cards)
To configure CPC ports
To configure DS-3 II card ports

Flow control
You can set bidirectional flow control for both serial ports as:

XON/XOFF for software flow control


DTR for hardware flow control
NONE for no flow control (default)
SP1 supports only software flow control. SP2 supports software and hardware flow
control.
Note
Setting the flow control has no effect on serial ports configured as port type CPSS or
CPSS_MODEM.

To configure the flow control, see the applicable card procedure:

Node Parameters

To configure Control card ports


To configure FRS, FRE and DCP card ports
To configure FRE and PE card ports (for Release 2 FRE cards)
To configure DS-3 II card ports

(400)

17.3-9

17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Configuring CPSS cost on serial ports


You can configure the CPSS cost on a serial port to one of three values:

NORMAL for normal cost (default)


BIAS_AGNST for cost greater than normal
BIAS_TOWRD for cost less than normal
For more information about CPSS, see chapter 17.6.
To configure the CPSS cost on serial ports, see the applicable card procedure:

To configure Control card ports


To configure FRS, FRE and DCP card ports
To configure FRE and PE card ports (for Release 2 FRE cards)
To configure DS-3 II card ports

To configure Control card ports


HOUSE

SER_PORT_2

SER_PORT_1

PORT_TYPE

VT100* CPSS PRINTER

300

FLOW_CTRL

BAUD_RATE

600

1200

CPSS_
MODEM

2400

4800

XON/XOFF

9600 19200

DTR

38400

NORMAL*

CPSS_COST

NONE*

AUTO_BAUD

BIAS_AGNST BIAS_TOWRD
SK000017

Note
The AUTO_BAUD feature and the baud rate 38 400 b/s are only available for the
3600+ MainStreet Control card.

17.3-10

(400)

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure FRS, FRE and DCP card ports


CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS

SER_PORT_1

PORT_TYPE

VT100*

CPSS

SER_PORT_2

CPSS_COST

BAUD_RATE
<baud rate>

NORMAL*

BIAS_AGAINST

BIAS_TOWRD
SK000018

where baud_rate is 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 or 19200 (*)

To configure FRE and PE card ports


CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS

SER_PORT_1

PORT_TYPE

VT100*

CPSS

FBCPSS1

BAUD_RATE

FBCPSS2

CPSS_COST

<baud rate>

NORMAL*

BIAS_AGAINST

BIAS_TOWRD
SK000019

where baud_rate is 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 or 19200 (*). Baud rate is not available for FBCPSS1 and
FBCPSS2.

Note
This configuration applies to Release 2 FRE cards (part number 90-1673-02) only. The
FBCPSS1 and FBCPSS2 softkeys do not appear for Release 1 FRE cards (part number
90-1673-01).

Node Parameters

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17.3-11

17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To configure CPC ports


CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS

SER_PORT_1

SER_PORT_2

BAUD_RATE
<baud_rate>
SK000020

where baud_rate is 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600* or 19200

To configure DS-3 II card ports


HOUSE SER_PORT_1

PORT_TYPE

VT100* CPSS PRINTER

300

FLOW_CTRL

BAUD_RATE

600

1200

XON/XOFF

CPSS_
MODEM

2400

CPSS_COST

NONE*

4800 9600*
NORMAL*

BIAS_AGNST BIAS_TOWRD
SK000021

where baud_rate is 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800 or 9600*


where baud_rate is 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600* or 19200

17.3.3

Configuring the Ethernet Port


The Ethernet port on the 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager has a configurable
IP address, subnet mask and default router. This port is disabled by default.
The port must be configured with a valid IP address, subnet mask and default router
IP address before being enabled. Attempting to enable the port before these
parameters are set results in the following error message: A local IP address, subnet
mask and default router must be configured first.
The IP address is the Control card IP address which is a unique 32-bit (four octet)
network layer address that uniquely identifies the node within the IP network. It is
entered in dotted decimal format

17.3-12

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17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

The subnet mask is a hexadecimal code used to parse an IP address into subnet ID
and host ID. You can configure it only if the network is partitioned into
subnetworks. When you configure the subnet mask, the system knows it is in a
network divided into subnets. The subnet mask is used during forwarding decisions
to determine the subnet ID of the outgoing IP frames.
The port can be connected to up to two remote IP addresses. The host remote
addresses are set using the NMTI.
Note
Disabling the Ethernet port forces CPSS paths to the two remote host addresses to
go down.

Figure 17.3-2 shows the HOUSE display for the 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth
Manager.
Figure 17.3-2: 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager HOUSE Display
3600+ MainStreet

S1117-H1-00

Toronto:A

Port

Baud Rate

Port Type

1
2

9600
9600

VT100
VT100

Current Port
Session Time
Domain Number
Node Number
Router Version
NOC Number
Shared CPSS Cost
Level Zero Access

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

Alarms:1

Flow Control

8:35a

CPSS Cost

XON/XOFF
NONE

Serial port one


30 minutes
1
Unassigned
1
Unassigned
Normal
No

11-May-1997

N/A
N/A

Ethernet Port :
Local IP Addr :
Subnet Mask
:
Default Router:
Host 1 IP Addr:
Host 2 IP Addr:
MAC Address

Disabled
Unassigned
Unassigned
Unassigned
Unassigned
Unassigned

: 00.00.00.00.02.00

HOUSE ETHER_PORT DEF_ROUTER "???.???.???.???"


Enter an IP address.

16-

Node Parameters

27-

38-CANCEL

(400)

49-QUIT

50-

17.3-13

17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table 17.3-3: HOUSE Display field Descriptions


Field

Description

Current Port

The serial port configuration information that is currently displayed.

Default Router

The system default router IP address is the IP address of the nearest


network router. When the system receives an IP packet addressed to a
host on a different subnet, the system forwards the packet to the default
router.
The IP address of the default router must be in the same subnet as the
Control card IP address. You can disable use of the default router by
entering this address as: 0.0.0.0.

Domain Number

The CPSS domain number is the number assigned to the active Control
card that is the CPSS overall master for the shelf.

Ethernet Port

Indicates the status of the port which can be either enabled or disabled.

Host 1 IP Addr

The IP address of a connected remote host.

Host 2 IP Addr

The IP address of a connected remote host.

Level Zero Access

Indicates if the level zero password is enabled. For more information see
chapter 17.5.

Local IP Addr

This is the Control card IP address and is a unique 32-bit (four octet)
network layer address that uniquely identifies the node within the IP
network. It is entered in dotted decimal format.

MAC Address

The MAC address of the shelf.

Node Number

The system CPSS address of the major node.

NOC Number

The telephone number of the modem serving the NOC computer, which
is the computer running the network management software.

Session Time

Indicates the duration of the current node management session.

Subnet Mask

The subnet mask is a hexadecimal code used to parse an IP address into


subnet ID and host ID. You can configure it only if the network is
partitioned into subnetworks. When you configure the subnet mask, the
system knows it is in a network divided into subnets. The subnet mask is
used during forwarding decisions to determine the subnet ID of the
outgoing IP frames.

Shared CPSS cost

The configured CPSS cost for the node.

Router Version

The version number assigned to the active Control card that is the CPSS
overall master for the node.

For information about configuring CPSS parameters for the node, see chapter 17.6.

17.3-14

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.3 Serial and Ethernet Ports


Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring the Ethernet port


HOUSE ETHER_PORT

DISABLE*/ENABLE

LOCAL_ADDR

SUBNET

DEF_ROUTER

HOST_ADDR1

HOST_ADDR2

<IP_address>

<subnet_mask>

<IP_address>

<IP_address>

<IP_address>
SK000835

where
IP_address is in the decimal format #.#.#.# and where # is in the range 0 through 255
subnet_mask is in the decimal format #.#.#.# and where # is in the range 0 through 255

Node Parameters

(400)

17.3-15

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.4

17.4 Date, Time, and Node Name


Issue 1, November 1997

Date, Time, and Node Name


This chapter describes how to set the following parameters:

date
time
node name

17.4.1

Configuring the Date, Time, and Node Name


The date, time, and node name appear in the header line of the node management
screen. Figure 17.4-1 shows an example of the header line settings for a 3645
MainStreet switching shelf. The switching shelf sets the date for the peripheral shelf,
DS-3 or DS-3 II card, or E3 card.
Figure 17.4-1: Header Line Fields
3645 MainStreet

F1-CONFIG
F6-

D117-H1-00

Toronto:P3A

F2-HOUSE
F7-

F3-MAINT
F8-

Alarms:1

11-May-1997

F4-STATS
F9-QUIT

8:35a

F5-ALARMS
F0-

You can configure the node for the date, time, and node name. Table 17.4-1 lists the
configurable parameters.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.4-1

17.4 Date, Time, and Node Name


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table 17.4-1: Node Configuration Parameters and Options


Control
Card

DS-3 Card

E3 Card

Parameter

Options

Date

<dd-MMM-yyyy>

Time

<hh:mmA or P or H>

Node name

up to 12 alphanumeric characters
(no spaces, no underscores)

To configure these parameters, see the procedure To configure the date, time, and
node name.
Note
Table 16.4-1 in chapter 16.4 explains the formats of the identifiers in the procedures.

Date
In a non control-redundant system, No Date appears in the header line until you
set the date.
In a control-redundant system, the date field indicates whether the node
management session is with the active or inactive Control card. If the programmed
date or No Date appears in the header line, the session is with the active Control
card. If OnStandby appears in the header line, it is with the inactive Control card.
To set the date, select DATE and enter the date in the form <dd-MMM-yyyy>, where:
dd = the day (two digits including a leading zero)
MMM = the month (the first three letters)
yyyy = the year (four digits)
For example, enter November 21, 1996 as <21-NOV-1996>.

Time
Until the time is set, the header line on the node manager screen displays the time
elapsed since a system reset in a 12-h format followed by the indicator R. For
example, if the header line shows 10:03R, it means that the system was reset 10 h and
3 min ago.
Real time appears in the header line in a 12-h format followed by an A or P for a.m.
or p.m. respectively. In the 24-h format, the time is followed by an H.

17.4-2

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Node Parameters

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.4 Date, Time, and Node Name


Issue 1, November 1997

To set the time, select TIME and enter the time in the form <hh:mmA> or <hh:mmP>
or <hh:mmH>, where:
hh = the hour (1 or 2 digits; leading zeros are not required)
mm = the minute (2 digits)
A = a.m.
P = p.m.
H = 24-h format
For example, enter 3:17 p.m. as <3:17P> or <15:17H>. If you do not enter A, P or H,
the node assumes an A.

Node name
Until you assign a node name, the default node name appears in the header line. The
node name can have up to 12 alphanumeric characters. In Figure 17.4-1,
CHEPSTOW is the node name.
The node name is not saved as part of a configuration database backup nor is it
affected when a database is restored. When a database is loaded into a node, the
node name stays as configured to prevent two or more nodes in a network from
having the same node name.
To set the node name, select NODE_NAME and enter up to 12 alphanumeric
characters (no spaces or underscores). To delete the node name, select
NODE_NAME and press .

To configure the date, time, and node name


HOUSE

DATE

TIME

NODE_NAME

<date>

<time>

<name>
SK000023

where
date is dd-MMM-yyyy (dd is the day in 2 digits including a leading zero, MMM is the month indicated in
the first 3 characters, and yyyy is the year in 4 digits)
time is hh:mmA or hh:mmP or hh:mmH (hh is hours in 1 or 2 digits, no leading zeros; mm is minutes in 2
digits; A is a.m., P is p.m., and H is 24-h format)
name is up to 12 alphanumeric characters (no spaces or underscores)

Node Parameters

(400)

17.4-3

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.5

17.5 Access Levels and Passwords


Issue 1, November 1997

Access Levels and Passwords


This chapter introduces access levels and passwords. The chapter provides a
recommended definition for each access level, and explains how to define the access
for each level and assign passwords.

17.5.1

Understanding Access Levels and Passwords


Control cards and E3 cards have six password-protected access levels. The DS-3 and
DS-3 II cards have one access level. By using access levels and setting passwords for
each level, you allow different users to configure, operate and monitor different
functions of the node manager.
Note
In a control-redundant system configured for hot standby mode, a user running a
node management session on the inactive Control card has the following access,
regardless of the access level entered when logging on:

read and write access for alarms


read-only access for all other functions
See chapter 18.1 for a detailed description of hot standby.

17.5.2

Setting Access Levels and Passwords


You can define the access levels and set passwords.
Table 17.5-1 lists the access level and password configuration parameters.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.5-1

17.5 Access Levels and Passwords


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table 17.5-1: Access Level and Password Configuration Parameters and Options
Control
Card

DS-3 Card

E3 Card

FRS, FRE
and PE
Card

Parameter

Options

Access level 5

level 5 + password

Access levels 1 to 4

level 1 + password
level 2 + password
level 3 + password
level 4 + password

Access level definition

read and write


read only
no access

Access level 0

level 0
no level 0

Passwords

8 to 12 characters, no spaces

Note
Table 16.4-1 in chapter 16.4 explains the formats of the identifiers in the procedures.

17.5.3

Setting Access Levels


The six access levels are 0 through 5; level 5 is the highest level.

Level 5
Level 5 is for the system administrator because level 5 users have read/write access
to all node management functions. Only level 5 users can modify access level
definitions and change passwords. Level 5 cannot be redefined.
To log on as a level 5 user, enter <5> when prompted for the level during log on, then
enter the level 5 password. The default password is <mainstreet>.
You can enter a password from the start-up screen. The node manager tries to use
this password automatically when a level 5 user logs on.
If you are a level 5 user, you can define access levels 1 to 4 for each softkeys as

NO_ACCESS for no access


READ_ONLY for read-only access
READ/WRITE for read and write access
See the procedure To define access levels 1 to 4.

17.5-2

(400)

Node Parameters

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.5 Access Levels and Passwords


Issue 1, November 1997

Levels 1 to 4
Levels 1 to 4 are defined to give users access to certain node management functions
and restrict access to other functions. Access can be defined as:

no access, which means the user has no access to the function


read-only access, which means the user can read but not make changes to the

function
read and write access, which means the user can read and make changes to the
function

To log on as a level 1 to 4 user, enter <1>, <2>, <3> or <4> when prompted for the
level during log on, then enter the appropriate password. The default password is
<mainstreet>.
Note
Only level 5 users can modify access level definitions. Levels 1 to 4 cannot be
accessed if a password was entered at the start-up menu of the node manager.

For levels 1 through 4, access can be defined for each of the softkeys listed in Table
17.5-2 (except CHNG_PSSWD) for the locally controlled or peripheral shelf. Access
can be defined for each of the softkeys listed in Table 17.5-3 for the FRE, FRS and PE
cards.
Access levels can also be defined at the main menu level, which represents the access
level immediately after logging on. If you define an access of a level for no access at
the main menu level, the user is only able to log off.
The access definition for a softkey overrides the access level of any softkeys
underneath it if the definition is more restrictive. That is, read-only overrides read
and write, and no access overrides both read-only and the read and write.
For example, on a locally controlled or peripheral shelf, assume the softkeys under
CONFIG have these access definitions: SLOT and CIRCUIT have read and write
access, and SYNCH has no access.
Case 1: If CONFIG has read and write access (the least restrictive definition), the
access definitions of the three softkeys SLOT, CIRCUIT and SYNCH will be in effect.
Case 2: If CONFIG is defined as read-only access (more restrictive), it overrides the
definitions for SLOT and CIRCUIT. Then SLOT and CIRCUIT will have read-only
access and SYNCH will have no access.
Case 3: If CONFIG is defined as no access (the most restrictive definition), it
overrides the definitions for SLOT, SYNCH and CIRCUIT and all three softkeys will
have no access.
As shown in Figure 17.5-1, the data area shows the access defined for a softkey; it
does not indicate if it is overridden by a more restrictive definition on another
softkey. The softkey that you are defining normally appears in the top left corner of
the data area (for example, CONFIG SLOT in Figure 17.5-1). If you are defining a
MORE softkey, the word MORE does not appear; for example, if you are defining
the access level for ALARMS MORE, only the word ALARMS appears.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.5-3

17.5 Access Levels and Passwords


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 17.5-1: CONFIG SLOT Access Level Definition


3600 MainStreet

1117-H1-00

Toronto:A

Alarms:1

11-May-1997

8:35a

CONFIGSLOT??
Level
1
2
3
4

Access Type
No Access
Read Only
Read/Write
Read/Write

CHANGE_ACCESS LEVEL_4 TO

F1-READ_ONLY
F6-

F2F7-

F3-NO_ACCESS
F8-CANCEL

F4F9-QUIT

F5F0-

Suggested definitions for levels 1 to 4


To simplify the process of defining access levels, Tables 17.5-2 and 17.5-3 provide
suggested definitions for access levels 1 through 4 for node management sessions
with the Control card and FRS, FRE and PE card, respectively. You can use these
definitions for your system or as a basis for defining your own access levels. In these
suggested level definitions, the types of user are defined as follows.
Level 1
You can use level 1 for network performance personnel whose main task is to collect
abnormal system conditions or significant events. The level 1 user can reset the
TEP-1E status indicators used to keep track of the acknowledgment and clearing of
alarms.
Level 2
You can use level 2 for the network performance operator whose main task is to
manage alarms and statistics and to perform maintenance functions such as
diagnostic tests on a circuit or slot.
Level 3
You can use level 3 for the network configuration operator whose main task is to
configure the network interfaces and the signalling or data processing applications
of the system. The level 3 user can manage the housekeeping functions related to the
serial ports and the time, and force an activity switch for hot or partitioned standby
operation or program a timed activity switch.

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17.5 Access Levels and Passwords


Issue 1, November 1997

Level 4
You can use level 4 for the system manager who does not modify access level
definitions or change passwords. The main tasks of the level 4 users are managing
the housekeeping functions related to user access and doing maintenance functions
related to the Control card non-volatile memory.
Table 17.5-2: Suggested Access Level Definitions for Control Card Sessions
Softkeys

Access Levels
1

RO (1)

RO

R/W (2)

R/W

CIRCUIT

RO

RO

R/W

R/W

CONNECT

RO

RO

R/W

R/W

SYNCH

RO

RO

R/W

R/W

SYSTEM

RO

RO

R/W

R/W

SER_PORT_1 (3)

RO

RO

R/W

R/W

SER_PORT_2 (3)

RO

RO

R/W

R/W

DATE

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

TIME

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

NODE_NAME

RO

RO

RO

R/W

MORE SESSN_TIME

RO

RO

RO

R/W

n/a (4)

n/a (4)

n/a (4)

n/a (4)

MORE NODE_NUM

RO

RO

RO

R/W

MORE NOC_NUM

RO

RO

RO

R/W

DIAG

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

DISPLAY

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

UNDO_MAINT

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

OW_MONITOR

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

ON_SLOT

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

ON_CIRCUIT

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

MORE BACKUP

RO

RO

R/W

R/W

MORE RESTORE

RO

RO

R/W

R/W

MORE VERIFY

RO

RO

R/W

R/W

CONFIG
SLOT

HOUSE

MORE CHNG_PSSWD

MAINT

MORE VIEW_NET

n/a

MORE REDUNDANT

(5)

RO

MORE NVM_DATA

n/a

(4)

n/a

(5)

RO
n/a

(4)

n/a

(5)

RO
n/a

(4)

n/a (5)
RO
n/a (4)

STATS

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17.5-5

17.5 Access Levels and Passwords


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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Softkeys

Access Levels
1

USAGE

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

QUALITY

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

SYNCH

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

MAN_CLEAR / AUTO_CLEAR

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

MIN/DEFER (6)

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

MAJ/PROMPT (6)

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

CONFIG

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

EXTNL_ALRM

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

RSET_TEP1E

R/W

R/W

R/W

R/W

MORE LOGGING

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

ALARMS

DIAG/INSTN

(6)

Notes
1. RO = read only.
2. R/W = read and write.
3. Changing the access level of one serial port automatically changes the access level of the other
serial port to the same parameter.
4. This softkey appears for Level 5 users only.
5. By definition, these softkeys are read-only functions.
6. Changing the access level of one alarm queue automatically changes the access levels of the other
alarm queues to the same parameter.

Table 17.5-3: Suggested Access Level Definitions for FRS, FRE and PE Card Sessions
Softkeys

Access Levels
1

RO (1)

RO

R/W (2)

R/W

FASTBUS (3)

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

STREAM

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

CONNECT

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

CONFIG
SWITCH

HOUSE
SESSN_TIME
CHNG_PSSWD

n/a

(4)

n/a

(4)

n/a

(4)

n/a (4)

MAINT

17.5-6

ON_CARD

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

ON_FASTBUS (3)

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

ON_STREAM

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

ON_CONNECT

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

(400)

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


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17.5 Access Levels and Passwords


Issue 1, November 1997

Softkeys

Access Levels
1

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

MONITOR

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

REFRESH

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

MAJ/PROMPT (5)

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

MIN/DEFER (5)

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

CONFIG

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

MORE LOGGING

RO

R/W

R/W

R/W

VIEW_NET
STATS

ALARMS

DIAG/INSTN

(5)

Notes
1. RO = read only.
2. R/W = read and write.
3. This softkey appears for the FRE and PE cards only.
4. This softkey appears for Level 5 users only.
5. Changing the access level of one alarm queue automatically changes the access levels of the other
alarm queues to the same level.

Level 0
Level 0 is a read-only access level for which no password is required. You configure
level 0 access on a per-node basis or on the FRS, FRE and PE card (both serial ports
on the FRS, FRE and PE cards have the same configuration). You can configure the
serial ports with level 0 access or no level 0 access.
When a serial port is configured for level 0 access, any user can look at the NMTI
settings by entering <0> when prompted for the level during log on. The system
does not prompt for a password.
Level 0 users have access to all softkeys except PROCEED. Only level 5 users can
configure a port as level 0 (this softkey does not appear for users logged on at other
levels).
If a serial port is configured for no level 0, users have to give one of the five access
level passwords to log on to the node manager. They have the read and write
privileges defined for that level. The setting for level 0 has no effect on the settings
for levels 1 to 5. Level 0 cannot be redefined or assigned a password.
Set level 0 access for the serial port as:

LEVEL_0 for level 0 access


NO_LEVEL_0 for no level 0 access (default)
See the procedure To set level 0 access.

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17.5-7

17.5 Access Levels and Passwords


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To define access levels 1 to 4


1.

Select the softkey that represents the level for which you want to change the
access.
For example, to define the access to card slots, select CONFIG then SLOT or
CONFIG then FASTBUS.

2.

Enter:
<Esc> <A>
Note

The access levels for the CONFIG CONNECT menu, available on a locally
controlled or switching shelf, cannot be changed.

Softkeys for the four levels appear.


3.

Select the level that you want to define:

4.

LEVEL _1
LEVEL_2
LEVEL_3
LEVEL_4

Select the access definition for this softkey:

READ/WRITE*
READ_ONLY
NO_ACCESS
To set level 0 access
HOUSE MORE LEVEL_0/NO_LEVEL_0*

17.5.4

Setting Passwords
You can configure each access level with its own password; users must enter the
password when they initiate a node management session.
The default password for levels 1 to 5 is <mainstreet>. The password for levels 1 to
5 can be changed after installation is complete. Passwords must be at least 8 and no
more than 12 alphanumeric characters with no spaces. When the system is first
commissioned, change the level 5 password on each shelf to protect the node
database. Only level 5 users can change passwords (the CHNG_PSSWD softkey
does not appear for users logged on at other levels).

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17.5 Access Levels and Passwords


Issue 1, November 1997

The access level passwords are not saved as part of a configuration database backup.
When a database is loaded into a node, the passwords revert to the default
<mainstreet>.
When you select CHNG_PSSWD, you are prompted for the level 5 password. This
prevents unauthorized users from changing passwords if a terminal is left
unattended while logged on at level 5.
When you enter the new password, the system prompts you to enter it a second
time. Then the system enters the password into the database in encrypted form.
Note
The DS-3 and DS-3 II cards support only one access level.

To set access-level passwords


HOUSE
MORE
CHNG_PSSWD
<level_5_psswd>

LEVEL_1

LEVEL_2

LEVEL_3

LEVEL_4

LEVEL_5

<new_psswd>
<new_psswd>

SK000025

where
level_5_psswd is your level 5 password (8 to 12 characters, no spaces)
new_psswd is the new password (8 to 12 characters, no spaces)

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17.5-9

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17.6

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

CPSS Configuration
This chapter introduces CPSS and explains how to configure the following
parameters:

17.6.1

node parameters
CPSS options
CPSS connections for a network manager
CPSS FASTbus connections
CPSS routing protocol

Understanding CPSS Configuration


CPSS is the Newbridge-proprietary packet-switched network management
protocol. MainStreet products use CPSS messages to exchange information.
CPSS messages carry information between nodes and network managers. CPSS
sends commands from the network manager to the nodes.
CPSS carries performance statistics, configuration status information and diagnostic
alarms from the nodes to the network manager. CPSS messages carry timing
information for synchronization between nodes that have ANS enabled. CPSS
messages also carry diagnostic and maintenance routing messages through the
CPSS network.
CPSS circuits cross-connected to aggregate link circuits, directly or through SRM,
carry messages between nodes. These circuits are supported by HDLC devices on
the Control card and the DCP card.
There are three kinds of CPSS circuit: shared, dedicated and FASTbus CPSS circuits.
Note
For information on backplane CPSS link configuration between the Control card and
DCP-based cards (CPC, DCP, FRE, FRS or PE card), see chapter 17.7.

Shared CPSS circuits


A shared CPSS circuit is provided by an HDLC device shared by several
system-related housekeeping tasks.
To provide CPSS connections between neighbour nodes, the Control card provides
one shared CPSS circuit that can be cross-connected to more than one aggregate link
circuit. The circuit identifier for a shared CPSS circuit is <CPSS>. Shared CPSS
circuits support speeds of 4, 8 or 16 kb/s.

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17.6-1

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Dedicated CPSS circuits


A dedicated CPSS circuit has exclusive use of an HDLC device and has a wider range
of speeds and configuration options (such as support for satellite delay) than shared
CPSS circuits.
The Control card provides four dedicated CPSS circuits. Each circuit can be
cross-connected to a different aggregate link (or to the same link). The circuit
identifier for a Control card dedicated CPSS circuit is <CPSS-n> where n is 1 to 4.
Control card dedicated CPSS circuits support speeds of 4, 8, 16, 48, 56 or 64 kb/s.
The DCP card provides up to 31 dedicated CPSS circuits. Each circuit can be
cross-connected to a different aggregate link (or to the same link). The circuit
identifier for a dedicated CPSS circuit on a DCP card is <sn-cc> where sn is the shelf
and slot occupied by the DCP card and cc is 1 to 31. DCP card dedicated CPSS
circuits support speeds of 4, 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 48, 56 and 64 kb/s.
DS-3 II and E3 cards support the termination of dedicated CPSS circuits on DS-3 or
E3 links. The DS-3 II and E3 cards support one dedicated CPSS circuit and the Dual
E3 card supports two. The dedicated CPSS (identified as CPSS-1 or CPSS-2) can be
cross-connected to any DS0. Dedicated CPSS circuits on DS-3 II and E3 cards support
speeds of 8, 16, 48 and 56 kb/s.

Backplane CPSS circuits


In situations where there is heavy CPSS traffic and potential network bottlenecks,
backplane CPSS circuits provide dedicated CPSS connections to the control card for
the DCP, CPC, FRE, FRS and PE cards. These cards, which previously could only
support shared CPSS, can use a backplane connection to improve their CPSS
connection speed from 16 kb/s shared CPSS to 64 kb/s dedicated CPSS.

FASTbus CPSS circuits


FASTbus CPSS connections are supported by the FRE (Release 2, part number
90-1673-02) or PE card. CPSS connectivity for the FRE or PE card is provided by
encapsulating CPSS over frame relay over the FASTbus. The limit of FASTbus CPSS
connections is two. CPSS over frame relay connections cannot be made over
backplane circuits. FASTbus CPSS connections can be made only to the FASTbus.
The circuit identifier for a FASTbus CPSS connection is either CPSS <x> to
F<y>-CPSS or F<y>-CPSS to CPSS<x>.
Note
Only 1350 PVCs are supported on an FRE or PE card carrying FASTbus CPSS.

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

CPSS cross-connections
You can cross-connect CPSS circuits to:

TS0 on E1, Dual E1, Dual E1-2, MPA and X.21/V.35 PRI links
FDL on T1 and Dual T1 links using ESF framing
all or part of a 64 kb/s channel (DS0) on all primary rate or data links (that is, they
can be subrate-multiplexed)
Unlike TS0 circuits with CPSS over them on other cards, you do not have to
cross-connect the Dual E1 card TS0 to the Control card or DCP card. Since CPSS is
terminated on the Dual E1 card, the system automatically makes the connection
when you enable CPSS over TS0.
CPSS cannot be directly or indirectly (through SRMs) connected to E1 or Dual E1
circuits in 3664 MainStreet systems. However, CPSS that terminates on other nodes
can be transported over E1 circuits.
CPSS is also carried over the system serial ports (directly or through a modem) when
configured for CPSS or modem operation (see section 17.6.8).
Note
Shared and dedicated CPSS circuits cannot be cross-connected to one another.

CPSS versions
There are two versions of CPSS: CPSSv1 and CPSSv2. CPSSv1 is supported on
Release 4 and lower systems. It provides a distance vector routing algorithm (router
version 1) and basic CPSS messaging and link costing options.
CPSSv2 is the most advanced version of CPSS supported in Release 6 and newer
versions of system software. In addition to CPSSv1 capability, it provides:

a Link State routing algorithm (router version 2)


domains (subnetworking)
enhanced network layer services
enhanced CPSS link cost options
master/slave protocol (CPSS parameter configuration consistency)

Router version 2 provides higher reliability, support for bigger networks and faster
routing table updates after a CPSS link failure. Router version 1 supports Release 6
and newer versions of node software in a Release 4 network and simplifies the
upgrade from Release 4 to 6 and up.

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17.6-3

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Note
CPSSv2 nodes are designed to interoperate with CPSSv1 nodes during and after an
upgrade to Release 6 and newer versions of system software (see Upgrading to
CPSSv2 in this section).

Router version 2
Previously, all CPSSv1 nodes performed CPSS message routing using router
version 1. With the introduction of CPSSv2, all nodes support enhanced network
layer services and link cost options, but only certain nodes perform CPSS message
routing using router version 2.
In a network running Release 6 or newer versions of system software, CPSSv2 nodes
running router version 2 typically form the backbone of a network. These are the
3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers nodes. In these nodes, there are one or
more CPSS routing elements that perform CPSS routing.
Routing elements are the Control card (switching, peripheral and locally controlled
shelf), DCP card, DS-3 II card and E3 card.
CPSSv2 nodes running router version 1 typically form the periphery of a network
and are called feeder nodes. To access the backbone CPSS network, feeder nodes
must be directly connected to a CPSSv2 backbone node, that is, not more than one
hop away. (A CPSS hop is a link between two CPSS routing elements that is free of
any intervening CPSS routing elements.) A node running router version 2 does not
forward CPSS traffic through a node running router version 1. Feeder nodes
typically form the periphery of the network and feed end user devices into the
backbone.
These nodes are the 3612, 3620, 3624, 3630 and 8230 MainStreet systems and the FRS,
FRE and PE cards.
Note
All backbone nodes in the same domain must run the same router version.

Domains
CPSSv2 lets you organize nodes into groups called domains; each domain has a
number. You can define up to 32 000 domains; this means that a large CPSS network
can be divided into smaller subnetworks. All domains are still under the control of
the same network manager, but each node knows only the topology of its own
domain. This reduces routing complexity, improves CPSS performance and
reliability and allows more than 1023 nodes to be included in the CPSS network.

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Note
The communication of CPSS messages from one domain to another needs an
inter-domain router, such as MDNS on the 4602 MainStreet Intelligent
NetworkStation or MainStreetXpress 46020 Network Manager.

Enhanced network layer services


CPSSv2 provides improved CPSS packet transmission services at the network layer.
These services support:

better error detection


large (256-byte) network-layer packets for higher throughput
a new datagram service for better performance
a maintenance packet for better diagnosis of CPSS problems

CPSS link cost


The cost of a CPSS link is a user-configured weight used by the current CPSS routing
algorithm during path selection. A route with a lower cost is selected over a route
with a higher cost.
CPSS cost is defined as NORMAL, BIAS_AGNST or BIAS_TOWRD to bias CPSS
traffic away from some links and toward others. For example, you can configure a
CPSS circuit cross-connected to a satellite link as BIAS_AGNST to encourage the
current routing algorithm to use a less expensive or faster connection. Table 17.6-1
lists the numeric values associated with these three choices. These values are not
user-configurable, but are assigned according to the nature of the CPSS circuit.
CPSS routing elements within a node are classified as follows.

Primary routing element:

CPSS routing element whose purpose is to route CPSS traffic exclusively, such as
the DCP card
Secondary routing element:
CPSS routing element that can route CPSS but whose main purpose is something
else, such as the Control, FRS, FRE and PE cards and the 4602 MainStreet
Intelligent NetworkStation or MainStreetXpress 46020 Network Manager.

Primary routing elements have lower CPSS path costs than secondary routing
elements to bias CPSS traffic towards them and away from secondary routing
elements.

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17.6-5

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table 17.6-1: CPSS Path Cost Values


Routing Element

Router Version 1

Router Version 2

Bias
Toward

Normal

Bias
Against

Bias
Toward

Normal

Bias
Against

Primary
Dedicated CPSS circuits
Serial ports

1
1

1
1

2
2

1
1

5
10

50
50

Secondary
Dedicated CPSS circuits
Shared CPSS circuits
Serial ports

1
1
1

1
1
1

2
4
8

1
5
1

10
25
20

50
100
200

Note 1
For switching shelf controlled systems, the CPSS cost of the CPSS link between the
switching shelf and a peripheral shelf is fixed at NORMAL (1 for router version 1
and 10 for router version 2) and is not user-configurable. For all systems, the CPSS
cost of the link between a Control card shared CPSS circuit and a minor node (DCP,
FRS, FRE or PE card) is fixed at NORMAL (7 for router version 2 or 0 for
router version 1) and is not user configurable.
Note 2
For Release 2 FRE (part number 90-1673-02) and PE cards, the default CPSS cost is
BIAS_AGAINST. When you configure for BIAS_AGAINST and a DCP card is
installed, CPSS will route through the DCP card instead of the FRE or PE CPSS link.

All displays showing CPSS information show CPSS cost as NORMAL,


BIAS_AGNST or BIAS_TOWRD (except for CPSS maintenance displays that show
the exact numeric value).
When CPSS path cost is changed for a link, the change takes effect immediately if
router version 2 is running. If router version 1 is running, the change does not take
effect until the link is restarted.
When the two ends of a connection are configured with a different path cost, router
version 2 uses the maximum of the two programmed costs. Router version 1 uses the
local programmed cost. In the example in Figure 17.6-1, the link is configured at
node A with a path cost of BIAS_AGNST and at node B with a path cost of
BIAS_TOWRD. If router version 2 is running, both node A and node B see the path
cost of this link as BIAS_AGNST. If router version 1 is running, node A sees a path
cost of BIAS_AGNST and node B sees a path cost of BIAS_TOWRD.
Figure 17.6-1: CPSS Cost Example
Bias against

Bias towards

B
8453

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Master/slave protocol
The CPSS master/slave protocol ensures that key CPSS parameters are configured
consistently in all elements of a system. It also simplifies the upgrade procedure
from Release 4 to Release 6 and newer versions of system software.
As shown in Figures 17.6-2 and 17.6-3, there is an overall CPSS master element and
one or more CPSS slave elements in any system. All slave elements receive their
CPSS parameter values from the master. Some slave elements function as
intermediate masters to the slave elements below them.
CPSS parameter changes can only be made on the overall master. In a switching
shelf controlled system, user attempts to change CPSSv2 parameters on peripheral
shelves are blocked.
Any CPSS parameter change made to the overall master is immediately propagated
to all slave elements. If a slave element is added to an existing system, the overall
CPSS master automatically downloads its CPSS parameter values to the new slave
element.
Figure 17.6-2: CPSS Master/Slave Protocol - Switching Shelf Controlled System

Active
switching
shelf

Active
DS-3/E3

Inactive
switching
shelf

Active
peripheral
shelf
Inactive
peripheral
shelf

Inactive
DS-3/E3

DCP
FRE/FRS
DCP
FRE/FRS
5370

Figure 17.6-3: CPSS Master/Slave Protocol - Locally Controlled System

Active
Control
card
Inactive
Control
card

DCP
FRE/FRS
DCP
FRE/FRS
5371

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17.6-7

17.6 CPSS Configuration


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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

For example, in a switching shelf controlled system, the active switching shelf is the
overall CPSS master and downloads its CPSS parameter values to the inactive
switching shelf and all active peripheral shelf Control cards, DS-3 II cards or E3
cards. In turn, each active peripheral shelf Control card downloads these values to
its inactive Control card and to all its UCS cards affected by CPSS parameter values.
Similarly, each active DS-3 II or E3 card downloads these values to its inactive
DS-3 II or E3 card mate.
Note
The master/slave protocol operates only within a system, not between all systems
in a network. It guarantees that all slave elements of a system are consistent with the
overall master of that system. The network manager must make sure that the overall
masters of each system in the network are consistent with one another.

Upgrading to CPSSv2
CPSSv2 nodes (both routing and feeder) provide backwards compatibility features
to support interoperability with CPSSv1 nodes and to simplify the upgrade
procedure from Release 4 to Release 6 and newer versions of system software.
Master/slave protocol and upgrades from Release 4 software
The master/slave protocol simplifies the upgrade procedure from Release 4 to
Release 6 and newer versions of system software, and ensures that the overall master
and all slave elements can be reached through the CPSS network at all times during
the upgrade.
The example in Figure 17.6-4 shows the basic steps (a through d) in the upgrade
procedure from Release 4 to Release 6 and how the master/slave protocol functions
for a dual-shelf, control-redundant locally controlled system. (This example applies
to upgrades from Release 4 to Release 6 and newer versions of system software.)

17.6-8

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 17.6-4: Example of Upgrade from Release 4


(b)

(c)

(d)

Release 4

Release 4 Master

Release 6 Master

Release 6 Master

CPSSv1

CPSSv1

CPSSv1

CPSSv1

Router 1

Router 1

CPSSv2

(a)

Router 2

Router 2

x Domain

x Domain

Release 6 Slave

Release 4

CPSSv1

CPSSv1

CPSSv1

CPSSv2

CPSSv2
Router 1

Release 4
Router 1

Router 1

Router 1

Slave

Release 6

Slave

CPSSv1

CPSSv2

Router 1

Router 1

Router 2

Router 2

1 Domain

x Domain

7176

Initially (a), both the active and inactive Control card run Release 4 and the
master/slave protocol does not exist.
The inactive Control card is upgraded (b) to Release 6 (or newer version of system
software) then restarted. The inactive Release 6 Control card identifies the active
Release 4 Control card as its master. Because the master is running CPSSv1, the
inactive Release 6 Control card enters CPSSv1 mode (this mode is not
user-selectable). The router is set to router version 1, by default, and is therefore
compatible with the master. The domain number is set to 1, by default. Now you can
change the domain number on the inactive Release 6 Control card to be ready for the
activity switch that makes the Release 6 Control card active.
When you initiate an activity switch (c), the formerly inactive Release 4 Control card
becomes active. The now-active Release 6 Control card detects that it has become the
new overall master and runs the highest version of CPSS it canCPSSv2. Domain
and router version remain on the active Release 6 Control card as configured. The
master prepares to download these parameters to the inactive Release 4 Control
card, waiting until the inactive can respond to its master/slave protocol requests.
You can then upgrade the inactive Release 4 Control card (d) to Release 6 and restart
the card. The inactive Release 6 Control card identifies the active Release 6 Control
card as its master and gets ready to receive the CPSS parameter values of the master.
The active Release 6 Control card downloads its CPSS parameters values to the
inactive Release 6 Control card.
Now the system is ready for the Router Upgrade Tool to switch the network over to
router version 2. Alternatively, you can select router version 2 manually on the CPSS
overall master (see Table 17.6-2 for the location of the configuration procedure).

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


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Caution
As a general rule, leave CPSSv2 parameters at their default during the upgrade. The
exception is domain number (step b, in Figure 17.6-4); it should be configured to
match the domain in which the system is located. For more information on upgrades
and the Router Upgrade Tool, contact your Newbridge representative.

Router interoperability
CPSSv2 backbone nodes support router version 1 and 2 and can exchange CPSS
messages using the small packet size used by CPSSv1 or the large packet size used
by CPSSv2.
When a CPSSv2 backbone node using router version 2 is directly connected to a
CPSSv1 or CPSSv2 node running router version 1 (that is, not more than one hop
away), it automatically translates router version 2 information into router version 1
format. (Router version 1 always uses small packets; router version 2 always uses
large packets.)
CPSSv2 feeder nodes support small and large CPSS message packet sizes. The small
packets option is the default for a CPSSv2 feeder node brought on-line in a CPSSv1
network during an upgrade from Release 4 to Release 6 and newer versions of
system software.
A CPSSv2 node running router version 2 can reach a router version 1 node any
number of hops away as long as the route to the node is through router version 2
nodes only. A CPSSv2 node running router version 2 does not forward CPSS traffic
through a router version 1 node.

CPSS status information


In Release 4 products, hops and CPSS cost are equivalent. This means that a
Release 4 feeder node shows hops as costs, not as hops.
When viewed from a feeder node, the CPSS cost is always equal to 100. For the real
CPSS cost, view the CPSS cost from a backbone node.

CPSS grooming
In a network of Newbridge equipment, only one channel in each pair of adjacent
nodes must be dedicated to CPSS messages. However, if Newbridge equipment is
connected to a network of non-Newbridge equipment, the ability to connect more
than one CPSS channel to a single CPSS carrier is advantageous. This connection is
called CPSS grooming.

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

In Figure 17.6-5, the node on the left side is doing CPSS grooming. It is mediating
between many CPSS channels on one primary rate link and a single CPSS channel
on the other link. The system monitors the incoming CPSS channels from both links
and makes dynamic cross-connections as required. For example, if a CPSS message
addressed to 3624 MainStreet (#3) node comes in on the T1 link, the system connects
the single CPSS channel to the DS0 for 3624 MainStreet (#3) node for the message to
pass. With CPSS grooming, many CPSS channels can be funneled into a single
channel.
In Figure 17.6-5, each CPSS channel is routed separately and transparently through
the non-Newbridge network from the node doing CPSS grooming to the other
Newbridge equipment.

Channel limitations
The following channel limitations affect the PRI cards.

For the E1 card, timeslot 0 and all 30 DS0s can be configured as CPSS channels.
For E1 or Dual E1 cards in a 3664 MainStreet system, no circuits can be configured

for CPSS.
For the T1 card, the FDL and up to 23 DS0s can be configured as CPSS channels.
For the Dual T1 card, FDL cannot be used for CPSS if the host is running router
version 2.
For T1 and Dual T1 cards in a 3664 MainStreet system, the FDL and up to 12 DS0s
can be configured for CPSS.
For DS-3 II and E3 cards, only one DS0 in a card can be configured as a CPSS
channel.
For Dual E3 cards, only two DS0s in a card can be configured as CPSS channels.

There are other limitations on a system level. If a node contains only E1 or T1 cards,
the maximum number of channels (DS0s, TS0s or FDLs) that can be designated as
shared CPSS channels for slots A1 through A6 is 34. For example, if slot A1 contains
an E1 card with all 30 DS0s and TS0 designated as CPSS channels (a total of 31
channels), only three other channels for slots A2 through A6 can be designated as
CPSS channels, for a total of 34 channels.
If you configure more CPSS channels than allowed, the system raises a System
Advisory alarm with subcode 225.

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


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Figure 17.6-5: CPSS Grooming Application

3624 MainStreet node


#1
T1

3624 MainStreet node


#2
T1

T1

T1

Network made up of
non-Newbridge equipment

3600 MainStreet node


(performing CPSS grooming)

3624 MainStreet node


#3

T1

Single DS0
configured for CPSS

T1

3624 MainStreet node


#4

Many DS0s
configured for CPSS
3624 MainStreet node
#5

2034

17.6.2

Configuring CPSS
Table 17.6-2 lists the CPSS configuration parameters and the cards to which they
apply. Each parameter has a list of options with any default option marked by an
asterisk.

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 17.6-2: CPSS Configuration Parameters and Options


Control
Card

DCP

DS-3 II
and
E3
Card

FRS
Card

FRE
and
PE
Card

Parameter

Options

4 kb/s CPSS

4 kb/s
8 kb/s
16 kb/s

4 kb/s CPSS

enabled
disabled*

CPSS
connection type

shared
dedicated*

Cost of dedicated
CPSS

normal*
bias against
bias towards

Cost of shared
CPSS

normal*
bias against
bias towards

CPSS node
number

1 to 999

Domain number

1 to 32000 (* = 1)

Interface speed

4 kb/s
8 kb/s
16 kb/s
48 kb/s
56 kb/s
64 kb/s

NOC number

up to 30 characters

Router version

version 1*
version 2

Routing protocol

host router
router version 1*

Satellite delay

satellite
normal

Timers

T200
TACK
N200
T203

(1)

Notes
1. This parameter applies only to Release 2 FRE cards and PE cards.

Table 17.6-3 lists the CPSS connection configuration procedures and the cards to
which they apply. These procedures explain how to make CPSS connections.

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


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Table 17.6-3: CPSS Connection Configuration Procedures


Control
Card

DCP

DS-3 II
and
E3
Cards

T1
Cards

E1
Cards

X.21,
V.35
and
MPA
Cards

FRE
and
PE
Cards

DNIC
and
2B1Q
Cards

FRS
Card

Configuration Procedure

64 kb/s CPSS

Cost on serial ports

CPSS connection type

FASTbus CPSS connections

FDL

PSTN and modem connection to


network manager

Serial port connection to network


manager

Signalling

Subrate CPSS channels


TS0

Note
Table 16.4-1 in chapter 16.4 explains the formats of the identifiers in the procedures.

17.6.3

Configuring CPSS Node Parameters


CPSS node parameters are basic system-related CPSS parameters that apply to the
node as a whole. The CPSS node parameters you can configure are:

node number
NOC number
domain number
CPSS connection type
router version
cost of shared CPSS

Table 17.6-2 lists these parameters and indicates the cards to which they apply.
Figure 17.6-6 shows a typical CPSS node parameter display.

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 17.6-6: CPSS Node Parameter Display


3600 MainStreet

Port
1
2

1117-H1-00

Baud Rate

Port Type

9600
1200

Current Port
Session Time
Domain Number
Node Number
Router Version
NOC Number
Shared CPSS Cost
Level Zero Access

Toronto:A

Alarms:1

Flow Control

VT100
CPSS_MODEM

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

11-May-1997

NONE
NONE

8:35a

CPSS Cost
N/A
Normal

Serial port one


30 minutes
1
Unassigned
2
Unassigned
Normal
No

HOUSE CPSS
1-NODE_NUM
6-

2-NOC_NUM
7-

3-DOMAIN_NUM
8-CANCEL

4-ROUTER
9-QUIT

5-SHARE_COST
0-

Note
Node number, domain number and router version are neither backed up nor
restored. All other node parameters are backed up and overwrite the current
configuration when you do a restore procedure.

Node number
The node number (NODE_NUM) is the address used by major nodes to identify and
communicate with each other. Minor nodes (such as FRS, FRE and PE cards) are
identified by the node number of their major node and their slot.
At installation, each major node in a domain (locally controlled shelf, switching shelf
or peripheral shelf Control card and DS-3 II or E3 card) is assigned a unique node
number. Because the two Control cards in a control-redundant system (or the two
cards in a control-redundant DS-3 II or E3 card pair) act as one node, both cards must
have the same node number.
Setting and changing the node number and assigning a new node number for the
Control card, DS-3 card and E3 card are described in Installation, Task 1400:
Commissioning the Nodes.
You may need to initiate a system restart before the new (programmed) node
number takes effect or appears in the header line. In the HOUSE display, both the
programmed and current node numbers appear.

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Note
The network manager and the Craft Interface node manager manuals see node
number as CPSS node ID.

To configure the node number, see the procedure To configure node parameters.

NOC number
You must set the NOC number (NOC_NUM) if the node is part of a network
controlled by network management software. The NOC is the computer running the
network management software. Normal communications with the NOC is through
primary rate links in the network. A PSTN link and modems can be used as a
back-up to the primary rate links. The NOC number is the telephone number of the
modem serving the NOC computer.
When you enter the number, include any prefix digits that would be required if the
call were dialed manually from a phone (such as the area code). The number can
include the Hayes AT modem dial modifiers (, = pause; W = wait for dial tone;
@ = wait for silence). The NOC number cannot be more than 30 characters long. For
example, to dial a long distance number from a PBX that provides a second dial tone
after the digit 9, use 9W1-613-591-3645. By default, the node instructs the modem to
dial the NOC number using dial pulsing. For the modem to dial using DTMF, you
must precede the NOC number with the characters DT.
To configure the NOC number, see the procedure To configure node parameters.

Domain number
You configure the domain number (DOMAIN_NUM) by assigning a number in the
range of 1 to 32000 to the CPSS overall master. For a switching shelf controlled
system, the overall master is the active switching shelf Control card. For a locally
controlled system, it is the active shelf. When you configure the master domain
number, CPSSv2 immediately configures the rest of the node with the same domain
number.
To configure the domain number, see the procedure To configure node
parameters.

CPSS connection type


You can configure CPSS connection type (CARD_COMM) for the DCP, FRE, FRS
and PE cards as DEDICATED or SHARED. Shared CPSS connections provide an
interface speed of 16 kb/s, while dedicated CPSS connections provide an interface
speed of 64 kb/s. Dedicated CPSS is provided across a backplane connection made
to the Control card.
To configure the CPSS connection type, see the procedure To configure CPSS
connection type.

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Router version
You configure the router version by assigning a version number (VERSION_1 or
VERSION_2) to the CPSS overall master. For a switching shelf controlled system, the
active switching shelf Control card is the CPSS overall master. For a locally
controlled system, the active shelf is the CPSS overall master. When you configure
the master router version, CPSSv2 immediately configures the rest of the node to the
same router version.
To configure the router version, see the procedure To configure node parameters.

Router version 2 FRS, FRE and PE card restrictions


The two valid CPSS routing protocol options for an FRS, FRE or PE card are
ROUTER_V1 (router version 1) and HOST_RTR (host router). An FRS, FRE or PE
card configured for Host Router will run the same router version as the node Control
card. A maximum of two FRS, FRE or PE cards can be configured for HOST_RTR if
the node Control card is configured for router version 2.
If you attempt to configure more than two FRS, FRE or PE cards for HOST_RTR in a
node configured for router version 2, an error message is displayed. Any additional
FRS, FRE or PE cards must be configured for router version 1. Similarly, if you
attempt to select router version 2 as host router from the House menu while having
more than two FRS, FRE or PE cards configured for Host router, the selection will be
blocked. In order to select router version 2 in this situation, you must first ensure that
no more than two FRS, FRE or PE cards are configured for Host router. See the
procedure To configure FRS, FRE and PE card router version for additional
information on how to configure the FRS, FRE or PE card CPSS router version.
Note 1
Router version 2 cannot be used if CPSS is being carried on TS0 of a Dual E1 card or
FDL of a Dual T1 card.
Note 2
If the node is configured for router version 2, and a FRS, FRE or PE card configured
for router version 1 has a CPSS connection present on a serial port, the node at the
end of that CPSS link may not be visible to the CPSS master.

Cost of shared CPSS


You configure shared path cost (SHARE_COST) by selecting one of three
pre-defined choices:

NORMAL for normal cost (default)


BIAS_AGNST for cost greater than normal
BIAS_TOWRD for cost less than normal
If the node is configured for router version 1, the system does not act on a CPSS path
cost change until the link is restarted. If the node is configured for router version 2,
it acts on a cost change immediately.

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


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To configure the cost of shared CPSS, see the procedure To configure node
parameters.

To configure node parameters


HOUSE MORE CPSS

DOMAIN_NUM

NODE_NUM

NOC_NUM

<node_num>

<noc_num> <domain_num> VERSION_1*/


VERSION_2

NORMAL*

ROUTER

BIAS_AGNST

SHARE_COST

BIAS_TOWRD
SK000026

where
node_num is 1 to 999
noc_num is the NOC telephone number with any prefix digits and modem dial codes (up to 30 characters)
domain_num is 1 to 32000 (1*)

To configure the CPSS connection type


CONFIG SLOT <sn> CARD_COMM SHARED/DEDICATED*

To configure FRS, FRE and PE card router version


CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS
ROUTER_V1/HOST_RTR
SK000029

17.6.4

Configuring CPSS Options


In addition to node parameters, you can configure these optional CPSS parameters:

cost of dedicated CPSS


interface speed
satellite delay
signalling

Table 17.6-2 lists these parameters and indicates the cards to which they apply.

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Note
For information about other CPSS options, such as viewing routing tables or CPSS
connections, see Maintenance, chapter 33.8.

Dedicated CPSS cost


You can configure CPSS path cost for dedicated and shared CPSS. (Section 17.6.3
describes configuring shared CPSS cost.) The dedicated CPSS path cost value on the
Control, DCP, DS-3 II, E3, FRS, FRE or PE card can be:

NORMAL for normal cost (default)


BIAS_AGNST for cost greater than normal
BIAS_TOWRD for cost less than normal
To configure the dedicated CPSS cost, see the applicable card procedure:

To configure Control, DS-3 II and E3 card CPSS options


To configure DCP card CPSS options
Interface speed
On a Control card, you can configure a dedicated CPSS channel for speeds of 4, 8, 16,
48, 56 or 64 kb/s. On a DCP card, you can configure speeds of 4, 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 48,
56 or 64 kb/s; 4 kb/s dedicated CPSS is available only on circuits 24 through 31 as a
slot option.
On a DS-3 II or E3 card, you can configure speeds of 8, 16, 48 or 56 kb/s. The larger
the bandwidth dedicated to CPSS, the faster CPSS messages are sent and received.
(The system automatically configures shared CPSS speed at connect time.)
On a Control, DS-3 II or E3 card, you configure the interface speed by selecting the
SPEED softkey.
On a DCP card, you configure the interface speed by selecting TRANSP_BW and
entering a starting bit position value from 1 to 8. Each bit position represents 8 kb/s.
For example, enter 2 for a 16 kb/s CPSS channel and 7 for a 56 kb/s channel.
To configure the interface speed, see the applicable card procedure:

To configure Control, DS-3 II and E3 card CPSS options


To configure DCP card CPSS options
Satellite delay
To transmit CPSS messages over a satellite link, you must use a Control, DCP,
DS-3 II, or E3 card dedicated CPSS circuit configured for satellite delay. To configure
satellite delay, select SATELLITE; to remove satellite delay, select NORMAL.

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


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To configure the satellite delay, see the applicable card procedure:

To configure Control, DS-3 II and E3 card CPSS options


To configure DCP card CPSS options
Signalling Restrictions
You must configure primary rate card circuits for T1_SIG or E1_SIG signalling
before cross-connection to DCP card CPSS circuits. Table 20.1-2 lists the parameters
used to configure signalling for the PRI cards.

To configure Control, DS-3 II and E3 card CPSS options


CONFIG CIRCUIT <CPSS-n> or <sn-cc> FUNCTION

SATELLITE/NORMAL*

SPEED
<speed>

NORMAL*

PATH_COST

BIAS_AGNST BIAS_TOWRD
SK000027

where
n is 1 to 4
speed is 4, 8, 16, 48, 56 or 64 (*)

To configure DCP card CPSS options


CONFIG CIRCUIT <sn-cc> FUNCTION

TRANSP_BW

SATELLITE/NORMAL

<bw>
NORMAL*

PATH_COST

BIAS_AGNST BIAS_TOWRD
SK000030

where bw is the number of 8 kb/s elements (1 to 8)

17.6.5

Configuring 64 kb/s CPSS Channels


You can designate all or part of a 64 kb/s channel on a primary rate or data link as a
CPSS channel. A 64 kb/s channel on a T1 or E1 PRI circuit or a 64 kb/s DCC, DNIC
or 2B1Q circuit can be used as a CPSS channel by connecting the 64 kb/s channel to
a CPSS channel on a Control card or DCP card.

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

If the link terminates on the Dual T1 or Dual E1 card, the card only passes CPSS
transparently. If the link terminates on the Control card, a Dual T1 supports up to 24
CPSS channels; a Dual E1 card supports up to 30 on a CAS framed E1 or 31 on a CCS
or 31-channel framed E1.
You can configure the 64 kb/s CPSS channel from the perspective of the CPSS
channel or the 64 kb/s circuit.
The Dual E1-2 card does not support the termination of CPSS on the card but can
cross-connect dedicated CPSS resources. The NU bits in TS0 are used to
cross-connect CPSS information terminated on the Control card or DCP to another
Control card or DCP. See section 17.6.6 for more information.
Note
In single-shelf control-redundant systems, CPSS-4 is automatically configured to
64 kb/s and connected as the mate link. If you try to configure CPSS-4, a warning
message appears.

To connect a Control, DS-3 II or E3 card CPSS channel


You can connect a Control, DS-3 II or E3 card CPSS channel in one of two ways.
From the CPSS channel perspective, enter:

CONFIG CONNECT <CPSS> or <CPSS-n>

TO_CIRCUIT

DISC_FROM or DISCONNECT

<sn-cc> or <sn-l-cc>
SK000031

where n is 1 to 4 for a Control card, 1 or 2 for a Dual E3 card and 1 for a DS-3 II card

From the 64 kb/s circuit perspective, enter:

CONFIG CONNECT <sn-cc> or <sn-l-cc>

TO_CIRCUIT

DISCONNECT

<CPSS> or <CPSS-n>
SK000032

where n is 1 to 4 for a Control card, 1 or 2 for a Dual E3 card and 1 for a DS-3 II card

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


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To connect a DCP card CPSS channel


You can connect a DCP card CPSS channel in one of two ways.
From the DCP channel perspective, enter:

CONFIG CONNECT <sn-cc>

TO_CIRCUIT

DISCONNECT

<sn-cc> or <sn-l-cc>
SK000033

where the first sn-cc is the DCP circuit configured to support a 64 kb/s circuit

From the 64 kb/s circuit perspective, enter:

CONFIG CONNECT <sn-cc> or <sn-l-cc>

TO_CIRCUIT

DISCONNECT

<sn-cc>
SK000034

where the second sn-cc is the DCP circuit configured to support a 64 kb/s circuit

17.6.6

Configuring CPSS over FDL and TS0


You can configure CPSS over FDL on the T1 and Dual T1 cards. The E1, Dual E1,
Dual E1-2, X.21, V.35 and MPA cards support CPSS over the 64 kb/s TS0
supervisory channel.
On E1, MPA, X.21 and V.35 PRI cards, you can use TS0 to terminate a CPSS channel
by cross-connecting it to a dedicated CPSS resource. Since CPSS is terminated on the
Dual E1 card, only the link TS0 option is used to enable or disable CPSS over TS0.
Dual E1-2 cards do not terminate CPSS on the card but can cross-connect dedicated
CPSS resources through the cards NU bits on TS0.

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


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T1 cards
The FDL is a 4 kb/s channel available when ESF is configured on T1 links. (To
configure ESF, see chapter 20.6.) For the T1 card, you can use the FDL channel for
CPSS by cross-connecting it to a CPSS circuit on the Control card or the DCP card.
Both dedicated and shared CPSS circuits are supported.
When you connect a dedicated CPSS channel to the FDL, you must configure the
interface speed of the CPSS channel to 4 kb/s (see section 17.6.4). You cannot connect
FDL to a shared or dedicated CPSS circuit on a Dual T1 card, but you can enable
CPSS over FDL for the card when configuring the slot.
Note
CPSS on FDL cannot be terminated to Dual T1 cards if the host system is running
CPSSv2.
FDL is not available for CPSS connections on Dual T1-2 cards.

To configure FDL, see the procedure To enable or disable CPSS over FDL on Dual
T1 cards.
To connect a CPSS channel to the FDL, see the procedure To connect a CPSS circuit
to the T1 card FDL.

E1 cards
On E1 cards, you can use TS0 as a CPSS channel by cross-connecting it to a CPSS
circuit. In the resulting CPSS channel, only 16 kb/s of the available 64 kb/s
bandwidth is used.
When you connect a dedicated CPSS channel to TS0, you must configure the
interface speed of the CPSS channel to 16 kb/s (see section 17.6.4). For the E1 card,
connecting and disconnecting the dedicated resources CPSS channel effectively
enables and disables CPSS over TS0. The Dual E1 card terminates CPSS when the
CPSS option is enabled on the card. The CPSS option on the card can be disabled
without disconnecting the CPSS channel.
For the Dual E1-2 card, the NU bits in TS0 can be used to carry a CPSS channel from
the Control card or DCP card in one node to the Control card or DCP card in another
node. Both dedicated and shared CPSS channels are supported. A CPSSv1 or
CPSSv2 connection of either 4, 8 or 16 kb/s is allowed.

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Note 1
Dual E1 and Dual E1-2 cards support three features that use the same NU bit
resources in TS0: SA4 Bit Error Rate, clear NU bits and CPSS over TS0. You can
enable only one of these three features at a time for the link. Any one of these features
can be used simultaneously with the E-bit option (see chapter 20.18).
Note 2
When an E1 HDSL module is installed on a Dual E1 card, you can use any timeslot
as a CPSS channel.

To configure TS0 on the Dual E1 card, see the procedure To enable or disable CPSS
over TS0 on Dual E1 cards.
To configure TS0 on the Dual E1-2 card, see To connect or disconnect a Control card
CPSS channel on FDL or TS0.

X.21 and V.35 PRI cards


On X.21 and V.35 PRI links, TS 0 corresponds to the supervisory channel. You can
use the X.21 or V.35 links TS0 to carry CPSS by cross-connecting it to a CPSS circuit
on the Control card or the DCP card.
The CPSS channel will occupy bit positions B7 and B6 of the supervisory channel.
You must configure the supervisory channel so that bit positions B7 and B6 are
unoccupied and not part of the HCM signalling frame. The framing bit of the HCM
frame must be in bit position B5, B3 or B6. See chapter 23.6 for more information.
Once the framing bit is in the correct position, the CPSS channel must be connected
to the X.21 or V.35 TS0 to enable CPSS.

MPA cards
The MPA card supports both shared and dedicated CPSS on each interface port. The
TS0 designated for each port must be configured seperately; however, configuration
of CPSS over TS0 is optional on a per port basis.
Either 8 kb/s or 16 kb/s CPSS can be configured on the TS0 supervisory channel. The
8 kb/s CPSS channel occupies bit position B7 of the supervisory channel and the 16
kb/s CPSS channel occupies bit positions B7 and B6. You must configure the
supervisory channel so that the required bit positions are unoccupied before
enabling CPSS on the link, for more information see chapter 20.20.
Once the framing bits are in the correct position, the speed of the CPSS channel must
be configured. To complete the CPSS circuit, the MPA card TS0 must be
cross-connected to the CPSS channel of the Control card or DCP.
If the message Not Enough Bandwidth appears when enabling CPSS for the
interface, the maximum number of channels available for data on the MPA card is
exceeded. For more information about bandwidth allocation, see chapter 20.20.
To enable 8 kb/s or 16 kb/s CPSS, see the procedure To configure CPSS over TS0
for MPA cards.

17.6-24

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

To enable or disable CPSS over FDL on Dual T1 cards


Note
Ensure that the link is configured for ESF before proceeding.

CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS FDL_CPSS/FDL_UNUSED*

To enable or disable CPSS over TS0 for Dual E1 cards


CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS TS0_OPTION CPSS_ON/CPSS_OFF*

To enable CPSS over TS0 for Dual E1-2 cards


1.

Enable CPSS over TS0 on the card, enter:


CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS PHYSICAL TS0_OPTION
CPSS_PIPE

2.

Connect the Dual E1-2 card link TS0 to the CPSS channel of either the
Control card or the DCP card.
a.

See To connect or disconnect a Control card CPSS channel on FDL or


TS0.

b.

See To connect or disconnect a DCP card CPSS channel on FDL or TS0.

To disable CPSS over TS0 for Dual E1-2 cards


CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS PHYSICAL TS0_OPTION CPSS_OFF*

To configure CPSS over TS0 for MPA cards


There are three steps to configure CPSS over TS0 for MPA cards.
1.

Move the MPA card framing and the HCM framing bits out of bit positions B7
and B6 (see section 20.20.7 for more information).

2.

Select either 8 kb/s or 16 kb/s bandwidth for CPSS transport on the link, enter:
CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS MORE CPSS

8K

16K
SK000692

Ensure that the speed matches the CPSS resource channel.


3.

Node Parameters

Connect the MPA card link TS0 to the CPSS channel of either the Control card
or the DCP card.

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17.6-25

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

a.

See To connect or disconnect a Control card CPSS channel on FDL or


TS0.

b.

See To connect or disconnect a DCP card CPSS channel on FDL or TS0.

To disable CPSS over TS0 for MPA cards


CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS MORE CPSS DISABLE

To configure CPSS over TS0 for X.21 or V.35 cards


1.

Move the HCM framing bits out of bit positions B7 and B6 (see chapter 23.6 for
more information).

2.

Connect the link to the CPSS channel of either the Control card or the DCP card.
a.

See To connect or disconnect a Control card CPSS channel on FDL or


TS0.

b.

See To connect or disconnect a DCP card CPSS channel on FDL or TS0.

To connect or disconnect a Control card CPSS channel on FDL or TS0


You can connect a Control card CPSS channel from the CPSS channel perspective or
from the cards FDL or TS0 perspective. This procedure is applicable to T1, E1,
Dual E1-2, MPA, X.21 and V.25 cards.

To connect or disconnect a DCP card CPSS channel on FDL or TS0


You can connect a DCP card CPSS channel from the CPSS channel perspective or
from the cards FDL or TS0 perspective. This procedure is applicable to T1, E1, Dual
E1-2, MPA, X.21 and V.25 cards.
From the CPSS channel perspective, enter:

CONFIG CONNECT <sn-cc>

TO_CIRCUIT
<sn-FDL> or <sn-TS0> or <sn-l-TS0>

DISCONNECT

SK000037

where sn-cc is a DCP circuit configured to support CPSS

From the FDL or TS0 perspective, enter:

17.6-26

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17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

CONFIG CONNECT <sn-FDL> or <sn-TS0> or <sn-l-TS0>

TO_CIRCUIT
<sn-cc>

DISCONNECT

SK000038

where sn-cc is a DCP circuit configured to support CPSS

17.6.7

Configuring Subrate CPSS Channels


In most cases, a node does not require a full 64 kb/s of bandwidth dedicated to CPSS
messages. You can configure a 64 kb/s channel on a T1, E1, or X.21 or V.35 PRI link
or a 64 kb/s DCC, DNIC or 2B1Q circuit to carry a subrate CPSS channel (less than
64 kb/s).
The Control card supports four dedicated CPSS channels that you can configure for
subrate speeds of 4, 8, 16, 48 or 56 kb/s and one shared CPSS channel that you can
configure for speeds of 4, 8 or 16 kb/s. The DCP card supports 31 dedicated CPSS
channels that you can configure for subrate speeds of 4, 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 48 or 56 kb/s.
When you configure the DCP card to support 4 kb/s CPSS circuits, eight circuits are
set aside (circuits 24 through 31) for 4 kb/s use; the remaining 23 circuits are
available for n x 8 kb/s CPSS circuits, where n 8.
You can subrate-multiplex a subrate CPSS channel with HCV compressed voice and
data (either HCM or transparent).
You can connect subrate CPSS channels to the supervisory channel on X.21 and V.35
PRI cards. The bit positions that the CPSS channel occupies must be unoccupied and,
in the case of 8 through 48 kb/s CPSS channels, must not be part of the HCM
signalling frame. (A 56 kb/s CPSS channel is not possible on the supervisory
channel because the framing bit would have to be in bit position B0, which is not
permitted.)
Figures 17.6-7 and 17.6-8 show how the location of the framing bit affects where a
4 kb/s subrate CPSS channel occupies its five bit positions in an HCM frame. The
circuit to which the 4 kb/s CPSS channel is connected must be an HCM channel with
five empty bit positions following the framing bit. This could be a DCC circuit, DNIC
circuit, a 2B1Q circuit or an SRM. CPSS channels at 4 kb/s are supported by SRMs
on DNIC Line or 2B1Q Line cards with a DPM2 and SRMs on DSP2 and DSP3 cards.
For more information on framing bit locations, see chapter 23.6.

Node Parameters

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17.6-27

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 17.6-7: 4 kb/s CPSS Channel with Framing Bit at F0-B7


B7

B6

B5

B4

B3

B2

B1

B0

F0

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

F9

a = CPSS

7187

Figure 17.6-8: 4 kb/s CPSS Channel with Framing Bit at F0-B4


B7

B6

B5

B4

B3

B2

B1

B0

F0

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

F9

a = CPSS

7188

The subrate CPSS channels from 8 to 56 kb/s are transparent channels that occupy
as many of the most significant bit positions as are required, where each bit position
represents 8 kb/s. For example, a 16 kb/s subrate CPSS channel is a transparent
channel that occupies the two most significant bit positions (bit positions B7 and B6).

17.6-28

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

The circuit carrying the CPSS channel, or the SRM used to multiplex the subrate
CPSS channel with other voice or data channels, needs some preparation, depending
on whether it is a transparent or HCM SRM.

If a DCC, DNIC or 2B1Q circuit is carrying the CPSS channel, it must be

configured for transparent rate adaption and for a bandwidth equal to or greater
than the bandwidth of the CPSS channel.
If a transparent SRM is being used to subrate-multiplex the CPSS channel, the
transport bandwidth must be equal to or greater than the bandwidth of the CPSS
channel. Nothing needs to be done with the transport position.
If an HCM SRM is being used to subrate-multiplex the CPSS channel, the
bandwidth available for transparent channels must be equal to or greater than
the bandwidth of the CPSS channel. That is, the framing bit must be adjusted so
that the HCM frame does not occupy the bit position(s) that the CPSS channel
occupies.

Figures 17.6-9 and 17.6-10 show how the framing bit can be relocated for a 16 and
48 kb/s CPSS channel, respectively.
Figure 17.6-9: 16 kb/s CPSS Channel with Framing Bit at F0-B5

F0

B7

B6

B5

B4

B3

B2

B1

B0

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

F9

a = CPSS
or
a = sn-cc
a DCP
circuit
identifier

7189

Node Parameters

(400)

17.6-29

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 17.6-10: 48 kb/s CPSS Channels with Framing Bit at F0-B6


B7

B6

B5

B4

B3

B2

B1

B0

F0

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

F9

a = sn-cc

7190

Note
If an SRM is carrying a CPSS channel, that SRM cannot be connected to the branch
channel of another SRM.

To configure a Control card CPSS channel


1.

Configure the DNIC or 2B1Q Line card or DSP card for subrate multiplexing
and either HCM or transparent rate adaption (see chapter 23.6).

2.

If you are connecting an 8 to 56 kb/s CPSS channel to an HCM SRM, adjust the
SRM framing bit so that it does not occupy the bit positions that the CPSS
channel will occupy (see chapter 23.6).

3.

Configure the SRM for CPSS and select the bandwidth to be dedicated to the
CPSS channel as 4_kbps, 8_kbps or 16_kbps.
When CPSS is connected to the SRM, the CPSS bandwidth is listed on the
display to the right under CPSS Speed.
CONFIG CIRCUIT <sn-cc-Mmm> FUNCTION CPSS

4_kbps

8_kbps

16_kbps*
SK000039

17.6-30

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4.

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

From the switching shelf, connect an SRM to a circuit on a T1, E1 or X.21 or V.35
PRI link, a supervisory channel on an X.21 or V.35 PRI link, or a DCC, DNIC or
2B1Q circuit by entering:
CONFIG CONNECT <x-sn-Mmm> or <x-sn-cc-Mmm>

TO_CIRCUIT

DISCONNECT

<x-sn-cc> or <x-sn-l-cc>
SK000040

5.

Connect CPSS to the SRM (you cannot connect the SRM to CPSS).
CONFIG CONNECT <CPSS>

TO_CIRCUIT

DISC_FROM

<sn-cc-Mmm>
SK000041

The display indicates the subrate CPSS channel bandwidth.

To configure a 4 kb/s DCP card CPSS channel


1.

From the locally controlled or peripheral shelf, configure a DCP card to support
4 kb/s CPSS channels by selecting slot option 4KBPS.
CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS 4KBPS/NO_4KBPS*

2.

Connect the circuits.


CONFIG CONNECT <sn-cc>

TO_CIRCUIT

DISCONNECT

<sn-cc>
SK000042

where
the first sn-cc is one of the DCP circuits from 24 to 31
the second sn-cc is an SRS configured for CPSS or an SRM configured for HCM rate adaption

To configure an 8 to 56 kb/s DCP card CPSS channel (no SRMs)


1.

Node Parameters

Configure the DCP circuit for the CPSS bandwidth you want (see section 17.6.4,
Interface Speed).

(400)

17.6-31

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

2.

Configure the DCC, DNIC or 2B1Q circuit for transparent rate adaption and
make sure that the circuits transport bandwidth is equal to that of the DCP (see
chapter 23.6).

3.

From the switching shelf, connect the DCP circuit to the DCC, DNIC or 2B1Q
circuit.
CONFIG CONNECT <sn-cc>

TO_CIRCUIT

DISCONNECT

<sn-cc> or <sn-cc-p>
SK000043

To configure an 8 to 56 kb/s DCP card CPSS channel (SRMs)


1.

Configure the DNIC or 2B1Q Line card or DSP card for subrate multiplexing
and either HCM or transparent rate adaption (see chapter 23.6).

2.

If you are configuring an HCM SRM, adjust the SRM framing bit so that it does
not occupy the bit positions that the CPSS channel will occupy (see
chapter 23.6).

3.

From the switching shelf, connect the SRM to a circuit on a T1, E1 or X.21 or V.35
PRI link, a supervisory channel on an X.21 or V.35 PRI link or a DCC, DNIC or
2B1Q circuit.
CONFIG CONNECT <sn-Mmm> or <sn-cc-Mmm>

TO_CIRCUIT

DISCONNECT

<sn-cc> or <sn-l-cc>
SK000044

4.

Connect the DCP circuit to the SRM. (You cannot connect the SRM to a DCP
circuit.)
CONFIG CONNECT <sn-cc>

TO_CIRCUIT

DISCONNECT

<sn-Mmm> or <sn-cc-Mmm>
SK000045

17.6-32

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.6.8

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Network Manager CPSS Connections


A network manager can exchange CPSS messages with a node through:

the serial ports on the backplane


the serial port on a DCP card
the PSTN and modems connected to the node
any channel on primary rate or data links

Each method requires a different configuration. This section describes connecting


through serial ports or the PSTN and modems. Section 17.6.4 describes connecting
through primary rate or data links (see Table 17.6-2 for a list of relevant
configuration parameters).

Connecting to the serial ports on the backplane


If the computer running the network manager is connected to one of the serial ports
on the backplane, you must set the port type for CPSS communications (see
chapter 17.3), and set the baud rate to match the baud rate set by the network
manager. If the network manager is connecting to a DCP card serial port, you only
need to set the baud rate.

Connecting to the PSTN and modems


If the computer running the network manager is exchanging CPSS messages with
the node through modems and the PSTN, you must configure:

the port type for CPSS communications (see chapter 17.3)


the serial port baud rate to match the baud rate of the modem (see chapter 17.3)
the telephone number (NOC_NUM) of the modem connected to the network
manager (see section 17.6.3)

17.6.9

FRS Card CPSS Connections


CPSS transport over frame relay allows 3600 MainStreet bandwidth managers on
either side of a frame relay network to communicate. Encapsulated CPSS frames are
transmitted over the network. The network handles all frames transparently; that is,
the network transmits all frames end-to-end without examining the frame contents.
Before connecting a CPSS circuit to the FRS card, a circuit on the FRS card must be
configured as an encapsulation circuit. To configure frame relay encapsulation
circuits on the FRS card, see chapter 25.10.
Encapsulated cirsuits on the FRS card can either be connected to a dedicated CPSS
circuit on the DCP card or to a dedicated CPSS circuit on the Control card.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.6-33

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Note
The FRS card does not support shared CPSS connections.

CPSS rerouting after fault detection in a frame relay network


The NNI is the interface which allows two network devices, like two FRS cards, to
communicate. Both network devices must be configured with a link management
protocol that accommodates network device-to-network device communication.
This protocol allows network devices to monitor and relay link and PVC
information across the network.
The LMI-NNI detects unavailable links in the frame relay network and signals the
Control card. Figure 17.6-11 shows what happens when a fault is detected within the
frame relay network. The elements within the network communicate through the
LMI and notification of the faulty link is passed through the network to node A and
node B. The DCP cards are notified of the fault in the link and reroute CPSS along an
alternate path through node C.
Figure 17.6-11: CPSS Rerouting

3600 MainStreet
Node A

F
R
S

D
C
P

C
T
L

F
R
S

FRS X DCP

D
C
P

C
T
L

3600 MainStreet
Node C

FRS X DCP

LMI
NNI

LMI
NNI
Frame Relay Network

Preferred path
Alternate path

Fault

F
R
S

D
C
P

C
T
L

3600 MainStreet
Node B

FRS X DCP
10484

17.6-34

(400)

Node Parameters

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.6.10

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

FASTbus CPSS Connections


For the FRE and PE card, CPSS connectivity is provided by encapsulating CPSS over
frame relay over the FASTbus. Figure 17.6-12 shows how two shelves can be
connected through CPSS without using TDM trunks or additional cabling. The
dotted lines indicate CPSS links between FASTbus elements.
Figure 17.6-12: FASTbus CPSS Connections

FRE

FRE
CPSS links

FRATM

FRE

3600 MainStreet node

FRE

FRE

FRE

3600 MainStreet node

FRATM

FASTbus
7620

FASTbus CPSS connections from one station to another are made in NMTI by
connecting one of the two available CPSS resources (CPSS1 or CPSS2) to a target
FASTbus station number. At the target station, a complementary connection must
be made. A special DLCI is automatically used for each frame relay CPSS link.
When you specify a FASTbus to CPSS1 link, the DLCI that is used is 1020; when you
specify a FASTbus to CPSS2 link, the DLCI used is 1021.
Two byte DLCIs are used for CPSS to prevent frame relay encapsulated CPSS from
being switched onto WAN links by FRE or PE cards. CPSS connections to WAN
DLCIs are blocked. FRE or PE cards can be configured only to switch data from
FASTbus DLCIs in the range 2000 to 3983 (see chapter 25.7).

Node Parameters

(400)

17.6-35

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To connect FASTbus CPSS circuits


The number of FASTbus CPSS connections is limited to two. To connect a CPSS
identifier (CPSS 1 or 2) to a FASTbus CPSS identifier, enter:
CONFIG CONNECT

CPSS<x>

F<y>-CPSS

TO_DLC F<y>-CPSS

TO_DLC CPSS<x>
SK000046

where x is 1 or 2 and y is 1 to 64

Note
FASTbus CPSS connections can only be made to FASTbus circuits.

Figure 17.6-13 shows the CONFIG CONNECT CPSSx screen used to configure
FASTbus CPSS.
Figure 17.6-13: CONFIG CONNECT CPSSx NMTI Screen
FRE

Stations:nn

P412-H1-00

From
CPSS1

Toronto:A

Status
Unknown

Alarms:1

Connected To
--

11-May-1997
Status
--

8:35a
Traffic Group

* Indicates that the CPSS link is Active and Up

CONFIG CONNECT CPSS1

16-

17.6-36

2-DISCONNECT
7-

3-TO_DLC
8-CANCEL

(400)

4-INFO_RATE
9-QUIT

50-

Node Parameters

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure CPSS timers


CONFIG MORE CPSS <CPSSx> TIMERS

T200 <value>

TACK <value>

N200 <value>

T203 <value>
SK000047

CPSS timers (available on the Release 2 FRE and PE cards only) define the
performance of the CPSS link over the FASTbus. Table 17.6-4 defines the types of
timers available.
Table 17.6-4: CPSS Timers
Timer

17.6.11

Description

T200

This is the amount of time the return ACK has for the point to point link layer
transport times. The timeout value can be between 1 and 30 s (default is 4 s).

TACK

This is the amount of time that the information frame that is received can wait for
acknowledgment. The TACK timeout value can be between 0.5 and 20 s (default
is 1 s).

N200

This establishes the number of retries that are permitted. The number of retries
that are permitted can be between 1 and 10 (default is 5).

T203

This establishes the amount of time the link can remain inactive. The timeout value
can be between 20 and 600 s (default is 30 s). T203 must be greater than twenty
times the T200 value.

CPSS Routing Protocol


CPSS routing protocol allows you to configure an FRS, FRE or PE card to run either
the DV router or the LS router. Typically, the routing protocol is used for
3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers nodes containing one or more FRS, FRE
or PE cards in an LS routing network.
Normally, FRS, FRE or PE cards run the same router as their host Control card (the
LS router). This means that all topology changes in the network, such as CPSS link
state, are forwarded to the FRS, FRE or PE card. However, when the only CPSS
connection for the FRS, FRE or PE card is to the host Control card (these FRS, FRE or
PE cards are known as leaf nodes), there is a greater strain placed on the CPSS
resources of the Control card when providing the FRS, FRE or PE card with the LS
routing information. For this reason, you can configure the FRS, FRE or PE card to
run the DV router through the CPSS routing protocol. When it runs the DV router,
the Control card sends only the node availability information to the FRS, FRE or PE
card, thereby reducing the amount of activity on the CPSS resources of the Control
card.

Node Parameters

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17.6-37

17.6 CPSS Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

There are two valid CPSS routing protocol configurations.

router version 1
This configures the card to run DV router.

host router
This configures the card to run the same routing protocol as the host Control
card.
To keep the amount of activity on the CPSS resources of the host Control card
manageable, you can configure only two FRS, FRE or PE cards as host router in an
LS routing node. The remaining FRE or FRS cards must be configured for router
version 1.
The CPSS routing protocol for an FRS, FRE or PE card can be configured through
NMTI as follows.

To configure CPSS routing protocol


CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS
ROUTER_V1*/ HOST_RTR
SK000048

Note
Do not configure an FRS, FRE or PE card for ROUTER_V1 in an LS routing node if
the card is carrying CPSS circuit or serial port connections. If you configure the FRS,
FRE or PE card for ROUTER_V1, the CPSS in the network may be disrupted.
Do not configure an FRS or FRE card for ROUTER_V1 in an LS routing node if the
card is carrying CPSS circuit or serial port connections. If you configure the FRS or
FRE card for ROUTER_V1, the CPSS in the network may be disrupted.

17.6-38

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.7

17.7 Backplane Card Communications


Issue 1, November 1997

Backplane Card Communications


This chapter describes backplane card communications and fault handling.

17.7.1

Overview
Backplane card communication links connect the Control card directly to
DCP-based cards. These links provide internal CPSS communications between the
Control card and a DCP-based card without affecting the throughput of the
DCP-based card. Although backplane CPSS is not configurable, the backplane card
communication links can be configured as shared or dedicated through NMTI.
The following DCP-based cards provide configurable backplane card
communication links.

17.7.2

CPC
DCP
FRE
FRS
PE

Backplane Card Communication Types


You can configure the backplane card communication link as shared or dedicated
using the following softkeys:

SHARED to configure the link for 16 kb/s shared CPSS


DEDICATED to configure the link for 64 kb/s dedicated CPSS
Configuring the backplane card communications link to the Control card as
dedicated optimizes the data transfer performance of the card. When the backplane
card communications link is configured for dedicated CPSS, there must be a
dedicated CPSS channel available on the Control card.
For the DCP, FRE, FRS and PE cards, backplane card communications are default
configured as shared.
For CPCs the default is dedicated CPSS to handle the messaging throughput needs
of ISDN backup and channel search applications.

Node Parameters

(400)

17.7-1

17.7 Backplane Card Communications


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Caution
For CPCs, it is recommended that the backplane card communication link remain
configured for dedicated CPSS. If the link is configured for shared CPSS, it will limit
the number of D channels the CPC can process.

To configure backplane card communications


Log onto the locally controlled or peripheral shelf and enter:
CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS CARD_COMM DEDICATED/SHARED*

17.7.3

Fault Handling
The FRE and PE cards provide configurable fault handling for backplane card
communications. A card can be set to handle faults in one of two modes: standard
or enhanced.
Note
Enhanced mode is only available to FRE and PE cards that support enhanced mode.
If a packet card that does not support enhanced mode is inserted in a slot configured
for enhanced mode a revision mismatch alarm is raised. For more information,
contact your Newbridge representative.

Standard mode
Standard mode provides card database synchronization at the expense of traffic
speed. Priority is placed on maintaining database synchronization between the
Control card and the packet card, even in the event of communication difficulties. To
assure database continuity, the packet card is automatically reset when
communication difficulties are experienced.

Enhanced mode
In enhanced mode, network or system operators have more control over the action
taken by the Control card when card communications faults are detected. This
control comes at the expense of database configuration synchronization between the
Control card and the packet card. Temporary database configuration mismatches
are possible in enhanced mode, but are resolved automatically by the system once
the fault clears.
Enhanced mode introduces minor and major fault counts, database re-sends, a major
fault count reset threshold and a major fault card dead threshold.

17.7-2

(400)

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.7 Backplane Card Communications


Issue 1, November 1997

Caution
Changing from enhanced to standard mode while a database re-send is in progress
will result in a disruption of service.

Minor fault count


A minor fault occurs when a management packet from the Control card is left
unacknowledged for a long period of time. When a minor fault occurs:

the minor fault count is increased by 100


a database re-send takes place
a Minor Fault Count Warning alarm is raised if the fault count was zero prior to
the occurrence of the fault
The minor fault count is reduced as re-sent management packets are successfully
acknowledged. When the minor fault count is reduced to zero, a Minor Fault Count
Normal alarm is raised. Minor fault alarms are considered non-service affecting and
default to the diagnostic alarms queue. If the minor fault count exceeds the
system-defined minor fault count threshold, the minor fault count is reset and the
major fault count is increased by 250. The minor fault count threshold is 500.
A card reset will reset the minor fault count.
Major fault count
A major fault occurs when the backplane card communication link goes down or
when too many minor faults occur. Two major fault counts are maintained: a current
major fault count and an overall major fault count.
When a major fault occurs:

a Card Comm Problem alarm is raised with the parameter of the alarm indicating
the cause of the problem

both the current and overall major fault counts are increased by 250
the Control card attempts to restart the link if the link is down; each failed
attempt causes the current and overall major fault count to increase by 250

if the link is successfully restarted, a database re-send takes place


After the link is restarted and the database re-send is complete, all fault counts that
are greater than zero are reduced by 20 for every 5 minutes that the backplane card
communication link remains up. When the current major fault count and overall
major fault count are both zero, a Card Comms Normal alarm is raised.
A manual card reset will reset both the major fault counts. A software-initiated card
reset will only reset the current major fault count.

Node Parameters

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17.7-3

17.7 Backplane Card Communications


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Major fault count reset threshold


The major fault count reset threshold determines how many current major faults are
tolerated by the Control card before it forces a software-initiated card reset. The
major fault count reset threshold is configurable with a range of 1 to 30 000 and a
default of 5000. The major fault count reset threshold can also be configured as
unlimited.
Caution
Changes to the major fault count reset threshold take effect immediately and cause
a card reset if the current major fault count exceeds the new major fault count reset
threshold. When a card reset occurs a Card Reset alarm is raised.

Major fault card dead threshold


The major fault card dead threshold determines how many overall major faults are
tolerated before the Control card forces a packet card out of service. The major fault
card dead threshold is configurable with a range of 1 to 30 000 and a default of 500.
The major fault card dead threshold can also be configured as unlimited.
Caution
Changes to the major fault card dead threshold take effect immediately and cause a
card to be declared dead if the current major fault count exceeds the new major fault
card dead threshold. When a card is declared dead a Card Dead alarm is raised.

Database re-sends
When a link is successfully restarted after a link failure, a database re-send takes
place. The Control card uses a database re-send to attempt to re-send all database
items needed by the packet card to restore database synchronization after the card
communication difficulty.
Database re-sends are attempted as soon as the link permits and proceed slowly to
increase the chances that re-sent information will be processed successfully by a
busy packet card. As re-sent management packets are successfully acknowledged,
the major and minor fault counts are reduced.
A card receiving a database re-send has an NMTI slot status of RSND or DB Resend.
Packet card-initiated resets
If the flow of CPSS packet data stops due to a serious fault, FRE and PE cards can
initiate a self-reset. Packet card-initiated resets cannot be prevented by using
enhanced mode fault handling.

17.7-4

(400)

Node Parameters

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

17.7 Backplane Card Communications


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure fault handling


Log onto the locally controlled or peripheral shelf and enter:
CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS CARD_COMM FLT_HNDLING

ENHANCED/STANDARD*

THRESHOLD

CARD_RESET

CARD_DEAD

<threshold>

UNLIMITED
SK000913

where threshold is in the range 1 to 30000 with a default of 500 for CARD_RESET and 5000 for
CARD_DEAD

Node Parameters

(400)

17.7-5

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

18. Redundancy

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

18.1

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

Control Redundancy
This chapter explains how to do the following tasks:

18.1.1

configure control-redundant and non control-redundant systems


configure standby modes
display system demerits
force and program activity switches
replace a redundant Control, DS-3 or E3 card while the system is in operation

Understanding Control Redundancy


Control redundancy provides backup system control to ensure continuity of service
if a system card or cable fails. Table 18.1-1 shows the cards and cables that you must
configure for redundancy in each shelf.
Table 18.1-1: Control Redundancy

Card or Cable

Enhanced
Locally
Controlled
Shelf

3600, 3645, 3664 and 36120


MainStreet Control cards
3600+ MainStreet Control card
Expander card

Locally
Controlled
Shelf

Switching
Shelf

Peripheral
Shelf

HSPS
Shelf

HSPS 2
Shelf

Clock card

Switching card

SI card

SI cable

DS-3 or DS-3 II card

DS-3 link

E3 card

E3 cable

Redundancy

(400)

18.1-1

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

3600+ MainStreet Control card


The 3600+ MainStreet bandwidth manager has a fully operational control complex,
consisting of a Control card and an associated Timing card. Control redundancy is
the duplication of the control complex to provide service protection against single
component failures. Control complex redundancy in a 3600+ MainStreet system
requires both an active and an inactive Timing and Control card. Each Control card
must have a mate Timing card.
The control complex can be configured for simplex or redundant operation.
Redundant operation works in either partitioned mode or hot standby mode. The
control complex is configured for simplex operation by default.

18.1.2

Configuring Control Redundancy


Table 18.1-2 lists the control redundancy configuration parameters. Each parameter
has a list of options with any default option marked with an asterisk.
Table 18.1-2: Control Redundancy Configuration Parameters and Options

Control
Cards (1)

3600+ MainStreet
Control Card

DS-3 and
DS-3 II
Card

E3
Card

Activity switch (forced)

RLS_CTRL

Activity switch (programmed)

name of the day


daily
time (hh:mmA or P or H)

Automatic activity switch disable

enable
disable*

3600, 3645, 3664 and 36120


MainStreet Control cards
redundancy

simplex*
redundant

Parameter

Options

single shelf (2)


dual shelf (2)

18.1-2

(400)

Redundancy

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Control
Cards (1)

3600+ MainStreet
Control Card

DS-3 and
DS-3 II
Card

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

E3
Card

Options

3600+ MainStreet control complex


redundancy

simplex
redundant*

DS-3 and E3 card redundancy (3)

simplex (unprotected)
interface
access

Fast protection switching (3)

enable*
disable
AIS
OOF
BER

Fast protection switching

enable*
disable
alarm time
error rate
error time

Standby mode

hot

Parameter

partitioned* (warm (4))

Notes
1. These are the 3600, 3645, 3664 and 36120 MainStreet Control cards.
2. These options apply only when the Control card is configured as redundant.
3. These parameters apply only to the DS-3 II card.
4. The term warm partitioned is not used with the 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager. Partitioned and warm partitioned
have the same functionality.

Table 18.1-3 lists the locations of the control redundancy configuration procedures
for the Control, DS-3 II or E3 card.
Table 18.1-3: Control Redundancy Configuration Procedures
Configuration Procedure

Redundancy

Section

Control redundancy information and SI cable


information display

18.1.3

System demerits display

18.1.5

Card replacement

18.1.9

(400)

18.1-3

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Note
To configure control redundancy for the HSPS equipped with DS-3 cards, you must
install jumpers for the DS-3 cards on the backplane (see Installation, Task 0500:
Setting the Redundancy Jumpers). Control redundancy can be program-configured
for DS-3 II cards.
Table 16.4-1 in chapter 16.4 explains the formats of the identifiers in the procedures.

18.1.3

Configuring Control Redundancy Parameters


A control-redundant 3600+ MainStreet bandwidth manager has two Control cards
installed on the enhanced locally controlled shelf. All other control-redundant 3600
MainStreet series bandwidth manager systems can be either a single-shelf
configuration with two Control cards or a dual-shelf configuration with a Control
card in each shelf.
Redundant DS-3 and E3 card pairs also operate with one active card and one inactive
card.
The basic functions of the Control cards in a control-redundant configuration is the
same for the 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Managers and all other 3600 MainStreet
series bandwidth managers. At any time, one Control card is responsible for the
operation of the system. This card is called the active Control card. The other Control
card is called the inactive Control card. The inactive Control card is always powered
up and informed of the state of the system so that it is ready to assume control if
necessary.
When a control-redundant system is powered up, the Control card that is powered
up first becomes the active Control card. After the power-up, you can distinguish the
active Control card from the inactive Control card by checking the Activity LED and
seven-segment Display LED on the cards.

The Activity LED is lit on the active Control card, DS-3 card and E3 card and is

off for the inactive card.


The Display LED flashes a number in the usual pattern for the active Control card
and displays a dash () in a 0.5 seconds on, 0. 5 seconds off pattern for the inactive
Control card.

The act of transferring control from one Control card to the other is called an activity
switch.The removal or major failure of an active Control card always causes an
activity switch regardless of the control redundancy mode. The removal or major
failure of an inactive Control card has no effect.

18.1-4

(400)

Redundancy

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring 3600, 3645, 3664 and 36120 MainStreet Control cards for
redundancy
For the locally controlled shelf, configure the redundancy mode as:

REDUNDANT for control redundancy


DUAL_SHELF for dual-shelf redundancy
SNGL_SHELF for single-shelf redundancy
SIMPLEX if you do not want control redundancy

The system must meet these conditions before you can configure a single-shelf
system as control-redundant.

The shelf Select jumper on the backplane next to the Control card in slot 9 must

be set to position A.
An appropriate filler plate must be installed in slot 10.
The dedicated CPSS-4 circuit must be available for the mate link (if it is already
in use, disconnect it).
The Expander card slot must be configured as empty.

To configure 3600, 3645, 3664 and 36120 MainStreet Control cards for
redundancy
CONFIG SYSTEM REDUNDANT/SIMPLEX*

DUAL_SHELF

SNGL_SHELF
SK000049

Note
For more information about upgrading to single-shelf redundancy, see Maintenance,
chapter 40.3.

Configuring 3600+ MainStreet Control card redundancy


For the enhanced locally controlled shelf, configure the redundancy mode as:

REDUNDANT for control redundancy


SIMPLEX if you do not want control redundancy
The node number must be set on the active Control card (optionally set on the
inactive Control card) before performing this procedure. To set the node number, see
Installation, Task 1420: Setting the Node Number for Enhanced Locally Controlled
and Locally Controlled Shelves.

Redundancy

(400)

18.1-5

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

In simplex mode, an inactive Control card will flash a u on its faceplate 7-segment
display to indicate that it is unavailable. If the active Control card is removed from
its slot, or if a serious card failure occurs, an activity switch occurs.
Caution
Because the databases of the inactive and active Control cards are not synchronized,
if an activity switch occurs in simplex mode a major service disruption can occur. All
current configuration information can be lost, but the node will be operational for
new configurations.

Switching from simplex mode to redundant mode


After a change from simplex mode to redundant mode, you can insert redundant
cards into the inactive Control card slot. If a card is already installed, its status will
change from unavailable to inactive.
The active card will then attempt to restart the mate link. After the mate link is up,
the Control card will perform the following checks.

Compatible software generic: the software generic of the inactive Control card

and of the active Control card are compared to make sure that they are
compatible. If the software generics are not compatible an Incompatible Mate
Generic alarm is raised.
Compatible CPSS address: the CPSS address of the inactive Control card and of
the active Control card are compared to make sure that they are compatible. If the
CPSS addresses are not the same, the mate link is brought down and a Wrong
Mate Node Number alarm is raised.
Address auto-configure: if the CPSS address of the inactive Control card is
unassigned it will be automatically configured with the CPSS address, domain
number and router version of the active Control card.

If all checks are successfully completed a Talking to Mate CTL is raised. If the mate
link is lost, a Not Talking to Mate alarm is raised and the active Control card will
continue to try to restart the mate link.
In hot standby mode, if one Control card has a Bank-B Memory module installed but
the other Control card does not, the inactive card raises a Memory Module Mismatch
alarm. See Table 35.8-17 in Maintenance.

To configure 3600+ MainStreet Control card redundancy


CONFIG SYSTEM REDUNDANT*/SIMPLEX

Configuring DS-3 II and E3 card redundancy


For DS-3 II and E3 cards, configure one of the three redundancy modes listed and
described in Table 18.1-4.

18.1-6

(400)

Redundancy

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 18.1-4: Redundancy Modes for DS-3 II and E3 Cards


Redundancy
Mode

Card/Interface

Description

Simplex
(UNPROTECTD)

DS-3 II, DE3, SE3

No redundancy is provided. Service is discontinued in the


event of an interface or link failure.

Interface
(INTFC_PROT)

DS-3 II, DE3, SE3

A second DS-3 II or E3 card protects the DS-3 II or E3


interfaces and switching interface cables, but the DS-3 II or
E3 line(s) are not protected.

Access
(ACCES_PROT)

DS-3 II, DE3, SE3

A second DS-3 II or E3 card protects the DS-3 II or E3


interfaces and switching interface cables. Parallel DS-3 or
E3 line(s) are supplied by the customer for redundancy
protection for the line(s).

To configure DS-3 II and E3 card redundancy


CONFIG SYSTEM

UNPROTECTD

NTFC_PROT

ACCES_PROT
SK000050

Note
Before you change a DS-3 II or E3 card protection mode from unprotected to accessor interface-protected, or vice versa, you must remove any card from the mate HSPS
slot. After you configure the protection mode, replace the inactive card.

To display control redundancy information


You can display control redundancy information from the switching, locally
controlled, enhanced locally controlled or the peripheral shelf, or the DS-3 II or E3
card. For switching shelves, you can also display SI cable information by selecting
ON_SLOT.
MAINT

MORE
REDUNDANT

ON_SLOT
<sn>
SK000051

Table 18.1-5 lists the fields that appear in the Control card redundancy menu.

Redundancy

(400)

18.1-7

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table 18.1-5: Field Descriptions for Control Redundancy


Field

18.1.4

Description

Redundancy

No redundancy
Partitioned
Hot Standby

Protection Mode

Simplex or Access Protection or Interface Protection


The reason for the last activity switch (if logged on to an E3 card)

Time Switch

The day and time of a programmed automatic activity switch


Unassigned

Last Switch

The time of the last activity switch


No switch since reset

System Demerits

The demerit values for both Control, DS-3 or E3 cards

SI Cables

The status of the four SI cables (if logged on to a peripheral shelf, HSPS or
HSPS2)

Configuring Standby Modes


The standby mode refers to the relationship between an active Control card and an
inactive Control card or an active and inactive DS-3 or E3 card. You can configure a
control-redundant system to operate in one of two modes:

hot standby mode


partitioned (or warm) mode
All 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers support hot standby and
partitioned (or warm) modes.

Hot standby
In hot standby mode, the configuration databases of the two cards are the same. Any
change to the database of the active card is automatically copied to the database of
the inactive card. An activity switch occurs after a database reconcile is completed.
Activity switches only occur if failures on the inactive Control card are less severe
than those on the active Control card; otherwise the active Control card will continue
to operate.
When an activity switch occurs in a hot standby system, calls in progress are not
dropped. The output timing of the system can experience a short disturbance and
there can be a short period of corruption of data or a short burst of noise on voice
circuits. This period lasts no longer than 125 ms. Maintenance operations in progress
could be lost and configuration changes in progress could be aborted. After a hot
standby activity switch occurs, the newly inactive card restarts itself and reconciles
its database with the database of the newly active card.

18.1-8

(400)

Redundancy

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

If the active Timing card fails or is removed in a 3600+ MainStreet system, a fast
activity switch occurs. A fast activity switch can only occur when:

the Control cards are configured for hot standby


the database is reconciled
If the active or inactive 3600+ MainStreet Control card loses timing from its
associated Timing card and a fast activity switch cannot occur, the following actions
are taken:

a Timing Failure alarm is raised against the Timing card


demerits are raised against the Timing card (see Table 18.1-6)
a CL pattern flashes on the 7-segment faceplate display of the Control card to

indicate the lack of the associated Timing card


if the active and the inactive Control cards do not detect their associated Timing
card, the Timing card is removed from service and a Card Removed alarm is
raised. If the Control card still detects its associated Timing card, a Card Dead
alarm is raised against the Timing card.

If the active Timing card is lost, the inactive 3600+ MainStreet Control card will also
raise a Timing Failure alarm and report demerits. Timing Failure alarm subcodes are
used to distinguish which of the two Control cards raised the alarm. Demerits
reported for the inactive Control card are substantially less than those reported for
the active Control card when the active Timing card is lost. See Table 18.1-6.
Note
3600+

If the active or inactive


MainStreet Control card has lost timing from an active
Timing card, all UCS and HSA cards are removed from service.

In hot standby mode, if one 3600+ MainStreet Control card has a Bank-B Memory
module installed but the other Control card does not, the inactive card raises a
Memory Module Mismatch alarm. See Table 35.8-17 in Maintenance.

Partitioned
In partitioned (or warm) mode, the active Control card does not report any changes
in the configuration of the system to the inactive Control card and the inactive
Control card does not monitor the status of the system. Since the configuration
databases of the two cards can differ, database synchronization cannot be
guaranteed in partitioned mode. Partitioned mode permits replacing and upgrading
of the software or hardware of either or both cards with minimal interruption to
service.
The 4602 MainStreet Intelligent NetworkStation or MainStreetXpress 46020
Network Manager provides backup and restore procedures that can be used to
transfer the configuration database from one card to the other in partitioned mode.
In partitioned mode, if background diagnostics are enabled for the inactive card, the
tests cycle through test 1 (program integrity), test 2 (RAM integrity) and test 3 (NV
RAM integrity). Only tests 1, 2 and 3 are available for directed diagnostic tests as
well (see Maintenance, chapter 39.1).

Redundancy

(400)

18.1-9

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Caution
Partitioned mode redundancy is for maintenace purposes only and is not
recommended as an operational mode.

If an activity switch occurs in partitioned mode, calls in progress are dropped, all
interface cards are reset and maintenance operations and configuration changes in
progress are lost. Changes made to the configuration database since the system was
placed in partitioned mode are also lost.
Configure standby mode as:

HOT for hot standby mode


PARTITION or WARM for partitioned (or warm) mode (default)
Note
The PARTITION option applies to the 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager, 3645
MainStreet Control cards, DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 cards.
The WARM option applies to 3600, 3664 and 36120 MainStreet Control cards.

To configure standby mode


MAINT MORE REDUNDANT

HOT

18.1.5

PARTITION* or WARM*

SK000052

Displaying System Demerits


In both hot standby and partitioned modes, the active card (Control, DS-3 II or E3
card) keeps an estimate of its operating quality and that of the inactive card. This
estimate, called the system demerits value, increases as the number of problem
conditions increases. The conditions that contribute to the system demerits are listed
in Table 18.1-6.

18.1-10

(400)

Redundancy

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 18.1-6: Conditions Contributing to System Demerits


Condition

Demerits

DS1 Circuit failure on a DS-3 card

15

Failure of 50% of circuits on an interface card

20

Adverse Control card diagnostic result

100

Any hardware diagnostic failure

100

8+ module diagnostic fault

100

Start-up diagnostic failure


Timing card diagnostic failure

100
150

(1)

Inactive Control card has lost contact with the active Timing card

(1)

200

E3 link alarm

250

Inactive Control card is not synchronized to the active shelf

275

Inactive Timing card is not synchronized to the active Timing cards (1)

275

Inactive Clock card not phase-locked to active Clock card

275

DS-3 link fault

350

Missing the Expander card

400

Missing a peripheral shelf

400

Missing a switching shelf

400

DE3 connection to switching shelf broken

400

8+ module absence

400

Activity switch that is not forced or automatic

500

Loss of Narrowband Switch module (1)

500

Loss of Broadband Switch module (1)

550

DE3 card is out of service

800

Database reconciliation in progress

1000

Control card loss of associated Timing card

(1)

2000

Missing both peripheral shelves

2500

Switching card absence

2500

Control card absence

3000

Clock card absence

3000

Loss of Control card

3500

(1)

DS-3 card absence

5500

DE3 card absence

5500

Notes
1. This condition applies only to the 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager.

Redundancy

(400)

18.1-11

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

In hot standby mode only, an activity switch occurs if the system demerits value for
the active card is greater than the value for the inactive card. If the other Control card
is present, an activity switch is guaranteed when:

common control equipment fails


the currently active cable connected to the Switching Interface card is removed
the Switching Interface card or Clock card installed in the same shelf as the active
Control card is removed
The softkeys used to display system demerits depend on the type of shelf or card to
which you are logged on.

To display system demerits for a locally controlled or enhanced locally


controlled shelf
CONFIG SYSTEM

To display system demerits for a locally controlled, enhanced locally controlled,


switching or peripheral shelf, DS-3 II or E3 card
MAINT MORE REDUNDANT

To display system demerits for a Control card


MAINT ON_SLOT <CTL>

18.1.6

Configuring an Activity Switch


An activity switch is a transfer of system control from the active to inactive Control,
DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 card.

18.1-12

(400)

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


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18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

An activity switch occurs if:

the active card loses power


the active card is removed from the system
the active Control card detects a fatal software error
the active Clock card is removed or loses power
the active Timing card is removed or loses power
the active Switching Interface card or cable is removed
the DS-3 link status on the inactive DS-3 or DS-3 II card is superior to the DS-3
link status on the active DS-3 or DS-3 II card
the active DS-3 II card detects an AIS, OOF or BER fault that is not detected by
the inactive DS-3 II card during a specified time period
the active E3 card detects an E3 fault (LOIS, LIS, AIS, Loss of Frame Alignment
or Distant Alarm) that is not detected by the inactive E3 card during a specified
time period
the detected E3 error rate (ERROR_RATE) exceeds the configured value on the
active E3 card but not on the inactive E3 card
the system demerits value for the active card is greater than the value for the
inactive card (hot standby mode only)
an activity switch is forced
the time for an automatic activity switch is reached
a node or network manager requests an activity switch

In a redundant switching shelf configuration, the active shelf does not allow an
activity switch to take place if the inactive switching shelf has lost power.

Alarms
Two alarms are raised by activity switches.

A System Restart (Active) alarm is raised by the newly active Control, DS-3,
DS-3 II or E3 card.

A System Restart (Inactive) alarm is raised by the newly inactive Control, DS-3,
DS-3 II or E3 card.
In both alarms, the first parameter is the slot of the card that lost activity. The second
parameter is the reason for the activity switch. (For more information, see
Maintenance, Table 35.8-23.)

Database reconciliation
A database reconciliation is the process of two Control, DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 cards
comparing their databases and making them the same. If differences are detected
between the two databases, the system assumes that the database of the active card
is correct and changes the database of the inactive card to match that of the active
card. A database reconciliation does not affect service.

Redundancy

(400)

18.1-13

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Only Control cards in a control-redundant system or DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 cards in a


redundant slot and pair configuration in hot standby mode can reconcile their
databases. They do so under two conditions:

after an activity switch (the newly inactive card restarts itself then reconciles its
database with that of the newly active card)

when the two cards begin to communicate after a period of not communicating
A fully loaded control-redundant locally controlled or enhanced locally controlled
shelf takes 20 min to reconcile the database. A fully loaded control-redundant dual
peripheral shelf takes 15 min and a switching shelf redundant configuration takes 2
min for each connected peripheral shelf for reconciliation (20 min for a fully loaded
system).
During database reconciliation, the message Reconcile in Progress and the
number of records processed appear in the data area for node management sessions
running on both the active and inactive cards. The system demerits value for the
inactive card increases by 1000 points.
An inactive Control card displays an L (for Load) on the display LED.
The inactive DS-3 or DS-3 II card cycles the faceplate LEDs as follows:

DS-3, DS1 and S1 LEDs remain off for 0.25 seconds


DS-3 LED lights for 0.25 seconds
DS-3 LED goes off and the DS1 LED lights for 0.25 seconds
DS1 LED goes off and the S1 LED lights for 0.25 seconds

The inactive E3 card cycles the faceplate LEDs as follows:

the alarm LEDs light individually from top to bottom for half a second each
after the bottom LED goes off, all alarm LEDs remain off for half a second
Refresh the screen (<Esc> <R>) to update the number of records and the demerits
value.
When the message Reconcile in Progress disappears from the screen and the
system demerits value for the inactive card decreases by 1000 points, the database
reconciliation is complete.

To force an activity switch


You can force an activity switch between a pair of Control cards, DS-3 or DS-3 II
cards, or E3 cards from the switching shelf, peripheral shelf, Control card, DS-3 or
DS-3 II card, or E3 card.
MAINT MORE REDUNDANT RLS_CTRL

Note
Do not force an activity switch during a database reconciliation.

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18.1.7

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring Fast Protection Switching


You can enable a form of activity switch called a fast protection switch, which occurs
when the active DS-3 II or E3 card detects a fault during a specified time period.
You can also configure the time over which the active card must detect the fault
before the switch occurs. If this fault time period is less than the alarm declare time,
the activity switch occurs before any alarms are declared, allowing the card pair to
restore service before applying trunk conditioning or call rerouting. (For
information on setting the alarm declare and clear time, see Maintenance,
section 35.4.1.)
Note
If the DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 card is configured for fast protection switching, an activity
switch will occur for a link fault based on increased demerits, even if the time
specified for fast protection switching has not elapsed.

Protection switching options


For both the DS-3 II and E3 cards, you can enable or disable fast protection switching
with the PROT_SWTCH softkey. If you disable fast protection switching, an activity
switch can still take place if a condition that normally causes a switch (such as card
removal) takes place.
For DS-3 II cards, you can configure the fault time for AIS, BER and OOF faults.
Table 18.1-7 lists and describes the DS-3 II card options.
Table 18.1-7: DS-3 II Fast Protection Switching Options
Option

Reason for
Activity
Switch

Description

Range

AIS

AIS fault

Sets the time over which the AIS fault must be


detected before the activity switch occurs.

500 ms
1500 ms
3000 ms
5000 ms

OOF

OOF fault

Sets the time over which the OOF fault must


be detected before the activity switch occurs.

500 ms
1000 ms
1500 ms
2000 ms

BER

Error rate
exceeded

Sets the error rate and the time over which the
error rate is integrated, before an activity
switch occurs.

10-6, 3 s
10-6, 10 s
10-4, 2 s
10-4, 6 s

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18.1-15

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

For E3 cards, you can configure:

a fault time to apply to all E3 faults


an E3 error rate that will trigger a fast protection switch
an error time over which the error must be integrated
Table 18.1-8 lists and describes the E3 card options.
Table 18.1-8: E3 Fast Protection Switching Options
Option

Reason for
Activity
Switch

Description

Range

ALARM_TIME

E3 fault

Sets the time over which the


E3 fault must be detected
before the activity switch
occurs.

100 ms to 30 s in 10 ms
increments (Default is 100 ms)

ERROR_RATE
ERROR_TIME

Error rate
exceeded

Sets the error rate and the


time over which the error rate
is integrated before an activity
switch occurs.

Error rate: 1 x 10-3 to 1 x 10-8 in


exponential increments
Error time: 1 to 3600 s in 1 s
increments
Default is error rate of 1 x 10-6
integrated over 3 s

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18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure DS-3 II fast protection switching


CONFIG SLOT <DS3> OPTIONS PROT_SWTCH

ENABLE*/DISABLE

AIS

OOF

BER

500_msec* 1500_msec 3000_msec 5000_msec 500_msec* 1000_msec 1500_msec 2000_msec

10-6_3sec*

10-6_10sec

10-4_2sec

10-4_6sec
SK000053

To configure E3 fast protection switching


CONFIG SLOT <E3id> OPTIONS PROT_SWTCH

ENABLE*/DISABLE

ALARM_TIME

ERROR_RATE

<alarm_time>

<range>

ERROR_TIME
<error_time>
SK000054

where
alarm_time is 100 ms to 30 s in 10 ms increments (100*)
range is 1E-3 to 1E-8 in exponential steps (1E-6*)
error_time is 1 to 3600 s in 1 s increments (3 s*)

18.1.8

Configuring Automatic Activity Switching


You can program a control-redundant shelf or card to do an activity switch at a
specific time each day or each week. An automatic activity switch distributes the
usage of the two Control, DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 cards and informs you of their
condition.
You can enable or disable the activity switch, and you can set the switch to occur on
a daily basis or on a specific day every week. In either case, you can set the time of
day for the automatic activity switch.
When the system time (in the case of a daily activity switch) or time and day (in the
case of a weekly activity switch) match the values entered, the active card
automatically tries to release activity to the inactive card.

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18.1-17

18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To configure automatic activity switching


MAINT MORE REDUNDANT TIMESWITCH

ENABLE/DISABLE*

<day>

DAY

TIME
<hh:mmA or P or H>

<DAILY>

SK000055

where
day is the name of the day
hh is the hour (1 or 2 digits)
mm is the minute (2 digits)

Note
If the system time has not been set, the node manager records the time entered here
in the format <hh:mmR>, where R represents the time elapsed since a system reset.
An automatic activity switch does not occur unless you set the system time.

For example, enter 3:17 P.M. as <3:17P> or <15:17H>. If you do not enter <A>, <P>
or <H>, the system assumes A.

18.1.9

Replacing a Control, DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 Card


This procedure minimizes disruption to service when replacing a Control, DS-3,
DS-3 II or E3 card in a control-redundant system configured for hot standby mode.

To replace a Control, DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 card


1.

Make sure that the card you want to replace is inactive. If it is active, establish
a node management session with the switching shelf, peripheral shelf, Control
card, DS-3, DS-3 II card or E3 card, then force an activity switch by entering:
MAINT MORE REDUNDANT RLS_CTRL

2.

Enter:
MAINT MORE REDUNDANT PARTITION or WARM

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18.1 Control Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

Note
The PARTITION option applies to the 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager, 3645
MainStreet Control cards, DS-3, DS-3 II or E3 cards.
The WARM option applies only to 3600, 3664 and 36120 MainStreet Control cards.

The information is passed to the inactive card; the card is then configured for
partitioned mode.
3.

Replace the inactive card with the new card.


For instructions on removing and installing cards, see Maintenance, chapter 40.8
(for the Control card) or chapter 40.9 (for the DS-3, DS-3 II card or E3 card).

4.

Enter:
MAINT MORE REDUNDANT HOT

The cards reconcile their databases. Wait for the reconciliation to finish before
starting another procedure.

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18.1-19

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18.2

18.2 Protection Switching


Issue 1, November 1997

Protection Switching
This chapter introduces protecting connections, provides guidelines for designing
protection switching circuits and explains how to configure protecting connections.

18.2.1

Understanding Protection Switching


As shown in Figure 18.2-1, you can specify two connections for each circuit: a
preferred connection and a protecting connection.
Figure 18.2-1: Terminology for Protecting Connections
Preferred
circuit

Voice card
Preferred
connection

Control card

Primary rate
card

DX

PBX

A2-1
A1-1 (PC)

Primary
rate link

Protecting
connection

Voice card

Control card

Primary rate
card

DX
= Active connection
= Inactive connection
PC = Protected circuit
NPC = Not protected circuit

A3-1
A4-1 (NPC)

Primary
rate link

Protecting
circuit
4176

The preferred connection is the connection that a circuit uses if that circuit is
available.
The protecting connection is the connection that a circuit uses if the preferred
connection fails or cannot be completed. When this happens, the protected circuit is
connected to the protecting circuit and the data follows the alternative route. This
automatic switching from a preferred connection to a pre-configured protecting
connection is called protection switching. There is a short disruption to the data flow
when a switch to a protecting connection occurs.
In general, any two circuit types that can be used to form a preferred connection can
also be used to form a protecting connection. The exceptions are DSP circuits,
circuits connected to branch channels of SRMs and compressors and voice
compression subchannels on Dual E1 and T1 cards.
A protecting connection is made under some conditions. If the preferred connection
is configured and available, the protecting connection is not needed. If the preferred
connection is not configured or not available, the protecting connection is made, if
possible.

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18.2-1

18.2 Protection Switching


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

For protection switching involving tandem nodes in an E1 and T1 environment, set


the fault signalling for each internode circuit to out-of-service type A or B. This
causes the failure of an internode link to be detected by other nodes and triggers a
switch to alternative connections.
For example, in Figure 18.2-2, each of the circuits in link E1 (1) at node (1) is
protected by a circuit in link E1 (3) and each of the circuits in link E1 (2) at node (3)
are protected by a circuit in link E1 (4).
Figure 18.2-2: Out-of-Service Signalling for Tandem Nodes
3600 MainStreet node (2)
Out-of-service
fault signalling

E1 (1)

E1 (2)

E1 (3)

E1 (4)

Phone

Phone
3600
MainStreet node (1)

Fault

3645
MainStreet node (3)

3645 MainStreet node (4)

Protecting connection
Active (and preferred) connection
7154

If link E1 (1) fails, the following will occur.

An alarm is raised at node (1) and protection switching occurs at the node (1);

protected circuits are switched to their protecting circuits on E1 (3).


The fault signalling configured at node (2) is carried on E1 (2) to node (3).

If the circuits on link E1 (1) are configured for seized or idle fault signalling at node
(2), node (3) is not informed that link E1 (1) is out of service, so the node does not
switch the circuits on link E1 (2) to their protecting circuits on link E1 (4).
By configuring the circuits on link E1 (1) for out-of-service signalling at node (2),
node (3) is informed that link E1 (1) is out of service and the node switches the
protected circuits on link E1 (2) to their protecting circuits on link E1 (4).

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18.2.2

18.2 Protection Switching


Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring Protection Circuits


Table 18.2-1 lists the protection circuit configuration parameters.
Table 18.2-1: Protection Switching Configuration Parameters and Options
Parameter

Options

Protecting connections

protect by
protecting

Protected circuit disconnection

preferred
protection

Note
Protection switching applies to all cards except DSP, circuits connected to SRM
branch channels and compressors and voice compression subchannels on Dual E1
and T1 cards.
Table 16.4-1 in chapter 16.4 explains the formats of the identifiers in the procedures.

18.2.3

Designing Protecting Circuits


The subjects discussed in this section should be considered before configuring
protecting circuits.

Automatic override
Normally, protecting circuits are not used for other applications. However, you can
set up a shared environment. In a shared environment, a connection involving a
protecting circuit can be broken at any time without warning, so that the protecting
circuit can connect to the circuit it has been configured to protect.
For example, in Figure 18.2-3, circuit A1-1 is connected to circuit A2-1 (the preferred
connection) and is configured for a protecting connection to circuit A3-1. Circuit
A4-1 is connected to circuit A3-1. When all circuits are available, the connection
between circuits A1-1 and A2-1 is active and the connection between circuits A4-1
and A3-1 is active.

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18.2-3

18.2 Protection Switching


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 18.2-3: Preferred Connection Available


Preferred
circuit

Voice card
PBX

Preferred
connection

Control card

Primary rate
card

DX
A2-1
A1-1 (PC)

Primary
rate link

Protecting
connection

Voice card

Control card

Primary rate
card

DX
= Active connection
= Inactive connection
PC = Protected circuit
NPC = Not protected circuit

A3-1
A4-1 (NPC)

Primary
rate link

Protecting
circuit
4177

However, if circuit A2-1 becomes unavailable for connection, circuit A1-1 switches
to its protecting connection with A3-1 and the connection between A3-1 and A4-1 is
overridden. Circuit A1-1 switches back to its preferred connection when circuit A2-1
becomes available.

Circular protection
The node management software does not let you configure a circular protecting
connection. For example, in Figure 18.2-3, circuit A2-1 cannot act as a protecting
circuit for circuit A4-1.
However, you can establish a chain of connections. Circuit A2-1, for example, could
be protected by a fifth circuit.

Super-rate protection
When you connect a protecting super-rate circuit to an unprotected circuit, the
unprotected circuit must be a super-rate circuit running at the same speed as the
protected circuit. A protecting super-rate circuit must have the same number of DS0s
and bandwidth as the protected circuit.

Using different cards


Do not protect a circuit with a circuit located on the same card as the preferred
connection (for example, do not connect circuit A1-1 to circuit A2-1 and protect it
with A2-2). If the preferred circuit becomes unavailable for connection, it is usually
due to a card or link failure, rather than circuit failure, so the protecting circuit is also
unavailable for connection.

Compatibility
When planning protection connections, make sure that the protected circuit is
compatible with the protecting connection.

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18.2 Protection Switching


Issue 1, November 1997

Note
Only the E&M and OCU-DP channel units support protection switching. All other
channel units do not support protection switching.
For the 3645 MainStreet system, the maximum number of circuits configured for
protection switching is 375.

Activity Qualified Access


AQA lets you specify a protecting connection for a voice or data circuit using V.35
DCCs and NTUs. The V.35 circuit is connected to an NTU configured with call
set-up information. If a preferred connection goes down, AQA uses pin 108 on the
V.35 DCC to transmit DTR (high) to the NTU, at which point the NTU initiates a call
to another NTU connected to a V.35 DCC in the other node.
When the NTU detects DTR low, it drops the call and the connection switches back
to the preferred path.
Figure 18.2-4 shows a sample application.
Figure 18.2-4: Activity Qualified Access
3645 MainStreet node

3600 MainStreet node

64 kb/s
Transparent

V.35
DCC

V.35
DCC

Preferred link

E1
card

DTE/Master
(pin 108 is forced high
if preferred path fails)

E1
card

64 kb/s
Transparent

DTE/Slave
(pin 108 is forced high
always)

Switched
64 kb/s
network
NTU

V.35
DCC

E1
card

NTU
4010

V.35 circuits involved in a protecting connection must be configured for DTE and
then configured as the master circuit or the slave circuit.
The AQA master circuit forces DTR high and transmits it to the NTU if the preferred
connection goes down. The slave circuit has DTR forced high at all times. Do not
make any changes to the control leads from the control leads menu (see
Maintenance). Changing the control leads could cause a protecting call to be
dropped.
If you try to configure the V.35 circuit for AQA before configuring it for DTE, the
system displays the message AQA only applicable to circuits configured for DTE
mode. If you try to change the mode from DTE to DCE, the system displays the
message AQA is configured, PROCEED will override; if you press PROCEED,
AQA is disabled.

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18.2-5

18.2 Protection Switching


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

After the protecting connection is made, the AQA configuration (master, slave or
disabled) cannot be changed. If you try to change the configuration, the system
displays the message Circuit must be disconnected before proceeding.
Chapter 22.3 describes the procedure for configuring V.35 circuits for AQA.

18.2.4

Configuring Protecting Connections


A protecting connection can be made from the perspective of the protected circuit or
the protecting circuit.

If you enter the protected circuit with the CONNECT softkey, select PROT_BY
and enter the protecting circuit identifier.

If you enter the protecting circuit with the CONNECT softkey, select
PROTECTING and enter the protected circuit identifier.
To disconnect a connection without defining another one, use the DISCONNECT
softkey, and select PREFERRED for the preferred connection or PROTECTION for
the protecting connection.
Note
If one of the circuits in the connection is on a T1 or E1 card that has a CCM, two
softkeys appear: COMP_CONV and NO_CONV. Select COMP_CONV if you want
companding conversion to be done on that connection; otherwise select NO_CONV.
The data area display indicates whether or not companding conversion is being
done for a connection by displaying Yes or No under the heading Conv.

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18.2 Protection Switching


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure protecting connections


CONFIG CONNECT <sn-cc> or <x-sn-cc>

PROT_BY

PROTECTING

<sn-cc> or <x-sn-cc>

COMP_CONV

DISCONNECT

PROTECTION

PREFERRED

NO_CONV
SK000056

To configure TTC2M cards as a protecting connection


CONFIG CONNECT <sn-cc> RAP+ID

PROT_BY

PROTECTING

<sn-cc>
SK000776

To disconnect the protecting TTC2M card connection


CONFIG CONNECT <sn-cc> DISCONNECT

PREFERRED

PROTECTION
SK000777

Select PROTECTION to disconnect the protecting circuit.


Select PREFERRED to disconnect the preferred circuit. This selection does not
disconnect the protecting circuit that is configured for that circuit.

Redundancy

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18.2-7

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18.3

18.3 PRI Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

PRI Redundancy
This chapter introduces PRI redundancy and explains how to do the following tasks:

18.3.1

configuring redundancy
handling failures
forcing an activity switch
handling fault processing
clearing card failures

Understanding PRI Redundancy


You can configure the system so that two primary rate cards are connected to a
single corresponding primary rate link, for example, two E1 cards to an E1 link. One
card is active (drives the primary rate line) while the other is on standby. In most
cases, the two PRI cards must be in the same locally controlled or peripheral shelf.
Two T1 cards configured as a redundant pair can be installed either on the same
shelf, or one on the A shelf and one on the B shelf.
The standby card detects the presence of incoming signals on the link, but cannot
drive the link because of a high impedance termination.
If the system detects a fault with the active card, the node management software
decides whether to switch to the standby card based on its operating rules.
Switching from the active card to the standby card causes a brief disruption in
service.
If the active card and the standby card differ in their reports of the state of the link,
the node manager starts fault processing on the card that declares the more severe
link fault. Fault processing assesses the condition of a card. If a card is determined
to be faulty, it is declared failed.

Hardware requirements
The following cards support primary rate interface redundancy:

Redundancy

E1 cards equipped with E1 LIMs


T1 cards equipped with T1 LIMs or CSU modules
X.21 PRI cards
V.35 PRI cards

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18.3-1

18.3 PRI Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

The following cards do not support primary rate interface redundancy:

Dual E1 and Dual E1-2 cards


Dual T1 cards
T1 cards equipped with a DSX-1 module
The redundant interface card pair must be permanently connected to the primary
rate link using an external Y-connector so that faulty cards can be replaced without
disruption to service. Redundancy kits consist of faceplate connectors and Y cables
and are available for T1 links, E1 links and X.21 or V.35 PRI links. For details on
installation, see Installation, Task 1605: Connecting External Devices to Peripheral,
Enhanced Locally Controlled or Locally Controlled Shelves.
See chapter 18.1 for a description of control redundancy for DS-3 or DS-3 II and E3
cards.

18.3.2

Configuring PRI Redundancy


Table 18.3-1 lists the PRI redundancy configuration parameter.
Table 18.3-1: PRI Redundancy Configuration Parameter and Options
Parameter

Options

Redundant PRI pair

protect by
no protection*

Table 18.3-2 lists the locations of the PRI redundancy configuration procedures.
Table 18.3-2: PRI Redundancy Configuration Procedures
Configuration Procedure

Section

Clear card failures

18.3.7

Clear outstanding demerit points

18.3.6

Force an activity switch

18.3.5

Note
Table 16.4-1 in chapter 16.4 explains the formats of the identifiers in the procedures.

18.3-2

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18.3.3

18.3 PRI Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring PRI Redundancy Parameters


When you configure two slots as a redundant primary rate interface pair, you
designate one the master and the other the slave. The master slot configuration
parameters are automatically applied to the slave slot. All configuration of slot
attributes, circuit attributes, or connections for the redundant pair must be done
through the master slot. Access to the slave slot or its circuits is blocked, except for
the maintenance menu. If the master slot is reconfigured, the slave slot configuration
is automatically updated to match.
Note
The designations of master and slave are used only to indicate which of the
redundant pair can be configured. They are independent of which card is active.
When a slot becomes active, it stays active for as long as possible, whether it is the
master or the slave.

To configure PRI redundancy


CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS MORE

NO_PROTECT*

PROT_BY
<sn>

SK000057

where
the first sn is the identifier of the master slot
the second sn is the identifier of the slave slot

Note
When a redundant primary rate interface pair is deconfigured, the two cards operate
independently. Both cards become active and drive the line. If the Y cable still
connects the two interfaces to the same primary rate link, there is a conflict on the
line. Disconnect the cards or connect them to separate primary rate links before
deconfiguring them.
When a redundant primary rate interface pair is deconfigured, the slave slot is reset
to the default configuration settings (including no connections). The slot that was the
master retains all configuration information.

18.3.4

Handling Failures
To handle failures, you need to know the operating rules for a redundant primary
rate interface pair.

Redundancy

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18.3-3

18.3 PRI Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Operating rules
When you power up the system, the member of a redundant primary rate interface
pair that powers up first is designated the active card and the other member becomes
the standby card. This is independent of which card is in the master slot.
When you power down the system, any card failures are lost.
If only one member of the pair is present, it is always the active card and the system
does not try to switch to the other card regardless of the state of the active card. A
card can be absent because it has been removed or it has been declared failed.
If both members of the pair are present and one card declares the beginning or end
of a link fault (called an event), that card starts a two-second timer. If another event
occurs within those two seconds, the card restarts the two-second timer.
When two seconds have elapsed with no events, the system compares the severity
of the link faults being declared by the two primary rate cards and acts according to
the operating rules listed below (see Figure 18.3-1).
Figure 18.3-1: Operating Rules for Redundant Primary Rate Pair

Declaration
of beginning
or end of
link fault

Is the
active card
link fault more
severe?

Yes

An activity switch occurs.


Fault processing begins on this card.
If the newly active card declares a link fault,
trunk conditioning will be applied (if configured).

Yes

An activity switch does not occur.


Fault processing begins on this card.
If the active card declares a link fault,
trunk conditioning will be applied (if configured).

Yes

An activity switch does not occur.


Fault processing does not occur.
If the active card declares a link fault,
trunk conditioning will be applied (if configured).

No

Is the
standby card
link fault more
severe?

No

Are the
link faults
of equal
severity?

5449

Rule 1: The card that has declared the less severe link fault (including no link fault)
is designated as the active card and the card that has declared the more severe link
fault is designated as the standby card (this may require an activity switch).
Rule 2: The system begins fault processing on the card that has declared the more
severe link fault.

18.3-4

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18.3 PRI Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

Rule 3: If the two link faults are equally severe, there is no activity switch and no
fault processing.
Rule 4: If the active card is still declaring a link fault, trunk conditioning is applied if
the slot is so configured.

Link faults
A link fault is a problem with a primary rate link. A card declares the beginning of a
link fault by raising one of the alarms listed in the left column of Table 18.3-3. The
faults are numbered in order of decreasing severity. Faults with the same number
have equal severity. When a card declares the end of a link fault, it raises the
corresponding alarm listed in the right column. Link fault alarms are raised for the
active card only and are listed in the alarm queue under the master slot identifier.
No alarms appear in the alarm queue under the slave slot identifier.
Table 18.3-3: Alarms for Declaring Beginning and End of Link Faults
Beginning of Link Fault Alarm

End of Link Fault Alarm

T1 link
1 Red Alarm

Red Alarm Cleared

2 Failed State
Framing Err Rate Exceeded

Failed State Cleared


Framing Err Rate Normal

3 Yellow Alarm

Yellow Alarm Cleared

E1 link
1 Framing Alarm
Incoming AIS

Framing Alarm Cleared


Incoming AIS Cleared

2 Multi-frame Alarm
Incoming TS16 AIS

Multi-frame Alarm Cleared


Incoming TS16 AIS Cleared

3 Failed State
Framing Err Rate Exceeded

Failed State Cleared


Framing Err Rate Normal

4 Distant Alarm
TS16 Distant Alarm

Distant Alarm Cleared


TS16 Distant Alarm Cleared

X.21 or V.35 PRI link


1 Framing Alarm

Framing Alarm Cleared

2 Distant Alarm

Distant Alarm Cleared

Fault processing cannot be initiated when the two members of a redundant interface
pair declare different link faults with the same severity (for example, Failed State
and Framing Err Rate Exceeded), because fault processing is done only on the card
declaring the more severe link fault. However, if one card declares a Yellow Alarm
and the other card a Red Alarm, the card that declared the Yellow Alarm (the less
severe alarm) becomes the active card if it is not already and fault processing starts
for the card declaring the Red Alarm.

Redundancy

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18.3-5

18.3 PRI Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

18.3.5

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Forcing an Activity Switch


An activity switch occurs when the active primary rate interface card goes on
standby and the standby primary rate card becomes active; that is, all connections
for the old active card are broken and re-established with the new active card.
Caution
Switching from the active card to the standby card causes a brief disruption in
service.

Ones density on T1 links


The CSU module provides a keep-alive signal consisting of unframed all ones (blue
alarm). If the interface transmits more than 15 consecutive zeros, or the node clock
stops, the module transmits the keep-alive signal to the network.
Caution
The all-ones density is not maintained during a switch between T1 cards equipped
with CSU modules.

To force an activity switch


To force an activity switch, select the MAKE_ACT softkey from the peripheral or
locally controlled shelf This forces the card in the slot indicated to become active if
possible; that is, if the card has not been declared failed and is not undergoing fault
processing.
MAINT ON_SLOT <sn> MAKE_ACT

Alarms
During an activity switch, the system raises a card Activity Change alarm. When you
display the alarm queue containing the card Activity Change alarm, the subcode is
the slot identifier of the new active card, the first parameter is a software
representation of the slot identifier of the new active card, and the second parameter
is the reason code for the activity switch. Table 18.3-4 lists the reason codes. Reasons
3 through 8 are the alarms that caused the activity switch (the activity switch
occurred because the active card declared the alarm listed and the standby card
declared a less severe alarm or no alarm).
For example, if the active card declares a Red Alarm and the standby card does not
do the same within two seconds, the standby card becomes the active card (an
activity switch). A card Activity Change alarm is raised with parameter 2 set to 3,
because a Red Alarm declaration caused the activity switch.

18.3-6

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18.3 PRI Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 18.3-4: Reason Codes for Card Activity Change Alarm


Activity
Change Code

Activity Change Reason

Requested switch (MAINT ON_SLOT MAKE_ACT) selected

Active interface card removed or interface redundancy deconfigured

Red Alarm/Framing Alarm/Incoming AIS

Multi-Frame Alarm/Incoming TS16 AIS

Failed State

Framing Err Rate Exceeded

Yellow Alarm/Distant Alarm

TS16 Distant Alarm

Active card has too many failed circuits

If there is an activity switch and the new active card does not declare a link fault, the
system does not invoke protection switching because the primary rate link is still in
service. Protection switching is invoked only if the link is out of service; that is, if
both members of the pair have declared a link fault and the link is configured for
two-way trunk conditioning for the class of fault being declared by the active card
(chapter 18.2 explains protection switching).

18.3.6

Handling Fault Processing


When a discrepancy occurs between the severity of link faults declared by the two
members of a redundant primary rate interface pair, fault processing is carried out
on the card that has declared the more severe link fault. This determines whether the
card should be declared failed and made unavailable to its mate. Fault processing
continues until one of the following events occurs.

The card accumulates 70 or more demerit points (the card is declared failed).
The card declares the end of the link fault.
The two cards declare link faults of equal severity, including none (fault
processing can be carried out for only one member of the pair at a time).
Fault processing is automatically carried out in two cases:

when the active card declares a more severe link fault (there is an activity switch

and fault processing begins on the old active card)


when the standby card declares a more severe link fault (there is no activity
switch and fault processing begins on the standby card)

Fault processing consists of assigning demerit points to the card that appears to be
at fault according to the schedule listed in Table 18.3-5.

Redundancy

(400)

18.3-7

18.3 PRI Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

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Table 18.3-5: Fault Processing Demerit Points


Fault Processing Action

Demerit Points

Fault processing begins on the old active card (there is an activity switch).

12

Fault processing begins on the standby card (there is no activity switch).

Fault processing continues.

10 every 30 s

Fault processing stops before the card is declared failed.

-1 every 4 h

To clear outstanding demerit points


To clear outstanding demerit points, select CLR_FAULTS from the locally controlled
or peripheral shelf. The CLR_FAULTS softkey appears only if the card has
outstanding demerit points and has not been declared failed. You can clear
outstanding demerit points for both cards by removing and re-installing either card.
When one card fails, the demerit points for the other card are cleared.
MAINT ON_SLOT <sn> CLR_FAULTS

Example
Both members of a redundant interface pair have no outstanding link faults. The
active card declares a Red Alarm. Two seconds later, the standby card has still not
declared a link fault, so an activity switch occurs between the active card and the
standby card and fault processing starts on the old active card (12 points). The
difference still exists 30 seconds later (12 + 10 = 22 points). The Red Alarm is cleared
and fault processing stops. If there is no more fault processing on that card, the 22
demerit points are cleared in 88 hours (22 points 4 hours/point).
If the card does not clear the Red Alarm, it accumulates 72 demerit points
(12 + 10 [3/0.5] = 72) after three minutes and the node manager declares the card
failed.

18.3.7

Clearing Card Failures


If a card accumulates 70 or more demerit points or if one third or more of the circuits
on the card fail background or directed diagnostics, the card is declared failed. The
Status LED goes off and the card is no longer available for use by the system. The
card is placed in bypass to isolate it from the line. The demerit points for the mate
card (if any) are cleared and the mate card operates as if the failed card were not
present.

18.3-8

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18.3 PRI Redundancy


Issue 1, November 1997

Alarms
When a card is declared failed, a Card Failure alarm is raised (see Maintenance,
Table 35.8-6). When you display the alarm queue containing the card Failure alarm,
the subcode is the slot identifier of the failed card (master or slave slot), the first
parameter is a software representation of the slot identifier of the failed card and the
second parameter is the reason code for the card failure, where:

1 indicates an unstable card (a card that has accumulated 70 or more demerit

points during fault processing)


2 indicates too many failed circuits
Caution

Use the loopback and bypass maintenance functions (invoked by selecting


LOOPBACK or BYPASS under the MAINT ON_SLOT menu) carefully because
they can lead to a card being declared failed.

To clear card failures


To clear the failure using the node manager, select the RET_SERV softkey. The
RET_SERV softkey appears only if the card has been declared failed. It also clears
outstanding demerit points.
MAINT ON_SLOT <sn> RET_SERV

Note
You can also clear the failure, without using the node manager, by removing and
re-installing either card of the redundant pair.

Redundancy

(400)

18.3-9

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19. System Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

19.1

19.1 Understanding System Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Understanding System Card


Configuration
This chapter summarizes the configuration parameters in this part of the manual
and shows how they apply to each system card.

19.1.1

Understanding System Cards


The 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers support configurable system cards
as follows:

Control cards (3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers)


Expander card (3600 MainStreet systems and locally controlled 36120 MainStreet
systems only)

Switching card (3645 MainStreet systems and switching shelf controlled 36120

MainStreet only)
Common Carrier card
Test card
GFC3

Control cards
The Control card provides all common control node management facilities for the
system.
For the 3600, 3645, 3664 and 36120 MainStreet Control cards in switching shelf
controlled systems, system control is shared between the switching and peripheral
shelf Control cards.

Expander card
The Expander card is used in locally controlled systems to increase the input and
output handling capacity of the Control card from 6 UCSs to 8, 12 or 16 UCSs,
depending on the variant you install.

Switching card
Each Switching card installed in a switching shelf increases the digital cross-connect
switching capacity of the switching shelf Control card by 64 Mb/s. Each Switching
card is connected to a peripheral shelf, DS-3 card or E3 card.

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19.1-1

19.1 Understanding System Card Configuration


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Common Carrier card


The Common Carrier card is installed in peripheral and locally controlled shelves to
provide four channel unit positions.

Test card
The Test card is installed in peripheral, locally controlled, and enhanced locally
controlled shelves to provide test access to voice and data circuits. The
user-installable Test module for the Test card provides analog and digital testing.

GFC3
The GFC3 is installed in peripheral and locally controlled shelves to provide analog
and digital tone tests for voice and data circuits, and BERT tests for data circuits.

19.1.2

Configuring System Cards


This section lists the configurable parameters and options for system cards.

Control card parameters and options


Table 19.1-1 lists the Control card configuration parameters.
Table 19.1-1: Control Card Configuration Parameters and Options
Parameter

Options

Card Level
Timing and synchronization

See Table 17.2-4.

Date, time, and node name

See Table 17.4-1.

Access level and password

See Table 17.5-1.

CPSS

See Table 17.6-2.

Control redundancy

See Table 18.1-2.

Slot Level

19.1-2

Card slot (3600+ MainStreet Control


card)

Narrowband Switching module


Broadband Switching module

Card slot (3600, 3645, 3664 and 36120


MainStreet Control cards)

8+ module
no module

Serial port

See Table 17.3-2.

(400)

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19.1 Understanding System Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Expander card parameters and options


Table 19.1-2 lists the Expander card configuration parameter.
Table 19.1-2: Expander Card Configuration Parameter and Options
Parameter

Options

Card slot

empty (not required)*


Expander card (6+2)
Expander card (6+6)
Expander card (8+8)
Expander card (16+)

Switching card parameters and options


Table 19.1-3 lists the Switching card configuration parameters. Each parameter has
a list of options with any default option marked by an asterisk.
Table 19.1-3: Switching Card Configuration Parameters and Options
Parameter

Options

Card slot

Switching card

Enabling or disabling the card

enabled*
disabled

Common Carrier card parameters and options


Table 19.1-4 lists the Common Carrier card configuration parameter.
Table 19.1-4: Common Carrier Card Configuration Parameter and Option
Parameter

Options

Card slot

Carrier card

Test card configuration parameters and options


Table 19.1-5 lists the Test card configuration parameters available for digital and
metallic connections. Each parameter has a list of options, with any default marked
by an asterisk.
Note
The 25-pair connector enable or disable option applies to digital and metallic access
through the card.

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19.1-3

19.1 Understanding System Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

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Table 19.1-6 lists the configuration parameters available for digital and analog test
connections through the user-installable Test module.
Table 19.1-5: Test Card Configuration Parameters and Options
Parameter

Options

Card Operation
Card slot

Test card

Digital DS0 Circuit Configuration


25-pair connector

enabled (faceplate connectors disabled)


disabled (faceplate connectors enabled)*

Interface speed

2.4 kb/s
4.8 kb/s
9.6 kb/s*
19.2 kb/s
56 kb/s
64 kb/s

Error correction

enabled*
disabled

Fault signalling code

a hexadecimal number: 00 to FF (1A*)

Metallic Test Access Connections


Metallic test access connections

direct monitor
high impedance monitor
split access
4-wire loopback

25-pair connector

enabled (faceplate connectors disabled)


disabled (faceplate connectors enabled)*

Table 19.1-6: Test Module Configuration Parameters and Options


Parameter

Options

Card Operation
Card modules

Test module
no module*

Tone Tester Configuration


Companding law

Mu-law*
A-law

Line impedance

600 W*
900 W

Transmission mode

2-wire*
4-wire

BERT Configuration
Rate adaption method

19.1-4

HCM*
Transparent
DDS

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19.1 Understanding System Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Parameter

Options

Transport position

B0 to B7*

Transport bandwidth

1 to 8*

Interface speed

see section 23.6.7

Signalling

enabled*
disabled

Data position

F0-B6* to F7-B0 (F0-B5*)

Tone Tester Maintenance


Tone type

single tone*
white noise
quiet tone

Analog tone test amplitude

40 to +10 dBm in 1 dBm D (0*)

Digital tone test amplitude

40 to 0 dBm* in 1 dBm D (0*)

Tone Frequency

200 to 3400 Hz in 1 Hz D (1004*)

Loopback

loopback C

Tone Tester test

enabled
disabled

Analog tone test direction

equipment*
facility

BERT Maintenance

System Cards

Inject ERR

inject an error

Inject ERR

none*
1.00E-1
1.00E-2
1.00E-3
1.00E-4
1.00E-5
1.00E-6
1.00E-7

Inject BER

n, where n is an integer corresponding to


a BERT pattern

BERT pattern

enabled
disabled

BER test

clear statistics

BERT statistics

n, where n is an integer corresponding to


a DDS control code

DDS control code

show status of last eight MJUs


show last eight Tx DDS codes
show last eight Rx DDS codes

DDS control code parameters

run a round trip delay measurement

Round trip delay measurement

enabled
disabled*

Audible error bell

loopback C

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19.1-5

19.1 Understanding System Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

GFC3 configuration parameters and options


Table 19.1-7 lists the card and maintenance level configuration parameters and
options for the GFC3. To configure maintenance level options, see Maintenance,
chapter 36.4.
Table 19.1-7: GFC3 Configuration Parameters and Options
Parameter

Options

Card Operation
Card slot

GFC

GFC type

GFC
GFC3

Companding law

Mu-law*
A-law

Ringback tone

Mu-law*
A-law

Tone generator companding law

Mu-law*
A-law

NRZ clock termination

enabled
disabled*

DS1/composite clock termination

enabled
disabled*

Order Wire Configuration


PCM companding law

Mu-law*
A-law

TLP

Tx: 3 to +4 dB in 1 dB D (0*)
Rx: 6 to +1 dB in 1 dB D (0*)

Signalling type

E1
Private Line Automatic Ringdown*
Central Battery Working
Loop Calling Disconnect Clear
Earth Calling
Remote Extension
T1
Private Line Automatic Ringdown*
Private Line Automatic Ringdown_D3
Loop Start
Loop Start to E&M Conversion
Ground Start
Ground Start to E&M Conversion

Ringing bias

48 V*
0V

Test Port Configuration


PCM companding law

19.1-6

Mu-law*
A-law

(400)

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19.1 Understanding System Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Parameter

Options
16.0 to +8.0 dB in 0.1 dB D (0*)

TLP
Tone Tester Configuration
PCM companding law

Mu-law*
A-law

Line impedance

600 W*
900 W

Transmission mode

2-wire*
4-wire

BERT Configuration
Rate adaption method

HCM*
Transparent
DDS DS0-A

Transport position

B0 to B7*

Transport bandwidth

1 to 8*

Interface speed

see section 23.6.7

Signalling

enabled*
disabled

Data position

F0-B6* to F7-B0 (F0-B5*)

Error correction for DDS rate adaption

disabled
enabled*

DS0 Port Configuration


Interface speed

2.4 kb/s
4.8 kb/s
9.6 kb/s*
19.2 kb/s
56 kb/s
64 kb/s

Error correction

enabled*
disabled

Fault signalling code

a hexadecimal number: 00 to FF (1A*)

Tone Tester Maintenance

System Cards

Tone type

single tone*
white tone
quiet tone

Analog tone test amplitude

40 to +10 dBm in 1 dBm D (0*)

Digital tone test amplitude

40 to 0 dBm in 1 dBm D (0*)

Tone Frequency

200 to 3400 Hz in 1 Hz D (1004*)

Loopback

loopback C

Tone Tester test

enabled
disabled

Analog tone test direction

equipment*
facility

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19.1-7

19.1 Understanding System Card Configuration


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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Parameter

Options

BERT Maintenance
Inject ERR

inject an error

Inject BER

none*
1.00E-1
1.00E-2
1.00E-3
1.00E-4
1.00E-5
1.00E-6
1.00E-7

BERT pattern

n, where n is an integer corresponding to


a BERT pattern

BER test

enable
disable

BERT statistics

clear statistics

DDS control code

n, where n is an integer corresponding to


a DDS control code

DDS control code parameters

show status of last eight MJUs


show last eight Tx DDS codes
show last eight Rx DDS codes

Round trip delay measurement

run a round trip delay measurement

Audible error bell

enable
disable*

Loopback

loopback C

Note
During installation, each Control card and Switching card must be assigned a
unique node number (see Installation, chapter 14.1).
Table 16.4-1 in chapter 16.4 explains the formats of the identifiers in the procedures.

19.1-8

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19.2

19.2 Understanding GFC3 Card Operation


Issue 1, November 1997

Understanding GFC3 Card


Operation
This chapter introduces the GFC3 card operation parameters and options.

19.2.1

GFC3 Card Operations


You can configure the following card parameters on the GFC3:

ringback tone companding law


RBT_MULAW for Mu-Law companding
RBT_ALAW for A-Law companding
tone generator companding law
TG_MULAW for Mu-Law companding
TG_ALAW for A-Law companding
NRZ clock termination
NRZTRM_OFF to disable NRZ clock termination
NRZTRM_ON to enable NRZ clock termination
DS1/Composite clock termination
DS1TRM_OFF to disable DS1/Composite clock termination
DS1TRM_ON to enable DS1/Composite clock termination
PCM companding law
SET_MULAW to set the companding law for all configurable parameters on
voice circuits to Mu-Law

SET_ALAW to set the companding law for all configurable parameters on


voice circuits to A-Law

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19.2-1

19.2 Understanding GFC3 Card Operation


Issue 1, November 1997

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To configure GFC3 card operations


Log on to the locally controlled or peripheral shelf and enter:

CONFIG SLOT <GFC>

TYPE

OPTIONS

GFC

GFC3

SET_MULAW

SET_ALAW

RBT_MULAW*/
RBT_ALAW

TG_MULAW*/
TG_ALAW

NRZTRM_OFF*/ DS1TRM_OFF*/
NRZTRM_ON
DS1TRM_ON
SK000772

19.2-2

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19.3

19.3 System Card Slots


Issue 1, November 1997

System Card Slots


This chapter explains how to configure slots for the configurable system cards.

19.3.1

Understanding System Card Slots


The 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers have system cards with parameters
to configure at the slot level.
Note
To configure all slots programmed as EMPTY to the default configurations of the
cards installed in the shelf, press the CONFIG_ALL softkey and the <Esc>
simultaneously.

3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers


You must configure a card slot for the Switching card and Common Carrier card
because they can be installed in any of the UCSs of the switching shelf or, peripheral
or locally controlled shelf. For the Switching card, you can also enable or disable the
card.
Although the Expander card is always installed in slot 10 of the locally controlled
shelf, you must configure the type of Expander card.
You do not need to configure the Control card slot, because it is always switching
shelf slot 10 or, peripheral or locally controlled shelf slot 9 (or slots 9 and 11 in
control-redundant single shelves). However, you can configure the SCC3(8+) to
provide single-shelf control redundancy with double-bandwidth switching
capacity.
You must configure the GFC slot for the type of General Facilities card installed (the
GFC3 provides more functionality than the GFC or GFC2). General Facilities cards
are installed in slot 12 of shelf A for peripheral or locally controlled shelves.

3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager


There are three system cards with parameters to configure at the slot level: the
Control card, the Common Carrier card and the Test card.

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19.3-1

19.3 System Card Slots


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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

The system automatically configures the slot location of the Control card on the
shelf, as well as the Timing card and the Alarm Panel. The Narrowband and
Broadband modules installed on the Control card must be manually configured as
present on the card. The Bank-B Memory module is automatically configured as
present on the Control card. The Test card can be configured in the MTA slot. See
section 19.3.8 for slot configuration information.

19.3.2

Configuring the SCC3(8+) Card Slot


You can configure a SCC3(8+), which provides the extra switching capacity needed
for full 8 UCS double bandwidth. The SCC3(8+) is used in a single-shelf
configuration to allow the installation of eight double-bandwidth cards and permit
single-shelf redundancy. (There is no room for an Expander card in a single-shelf
system with two Control cards.)
Configure the SCC3(8+) as:

8+_MODULE
NO_MODULE
To configure the SCC3(8+) card slot
CONFIG SLOT <CTL> OPTIONS

8+_MODULE

NO_MODULE
SK000059

Note
You must configure the Expander card as EMPTY before you can configure the
SCC3(8+).
If you have configured more than four shared CPSS connections, you must
disconnect them before configuring the SCC3(8+).
Before you select NO_MODULE, you must deconfigure slots 7 and 8 and any
double-bandwidth cards.

19.3-2

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19.3.3

19.3 System Card Slots


Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring the Expander Card Slot


You can configure the Expander card with identifier <EXP> and the appropriate
card type. Table 19.3-1 lists various system configurations and the corresponding
Expander card types. Alternatively, you can select AS_PRESENT, to match the card
in the slot. (The AS_PRESENT softkey does not appear if the Expander card installed
in the slot matches the slot configuration.) The default configuration is EMPTY.
Table 19.3-1: Expander Card Configuration Options
System Configuration

Expander Card

Configure As

Single shelf

Not required

EMPTY*

Expanded single shelf

Expander card (6+2)

6+2

Dual shelf

Expander card (6+6)

6+6

Expanded dual shelf

Expander card (8+8)

8+8

Double bandwidth (single or dual shelf)

Expander card(16+)

16+

Warning
Configuring an Expander card while the system is in operation causes a temporary
disruption of service.

Note
The Expander card must be configured before a CONFIG_ALL operation. Otherwise
the system assumes only six slots will be configured.

To configure the Expander card slot


CONFIG SLOT <EXP>

EMPTY*

6+2

6+6

8+8

16+
SK000060

Note
If the Expander card slot is configured as anything other than EMPTY and you want
to change the slot configuration, all slots that will no longer be supported by the
Expander card must be configured to EMPTY. On the warning line, the system
displays the message Configure to EMPTY, followed by the identifiers of the slots
that need to be changed.

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19.3 System Card Slots


Issue 1, November 1997

19.3.4

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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Configuring the Switching Card Slot


Configure the Switching card with type SC in any of slots 1 to 8 in the switching
shelf. You can also disable and enable the Switching card.
During a database restore, you must disable the Switching cards while the
peripheral shelves, DS-3 cards and E3 cards are restored. After the restore procedure
is completed, you can enable the Switching cards again. Configure the Switching
card by selecting:

ENABLE for enabled (default)


DISABLE for disabled
To configure the Switching card slot
CONFIG SLOT <n>

TYPE

SC

OPTIONS
ENABLE*/DISABLE

EMPTY*

SK000061

where n is a 1-digit slot number (1 through 8)

19.3.5

Configuring the Common Carrier Card Slot


Configure the Common Carrier card in any of slots 1 to 8 in the peripheral or locally
controlled shelf as type CARRIER. Alternatively, you can select AS_PRESENT, to
match the card in the slot.

To configure the Common Carrier card slot


CONFIG SLOT <sn>

CONFIG_ALL

TYPE

AS_PRESENT

MORE
CARRIER
SK000062

19.3-4

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19.3.6

19.3 System Card Slots


Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring the Test Card Slot


Configure the Test card in any of slots 1 to 8 in the peripheral or locally controlled
shelf, or in the MTA slot in the enhanced locally controlled shelf, as type
TESTCARD. Alternatively, you can select AS_PRESENT, to match the card in the
slot.
If a Test module is installed on the Test card, select TESTMODULE to configure the
card slot for the Test module.

To configure the Test card slot


CONFIG SLOT <sn> or <MTA>
TYPE

AS_PRESENT

MORE
TESTCARD
SK001051

To configure the Test card for the Test module


CONFIG SLOT <sn> or <MTA> OPTIONS TESTMODULE/NO_MODULE*

19.3.7

Configuring 3600+ MainStreet Bandwidth Manager System


Card Slots
There are three system cards with parameters to configure at the slot level: the
Control card, the Common Carrier card (see section 19.3.5) and the Test card (see
section 19.3.6).

Configuring the Narrowband and Broadband Switching modules


Two modules can be configured on the Control card:

Narrowband Switching module


Broadband Switching module
Before configuring the Control card module parameters, the modules should be
physically installed. See Installation, Task 1305: Installing User-installable Card
Modules for information about installing modules.
The Narrowband Switching module is required on the Control card to enable the
system to communicate with the eight lower shelf UCS slots, or with HSA cards
installed in slots H1 and H2 on the lower shelf for narrowband communications.

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19.3-5

19.3 System Card Slots


Issue 1, November 1997

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The Broadband Switching module is required on the Control card to enable the
system to communicate with any HSA cards installed in slots H1, H2 or H3 on the
enhanced locally controlled shelf.
After the modules are physically installed, the Control card must be installed on the
shelf. If the system is configured for control redundancy, the Control cards are
installed in slots CTL-A and CTL-B. For more information about control redundancy
configurations, see chapter 18.1. For simplex system configurations, the card can be
installed in either CTL-A or CTL-B, but the preferred slot is CTL-A. For both system
configurations, the slot chosen for the Control card must be the mate to the slot
where the Timing card is installed.
Note
The Timing card must be installed before the Control card.

The system automatically acknowledges the Control card as present in the slot. In
the case of a control-redundant configuration, the first card to complete the start-up
diagnostic tests becomes the active Control card.
The system raises alarms if the Narrowband or Broadband Switching modules are
configured but not physically installed on the Control card. During this condition,
all cards that would have been available if the module was installed are held in reset
until the correct module is installed. For example, if the Narrowband Switching
module is configured but not installed, and the Broadband Switching module is also
not installed, the cards in slots H1, H2 and B1 to B8 are held in reset.
You cannot deconfigure the Narrowband or Broadband Switching modules while
cards are installed in the slots that the modules make available. The following error
message is displayed: Configure to EMPTY: <slot number>.

To configure Control card modules


CONFIG SLOT <CTL> OPTIONS

NBAND_MOD

NO_MODULE

BRAND_MOD

8k_X_8k_SW

NO_MODULE

4_X_4_SW
SK000838

19.3-6

(400)

System Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

19.3.8

19.3 System Card Slots


Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring the General Facilities Card Slot


Configure a GFC or GFC2 in slot 12 in the peripheral or locally controlled shelf as
type GFC. Configure a GFC3 in slot 12 in the peripheral or locally controlled shelf as
type GFC3. Alternatively, you can select AS_PRESENT, to match the card in the slot.

To configure the GFC or GFC2 slot


CONFIG SLOT <GFC> TYPE GFC

To configure the GFC3 slot


CONFIG SLOT <GFC> TYPE GFC3

System Cards

(400)

19.3-7

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


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20. Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.1

20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Understanding PRI Card


Configuration
This chapter introduces the PRI cards. It provides a summary of the configuration
procedures in this part of the manual and indicates how they apply to each PRI card.

20.1.1

Understanding PRI Cards


MainStreet systems support PRI cards as follows:

Single T1, Dual T1 and Dual T1-2 cards (3600 MainStreet series bandwidth

managers)
Single E1, Dual E1 and Dual E1-2 cards (3600 MainStreet series bandwidth
managers)
Single and Dual Optical Extension cards (3600 MainStreet series bandwidth
managers)
MPA card (3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers)
TTC2M card (3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers)
X.21 and V.35 PRI cards (3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers)
DS-3 and DS-3 II cards (3645 and 36120 MainStreet systems)
Single and Dual E3 cards (3645 and 36120 MainStreet systems)

T1 cards
T1 cards are used in peripheral and locally controlled shelves. They provide
24-channel DS1 digital link interfaces that conform to the relevant sections of AT&T
Channel Bank specifications Pub 43801 and Pub 62411 at 1.544 Mb/s. The Single T1
card provides one link; the Dual T1 and Dual T1-2 cards provide two. You can install
T1 cards in any UCS 1 to 8.
Warning
For shelves with a 6-UCS backplane (part numbers 90-0010-01, 90-0010-02 and
90-0010-08), the Dual T1-2 card must be installed in slots 1 to 6 only. Damage will
occur to the card if it is inserted in slot 7 or 8 (resource slots).

Primary Rate Interface Cards

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20.1-1

20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Note
In 3664 MainStreet systems, T1, Dual T1 and Dual T1-2 cards provide 12-channel
DS1 digital links.

E1 cards
E1 cards are used in peripheral and locally controlled shelves. They provide
32-channel 2.048 Mb/s DS1 digital link interfaces that conform to ITU-T G.703, G.704
and G.732 specifications at 2.048 Mb/s. The Single E1 card provides one link; the
Dual E1 and Dual E1-2 cards provide two. You can install E1 cards in any UCS 1 to 8.
Note
In 3664 MainStreet systems, E1, Dual E1 and Dual E1-2 cards provide 16-channel
DS1 digital links (or 15-channel links when configured for CAS framing).

The Dual E1-2 card can be used wherever a Dual E1 card is used; however, node
software sees the two cards as different types, so they cannot be directly
interchanged. The Dual E1-2 card provides the following additional features:

software downloading over the network, which minimizes card down time
local and remote G.821 statistics compliance
RAI configurable to meet ISDN requirements and detection of F2 and F5 states
enhanced maintenance and performance reports

Optical Extension Cards


Optical Extension cards can be installed in any enhanced locally controlled or
peripheral shelf UCS 1 to 8.
Optical Extension cards can extend transmission links beyond the range of any
device that uses current copper technology. The cards are equipped with either one
or two IOTUs, which convert electrical signals to optical signals. Each IOTU
supports up to 31 DSOs and provides a bidirectional bandwidth of 2.048 Mb/s over
a distance of up to 15 km (9 mi), using 1300nm single-mode fibre.
Although Optical Extension cards have a proprietary fibre optic interface, they are
configured using the same procedures to configure Dual E1 cards.

T1, E1 and Optical Extension card modules


Table 20.1-1 lists the modules supported by the T1, E1 and Optical Extension cards.

20.1-2

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20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 20.1-1: Modules Supported by the T1, E1 and Optical Extension Cards
T1 Card

E1 Card

Dual T1
Card

Dual T1-2
Card

Dual E1
Card

Dual E1-2
Card

Opt. Ext.
Cards

CSU

CSU2

CCM

DSX-1

TS24

E1 HDSL LIM

E1 LIM

Module

FT1

NTI

SAM

IHTU-C

IHTU-R

T1 LIM

TSM (1)

DRM (1)

VCM
VCM2 (2)

VCM3

IFM

Notes
1. Dual T1 cards in 3664 MainStreet systems do not support TSMs or DRMs.
2. When this document was published, the VCM2 was not available. Contact your Newbridge representative for information.

FT1 module
The FT1 module provides fractional T1 loopback support on the Dual T1-2 card. This
module generates and detects FT1 loopback activation and deactivation codes
according to Annex B ANSI T1.403. Once the code is generated, it is transmitted to
the remote end, where another FT1 module or an T1.403 compliant device detects it
and applies or removes the loopback.
Fractional T1 loopbacks are remotely initiated on individual or super-rate circuits
without taking down the entire T1 span and interrupting services. These loopbacks
allow the user to systematically test the link for faults at each successive node.
E1 HDSL LIMs and T1 IHTU modules
E1 HDSL LIMs and the T1 IHTU modules use HDSL technology to provide
repeaterless transport of service over two pairs of unconditioned copper loops.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.1-3

20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

The IHTU-C (central/master) and IHTU-R (remote/slave) are both required to


provide HDSL transmission, which supports greater distances between midspan
repeaters in a CSA. The IHTU modules are used at both ends of a T1 HDSL link. The
IHTU-C is installed at the central-office end, and the IHTU-R is installed at the
subscriber end.
Caution
Damage to equipment may occur if T1 lines are connected to a card that has an IHTU
module installed. If you use IHTU modules in your system, you can clearly identify
those circuits using the name field on the NMTI. To name circuits, see section 17.1.3.

Two E1 HDSL LIMs are required to provide HDSL transmission. The E1 HDSL LIMs
are used at both ends of an E1 HDSL link to increase the distance between midspan
repeaters in an ETSI DLL.
To establish an E1 HDSL link, the E1 HDSL LIMs at each end of the E1 link must be
programmed to be either a master or slave; this is achieved by configuring the Dual
E1 card Transmit BNC Shield option. By default, the Dual E1 card Transmit BNC
Shield option is set to Earthed, which corresponds to the master mode on the E1
HDSL LIM. To program one of the E1 HDSL LIMs for slave mode, the Dual E1 card
Transmit BNC Shield option must be configured for Floating.
Warning 1
If the Dual E1 cards at each end of the link are programmed for the same Transmit
BNC Shield option (for example, master/master or slave/slave), the E1 HDSL LIMs
do not synchronize.
Warning 2
The Receive BNC Shield option must be configured for Earthed at all times.

Note
Once the E1 HDSL link is connected and the modules are programmed for either
master or slave mode, it takes from 40 to 120 seconds for the E1 HDSL interfaces to
synchronize. It also takes from 40 to 120 seconds for the T1 HDSL interfaces to
synchronize once the T1 HDSL link is connected.

MPA cards
The MPA card is used in peripheral and locally controlled shelves and has four
programmable ports. Each primary rate interface is software configurable to
transport data according to either RS-530-A, RS-449, X.21, X.21 ESI or V.35
specifications. Two alarm contacts on the primary rate interface indicate an
out-of-sync condition on the X.21 interface, making it X.21 ESI compatible. The

20.1-4

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20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

MPA card interface can be configured as either DTE or DCE. The MPA card can
connect to a total of 60 DS0s for data transport. Each interface supports n 48, n 56
or n 64 kb/s channels (where n = 1 to 30). A supervisory channel, TS0, is required
for each port to carry signalling. Super-rate channels are supported, as well as CPSS
over TS0.
A cable connects the MPA card to the UDP, which provides the physical interface to
external devices. You can install the MPA card in any UCS 1 to 8.

TTC2M cards
TTC2M cards are used in peripheral and locally controlled shelves, providing a
channelized 2.048 Mb/s CMI interface to PBXs. The interface to the PBX conforms
with TTC Standard Vol. IV Part 1 JJ-20.11 and supports thirty 64 kb/s data or voice
channels. The interface also has a TS0 supervisory channel and an unused channel,
TS16. The channels can be cross-connected at the TTC2M card to a combination of
card and channel types, including: T1, E1, X.21, V.35, DSP, E&M, LGS PLAR, BRI,
64 kb/s Codirectional, and E3. Signalling for the connected circuit assumes the
TTC2M card signalling. You can install the TTC2M card in any UCS 1 to 8.

X.21 and V.35 PRI cards


X.21 and V.35 PRI cards are used in peripheral and locally controlled shelves. The
X.21 PRI card presents an X.21/V.11 interface and the V.35 PRI card a V.35 interface
at the customer premises that provides n x 64 kb/s, where n = 1 to 30, or 56 kb/s (for
Switched 56 service). You can install X.21 and V.35 PRI cards in any UCS 1 to 8.

DS-3 cards
DS-3 and DS-3 II cards are used in HSPSs. They provide 28 DS1 compatible channels;
each channel contains 24 DS0s for a total of 672 DS0s. The 28 DS1 channels are
bundled together into one DS3-compatible digital trunk interface that conforms to
AT&T Pub 54014, at 44.736 Mb/s. DS-3 II cards are used with Release 6 and newer
versions of 3600 MainStreet series bandwidth managers software. The slot is
configured automatically for the DS-3 or DS-3 II card.

E3 cards
E3 cards are used in HSPS2s. They provide 34.368 Mb/s E3 interfaces that provide
16 E1 DS1 channels; each channel contains 32 DS0s for a total of 512 DS0s. The SE3
card provides one link through coaxial connectors on the bulkhead. The DE3 card
provides two links.

Data interfaces
The 64 kb/s Codirectional card and the OCU-DP Channel Unit are data interfaces
that can perform some primary rate functions. See chapter 22.1 for a description of
data interfaces. See chapters 20.9, 20.10 and 20.12 for a description of the primary
rate functions of data interfaces.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.1-5

20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

20.1.2

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Configuring PRI Cards


Table 20.1-2 lists the T1 card configuration parameters. Each parameter has a list of
options, with any default option marked by an asterisk.
Note
Table 16.4-1 in chapter 16.4 explains the formats of the identifiers in the procedures.
Chapter 17.6 provides CPSS connection procedures for PRI cards.
Chapter 18.3 provides procedures for configuring PRI redundancy.
During installation, each DS-3 or DS-3 II and E3 card must be assigned a unique
node number (see Installation, Task 1415: Setting the Node Number for a Peripheral
Shelf or DS-3, DS-3 II, DE3 and SE3 Cards).

Table 20.1-2: T1 PRI Card Configuration Parameters and Options


Single
T1 Card

Dual
T1
Card

Dual
T1-2
Card

Parameter

Options

CPSS

See Table 17.6-2.

Card type

T1
Dual T1
Dual T1-2

Application module

no module
voice compression
TS24 signalling (for Dual T1 card)
DRM (for Dual T1-2 card)
FT1 module (for Dual T1-2 card)

ISDN

non-ISDN*
ISDN

CCM

conversion
no conversion*

SAM (1)

no module*
normal (installed, not used)
circuit order
timeslot order

Card Level

Slot Level

20.1-6

VCM

delta
delta G3 fax
transitional
transitional G3 fax

Timeslot 24 signalling (2)

timeslot 24 signalling
no timeslot 24 signalling

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

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20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Single
T1 Card

Dual
T1
Card

Dual
T1-2
Card

Parameter

Options

DS1 Framing

D4 framing format*
ESF

Line length with a DSX-1


module or T1 LIM

0 to 46 m (0 to 150 ft)*
46 to 137 m (150 to 450 ft)
137 to 200 m (450 to 655 ft)

Line length with a CSU


module

15 dB*
7.5 dB
0 dB

Zero code suppression

transparent
binary 8-zero suppression
jam bit 7*

Trunk conditioning

one-way
two-way*

Fault classes

red/frame off or on*


yellow/distant off or on*
failed off or on*
error off or on*
CSU loopback off or on*

Loopback detection

none*
through CPSS
through TS24 (3)
on fault (4)

24 DS0 super-rate circuit


protection(2)

TS24 signalling

Link availability monitoring

enabled
disabled*

Errored seconds

1 to 255 (* = 86)

Severely errored seconds

320/1544* (5)
101/487 (5)
10-3* (4)
10-4 (4)
10-5 (4)
5 x 10-5 (4)
10-6 (4)
10-7 (4)

PRI redundancy (6)

See Table 18.3-1.

Alarm Time
Declare
Clear

0.1 to 60 seconds
0.1 to 60 seconds

Circuit Level

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.1-7

20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


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NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Single
T1 Card

Dual
T1
Card

Dual
T1-2
Card

Parameter

Options

Fault signalling

seized
idle*
OOS-A
OOS-B
OOS-C
None

Custom trunk conditioning,


ABCD bits

4-digit code, E&M (idle=0000*;


seized=1111*)

Custom trunk conditioning,


data

8-digit code, primary rate


(00000000 to 11111111*)

T1 signalling types

transparent*
clear channel
E&M
LGS LS
LGS GS
LGS PLAR
LGS PLAR D3
LGE LS
LGE GS
Terminate (7)

Robbed bit signalling

enabled*
disabled

Clear channels

NOSIG
RBS OFF

Inversion

inverted* (voice)
not inverted (data)

Super-rate formats

contiguous
non-contiguous
equidistant

Notes
1. The SAM is not required in switching shelf controlled systems.
2. These parameters do not apply to T1 cards in 3664 MainStreet systems.
3. This option does not apply to Single T1 cards.
4. These options apply only to Dual T1-2 cards.
5. These options apply only to Dual T1 cards.
6. This parameter applies only to Single T1 cards equipped with T1 LIMs or CSU modules.
7. This signalling type provides T1 termination for frame relay access to frame stream circuits (on FRS,
FRE and PE cards) and Rate Adapted circuits (on FRS cards only). See chapter 25.11 for more
information.

20.1-8

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20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 20.1-3 lists the E1 and Optical Extension card configuration parameters. Each
parameter has a list of options, with any default option marked by an asterisk.
Note
Optical Extension cards are configured using the same card configuration
parameters and options as the Dual E1 card.

Table 20.1-3: E1 PRI Card and Optical Extension Card


Configuration Parameters and Options
Single
E1 Card

Dual E1,
and
Opt. Ext.
Card

Dual E1-2
Card

Parameter

Options

CPSS

See Table 17.6-2.

Card type

E1
Dual E1
Dual E1-2

Application module

no module
voice compression
ISDN frame (for Dual E1)

ISDN

non-ISDN*
ISDN

RAI

on loss of frame alignment*


on BER enable
on BER disable

CCM

conversion
no conversion

SAM (1)

no module*
normal (installed, not used)
circuit order
timeslot order

Card Level

Slot Level

VCM

delta
delta G3 fax
transitional
transitional G3 fax

E1 Framing

CAS*
CCS
31 channels
X.21 NTU (for E1 card)

Trunk conditioning

one-way
two-way*

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.1-9

20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Single
E1 Card

Dual E1,
and
Opt. Ext.
Card

Dual E1-2
Card

Fault classes

red/frame off or on*


yellow/distant off or on*
failed off or on*
error off or on*

Loopback detection

none*
through CPSS
on fault (for Dual E1-2 card)

Link monitoring

enable
disable*

Statistics type

CRC4
HDB3*

Nu bit

enabled
disabled*

Shield ground

Chassis (for Dual E1-2 card)


Signal*
Rx shield grounding*
Rx shield floating
Tx shield grounding*
Tx shield floating
Optical Extension cards:
For master operation set card to
Tx shield floating
For slave operation set card to
Tx shield grounding
For maintenance set card to
Rx sheild grounding

Severely errored
seconds

5 x 10-6

Parameter

Options

10-5
10-4
10-3*

Alarm Time
Declare
Clear

0.1 to 60 seconds
0.1 to 60 seconds

BER alarm option

enabled
disabled*
SA4 bit on
SA4 bit off*

CRC4 reframing

enabled
disabled*

E-bit

enabled
disabled*

PRI redundancy (2)

See Table 18.3-3.

Circuit Level

20.1-10

(400)

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20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Single
E1 Card

Dual E1,
and
Opt. Ext.
Card

Dual E1-2
Card

Parameter

Options

Fault signalling

seized
idle*
OOS-A
OOS-B
OOS-C
None

Custom trunk
conditioning, ABCD
bits

4-digit code, E&M (idle=0000*;


seized=1111*)

Custom trunk
conditioning, data

8-digit code, primary rate


(00000000 to 11111111*)

E1 signalling types

transparent*
clear channel
E&M
continuous E&M
LGS RE
LGS EC
LGS PLAR
LGS PLAR D3
LGE RE
LGE EC

R2 signalling type

R2 digital signalling

T1 signalling types

transparent*
clear channel
E&M
LGS LS
LGS GS
LGS PLAR
LGS PLAR D3
LGE LS
LGE GS

Inversion

inverted* (voice)
not inverted (data)

Super-rate formats

contiguous
non-contiguous
equidistant

Notes
1. The SAM is not required in switching shelf controlled systems.
2. This parameter applies only to Single E1 cards equipped with E1 LIMs.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.1-11

20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table 20.1-4: MPA Card Configuration Parameters and Options


Parameter

Options

Slot Level
Card type

MPA

Circuit Level
Alarm Time
Declare
Clear

20.1-12

0.1 to 60 seconds
0.1 to 60 seconds

Channel type

voice*
data

Control leads
(X.21, V.35, RS-449, RS-530-A)

forced on
forced off

Control lead conditioning OOS

on
off
none

Control lead initiated local loopback

enable
disable*

CPSS

disable*
8 kb/s
16 kb/s

Custom trunk conditioning, ABCD bits

4-digit code, E&M (idle=0000*; seized=1111*)

Custom trunk conditioning, data

8-digit code, primary rate (00000000 to 11111111*)

DGM Limit

1 to 60 (default = 5*)

Doppler buffer

enable
disable

E1 signalling types

transparent*
clear channel
E&M
LGS RE
LGS EC
LGS GS
LGS LS
LGS PLAR
LGE RE
LGE EC
LGE GS
LGE LS
R2 digital signalling

Fault classes

frame off or on*


distant off or on*
failed off or on*
loopback off or on*

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Parameter

Options

Fault signalling

seized
idle*
OOS-A
OOS-B
OOS-C
None

Framing

HCM1
HCM2
HCM3*
HCM4
HCM5

Gender (clocking source)

DCE
DTE*

Interface type

RS-530-A*
RS-449/V.36
V.35
X.21
X.21 ESI

Inversion

inverted* (voice)
not inverted (data)

Loopback detection

none*
CPSS
In-band

Number of circuits

1 to 30 (48 to 1920 kb/s), default = 15*

R2 signalling type

R2 digital E+M

Slip buffer

10 to 39 frames (10*)
slip by 10 to 39 frames (10*)

SES Limit

1E-3*
1E-4
1E-5
1E-6
5E-5

SRM HCM data in TS0

unused bit positions to the right of framing bits in TS0

Super-rate formats (1)

contiguous
non-contiguous
equidistant

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.1-13

20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Parameter

Options

Supervisory channel number of circuits


with signalling

0* to 29

Supervisory channel framing bit

any unused bit position (B7*)

T1 signalling types

transparent
clear channel
E&M
LGS LS
LGS GS
LGS PLAR
LGS PLAR D3
LGE LS
LGE GS

Transport bandwidth

48 kb/s
56 kb/s
64 kb/s*

Trunk conditioning

one-way
two-way*

Notes
1. The MPA card supports both one-way and broadcast unidirectional super-rate connections.

Table 20.1-5 lists TTC2M card configuration parameters. Each parameter has a list of
options, with any default option marked by an asterisk.
Table 20.1-5: TTC2M Card Configuration Parameters and Options
Parameter

Options

Slot Level
Card type

TTC2M

Alarm Time
Declare
Clear

0.1 to 60 seconds
0.1 to 60 seconds

Fault classes

frame off or on*


SAI off or on*
failed off or on*
error off or on*

Trunk conditioning

one-way
two-way*

Circuit Level

20.1-14

(400)

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20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Parameter

Options

Circuit inversion

none
ADI
even
magnitude inversion*

Companding conversion

none*
A law
Mu law

Custom trunk conditioning, data

8-digit code, primary rate (00000000 to 11111111*)

Fault signalling

in-use
idle*
NIS
none

Protection switching

protected by
protecting

Table 20.1-6 lists the X.21 and V.35 card configuration parameters. Each parameter
has a list of options, with any default option marked by an asterisk.
Table 20.1-6: X.21 and V.35 PRI Card Configuration Parameters and Options
Parameter

Options

Card Level
CPSS

See Table 17.6-2.

Slot Level
Card type

X.21 PRI 1
X.21 PRI 2
V.35 PRI

Framing (1)

1
2*

Trunk conditioning

one-way
two-way*

Fault classes

frame off or on*


distant off or on*
failed off or on*

Loopback detection

none*
through CPSS

Number of circuits

1 to 30* (64 to 1920 kb/s*)

Supervisory channel number of circuits


with signalling

0* to 29

Supervisory channel framing bit

B1, B3, B5, B7*

Clocking source

service provider (DCE)


the MainStreet node (DTE)*

Clock inversion (1)

invert*
normal

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.1-15

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3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


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Parameter

Options

Slip buffer

0.5 bits per 1 kb/s of bandwidth*


1.0 bits per 1 kb/s of bandwidth

PRI redundancy

See Table 18.3-1.

Circuit Level
Alarm Time
Declare
Clear

0.1 to 60 seconds
0.1 to 60 seconds

Fault signalling

seized
idle*
OOS-A
OOS-B
OOS-C
None

Custom trunk conditioning, ABCD bits

4-digit code, E&M (idle=0000*; seized=1111*)

Custom trunk conditioning, data

8-digit code, primary rate (00000000 to 11111111*)

E1 signalling types

transparent*
clear channel
E&M
continuous E&M
LGS RE
LGS EC
LGS PLAR
LGE RE
LGE EC

R2 signalling type

R2 digital signalling

T1 signalling types

transparent
clear channel
E&M
LGS LS
LGS GS
LGS PLAR
LGS PLAR D3
LGE LS
LGE GS

Inversion

inverted* (voice)
not inverted (data)

Super-rate formats

contiguous
non-contiguous
equidistant

(2)

Notes
1. These parameters apply only to X.21 PRI cards.
2. The X.21 and V.35 card variants that have 1 to 30 circuits available support both one-way and
broadcast unidirectional super-rate connections.

20.1-16

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 20.1-7 lists the DS-3 and DS-3 II card configuration parameters. Each
parameter has a list of options, with any default option marked by an asterisk.
Table 20.1-7: DS-3 and DS-3 II Card Configuration Parameters and Options
Parameter

Options

Card Level
Timing and synchronization

See Table 17.2-4.

Node name

See Table 17.4-1.

Access level and password

See Table 17.5-1.

CPSS

See Table 17.6-2.

Control redundancy

See Table 18.1-2.

Slot Level
Serial ports

See Table 17.3-3.

Fast protection switching

See Table 18.1-7.

DS3 level
Line length

0 to 69 m (0 to 225 ft)*
69 to 137 m (225 to 450 ft)

DS3 Framing

transmit as received*
M13
C-bit parity

DS1 Level
DS1 Framing

D4 framing format*
ESF

Zero code suppression

transparent
jam bit 7*

Trunk conditioning

one-way
two-way*

Fault classes

red off or on*


yellow off or on*
failed off or on*
error off or on*

Circuit Level

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.1-17

20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Parameter
Alarm Time
Declare
Clear

Options

0.1 to 60 seconds
0.1 to 60 seconds

Fault signalling

seized
idle*
OOS-A
OOS-B
OOS-C
none

T1 signalling types

transparent*
clear channel
E&M
LGS LS
LGS GS
LGS PLAR
LGS PLAR D3
LGE LS
LGE GS

Clear channels

NOSIG
RBS OFF

Robbed bit signalling

enabled*
disabled

Inversion

inverted* (voice)
not inverted (data)

Super-rate formats (1)

contiguous
non-contiguous

Notes
1. DS-3 II cards support both one-way and broadcast unidirectional super-rate connections.

Table 20.1-8 lists the E3 card configuration parameters. Each parameter has a list of
options, with any default option marked by an asterisk.

20.1-18

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 20.1-8: E3 Card Configuration Parameters and Options


Parameter

Options

Card Level
Timing and synchronization

See Table 17.2-4.

Node name

See Table 17.4-1.

Access level and password

See Table 17.5-1.

CPSS

See Table 17.6-2.

Control redundancy

See Table 18.1-2.

Slot level
Card type

as present
empty
E3

Serial ports

See Table 17.3-2.

E3 Level
Alarm Time
Declare
Clear

0.1 to 60 seconds
0.1 to 60 seconds

Equalization

0 to 4 dB*
4 to 8 dB
8 to 10 dB
10 to 12 dB

NU bit

0
1*

Fast protection switching

See Table 18.1-8.

E2 Level
NU bit

Primary Rate Interface Cards

0
1*

(400)

20.1-19

20.1 Understanding PRI Card Configuration


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Parameter

Options

E1 Level
E1 Framing

CAS*
CCS
31 channels

Trunk conditioning

one-way
two-way*

NU bit

0000 to 1111*

E1 link quality monitoring

CRC4 statistics
frame alignment signal statistics*

Circuit Level

20.1-20

Fault signalling

seized
idle*
OOS-A
OOS-B
OOS-C
none

Custom trunk conditioning, ABCD bits

4-digit code, E&M (idle=0000*; seized=1111*)

Custom trunk conditioning, data

8-digit code, primary rate (00000000 to 11111111*)

E1 signalling types

transparent*
clear channel
E&M
continuous E&M
LGS RE
LGS EC
LGS PLAR
LGE RE
LGE EC

R2 signalling type

R2 digital signalling

T1 signalling types

transparent
clear channel
E&M
LGS LS
LGS GS
LGS PLAR
LGS PLAR D3
LGE LS
LGE GS

Inversion

inverted* (voice)
not inverted (data)

Super-rate formats

contiguous
non-contiguous
equidistant

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.2

20.2 PRI Card Slots


Issue 1, November 1997

PRI Card Slots


This chapter explains how to configure card slots and slot options for the PRI cards.

20.2.1

PRI card type


application module type
unidirectional connections on 3645 MainStreet peripheral shelves
ISDN links
E3 cards

Understanding PRI Card Slots


You must configure a slot for each type of primary rate card slot, except the DS-3 or
DS-3 II card slot, which is automatically configured.
Configuring a slot type means programming a card slot to accept a specific card
type. When the slot type is configured, the circuits for that slot are configured with
default settings. After the slot type has been configured, you can configure or
cross-connect the circuits on the primary rate card.

20.2.2

Configuring T1, E1, Optical Extension, MPA, TTC2M, X.21


or V.35 Card Slots
To configure all slots programmed as EMPTY to the default configurations of the
cards installed in the shelf, press the CONFIG_ALL softkey and the <Esc> key
simultaneously.
Note
Select the DUAL_E1 softkey to indicate that a Single or Dual Optical Extension card
is installed.

Configure the type of application module installed on the card once you have
configured the card type for the slot. See Installation, chapter 13.38 for information
about user-installable application modules.
Table 20.2-1 lists PRI cards and the application modules they support.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.2-1

20.2 PRI Card Slots


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table 20.2-1: Application Modules Supported by PRI Cards


T1 Card

Dual T1
Card

Dual
T1-2
Card

E1 Card

Dual E1
Card

Dual
E1-2
Card

Optical
Ext.
Card

Application
Modules
CCM

DRM

IFM
FT1

SAM

TSM

VCM

You can also configure these options at the card slot level:

unidirectional connections for primary rate cards on 3645 MainStreet peripheral


shelves

ISDN for Dual T1-2, Dual E1, Dual E1-2 and Optical Extension card links
If you select ISDN for a Dual T1-2 card, the system automatically turns on B8ZS and
ESF, and turns off RBS for all circuits in the link. It also sets the signalling type to
NOSIG and sets inversion to DATA.
If you select ISDN for the Dual E1, Dual E1-2 or Optical Extension cards, the system
automatically reconfigures the link. Table 20.2-2 lists the reconfigured link options
with their default ISDN settings.
Table 20.2-2: ISDN Link Default Configuration
Link Option

Default Setting

Signalling type

CCS

Statistics

CRC4

CRC reframing

On

E-bits

On

LIM termination

Twisted pair

BNC shield grounding

Floating

Alarm declare/clear times

0.8 s

IFM

(1)

On

RAI

(2)

On resynchronization
On BER disable

Trunk conditioning (2)

Disabled

Notes
1. The ISDN framing module is only necessary on the Dual E1 and Optical Extension card.
2. Only for the Dual E1-2 card.

20.2-2

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.2 PRI Card Slots


Issue 1, November 1997

Note
The Dual E1 and Optical Extension cards require the IFM module to support ISDN
connectivity. The Dual E1-2 card provides ISDN functionality and does not require
the IFM module.

Each Dual E1 or Dual E1-2 card channel has the following options automatically
configured when ISDN is selected for the link.

NOSIG signalling type


channel type set to DATA
fault signalling set to NONE for B-channels, IDLE for D-channels
On the Dual E1-2 card, trunk conditioning is disabled automatically when ISDN is
selected. The Dual E1 card does not have the trunk conditioning automatically
turned off when ISDN is selected; however, this should be done manually. See
chapter 20.9 for more information.
The Dual E1 card can be configured for ITU G.706 compatible frame alignment when
equipped with an IFM. If you select IFM_ON for the Dual E1 card link, the statistics
type is set to CRC4 and the E bits and CRC reframing options are on.
Note
The ISDN option does not apply to 3664 MainStreet systems.

To configure PRI card slots


CONFIG SLOT <sn> TYPE

AS_PRESENT

E1

T1

DUAL_E1

PRIME_RATE

DUAL_T1

DUAL2_E1

X21_PRI_1

X21_PRI_2

DUAL2_T1 MORE

V35_PRI

MPA TTC2M
SK000063

Note
Use the AS_PRESENT softkey if the card is already installed in the slot.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.2-3

20.2 PRI Card Slots


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To configure T1 and E1 card slot options


CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS

COMP_CONV/NO_CONV*

SAM
SK000064

To configure Dual T1, Dual E1, Dual E1-2 and Optical Extension card
slot options
CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS APP_MOD

VOICE_COMP

DELTA

DELTA_G3

NO_MODULE

TRANS

TS24_SIG or ISDN_FRAME

TRANS_G3
SK000065

Note
The TS24_SIG option applies only to the Dual T1 card. The ISDN_FRAME option
applies only to the Dual E1 card.

To configure Dual T1-2 card slot options


CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS APP_MOD

VOICE_COMP

DELTA

DELTA_G3

NO_MODULE

TRANS

TRANS_G3

DRM

FT1

TS24_SIG
SK000828

To configure ISDN and IFM link options for Dual E1 and Optical Extension cards
CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS MORE ISDN/NON_ISDN or
IFM_ON/IFM_OFF

To configure ISDN on Dual T1-2 and Dual E1-2 card links


CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS ISDN/NON_ISDN*

20.2-4

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.2 PRI Card Slots


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure Unidirectional cards


CONFIG SLOT <sn> or <sn-l> OPTIONS UNIDIRECT/NO_UNIDIR

20.2.3

Configuring E3 Card Slots


Slots are configured for the E3 cards on an individual E3, E2 and E1 basis, as EMPTY
or AS_PRESENT. You can configure an E2 as AS_PRESENT only if the associated E3
is configured AS_PRESENT. Similarly you can configure an E1 as AS_PRESENT
only if the associated E3 and E2 are configured AS_PRESENT.
On an E3 card, you can configure any unused E1, E2 or E3 (DE3 card only) as EMPTY
to prevent alarms from being raised. Configuring an E2 or E3 as EMPTY
automatically configures the embedded E1s and E2s as EMPTY.
You cannot configure an E1 as EMPTY if it is a source of synchronization. Similarly,
you cannot configure an E2 or E3 as EMPTY if one of the embedded E1s is a source
of synchronization. (See chapter 17.2 for a description of synchronization.)

To configure E3 card slots


CONFIG SLOT <E3id> or <E3id-E2id> or <E3id-E1id> TYPE

AS_PRESENT EMPTY

E3*
SK000066

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.2-5

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.3

20.3 E1-to-T1 Conversion


Issue 1, November 1997

E1-to-T1 Conversion
This chapter introduces E1-to-T1 conversion and explains how to do the following
tasks:

configure a CCM
configure a SAM in a 3600 MainStreet system
enable or disable companding conversion on the TTC2M card

20.3.1

Understanding E1-to-T1 Conversion


The following two E1-to-T1 conversion modules are available for T1-to-E1
conversion when T1 and E1 cards are used in a mixed T1 and E1 environment:

the CCM
the SAM (for the 3600 MainStreet system only)
Single E1 and T1 cards support either a CCM or a SAM but not both, because only
one module can be installed on a card. The TTC2M card performs companding
conversion without an application module.
When analog voice is digitized, the analog waveform is sampled. Each sample, or
pulse, is compared to a non-linear digital scale to obtain a corresponding digital
value. This technique, known as PCM, is used to transmit voice on both E1 and T1
digital links. The process of performing PCM is known as companding.
E1 and T1 companding differ in that each uses its own non-linear digital scale (or
companding law). Voice is digitized according to A-law for transmission on E1 links
and to Mu-law for transmission on T1 links.
The SAM is used to support super-rate T1-to-E1, T1-to-T1 and E1-to-E1
cross-connections. In a locally controlled system, you must configure a SAM to
support super-rate connections in:

Single T1 cards
Single E1 cards, if the super-rate circuit includes channels on either side of TS16
(timeslot 16)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.3-1

20.3 E1-to-T1 Conversion


Issue 1, November 1997

20.3.2

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Configuring the CCM


When Single E1 and T1 cards are equipped with a CCM, you can configure them to
convert between A-law and Mu-law, so that E1 and T1 circuits can be
cross-connected with companding conversion occurring.
Note
When you are connecting circuits to a primary rate circuit that has been configured
with a CCM, the system prompts whether companding conversion should be
enabled on that circuit.

To enable or disable companding conversion on a T1 or E1 card


Configure companding conversion for the T1 or E1 card as:

COMP_CONV to configure the module


NO_CONV to deconfigure the module (default)
CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS COMP_CONV/NO_CONV*

Note
You cannot configure a slot with both a CCM and a SAM because only one module
can be installed on a card. If you configure a slot for a SAM, the COMP_CONV
softkey will not appear. To access the COMP_CONV softkey, you must select SAM
then NO_MODULE.

20.3.3

Configuring the SAM


For Single E1 and T1 cards in a locally controlled system, the SAM is used to support
super-rate T1-to-E1, T1-to-T1 and E1-to-E1 cross-connections. In a locally controlled
system, you must configure a SAM to support super-rate connections in:

Single T1 cards
Single E1 cards, if the super-rate circuit includes channels on either side of TS16
(timeslot 16)
Note
In a switching shelf controlled system, Single T1 and E1 cards do not need a SAM for
super-rate connections. Dual E1 and T1 cards never need a SAM for super-rate
connections.

20.3-2

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.3 E1-to-T1 Conversion


Issue 1, November 1997

For the purposes of the SAM, circuits and timeslots are not synonymous.

A circuit is a device internal to the node. Single T1 and E1 cards are assigned

circuits 1 to 24 and 1 to 31, respectively.


A timeslot is a channel on the physical T1 or E1 link external to the node. T1 and
E1 links are made up of timeslots 1 to 24 and 1 to 31, respectively.
For T1 links only, circuit n always corresponds to timeslot n. For example,
timeslot 12 of a T1 link always corresponds to circuit 12 of the T1 card on which
it terminates.
For E1 links, circuit n does not always correspond to timeslot n. There is a direct
correspondence between circuit and timeslot for circuits 1 through 15. Circuits
above 15 correspond to the next highest timeslot relative to that circuit (for
example, circuit 16 corresponds to timeslot 17) with the exception of circuit 31.
When the framing type is configured as 31_Chan, circuit 31 becomes available for
use taking the place of the signalling channel S in timeslot 16 (see Table 20.3-1).

When two super-rate circuits (see chapter 20.15) are cross-connected, timeslots from
one link map onto timeslots on another. First the master circuits are cross-connected,
mapping their respective timeslots to one another. Then, each successive circuit in
one super-rate bundle is cross-connected to each successive circuit in the other
super-rate bundle, mapping their respective timeslots to one another.
Since super-rate bundles may include non-contiguous circuits and circuits do not
always correspond to timeslots in a one-to-one correspondence, delay equalization
problems can occur between respective timeslots of the two super-rate bundles that
are being connected. This delay equalization problem will prevent the super-rate
connection from functioning properly.
The SAM solves this problem by ensuring that, at cross-connect time, each circuit
that is part of a super-rate bundle has its respective timeslot mapped onto a timeslot
with equal delay.
There are three types of super-rate bundle configurations (see chapter 20.15). In the
case of contiguous super-rate bundles, delay problems are easily resolved prior to
connection time by following the recommended configuration guidelines contained
in this section. For the non-contiguous or equidistant super-rate bundles, delay
problems become subject to the particular circuit arrangement at cross-connect time
and may still exist after SAM configuration due to the numerous circuit arrangement
possibilities. In this case, it may be necessary to choose an alternate SAM
configuration or reconstruct the super-rate bundles with a different circuit ordering
to solve the delay problem.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.3-3

20.3 E1-to-T1 Conversion


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

The following is a list of recommended SAM configurations. Configure the SAM as:

NO_MODULE if there is no SAM installed on the card (default)


NORM if a SAM is installed but not being used
CCT if the SAM is used to switch super-rate data from a T1 link to an E1 link in

circuit order (circuits 1 through 24 on a T1 link are switched to circuits 1 through


24 on an E1 link)
TS if the SAM is used to switch super-rate data from a T1 link to an E1 link in
timeslot order (circuits 1 through 24 on a T1 link are switched to timeslots 1
through 24 on an E1 link)
CONTIGUOUS if the SAM is used to switch super-rate data between two E1
links (circuits 1 through 30 on an E1 link are switched to circuits 1 through 30 on
another E1 link). Specifically, it should be used when at least one of the super-rate
bundles spans timeslot 16 and the super-rate bundles being connected are offset
by 2 or fewer circuits (notwithstanding note 3 of Table 20.3-1).

Circuits in a super-rate bundle follow the ordering outlined in Table 20.3-1. For
example, a 3 circuit contiguous super-rate bundle starting with circuit 15 on an E1
link configured for 31_Chan framing will contain, in order, circuits 15, 31 and 16.
Table 20.3-1: Super-rate Timeslot-to-Circuit Correlation
Switching Order of Circuits
Timeslot 1 2 3...15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Framing
Type

NORMAL SAM
(See chapter 20.15 for details.)
CCT SAM (1)
E1 Circuit 1 2 3...15 S 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 (2)
E1 Circuit 1 2 3...15 31 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

(2)

T1 Circuit 1 2 3...15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

CAS/CCS
31_CHAN (3)
D4/ESF

TS SAM (1)
E1 Circuit 1 2 3...15 S 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 (2)

CAS/CCS

E1 Circuit 1 2 3...15 31 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 (2)

31_CHAN (3)

T1 Circuit 1 2 3...15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

D4/ESF

CONTIGUOUS

(4)

E1 Circuit 1 2 3...15 S 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

CAS/CCS

E1 Circuit 1 2 3...15 31 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

31_CHAN (3)

Notes
1. A maximum of 24 E1 circuits can be cross-connected to a T1.
2. If connecting the italicized E1 circuits to T1 links or the SAM is residing on the E1 card, the italicized
circuits can only be cross-connected on a circuit-by-circuit basis. (For example, they cannot be
connected as part of a super-rate bundle).
3. If 31_CHAN E1 framing is used, the CCT and CONTIGUOUS options will block certain super-rate
connections involving circuit 31. When the CCT option is selected, all connections involving a
super-rate bundle that includes circuit 31 will fail due to unavoidable delay problems. Similarly, when
the CONTIGUOUS option is selected, all connections involving a super-rate bundle that spans circuit
31 will fail due to unavoidable delay problems.
4. The CONTIGUOUS option is not available for SAMs on a T1 card.

20.3-4

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.3 E1-to-T1 Conversion


Issue 1, November 1997

Note
A slot cannot be configured to have both a CCM and a SAM because only one
module can be installed on a card. If COMP_CONV is selected, the SAM softkey will
not appear. To access the SAM softkey, you must select NO_CONV.

To configure the SAM


CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS SAM

NO_MODULE*

NORM

TS

CCT

CONTIGUOUS
SK000067

20.3.4

Enabling or Disabling Companding Conversion on the


TTC2M Card
The TTC2M card provides companding conversion. Voice channels from the PBX
are converted to the digitized signal at the TTC2M card before being passed through
to any cross-connected T1 or E1 circuits.

To enable or disable companding conversion on the TTC2M card


CONFIG CIRCUIT <sn-cc> FUNCTION COMP_CONV

NONE*

A_LAW

MU_LAW
SK000744

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.3-5

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.4

20.4 Voice Compression


Issue 1, November 1997

Voice Compression
This chapter introduces voice compression on Dual T1, Dual T1-2, Dual E1,
Dual E1-2 and Optical Extension cards and explains how to:

configure voice compression algorithms and subframes


view connections

20.4.1

Understanding Voice Compression


The Dual T1, Dual T1-2, Dual E1, Dual E1-2 and Optical Extension cards support two
types of ADPCM voice compression.

Delta signalling carries signalling and voice information in separate channels.


Transitional signalling carries signalling and voice in the same bandwidth.
M44 (for T1 environments) and M55 (for E1 environments) are delta voice
compression algorithms that provide up to 44 or 55 full-duplex channels of 32 kb/s
ADPCM compressed voice information.
M48 (for T1) and M60 (for E1) are voice compression and signalling algorithms that
compress 64 kb/s channels into 32 kb/s ADPCM. With M48 transitional signalling,
48 DS0s can be compressed and carried on a single T1 link. With M60, a maximum
of 60 DS0s can be compressed and carried on a single E1 link. Figure 20.4-1 shows an
example of M48 transitional signalling using a Dual T1-2 card installed with a
VCM2. Figure 20.4-2 shows an example of M60 transitional signalling using a
Dual E1 card installed with a VCM3.
Figure 20.4-1: M48 Transitional Signalling

MainStreet node
24 DS-0s

24 DS-0s

Network

Dual T1-2
with
VCM2

Forty-eight 32 kb/s
ADPCM compressed
channels
5190

Note
At the time of publication, the VCM2 was not supported on the 3600 MainStreet
series bandwidth managers. Contact your local Newbridge representative for
information about availability.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.4-1

20.4 Voice Compression


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 20.4-2: M60 Transitional Signalling

MainStreet node
30 DS-0s

30 DS-0s

Network

Dual E1
with
VCM3

Sixty 32 kb/s
ADPCM compressed
channels
5191

The type of VCM needed to do voice compression depends on the type of card and
the type of signalling. Table 20.4-1 lists VCM requirements. All VCMs can compress
either voice or G3 fax voice-band signals. Figures 20.4-3 and 20.4-4 show delta and
transitional signalling through compressors, subframes and sub-channels for a
Dual T1-2 card with an installed VCM.
Table 20.4-1: VCM Requirements
Card Type
Dual T1 card

For Delta Voice


Compression

For Transitional Voice


Compression

VCM or VCM3

VCM3

VCM2

VCM2

VCM or VCM3

VCM3

VCM2

VCM2

VCM or VCM3

VCM3

Dual T1-2 card


Dual E1 card
Dual E1-2 card
Optical Extension Card

20.4-2

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.4 Voice Compression


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 20.4-3: Delta (M44/M55) ADPCM Subframe


64k PCM

ADPCM

64k PCM

Site 1
PBX

DET
Dual Card
T1-2
Card
with
with
VCM Module
module

Site 2
Primary
Rate
Rate Card
card

Primary
Rate card

Dual T1-2
card with
VCM module

PBX

VCM Module
(Transcoder Device)
Primary
Rate
Circuit n
Primary
Rate
Circuit n1
Primary
Rate
Circuit n2
Primary
Rate
Circuit n3
Primary
Rate
Circuit n4
Primary
Rate
Circuit n5

Delta
Dual T1-2 Circuit

S1

Dual T1-2 Circuit

S2

Dual T1-2 Circuit

S3

Dual T1-2 Circuit

S4

Dual T1-2 Circuit

S5

Dual T1-2 Circuit

S6

Dual T1-2 Circuit

S7

Dual T1-2 Circuit

S8

Dual T1-2 Circuit

S9

Dual T1-2 Circuit

S10

Dual T1-2 Circuit

S11

M44 ADPCM
Sub-frame

DX connection
Primary Rate line

6638

A compressor is a logical circuit on the VCM that compresses a 64 kb/s DS0 to a


32 kb/s channel. A DS0 that carries the compressed voice channels from the
compressor to the far-end connection is called a subframe. The subframe is created
by connecting a DS0 to a compressor. The DS0 carrying the subframe cannot be
configured on the same card that performs the compression. The individual
compressed channels are called sub-channels.
A delta subframe is composed of up to eleven 32 kb/s compressed voice channels
and one 32 kb/s signalling channel, and occupies up to six contiguous DS0s. A
transitional signalling subframe is composed of two 32 kb/s compressed voice
channels, and occupies one DS0.
The M44 or M55 delta signalling provides Dual T1, Dual T1-2, Dual E1, Dual E1-2
and Optical Extension cards with access to 5 compressors. Each delta signalling
compressor can compress 11 DS0s.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.4-3

20.4 Voice Compression


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

The M48 or M60 transitional signalling provides Dual T1, Dual T1-2, Dual E1, Dual
E1-2 and Optical Extension cards with access to 32 compressors. Each transitional
signalling compressor can compress 2 DS0s.
The compressed voice channels can be carried on any 64 kb/s codirectional circuit.
They are supported by: T1, Dual T1, Dual T1-2, E1, Dual E1, Dual E1-2, Optical
Extension, MPA, X.21 PRI, V.35 PRI, DS-3, DE3 and SE3 cards. M48 and M60
compressed channels can be connected to an SRS but M44 and M55 channels cannot.
Figure 20.4-4: Transitional (M48/M60) ADPCM Subframe
64k PCM

ADPCM

64k PCM

Site 2

Site 1
PBX

DET
Dual Card
T1-2
card
with
with
VCM Module
module

Primary
Rate
Rate Card
card

Primary
Rate card

Dual T1-2
card with
VCM module

PBX

VCM module
(Transcoder Device)
Dual T1-2 circuit

S1

Dual T1-2 circuit

S2

Primary
Rate
Circuit n

DX connection
M48 ADPCM
Sub-frame

Primary Rate line

6639

20.4.2

Viewing Compressor Connections


This section describes how to view compressor and sub-channel connections on
Dual T1, Dual T1-2, Dual E1, Dual E1-2 and Optical Extension cards.

To view compressor connections


CONFIG CONNECT <x-sn-Xt> SHOW_GROUP
where
X indicates compressor
t is 1 to 5 for delta voice compression or 1 to 32 for transitional signalling

20.4-4

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.4 Voice Compression


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 20.4-5 shows the compressor connections of a Dual T1 card configured for
transitional signalling. Displays for the Dual T1-2, Dual E1, Dual E1-2 and Optical
Extension cards are similar to the Dual T1 display.
Figure 20.4-5: Viewing Compressor Connections
3600 MainStreet
Circuit

1117-H1-00

Name

Toronto:A

Alarms:1

Status

DT1_Compressor
DT1_Compressor
DT1_Compressor
DT1_Compressor
DT1_Compressor

Connected
Configured
Configured
Configured
Configured

A1-X1
A1-X2
A1-X3
A1-X4
A1-X5

Type

11-May-1997

8:35a

CONFIG CIRCUIT 1-X1

1-SHOW_CCT
6-

2-NAME
7-

38-CANCEL

49-QUIT

50-

To view sub-channel connections


CONFIG CONNECT <x-sn-Scc-vv>
where
x-sn-Scc-vv is the compressed voice circuit you specified in creating the subframe
vv is 1 to 11 (for delta signalling) or 1 or 2 (for transitional signalling) to identify the sub-channel

Figure 20.4-6 shows the sub-channel connections of a Dual T1 card with a DS0
connected to a compressor. Displays for Dual T1-2, Dual E1, Dual E1-2 and Optical
Extension cards are similar to the Dual T1 display.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.4-5

20.4 Voice Compression


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 20.4-6: Viewing Sub-channel Connections


3600 MainStreet
Circuit

Name

A1-S1-11
A1-S1-10
A1-S1-09
A1-S1-08
A1-S1-07
A1-S1-06
A1-S1-05
A1-S1-04
A1-S1-03
A1-S1-02
A1-S1-01
A1-S01-02
A1-S01-01

1117-H1-00

Toronto:A

Alarms:1

Type

Status

T1_SUBCHAN
T1_SUBCHAN
T1_SUBCHAN
T1_SUBCHAN
T1_SUBCHAN
T1_SUBCHAN
T1_SUBCHAN
T1_SUBCHAN
T1_SUBCHAN
T1_SUBCHAN
T1_SUBCHAN
T1_SUBCHAN
T1_SUBCHAN

Connected
Connected
Connected
Connected
Configured
Configured
Configured
Configured
Configured
Configured
Configured
Configured
Configured

11-May-1997

8:35a

CONFIG CIRCUIT 1-S1-1

1-SHOW_CCT
6-

20.4.3

2-NAME
7-

38-CANCEL

49-QUIT

50-

Configuring Voice Compression


There are four configuration steps to perform to configure voice compression and to
connect a voice compression channel on Dual T1, Dual T1-2, Dual E1, Dual E1-2 or
Optical Extension cards.
Voice compression general configuration procedure
1.

For transitional signalling, configure the DS0 that carries the compressed
channel with default data equal to all zeroes (eight 0s). See the procedure To
configure the DS0 that carries the compressed channels.

2.

Configure the Dual T1, Dual T1-2, Dual E1, Dual E1-2 or Optical Extension card
for delta or transitional signalling (either voice or G3 Fax voice band). This step
defines the voice compression algorithm and enables the compressors. See the
procedure To set the compressor type as delta or transitional signalling.

3.

Connect a subframe from the Dual T1, Dual T1-2, Dual E1, Dual E1-2 or Optical
Extension card compressor to a DS0 on the card that will carry the compressed
channels. See the procedure To connect the subframe to a DS0.

4.

Connect a voice channel from the Dual T1, Dual T1-2, Dual E1, Dual E1-2 or
Optical Extension card to a sub-channel on the VCM. See the procedure To
connect a voice channel to the VCM sub-channel.

Table 20.4-2 lists and describes the restrictions on transitional signalling


connections.

20.4-6

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.4 Voice Compression


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 20.4-2: Restrictions on Transitional Signalling Connections


Restriction
Type

Description

Circuit
Protection

Circuit protection is not available for compressed channels.

Companding
Law

DS0s connected to Dual T1 compressors are treated as Mu-law.


DS0s connected to Dual E1 or Optical Extension compressors are treated as
A-law.
Companding conversion is not supported for compressed channels.

Connection

Compressors and subframes must be on different cards.


All sub-channels must be connected to circuits on the same dual card.

Robbed Bit
Signalling

RBS is automatically disabled when the subframe is created.


RBS must be disabled on all DS0s as it transits the network on M48/M60
compressed channels.

SRS

Only M48/M60 compressed channels can be connected to an SRS.


The SRS must be configured for transparent rate adaption.
Sub-channel 1 connects to bit positions B3 through B0.
Sub-channel 2 connects to bit positions B7 through B4.

Zero Code
Suppression
(T1)

Subframes configured for JB7 may experience minor delays in signalling


propagation.

To configure the DS0 that carries the compressed channels


CONFIG CIRCUIT <sn-cc> FAULT_SIG MORE CUSTOM DATA
<00000000>

To set the compressor type as delta or transitional signalling


CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS APP_MOD VOICE_COMP

DELTA

DELTA_G3

TRANS

TRANS_G3
SK000068

Note
When configured for TRANS_G3, only the compressed channels use G3 Fax voice
band lookup tables. Uncompressed circuits are not affected. When a Dual T1-2,
Dual E1, Dual E1-2 or Optical Extension card is configured for transitional
signalling, only the circuits connected to a sub-channel are compressed.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.4-7

20.4 Voice Compression


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To connect the subframe to a DS0


CONFIG CONNECT <x-sn-Xt> TO_CIRCUIT <x-sn-cc> or <x-sn-l-cc> or
<E3id-E1id-cc> or <x-sn-SRS-dd>
where
x indicates the peripheral shelf (whereas X indicates voice compression)
sn indicates the slot number
t indicates the subframe number, which can be 1 to 5 for delta voice compression or 1 to 32 for transitional
voice compression
x-sn-cc is the DS0 that will carry the subframe on an X.21/V.35 PRI, DS-3, MPA, T1 or E1 card; cc is 1 to
24 for DS-3 and T1 cards, 1 to 30 for X.21/V.35 PRI cards and 1 to 30 (CAS framing) or 31 (CCS or
31-channel framing) for E1 cards
x-sn-l-cc is the DS0 that will carry the subframe on a Dual T1, Dual E1 or Optical Extension card; cc is 1 to
24 for Dual T1 cards and 1 to 30 (CAS framing) or 31 (CCS or 31-channel framing) for Dual E1 and Optical
Extension cards
E3id-E1id-cc is the DS0 that will carry the subframe on an E3 card; cc is 1 to 30 (CAS framing) or 31 (CCS
or 31-channel framing)
x-sn-SRS-dd identifies the DS0 port for M48 or M60 connections to an SRS; dd is 1 to 30 for
single-bandwidth systems and 1 to 48 for double-bandwidth systems

Note
The circuit to which you are connecting (x-sn-cc, x-sn-l-cc, E3id-E1id-cc or
x-sn-SRS-dd) must not be on the same card as the compressor (x-sn-Xt).

To connect a voice channel to the VCM


To connect a voice channel to the VCM, enter:
CONFIG CONNECT <x-sn-l-cc> TO_CIRCUIT <x-sn-St-vv>
where
x-sn-l-cc is an uncompressed DS0 on the Dual T1, Dual E1 or Optical Extension card (for the card on which
the VCM resides)
x-sn-St-vv is the compressed voice circuit. The t indicates the subframe number, which can be 1 to 5 for
delta voice compression or 1 to 32 for transitional voice compression; vv indicates the sub-channel and
can be 1 to 11 (for delta signalling), or 1 or 2 (for transitional signalling)

For Release 6 and newer versions of system software, the sn-St in <x-sn-St-vv>
refers to the slot and compressor number of the card on which the VCM resides. For
Release 5.x, these variables refer to the slot and timeslot of the card to which the
compressor connects.
For example, assume the node in Figure 20.4-7 is a 3600 MainStreet node with a
Dual T1 card configured for transitional ADPCM in slot 2, a T1 card in slot 5 and the
subframe connection <A2-X7> TO_CIRCUIT <A5-2>. The softkey sequence for the
Link A subframe connections is as follows.
For Release 6 and newer versions of system software:
CONFIG CONNECT <A2-A-5> TO_CIRCUIT <A2-S7-1>

20.4-8

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.4 Voice Compression


Issue 1, November 1997

For Release 5.x:


CONFIG CONNECT <A2-A-5> TO_CIRCUIT <A5-S2-1>
Figure 20.4-7: Connecting a Compressed Channel

MainStreet node

Uncompressed
voice circuit on link A

Dual T1
card

4 5 6

T1 card

VCM3
24 voice circuits

Network

24 voice circuits

1
2
3

24
voice
circuits
Network

14 15 16

Sub-frame
Compressor

Uncompressed
voice circuit on link B

Uncompressed voice circuits:


Timeslot 5 link A (DT1)
Sub-frame
Timeslot 15 link B (DT1)
Compressor:
7 (of 32)
Sub-frame:
Compressor 7 (DT1) to timeslot 2 (T1)
Sub-channels:
S2 carrying compressed timeslot 5 link A (DT1)
S1 carrying compressed timeslot 15 link B (DT1)

S2 (5)
S1 (15)

Sub-channels

5192

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.4-9

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.5

20.5 Timeslot 24 Signalling


Issue 1, November 1997

Timeslot 24 Signalling
This chapter explains how to configure timeslot 24 signalling on Dual T1 and Dual
T1-2 cards.

20.5.1

Understanding Timeslot 24 Signalling on Dual T1 and Dual


T1-2 Cards
Typical T1 connections use RBS to carry ABCD signalling. When RBS is enabled, the
least significant bit (bit 8) of every channel in frames 6 and 12 (if D4 framing is used),
or in frames 6, 12, 18 and 24 (if ESF framing is used), is overwritten with signalling
information. (Chapter 20.12 describes signalling, including RBS.)
For some applications (such as voice), the loss of these bits is undetectable. These
applications can use the full 64 kb/s of each DS0 and still use ABCD signalling.
Other applications (such as data) cannot tolerate the loss of these bits. These
applications can use only 56 kb/s of each DS0 if signalling is required. They can use
the full 64 kb/s only if signalling is disabled.
Timeslot 24 signalling provides both 64 kb/s clear channels and ABCD signalling
suitable for all applications by carrying signalling for all DS0s in a dedicated
common channel. Signalling for timeslots 1 to 23 is carried in timeslot 24 (see
Figure 20.5-1) using a form of common channel signalling called SIG24 (based on the
AT&T M44 delta channel format).
Figure 20.5-1: TSM Timeslot Assignment
T1 link

23 24
Reserved for
signalling of
circuits 1 to 23
4694

SIG24 is compatible with both ESF and D4 framing and introduces no signalling
distortion. SIG24 can pass regular voice signalling (such as off-hook and ringing),
OOS codes and any of the signalling types that can be configured for timeslots
1 to 23 (see chapter 20.11). Both standard-rate (64 kb/s) and super-rate circuits are
supported.
To support timeslot 24 signalling, the Dual T1-2 card must be equipped with a DRM
and the Dual T1 card with a TSM. As timeslot 24 signalling is a link option for the
Dual T1-2, each link can be independently configured to support timeslot 24
signalling or RBS. Timeslot 24 signalling is a slot-level option for Dual T1 cards.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.5-1

20.5 Timeslot 24 Signalling


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Note
A Dual T1-2 card can be equipped with either a DRM or a VCM. A Dual T1 card can
be equipped with either a TSM or a VCM. Dual T1 cards in 3664 MainStreet systems
do not support TSMs, DRMs or timeslot 24 signalling.

20.5.2

Configuring Timeslot 24 Signalling on Dual T1 and Dual


T1-2 Cards
To configure a Dual T1 card for timeslot 24 signalling, you select the APP_MOD and
TS24_SIG softkeys. To configure the Dual T1-2 card for the parameter, you must
configure the card for a DRM, and then select the SIG_MODE and SIG24 softkeys for
each link.
Caution
T1 links using RBS and E1 links using CAS can be cross-connected to a Dual T1 with
a TSM. However, if SIG24 is enabled on a link, both ends of the link must terminate
on a Dual T1 card with a TSM.

To configure the DRM for a Dual T1-2 card


CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS APP_MOD DRM TS24_SIG

To configure a Dual T1-2 link for timeslot 24 signalling


CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS PHYSICAL SIG_MODE SIG24

To configure a Dual T1 card for timeslot 24 signalling


CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS APP_MOD TS24_SIG

20.5-2

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.6

20.6 Framing
Issue 1, November 1997

Framing
This chapter explains how to configure framing for PRI cards.

20.6.1

Understanding Framing for PRI Cards


Framing can be configured for:

T1, Dual T1, Dual T1-2 and DS-3 or DS-3 II cards


E1, Dual E1, Dual E1-2 and E3 cards
X.21 PRI-2 cards
MPA card
Optical Extension cards

For information on MPA card framing, see section 20.20.6.

20.6.2

Configuring Framing for T1 and DS-3 or DS-3 II Cards


You can configure one of five framing options for a T1 or a DS-3 or DS-3 II card.
Table 20.6-1 lists the framing options. Default options are marked with an asterisk.
Table 20.6-1: T1 and DS-3 Card Framing Options
T1
card

DS-3
card

Level

Framing

Option

DS3

Transmit as received

AUTO*

DS3

M13

M13

DS3

C-bit parity

C_BIT

DS1

D4

D4_FRAMING*

DS1

ESF

ESF

Transmit as received (AUTO) framing


In this mode, the DS-3 or DS-3 II card detects the format used by the node at the far
end and transmits in that format. If both ends of the link are configured in this mode,
the framing defaults to M13 format.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.6-1

20.6 Framing
Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

M13 framing
This format is the established standard for public networks. The M13 process first
combines four DS1 lines into a DS2 bit stream at 6.312 Mb/s and adds 150 kb/s of
overhead for bit stuffing to accommodate variations in the clock rates of incoming
T1 links. Then, seven DS2 streams are combined into one DS3, with extra bits added
to bring the DS3 rate to 44.736 Mb/s.

C-bit parity framing


This format is a newer format, similar to M13, in which some of the bits are redefined
and used to carry C-bit parity information for error checking.

D4 framing
A D4 frame consists of 193 bits: 24 timeslots containing 8 bits each and one framing
bit. A D4 superframe consists of 12 frames. Figure 20.6-1 shows the D4 superframe
format.
Figure 20.6-1: D4 Framing Format
D4 Superframe

12 D4 frames

10

11

12

2316 bits
12 Framing bits
Framing pattern =

100011011100

Frame 1

Framing bit
Timeslot 1

Timeslot 2

Timeslot 24

8 bits
193 bits
D4 Format
8137

ESF framing
This framing format creates superframes consisting of 24 D4 frames. Figure 20.6-2
shows the ESF format.

20.6-2

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.6 Framing
Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 20.6-2: ESF Framing Format

Extended Super Frame


1

24 D4 frames

21

22

23

24

4632 Bits
24 bits: 6 framing (2 kb/s)
6 error checking (2 kb/s)
12 FDL (4 kb/s)
7174

Note
In 3664 MainStreet systems, connections to D4- and ESF-framed T1 cards are
restricted to the first 12 channels.

To configure the DS-3 framing format for DS-3 or DS3 II cards


CONFIG SLOT <DS3> OPTIONS TX_MODE

C_BIT

M13

AUTO*
SK000069

To configure the DS-1 framing format for T1, Dual T1 and DS-3 or DS-3 II cards
CONFIG SLOT <n> or <sn> or <sn-l> OPTIONS ESF/D4_FRAMING*

To configure the DS-1 framing format for Dual T1-2 cards


CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS PHYSICAL ESF/D4_FRAMING*

20.6.3

Configuring Framing for E1, E3 and Optical Extension


Cards
You can configure one of four framing options for an E1 or E3 card. Table 20.6-2 lists
the framing options.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.6-3

20.6 Framing
Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Note
When making super-rate connections (connections that occupy more than one
channel on a primary rate link) to an E1 link, timeslot 16 (circuit 31) is not used if
CAS or CCS is selected. Timeslots 1 through 15, then 17 through 31 are used (see
Table 20.3-1 in chapter 20.3). Timeslot 16 is used only if 31_CHAN is selected.
The framing type cannot be changed if any circuit on the card is connected.
Dual E1, Dual E1-2 and Optical Extension cards do not support the X.21 NTU
framing pattern.

Table 20.6-2: E1 and E3 Card Framing Options


E1 Card

Dual
E1,
Dual
E1-2
Cards

E3 Card

Optical
Ext.
Cards

CAS

CCS

Framing

31 channels
X.21 NTU

Option

CAS*
CCS
(1)

31_CHAN
X21_NTU

Notes
1. The 31 channel framing option is not available on E1 cards in 3664 MainStreet systems.

Table 20.6-3 shows the timeslot-to-circuit designation for these framing options. A
circuit is a device internal to the node. E1 cards are assigned circuits 1 to 31. A
timeslot is a channel on the physical E1 link external to the node. E1 links are made
up of timeslots 0 to 31, respectively.
Note
In 3664 MainStreet systems, connections to CCS- and X.21 NTU-framed E1 cards are
restricted to the first 15 channels and channel 31 (timeslot 16). Connections to
CAS-framed E1 cards are restricted to the first 15 channels.

20.6-4

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.6 Framing
Issue 1, November 1997

Table 20.6-3: Timeslot-to-Circuit Designation for E1 and E3 Cards


Switching Order of Circuits (1)

Frame Type
CAS

Timeslot
Circuit

0 1 2 3... 15 16 17... 29 30 31
F 1 2 3... 15 S 16... 28 29 30

CCS
31 Channels
X.21_NTU

Timeslot
Circuit

0 1 2 3... 15 16 17... 29 30 31
F 1 2 3... 15 31 16... 28 29 30

Notes
1. F = framing; S = signalling

Common channel signalling, 31 channels and X.21 network termination unit provide
31 configurable circuits, but they treat circuit 31 differently.

CAS framing
Timeslot 16 is used for CAS and is not user-configurable. Timeslot 0 is used for
framing. The rest of the timeslots are used for information. Timeslots 1 through 15
correspond to circuits 1 through 15 and timeslots 17 through 31 correspond to
circuits 16 through 30.

CCS framing
Timeslot 16 corresponds to circuit 31, which can be configured as an additional
64 kb/s data channel (typically for the transport of CCS messages). The rest of the
timeslots are labelled as in CAS: timeslots 1 through 15 correspond to circuits 1
through 15 and timeslots 17 through 31 correspond to circuits 16 through 30. The 31
circuits are treated equally. Timeslot 0 is used for framing.

31 channels framing
This framing pattern has the same designation of timeslots to circuits as CCS.
However, when making super-rate connections (connections that occupy more than
one channel on a primary rate link) to an E1 link, the system does not skip timeslot
16 (the 31st circuit); timeslots 1 through 31 are used consecutively (see Table 20.6-3).
Timeslot 0 is used for framing.

X.21 NTU framing


This framing pattern has the same designation of timeslots to circuits as CCS. The
X.21 NTU framing type is selected when an E1 link is connected to an X.21 NTU.
Timeslot 0 is used for framing.
Table 20.6-4 shows an example of how the E1 channels are occupied if you connect
a 256 kb/s (4 x 64 kb/s) data circuit to circuit 15 of an E1 link.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.6-5

20.6 Framing
Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table 20.6-4: E1 and E3 Card Super-rate Connections and Frame Types


Frame Type

Order

CAS
CCS

Timeslot
Circuit

15 17 18 19
15 16 17 18

31 Channels

Timeslot
Circuit

15 16 17 18
15 31 16 17

For more information on super-rate connections to primary rate interfaces, see


chapter 20.15.

To configure framing for E1 and E3 cards


Configure framing for E1 and E3 cards according to the options listed in Table 20.6-2.
CONFIG SLOT <sn> or <sn-l> or <E3id-E1id> OPTIONS FRAME_TYPE

CAS*

CCS

X.21_NTU

31_CHAN

SK000070

Note 1
You cannot select FRAME_TYPE if any circuits are connected.
Note 2
The X.21_NTU option is available only for E1 cards

To configure framing for Dual E1, Dual E1-2 and Optical Extension cards
CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS PHYSICAL FRAME_TYPE

CAS

CCS

31_CHAN
SK000705

20.6-6

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.6.4

20.6 Framing
Issue 1, November 1997

Configuring Framing for X.21 PRI-2 Cards


There are two variants of the X.21 PRI card.

The X.21 PRI card uses Frame 1-type framing to provide up to 30 circuits without

signalling; a supervisory channel (TS0) is not supported.


The X.21 PRI-2 card can be configured to use either:
Frame 1 type (FRAME_1) framing
Frame 2 type (FRAME_2) framing to provide 30 circuits with or without
signalling and a supervisory channel (TS0)

The X.21 PRI-2 card is normally configured for Frame 2 type framing. The Frame 1
type option is provided for backwards compatibility with older X.21 PRI cards.

To configure framing for X.21 PRI-2 cards


CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS FRAME_1/FRAME_2*

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.6-7

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.7

20.7 Line Length


Issue 1, November 1997

Line Length
This chapter explains how to configure line length for:

T1 cards with a DSX-1 module, LIM, CSU or CSU2 module


DS-3 or DS-3 II cards

20.7.1

Configuring Line Length for a T1 Card


The following subsections explain how to configure line length for the T1 card.

T1 card with a DSX-1 module or LIM


For DSX-1 or LIM equipped T1 cards, line length is the distance between the T1 card
and the external channel service unit or digital cross-connect point. You can
configure line length as:

SHORT for 0 to 46 m (0 to 150 ft) (default)


MEDIUM for 46 to 137 m (150 to 450 ft)
LONG for 137 to 200 m (450 to 655 ft)
T1 card with a CSU or CSU2 module
For a T1 card with a CSU or CSU2 module, the line length specifies the LBO. You can
configure the line length as:

SHORT for 15 dB (default)


MEDIUM for 7.5 dB
LONG for 0 dB
Note
Use 100 W RJ48C cables to connect external devices to T1 interfaces.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.7-1

20.7 Line Length


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To configure the line length for a T1 card


CONFIG SLOT <n> or <sn-l>
OPTIONS

OPTIONS
PHYSICAL

LINE_LNGTH

SHORT*

MEDIUM

LONG
SK000071

20.7.2

Configuring Line Length for a DS-3 or DS-3 II Card


For the DS-3 or DS-3 II card, the line length is the distance between the card and the
digital cross-connect point. You can configure line length as:

SHORT for 0 to 69 m (0 to 225 ft) (default)


LONG for 69 to 137 m (225 to 450 ft)
To configure line length for a DS-3 or DS-3 II card
CONFIG SLOT <DS3> OPTIONS LINE_LNGTH

SHORT*

LONG
SK000072

20.7-2

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.8

20.8 Zero Code Suppression


Issue 1, November 1997

Zero Code Suppression


This chapter explains how to configure zero code suppression for T1 and DS-3 or
DS-3 II cards.

20.8.1

Understanding Zero Code Suppression


Line synchronization is lost if too many consecutive zeros are transmitted on the
link. Zero code suppression provides sufficient pulse (ones) density to ensure that
line synchronization is maintained.
Table 20.8-1 lists the types of zero code suppression supported on cards that provide
this option. The type of zero code suppression you select applies to all circuits on the
link DS1.
Table 20.8-1: Zero Code Suppression Options
T1 card

DS-3 and
DS-3 II
cards (1)

Framing

Option

Transparent

TRANSP

Binary 8 Zero suppression

B8ZS

Jam Bit 7

JB7*

Notes
1. Zero code suppression is done at the DS1 level on the DS-3 or DS-3 II card.

Caution
The same type of zero code suppression must be configured at both ends of a link.

Transparent framing
The transparent option means that the system uses no zero suppression at the slot
level. Cross-connected devices must use a protocol designed to ensure a sufficient
ones density pattern to avoid line synchronization problems.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.8-1

20.8 Zero Code Suppression


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Caution
The transparent setting should be used with caution as network equipment could
lose synchronization if the ones density requirement is not satisfied.

Binary 8-zero suppression framing


Binary 8-zero suppression ensures a minimum one-in-eight ones density by
replacing eight consecutive zeros with a known pattern of ones with bipolar
violations. You must select B8ZS if 64 kb/s clear data channels are required (either
channels for which signalling is not passed, or channels configured for TS24S
signalling with a TSM).

Jam bit 7 framing


Jam bit 7 changes bit 7 (the next-to-least significant bit) to a 1 if all eight bits of the
word are 0. Do not select JB7 if 64 kb/s clear data channels are required (either
channels for which signalling is not passed, or channels configured for TS24
signalling when a TSM is installed).

20.8.2

Configuring Zero Code Suppression


Configure zero code suppression according to the options listed in Table 20.8-1.

To configure zero code suppression for T1 cards


CONFIG SLOT <sn> or <sn-l>
OPTIONS OPTIONS
PHYSICAL

ZERO_SUPPR

TRANSP

B8ZS

JB7*
SK000073

20.8-2

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.8 Zero Code Suppression


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure zero code suppression for DS-3 or DS-3 II cards


CONFIG SLOT <n> OPTIONS ZERO_SUPPR

TRANSP

JB7*
SK000074

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.8-3

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.9

20.9 Trunk Conditioning


Issue 1, November 1997

Trunk Conditioning
This chapter introduces trunk conditioning for PRI cards and explains how to
configure trunk conditioning.

20.9.1

Understanding Trunk Conditioning for PRI Cards


When an aggregate interface card link experiences a fault, trunk conditioning is
applied to all circuits on that link. The type of trunk conditioning you configure for
a link determines on which paths (information or signalling) and in which directions
(transmit or receive) fault signalling is transmitted. You can enable or disable trunk
conditioning independently for different classes of link faults. Chapter 20.10
describes fault signalling and fault classes.
For Dual T1-2, Dual E1-2 and MPA cards, you can configure trunk conditioning
independently for each link.
Each aggregate interface card circuit (bidirectional and unidirectional) is made up of
two components.

An information component thatcarries the circuit's payload, data or voice.


A signalling component that carries signalling, when signalling is enabled
Chapter 20.12 describes signalling.
Trunk conditioning direction is defined with respect to an aggregate interface card
circuit on the faulty link.

The transmit direction is defined by the transmit path from the aggregate

interface card circuit to its connected circuit.


The receive direction is defined by the receive path from the connected circuit to
its aggregate interface card circuit.

Table 20.9-1 lists the types of trunk conditioning supported. The default trunk
conditioning direction for all card types is two-way.
Table 20.9-1: Aggregate Interface Card Trunk Conditioning
Card Type
T1

Two-way

E1

(1)

Dual T1

Dual E1
MPA
Optical Extension

Primary Rate Interface Cards

One-way

(400)

(1)

(1)

20.9-1

20.9 Trunk Conditioning


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Card Type

One-way

Two-way

TTC2M

X.21 and V.35 PRI

DS-3 or DS-3 II

E3

64 kb/s Codirectional card (2)

Notes
1. When configured for unidirectional circuits, PRI cards support only one-way trunk conditioning.
2. The 64 kb/s Codirectional card performs trunk conditioning when it detects a Loss of Incoming Signal
condition.

Note
Regardless of the type of trunk conditioning configured, two-way trunk
conditioning is applied to aggregate interface card circuits cross-connected to CPSS
circuits and voice compression subframes.

One-way trunk conditioning


When you configure one-way trunk conditioning, the signalling path or the
information path, or both (depending on the fault), are broken in the transmit
direction only. Transmission in the receive direction is not affected.
One-way trunk conditioning operates differently for each of three groups of link
faults. Table 20.9-2 lists the effect on the signalling and information path for each
group of link faults when one-way trunk conditioning is selected. One-way trunk
conditioning does not affect Group 3 link faults.
After breaking the signalling or information path in the transmit direction, the
aggregate interface card circuit transmits the fault signalling it was configured with,
or a special code, to the connected circuit. Table 20.9-3 lists the type of code
transmitted for each type of connected circuit. If a signalling or information path is
not broken, the aggregate interface card continues to transmit what it receives.

20.9-2

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.9 Trunk Conditioning


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 20.9-2: One-way Trunk Conditioning Link Faults


Card

Link Faults

Signalling Path

Information Path

Group 1 Link Faults


E1, E3

Framing Alarm
AIS
Framing Error Rate
Exceeded
Failed State

Broken in the transmit


direction

Broken in the transmit


direction

64 kb/s
Codirectional

Failed State

Broken in the transmit


direction

Broken in the transmit


direction

T1

Red Alarm

Broken in the transmit


direction

Broken in the transmit


direction

TS24 Frame Alarm (1)


Framing Error Rate
Exceeded
Failed State
X.21 and V.35 PRI

Framing Alarm
Failed State

Broken in the transmit


direction

Broken in the transmit


direction

MPA

Framing Alarm
Failed State
Loopback Detected
Clock Speed Mismatch

Broken in the transmit


direction

Broken in the transmit


direction

TTC2M

Framing Alarm
Framing Error Rate
Exceeded
Failed State
LIS

Broken in the transmit


direction

Broken in the transmit


direction

E1, E3, 64 kb/s


Codirectional,
X.21 and V.35 PRI

Multi-frame Alarm
Incoming TS16 AIS

Broken in the transmit


direction

No change

TTC2M

Multi-frame Alarm

Broken in the transmit


direction

No change

Group 2 Link Faults

Group 3 Link Faults (2)


E1, E3

Distant Alarm
TS16 Distant Alarm

No change

No change

T1

Yellow Alarm

No change

No change

TS24 Frame Alarm (1)


X.21 and V.35 PRI

Distant Alarm

No change

No change

MPA

Distant Alarm

No change

No change

TTC2M

Distant Alarm

No change

No change

Notes
1. For TSM-equipped Dual T1 or DRM-equipped Dual T1-2 only.
2. One-way trunk conditioning does not result in the information or the signalling path being broken in
either direction, because the fault lies in the aggregate interface card circuit receive path.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.9-3

20.9 Trunk Conditioning


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table 20.9-3: One-way Trunk Conditioning Signalling and Information Path Codes
Code

Non-Aggregate Interface Card


Connected Circuit

Aggregate Interface Card


Connected Circuit

Code Transmitted on
Signalling Path

Signalling state at time of fault

Fault signalling (1)

Code Transmitted on
Information Path

All zeros

All ones or ASC (2)

Notes
1. If the fault signalling configured for this circuit is seized, the system does not transmit an idle code
first, as is the case for two-way trunk conditioning.
2. If the connected circuit is an aggregate interface card circuit configured for DDS rate adaption, an
ASC is transmitted. If it is not configured for DDS, all ones are transmitted.

Figure 20.9-1 shows one-way trunk conditioning for Group 1 link faults.
Figure 20.9-1: One-way Trunk Conditioning (Group 1)
If primary
rate circuit

SEIZED Signalling
or IDLE

If not primary
rate circuit

Frozen
Fault

Direction of transmission
Fault
If not primary rate circuit,
all 0s.
If primary rate circuit not
carrying a circuit
using DDS, all 1s.
If primary rate circuit
carrying a circuit using
PRI card
Connected circuit
Primary rate circuit
DDS, DDS abnormal
station code (ASC).

Signalling
Information

Direction of transmission
3715

20.9-4

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.9 Trunk Conditioning


Issue 1, November 1997

Figure 20.9-2 shows one-way trunk conditioning for Group 2 link faults.
Figure 20.9-2: One-way Trunk Conditioning (Group 2)
If primary
rate circuit

SEIZED Signalling
or IDLE

If not primary
rate circuit

Frozen
Fault

Direction of transmission

Connected circuit

Signalling

PRI card

Fault

Primary rate circuit

Direction of transmission

Information

3716

Two-way trunk conditioning


When you configure two-way trunk conditioning, the signalling path and
information path are broken in both the transmit and receive direction.
After breaking the signalling and information paths, the aggregate interface card
circuit transmits the fault signalling it was configured with, or a special code, both
in the transmit direction and the receive direction.
Table 20.9-4 lists the type of code transmitted in each case.
Table 20.9-4: Two-way Trunk Conditioning Signalling and Information Path Codes
Code

Non-Aggregate
Interface Card
Connected Circuit

Aggregate
Interface Card
Connected Circuit

To Far End

Code Transmitted on
Signalling Path

Fault signalling (1)

Fault signalling (1)

Fault signalling (1)

Code Transmitted on
Information Path

All zeros

All ones or ASC (2)

All ones or ASC (2)

Notes
1. Signalling is driven to idle for 2.5 seconds and then fault signalling is transmitted as configured. If
fault signalling is configured as Out-of-service, A, B or C signalling is not driven to idle first.
2. If the connected circuit is an aggregate interface card circuit configured for DDS rate adaption, an
ASC is transmitted. If it is not configured for DDS, all ones are transmitted.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.9-5

20.9 Trunk Conditioning


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Figure 20.9-3 shows two-way trunk conditioning.


Figure 20.9-3: Two-way Trunk Conditioning
SEIZED
or
IDLE

Signalling

Fault

Direction of transmission

If not primary rate circuit,


all 0s.
If primary rate circuit not
carrying a circuit
using DDS, all 1s.
If primary rate circuit
carrying a circuit using
DDS, DDS abnormal Connected circuit
station code (ASC).

PRI card

Fault

Primary rate circuit


All 1s
or
DDS ASC

Direction of transmission
Signalling

2.5s
SEIZED
or
IDLE

Signalling

Information
Fault

3714

Disabling trunk conditioning


For all aggregate interface cards, you can disable trunk conditioning for certain
groups of link faults called fault classes. Deselecting all the fault classes on the link
disables trunk conditioning on that link; see section 20.9.5 for information. For Dual
T1-2, Dual E1-2 and MPA cards you can disable trunk conditioning for each link
independently.
For the DS-3 or DS-3II card, you can disable trunk conditioning for all link faults, as
well as by fault class.
If you disable trunk conditioning, fault signalling is not applied to any connected
circuit, regardless of the link status; all connected circuits stay connected during the
affected link faults. If the connected circuit is protected, it does not switch to the
protecting circuit when link faults are raised; it switches only when the aggregate
interface card is physically removed.

To disable trunk conditioning for PRI cards


CONFIG CIRCUIT <sn- cc> or <E3id-E1id-cc> FAULT_SIG NONE

20.9-6

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.9.2

20.9 Trunk Conditioning


Issue 1, November 1997

Trunk Conditioning Configuration Overview


To enable trunk conditioning on PRI card links and circuits, three configuration
procedures are involved.
Trunk conditioning general configuration procedure
1.

Set one-way or two-way trunk conditioning for the link. See section 20.9.3.

2.

Configure the trunk conditioning fault class for the link. See section 20.9.5.

3.

Enable fault signalling for each circuit on the link. See section 20.10.2.

For all aggregate interface cards, you can enable trunk conditioning for certain
groups of link faults called fault classes. Enabling all the fault classes on the link
enables trunk conditioning on that link.

20.9.3

Configuring One-way or Two-way Trunk Conditioning


The type of trunk conditioning you select for a PRI card link determines on which
paths (information or signalling) and in which directions (transmit or receive) fault
signalling is transmitted. Configure trunk conditioning as:

ONE_WAY for one-way conditioning


TWO_WAY for two-way conditioning (default)
Caution 1
Except for Dual T1-2 and Dual E1-2 cards, changing the trunk conditioning
configuration while circuits are connected causes a service disruption.
Caution 2
To guarantee the correct propagation of OOS codes, ensure that trunk conditioning
is enabled at both ends of a TS24 signalling link.

To select one-way or two-way trunk conditioning for Dual E1-2 and


Dual T1-2 cards
CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS FAULT_HNDL TRUNK_COND
ONE_WAY/TWO_WAY*

To select one-way or two-way trunk conditioning for MPA cards


CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS MORE FAULT_HNDL TRUNK_COND
ONE_WAY/TWO_WAY*

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.9-7

20.9 Trunk Conditioning


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

To set other PRI cards for one-way or two-way trunk conditioning


CONFIG SLOT <n> or <sn> or <sn-l> <E3id-E1id> OPTIONS MORE
TRUNK_COND ONE_WAY/TWO_WAY*

Note
The MORE option is not applicable for the 64 kb/s Codirectional and the
TTC2M cards.

20.9.4

Understanding Fault Class Trunk Conditioning


For T1, E1, MPA, TTC2M, X.21 and V.35 PRI, DS-3 and DS-3 II cards, link alarms are
organized into groups called fault classes. You can enable or disable trunk
conditioning independently for each fault class.
For E3 and 64 kb/s Codirectional cards, trunk conditioning is applied as configured
for all link alarms when an alarm in any fault class is raised. Chapters 20.9 and 20.11
describe trunk conditioning.
Deselecting all fault classes disables the trunk conditioning for the link. For
Dual T1-2, Dual E1-2 and MPA cards, you can disable trunk conditioning for each
link independently.
If you turn trunk conditioning off for a primary rate circuit, no trunk conditioning is
done on that circuit regardless of how the link is programmed for trunk
conditioning. That is, the voice or data circuit connected to it stays connected during
any framing or distant alarms. If the voice or data circuit has a protecting connection,
it does not switch to that connection when a link alarm is raised. It switches only
when the primary rate card is absent.
Table 20.9-5 lists the fault classes and explains the alarms in each.
Note
Optical Extension cards support the same fault class descriptions as the Dual E1
card.

20.9-8

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.9 Trunk Conditioning


Issue 1, November 1997

Table 20.9-5: Fault Class Descriptions for PRI Cards


Fault Classes

E1, MPA, TTC2M,


X.21 and V.35 PRI
Alarms

DS-3 and T1 Alarms

Alarm Description

Framing Alarm
Incoming AIS
Multi-frame Alarm
Incoming TS16 AIS

Red Alarm

Distant Alarm
Incoming TS16 AIS

Yellow Alarm

Failed

Failed State

Failed State

This alarm is raised when 10 Severely Errored


Seconds have occurred in a row. It is cleared when
10 non-Severely Errored Seconds have occurred in
a row.

Error

Frame Error Rate


Exceeded (4)

Frame Error Rate


Exceeded

For T1 and DS-3 cards, this alarm is raised when the


terminal framing bit (Ft) Error rate exceeds
approximately 10-3 for a period of 4 to 6 s. It is
cleared when the Ft Error rate is below
approximately 10-4 for 9 to 11 s.
For E1 cards, this alarm is raised when the FAS error
rate exceeds approximately 10-3 for a period of 4 to
6 s. It is cleared when the FAS error rate is below
approximately 4 x 10-4 for 9 to 11 s.
For the TTC2M card, this alarm is raised when the
framing error rate has exceeded 10-3 frames per
second. This alarm is cleared when the framing error
rate falls below approximately 4 x 10-4 for 10
consecutive seconds.

Loopback (5)

CPSS Loopback
activated
In-band Loopback
activated
On-fault Loopback
activated

CPSS Loopback
activated
TS24 Loopback
activated
On-fault Loopback
activated

When the card receives a framed or unframed 10000


code from the network (usually originated by the
carrier), it enters a remote loopback state. The
incoming signal is looped back at the card towards
the network and continues through to the system.
Loopback trunk conditioning is applied as
configured. The card remains in this state until a
framed or unframed 100 code is received from the
network.

Frame/Red (1)

Distant/Yellow (3)

TS24 Frame Alarm (2)

TS24 Distant Alarm (2)

These alarms are associated with frame alignment


or multi-frame alignment. These alarms are cleared
when frame alignment or multi-frame alignment is
regained.
These alarms are received from the equipment at the
far end of the primary rate link. These alarms are
cleared when the remote equipment is no longer
transmitting the alarm.

Notes
1. For E1, MPA, TTC2M, X.21 and V.35 PRI cards, this is the Frame fault class. For DS-3 or DS-3 II and T1 cards, it is the Red
fault class.
2. TS24 alarms apply only to a Dual T1 with TSM installed or Dual T1-2 with DRM.
3. For CEPT cards, this is the Distant fault class. For NA cards, it is the Yellow fault class.
4. Supported on E1, Dual E1 and Optical Extenstion cards only.
5. Different types of loopback alarms apply to the various PRI cards depending on the card type. See chapter 20.14 for details.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.9-9

20.9 Trunk Conditioning


Issue 1, November 1997

20.9.5

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Enabling or Disabling Fault Classes for PRI Cards


Configure fault classes for PRI cards according to Table 20.9-6. In all cases, the
default condition is enabled.
Table 20.9-6: Configuring Fault Classes for PRI Cards

T1 Cards

E1 Cards

MPA
Cards

TTC2M
Cards

X.21 and
V.35
Cards

DS-3 and
DS-3 II
Cards

Frame/Red

Distant/Yellow

Failed

Error

CSU Loopback/Loopback

Fault Class

Disabling trunk conditioning using fault classes


To completely disable trunk conditioning on the link, turn off all of the fault classes.
For Dual T1-2, Dual E1-2 and MPA cards, you can disable trunk conditioning for
each link independently.

To set fault classes for MPA cards


CONFIG SLOT <sn-l> OPTIONS MORE FAULT_HNDL TRUNK_COND

FRAME_OFF/
FRAME_ON*

DIST_OFF/
DIST_ON*

FAILED_OFF/
FAILED_ON*

LPBK_OFF/
LPBK_ON*
SK000693

To set fault classes for TTC2M cards

CONFIG SLOT <sn> OPTIONS TRUNK_COND

FRAME_OFF/
FRAME_ON*

SAI_OFF/
SAI_ON*

FAILED_OFF/
FAILED_ON*

ERROR_OFF/
ERROR_ON*
SK000746

20.9-10

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.9 Trunk Conditioning


Issue 1, November 1997

To set fault classes for other PRI cards


CONFIG SLOT <sn> or <n> or <sn-l> or <sn-l> OPTIONS

MORE

FAULT_HNDL

TRUNK_COND
RED_OFF/
YELLOW_OFF/
RED_ON* or
YELLOW_ON* or
FRAME_OFF/ DISTANT_OFF/
FRAME_ON*
DISTANT_ON*

FAILED_OFF/ ERROR_OFF/ LPBK_OFF/


FAILED_ON* ERROR_ON* LPBK_ON*or
CSU_LP_OFF/
CSU_LP_ON*

SK000078

where the second sn-l indicates a Dual T1-2 or Dual E1-2 card link

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.9-11

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.10

20.10 Fault Signalling


Issue 1, November 1997

Fault Signalling
This chapter describes how to configure fault signalling for PRI cards.

20.10.1

Understanding Fault Signalling for PRI Cards


When trunk conditioning is applied to a link, the system transmits a bit pattern (or
code), called fault signalling, on each circuit cross-connected to the link.
(Chapter 20.9 describes trunk conditioning.)
As Figure 20.10-1 shows, a T1 card circuit is configured to transmit a seized
fault-signalling code to the LGE card cross-connected to it. This prevents the PBX
from trying to place a call through the T1 card until its link returns to service.
Figure 20.10-1: Fault Signalling
MainStreet node
LGE

PBX

T1

Link
fault
Network

Phone
Fault signalling
seized
5418

You can configure the type of fault signalling independently for each aggregate
interface card circuit. Table 20.10-1 lists the fault signalling types and defaults for
each aggregate interface card.
Note
The 64 kb/s Codirectional card and the DS0-DP and OCU-DP channel units support
fault signalling, and the procedures in this chapter also apply to them. Certain voice
cards and channel units also support fault signalling (see chapter 21.8).
Of the channel units, only the E&M, DS0-DP and OCU-DP channel units respond to
OOS-A.

When you program a super-rate connection for OOS A, B or C, the first DS0 (the
master circuit) detects the fault condition and transmits the appropriate OOS code
(see chapter 20.9).
When a link carrying a channel that is being compressed fails, the fault signalling
sent to the far end is always seized (regardless of the fault signalling configured).

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.10-1

20.10 Fault Signalling


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

Table 20.10-1: Fault Signalling for PRI Cards


Seized

Idle(1)

OOS A

OOS B

OOS C (2)

None

Single T1
card

(4)

(5)

(6)

Dual T1
card

(4)

(5)

Single E1
card

(7)

(7)

(8)

Dual E1
card

Optical
Extension
card

MPA card

Card or
Channel
Unit

CMI

NIS

In-use

DATA

TTC2M
card

MOS(3)

X.21 and
V.35 PRI
card

DS-3 or
DS-3 II card

(9)

(10)

(11)

SE3 and
DE3 card

(7)

(7)

(12)

64 kb/s
Codirection
al card

(13)

(13)

DS0-DP
channel
unit

Notes
1. Idle = default.
2. Only one end of a circuit may be configured for OOS-C fault signalling.
3. MOS = default.
4. Applies to DS0s (on either D4- or ESF-framed DS1s) with RBS enabled connected to 56 kb/s (or less) data, OCU-DP or
E&M circuits.
5. Applies to DS0s (on ESF-framed DS1s only) with RBS enabled connected to 56 kb/s (or less) data, OCU-DP or E&M circuits.
6. Applies to DS0s (on either D4- or ESF-framed DS1s) with RBS enabled connected to data or any voice circuits.
7. Applies to timeslots (on CAS-framed links only) connected to data or any voice circuits.
8. Applies to timeslots (on either CCS- or 31 Channel-framed links) connected to data or any voice circuits.
9. Applies to DS0s (on either D4- or ESF-framed DS1s) connected to data or E&M circuits.
10. Applies to DS0s (on ESF-framed DS1s only) connected to data or E&M circuits.
11. Applies to DS0s (on either D4- or ESF-framed DS1s) connected to data or any voice circuits.
12. Applies to timeslots (on CAS-, CCS- or 31 Channel-framed links) connected to data or any voice circuits.
13. Not applicable for timeslots configured for R2D signalling.

20.10-2

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.10 Fault Signalling


Issue 1, November 1997

Disabling fault signalling for PRI cards


You can enable or disable fault signalling independently for each circuit. If you
disable fault signalling (configure it as NONE), the circuit stays connected during
link faults. If the connected circuit is protected, it does not switch to the protecting
circuit when a link fault is raised; it switches only when the aggregate interface card
it is connected to is physically removed.

Fault signalling codes for PRI cards


The bit pattern transmitted when you select Idle or Seized as the fault signalling
defaults to the codes used in E&M signalling for most cards. PRI fault signalling
codes are:

Idle: 0000 (ESF), 00 (D4)


Seized: 1111 (ESF), 11 (D4)
For the TTC2M card, In-use signalling is used instead of Seized signalling. When
In-use is selected as the fault signalling, the bit pattern transmitted during trunk
conditioning is 0. When the Idle code is selected, the bit pattern transmitted is 1. If
NIS is selected, 2.5 seconds of Idle code is transmitted, followed by the In-use
condition. NONE fault signalling causes the signalling bit pattern to remain at the
value it was when trunk conditioning initially occurred.
To accommodate circuits configured for other signalling types, you can also
configure custom bit patterns, see chapter 20.11.
Table 20.10-2 lists the bit patterns transmitted when OOS A, B, or C fault signalling
is selected for aggregate cards that support OOS fault signalling.
Table 20.10-2: Fault Signalling Codes OOS A, B and C for PRI Cards
Card
Single T1

OOS C (1)

OOS A

OOS B

0100(01) (2)

0110(n/a)

Yellow/Distant Alarm

(2)

0110(n/a)

Dual T1

0100(01)

Dual E1

1111

0110

Yellow/Distant Alarm

Dual E1

1111

0110

Yellow/Distant Alarm

X.21 and V.35 PRI

1111

0110

Yellow/Distant Alarm

MPA

1111

0110

Yellow/Distant Alarm

DS-3

0100(01) (2)

0110(n/a)

Yellow/Distant Alarm

SE3 and DE3

1111

0110

Yellow/Distant Alarm

64 kb/s Codirectional

1111

0110

Notes
1. When OOS-C is selected for a DS0 and that circuit connection becomes unavailable, a yellow alarm
is generated on the DS1 circuit for a T1 DS0; a distant alarm is generated for an E1 DS0.
2. For ESF-framed DS1s, all four ABCD signalling bits are defined. For D4-framed DS1s, only the AB
signalling bits (shown in brackets) are defined.

Primary Rate Interface Cards

(400)

20.10-3

20.10 Fault Signalling


Issue 1, November 1997

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

3664 MainStreet E1 and T1 cards


In 3664 MainStreet systems, T1 cards provide 12-channel DS1 links and E1 cards
provide 16-channel links. This configuration results in 12 unused channels on T1
cards and 15 unused channels on E1 cards. You can use the UNUSD_FSIG softkey to
define fault signalling at once for all the unused circuits (13 through 24 on T1 links
and 16 through 30 on E1 links).

20.10.2

Configuring Fault Signalling for PRI Cards


Configure fault signalling according to the options listed in Table 20.10-1. The trunk
conditioning for each circuit is disabled when no fault signalling is selected for the
circuit.
Note
For T1 circuits, fault signalling can be transmitted only if RBS is enabled or if a TSM
or DRM is installed. If neither of these conditions is met and OOS-A or OOS-B is
selected, a warning message appears when you attempt the cross-connection.
RBS uses the least significant bit of every channel in frames 6 and 12 (if D4 framing
is used) and frames 6, 12, 18 and 24 (if ESF framing is used). Use RBS with caution
on data circuits. If 64 kb/s clear channels with signalling are required, use a TSM or
DRM.
If you configure fault signalling before the signalling type, the system offers OOS
types A, B and C. If you subsequently select an incompatible signalling type (for
example, an LGS signalling type on a circuit with OOS type A enabled), a warning
message appears.

Restrictions
The following restrictions apply.

For D4-framed T1 circuits connected to E&M or data circuits, you can select
SEIZED, IDLE, OOS-A or OOS-C.

For ESF-framed T1 circuits connected to E&M or data circuits, you can select

20.10-4

SEIZED, IDLE, OOS-A, OOS-B or OOS-C.


For D4- or ESF-framed T1 circuits connected to LGS or LGE circuits, you can
select SEIZED, IDLE or OOS-C.
For 64 kb/s codirectional circuits, you can select SEIZED, IDLE, OOS-A or
OOS-B.
For the TTC2M card, a circuit must be disconnected before NIS or NONE fault
signalling can be applied.

(400)

Primary Rate Interface Cards

3600 MainStreet Series Bandwidth Managers


NNP 95-2035-01-00-B

20.10 Fault Signalling


Issue 1, November 1997

To configure fault signalling for PRI cards


When you select FAULT_SIG, the screen displays only the fault signalling options
that apply to the selected circuit.
CONFIG CIRCUIT <sn-cc> or <sn-l-cc> or <n-cc> or <E3id-E1id-cc> FAULT_SIG

SEIZED

IDLE*

OOS-B

OOS-A

NONE

OOS-C
SK000075

To configure fault signalling for TTC2M cards


When you select FAULT_SIG, the screen displays only the fault signalling options
that apply to the selected circuit.
CONFIG CIRCUIT <sn-cc> FAULT_SIG

IDLE*