INNOVATION IN EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR PERSONS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES DAVID BRADDOCK, Ph.D.

Coleman-Turner Chair & Professor in Psychiatry, CU School of Medicine Associate Vice President, University of Colorado System Executive Director, Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities

JOINT LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE ON DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES COLORADO STATE LEGISLATURE DENVER JULY 18, 2007

INNOVATION IN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY

I.

OVERVIEW OF THE COLEMAN INSTIUTE

II. SMART HOMES III. PERSONAL SUPPORT TECHNOLOGIES

2

I. OVERVIEW OF COGNITIVE DISABILITY AND THE COLEMAN INSTITUTE

COLEMAN INSTITUTE MISSION The Institute’s mission is to catalyze and integrate advances in science, engineering and technology to promote the quality of life and independent living of people with cognitive disabilities.

www.ColemanInstitute.org
3

COGNITIVE DISABILITY IN THE U.S.
COGNITIVE DISABILITY IN THE UNITED STATES, 2006
Intellectual Disability 4.76 Million 21% 29% Severe, Persistent Mental Illness 6.42 Million

19% Alzheimer's 4.23 Million 4% Stroke .80 Million 27% Brain Injury 6.03 Million

Total: 22.24 Million Persons
Source: Braddock, D (2007). Boulder, CO: University of Colorado, Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities.
4

COGNITIVE DISABILITY IN COLORADO
PREVALENCE OF COGNITIVE DISABILITY IN COLORADO, 2006
Intellectual Disability 75,103 22% 30% Severe, Persistent Mental Illness 102,459

16% Alzheimer's 54,876 4% Stroke 12,701 28% Brain Injury 95,068

Total: 340,207 Persons
Source: D. Braddock. (2007). Boulder, CO: University of Colorado, Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities.

5

COLEMAN INSTITUTE – PRINCIPAL ACTIVITIES

Research grants to CU faculty in applied technology and graduate research assistantships
- Since 2001, the Institute has funded 98 projects involving 51 faculty and numerous students

Annual Coleman Institute Conference + additional conference sponsorship
- 2007 Coleman Conference: October 24-26, Westin Hotel, Westminster, CO

Source: Braddock, D., Coleman Institute, University of Colorado, 2007.
6

2007 COLEMAN INSTITUTE CONFERENCE
THE STATE OF THE WORLD AND THE STATE OF THE SCIENCE IN COGNITIVE DISABILITY AND TECHNOLOGY Oct 24-26, Westin Hotel, Westminster, CO
Speakers:
• David Allen, Ph.D., Associate Vice President, Office of Technology Transfer, University of Colorado
“Technology Transfer and the Coleman Institute.” Panelists include:
Daniel Abrams, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and resident in Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, founder and CEO, Sierra Puente, Inc. Henry Kaplan, Chairman and CEO, Mentor InterActive, Inc. Karen Newell, PhD, Associate Professor and Markert Endowed Chair of Biology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs; Chief Executive and Scientific Director, CU Institute of Bioenergetics; founder, Agada, Inc. Regan Zane, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Colorado at Boulder, 2006 Technology Transfer Office Awardee: Inventor of the Year
7

2007 COLEMAN INSTITUTE CONFERENCE
• Ted Berger, Packard Chair of Engineering, Director, Center for Neural Engineering, University of Southern California
“Neural Prostheses for Cognitive/Memory Function.”

• Glenn Fujiura, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago
“Cognitive Disability in the World Today.”

• Clayton Lewis, Ph.D., Coleman Institute Scientist-in-Residence and Professor of Computer Science, University of Colorado at Boulder
“World Wide Web Accessibility and the Digital Divide.” Other speakers on this panel include: William “Bill” T. Coleman III, founder, chairman and CEO, Cassatt, Inc. and founding donor, Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities Enrique Varela Couceiro, Director of Accessible Technology and Research and Development for the ONCE Foundation, Spain
8

2007 COLEMAN INSTITUTE CONFERENCE
Teresa Moore, Arizona Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities and self-advocate Richard Schwerdtfeger, Distinguished Engineer, SWG Architect/Strategist; Chair, IBM Accessibility Architecture Review Board Jim Tobias, Co-chair, Telecommunications and Electronic and Information Technology Advisory Committee (TEITAC), Principal, Inclusive Technologies Gregg Vanderheiden, PhD, Professor, Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering; Director, Trace Center for R & D, University of Wisconsin-Madison

• Michael Stein, Visiting Professor, Harvard Law School
“UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities: Overview of the UN Convention and Implications for the U.S.”

• Sue Swenson, CEO, Arc of the United States
“Distinguished Dinner Speaker”

9

CU AWARDED FIRST FEDERAL R&D CENTER ON COGNITIVE TECHNOLOGIES

N

$5.5 Million Center funded by National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR): 2004-09 Includes $1.25 M in funding from the Coleman Institute Partners include CU, KU, ABLELINK, UIC, Michigan, Pitt., and others

N

N

Source: Braddock, D., Coleman Institute, University of Colorado, 2007.
10

HOW CAN TECHNOLOGY HELP IN DD?

Smart Homes/Smart Care can help address the projected increase in demand for long-term care services and supports, and the accompanying need for tens of thousands of additional staff Imagine!, the CCB, is developing Colorado’s first DD “smart home”…to be constructed in Longmont Two providers in DD nationally are offering specialized “smart care support services.”

11

WHY USE TECHNOLOGY IN DD RESIDENTIAL CARE? • U.S. demand will grow from over 523,000 persons currently in residential services – to over 700,000 persons in 10 years, if present trends continue; • Meanwhile, turnover in community living settings averages 50-70% nationally; • Emerging residential technologies can address projected demand for long-term care services and reduce somewhat the need for tens of thousands of additional staff; and • Technology can also monitor and support persons with ID/DD in recreational, health promotion, and other activities of daily living.
Source: D. Braddock, State of the Science Conference, Denver, 2006.
12

A VISIONARY VIEW IN 2006

“I think we can do a ‘virtual nursing home’ with technology”…
Andy Grove Co-Founder, Intel Corp. In USA Today, 2006

IF so, we can also provide individualized technology supports in multiple residential settings for people with developmental disabilities.
13

II. SMART HOMES: REST ASSURED PROGRAM

Staff person monitors several apartments simultaneously.
Wabash Center - Indiana
14

REST ASSURED PROGRAM – LIVING ROOM

Pan-tilt-zoom monitoring cameras located above entryway and looking into living space.

Source: Jeff Darling, Executive Director, Rest Assured, LLC.
15

REST ASSURED PROGRAM – Lafayette, Indiana

Wabash Center: in collaboration with EPICS (Engineering Projects In Community Service) at Purdue Serves consumers with ID/DD 40 apartments with 101 consumers served (as of 7/11/07) Uses PTZ (Pan, Tilt, Zoom) cameras for monitoring in high risk areas like the kitchen Uses Motion, temperature, carbon monoxide, door brake sensors, and a Personal Emergency Response System
Source: Jeff Darling, Executive Director, Rest Assured, LLC.

16

REST ASSURED PROGRAM – ATTRIBUTES CONT…

Remote supervision via two-way audio/video communication with caregiver Consumers report increased independence since caregiver is not a constant physical presence Reduced overall cost of care Used for third-shift support Website:http://www.restassuredsystem.com/

Source: Jeff Darling, Executive Director, Rest Assured, LLC.
17

SOUND RESPONSE / NIGHT OWL: MADISON, WISCONSIN

Support staff member at monitoring station
Source: Sound Response Program, Waisman Center, Univ. of Wisconsin Madison
18

SOUND RESPONSE / NIGHT OWL CONT…

• Currently supports 170 persons with ID/DD and 102 residences w/ planned expansion into other states (VT) • Central monitoring site in Dane County, WI (Madison area) • Provides offsite nighttime monitoring with direct staff intervention/support (only if necessary), 3-5 min. response time • Less staff intensive, less costly, and less intrusive than having ongoing overnight staffing • Contact: http://www.waisman.wisc.edu/soundresponse

19

SOUND RESPONSE / NIGHT OWL
• Integrating cellular technology with web-based software: - Sensing devices include motion and sound sensors, pressure sensors, door/window sensors and security/safety systems - Two-way hands free communication - Personal paging devices and, - Complete system is wireless and remote • Enables individuals who require occasional overnight assistance to live more independently • Evaluation data show higher Quality of Life scores among clients in Sound Response program compared to traditional service systems • Contact: http://www.waisman.wisc.edu/soundresponse
20

EVOLUTION OF SMART HOME TECHNOLOGY

Care information systems … on web
2000 2005

Predictive modeling … Cognitive assistance
2010 2015

RECOMMENDATIONS: o Adopt early: learn from experience o Start small: expand incrementally o Adopt gradually: change care procedures o Assess needs, cost-benefits, & risk o Plan pilot & evaluation with R&D partner
o Source: Rodney Bell, Coleman Institute consultant
21

III. PERSONAL SUPPORT TECHNOLOGIES Visual Assistant (Prompting System)

Source: Ablelink Technologies, Colorado Springs (Terry & Jonathan).
22

PERSONAL SUPPORT TECHNOLOGIES Visual Assistant
A pocket personal computer with an integrated PC-slot digital camera; Staff/caretakers take pictures of— and narrate--the steps in a task;

The verbal instructions and images guide users through the steps: – Grocery shopping – Medications – Personal hygiene – Using public transportation, etc. – Weight management
SOURCE: Ablelink Technologies, Colorado Springs.
23

Prevalence of Overweight & Obesity in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities
100.0 90.0 80.0 70.0 84.8 General Population Overweight (64.5%)

Overweight (BMI > 25) Obesity (BMI > 30) Extreme Obesity (BMI > 40)

Percent (%)

60.0 50.0 40.0 30.0 20.0 10.0 0.0 I/DD 12.1 General Population Extreme Obesity (4.7%) 60.6

General Population Obesity (30.5%)

Rimmer JH, Wang E. Arch Phy Med Rehabil 2006;86:1461-1464
24

PERSONAL SUPPORT TECHNOLOGIES Adapted Web Browsers & Email Programs

The Web Trek adapted web browser improves access to the World Wide Web for people who have difficulty with reading and writing.

SOURCE: Ablelink Technologies, Colorado Springs.
25

PERSONAL SUPPORT TECH. – Lifeline pager

Consumer with Lifeline pager on his wrist
Source: Sound Response Program, Waisman Center, Univ. of Wisconsin Madison
26

PERSONAL SUPPORT TECH. – LOCATION TRACKING
Nextel mobile locator: http://www.nextel.com/en/services/gps/mobile_locator Wherifone: http://www.wherify.com/wherifone/ Accutracking: http://www.accutracking.com/ 911 to go: http://911togo.com/rf_child_tracking/child-locator.html Contact you cell phone provider for phones/services

27

THE ARC’s PROPHECY: 1988

There is a prevailing belief …in the field of assistive technology that people with mental retardation are not appropriate consumers of assistive technology… People with mental retardation should be named as a ‘traditionally underrepresented group’…It is the belief of the Association for Retarded Citizens of the United States that advances [in AT] will not occur without strong leadership from our federal government (Cavalier, 1988) [AND FROM STATE GOVERNMENTS]

Source: Testimony of A. Cavalier before the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on the Handicapped, 1988.

28

http://www.ColemanInstitute.org 29