You are on page 1of 68

5 TED TALKS

23TOP
FOR TEACHERS

SUBBAN’S
30P.K.
REMARKABLE TEACHER

IN
48SKYPING
THE CLASSROOM

DECEMBER 2014

T H E M AG A Z I N E O F T H E
O N TA R I O C O L L E G E O F T E A C H E R S

SafetyRules

CREATING SAFE SCHOOLS FOR STUDENTS p.34

COMMUNICATING
IN A CRISIS
p.40

Is it time to rethink
your life insurance coverage?

50% of Canadians worry they don’t
have enough life insurance.*
80% overestimate the cost.

Nothing a little education can’t fix.

* Source: Multiple Canadian Research Studies

Source: lifehappens.ca

Teachers Life introduces a new
way to purchase life insurance.
Our online tool is simple, secure, and easy to use.
Instant coverage.
No medical exam required.
Premiums as low as $5.58 a month.
Affordable term life insurance customized to suit
your current life stage, time frame and budget.

Why Teachers Life?
We’re education community focused.
Exclusive membership benefits.
Manage your policy online.

Get started online.

Go to teacherslife.com or
call 1-866-620-LIFE(5433) .

Celebrating 75 years serving
the education community.

Everything from restaurants
and shoes to tickets and travel.
Location

Welcome Catarina

Porter Escap...

Favourites

Hertz

view details

Settings

Loblaw Optic...

view details

français

search

Canada's Won...

view details

sign out

Sleep Countr...

view details

• • • • •• • • • • • • • • •

perks nearby
Apparel

display perks by

distance

recently updated

Shoeless Joe's Sports Grill Meadowvale
15% off food purchases

Auto
Location: Mississauga, Ontario 1.21 KM

Last Updated: 19 June 2014

Beauty

Porter Escapes

view details

Choice Hotels

view details

Parkway Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram
Come see us for the best deals in Ontario on all Chrysler, Dodge,
Jeep and Ram vehicles. We have ove...

Business Services

Computers &
Electronics

Location: Mississauga, Ontario 1.62 KM

Dining & Food

SONIC

Last Updated: 07 March 2014

If you or a family member thinks your hearing health needs
attention, Sonic can help! Our preferred ...

Education

Location: Mississauga, Ontario 1.92 KM

Last Updated: 16 July 2014

Entertainment

Comfort, Quality, Sleep Inn, Clarion, Econo Lodge
Financial Services

Choice Hotels is proud to offer you a discount of up to 20% at
participating hotels in Canada. Plus,...

Flowers & Gifts

Location: Mississauga, Ontario 1.92 KM

Health & Wellness

Enterprise Rent-A-Car™

Last Updated: 29 May 2014

When you're ready to go, Enterprise makes it easy with great cars
and great deals, plus a discount f...

Home & Living
Location: Mississauga, Ontario 2.01 KM

Last Updated: 30 June 2014

Insurance

Alamo Rent-A-CarTM
News, Mags & Books

Drive Happy® with Alamo®. Save up to 20% on your next rental &
A One Car Class Upgrade

Professional Services

Location: Mississauga, Ontario 2.01 KM

Shoes & Accessories

Avis

Last Updated: 30 June 2014
Home

We are pleased to offer members up to 25% off your next car
rental. PLUS, save even more by taking...

Welcome Catarina, tell us what you've saved & win!

Specialty

Brooks Brothers

Location: Mississauga, Ontario 2.03 KM

Enroll for your Brooks Brothers Corporate Membership Card and Save 15% on regular price merch…

Last Updated: 02 September 2014

Toronto, Ontario 16.57km

Sports & Recreation

Budget

Carlson Wagonlit Travel

We are pleased to offer members up to 25% off your next car
rental in Canada and the USA, and on tru...

Travel

WestJet Vacations: Free Indulgence package** ($79 per person value) includes advanced seat selection, e…
Toronto, Ontario 6.37km

Equifax

Location: Mississauga, Ontario 2.03 KM

Take charge of your credit today. Make sure your reports are accurate and free of fraud. See your personal…

Last Updated: 02 September 2014

m0851

Visit m0851, where as a preferred customer, you get 20% off all regular priced products.

Streetsville Hyundai

Toronto, Ontario 14.65km

$200 over Dealer Invoice on any new in-stock Hyundai model. All
current Hyundai incentives will also...

La Vie en Rose

Only for you! Get 20% off your purchase on all regular price and sale merchandise (cannot be combined wi…
Vaughan, Ontario 8.28km

Location: Mississauga, Ontario 2.88 KM

Last Updated: 29 November 2013

ClubLink - CCX Golf Loyalty Club

Receive special pricing on ClubLink's CCX Golf Loyalty Club.
King City, Ontario 29.31km

Cagney's Restaurant

Apple Inc.

20% off food and non-alcoholic beverages at lunch. 15% off food
and non-alcoholic beverages at dinn...

Working has its perks. Apple and your company have included you in a special program. You qualify for pr…

Location: Mississauga, Ontario 3.11 KM

Toronto, Ontario 17.20km

SUN & Sun Media Community Network

Keep score on all the world sports this summer.Save up to 83% off newsstand price when you sign up for a…

Last Updated: 06 May 2014

LASIK MD

load more perks

SAVE $200* on laser vision correction. As a valued corporate member, LASIK MD is proud to offer you and…
Mississauga, Ontario 7.00km

Costco Wholesale

Become a new Costco member and enjoy dinner on us!$20 bon appétit E-card* voucher when you becom…

Nissan Canada's Vehicle Purchase Program

terms of use

privacy policy

suggest a perk

1.866.383.6646

contact us

Welcome to Nissan Canada's Vehicle Purchase Program.As a valued partner of Nissan Canada, you are el…

©Copyright 2014 Venngo Inc. All rights reserved. WorkPerks® is a registered trade-mark of Venngo Inc. All other trade-marks are the property of their respective owners.

come

Location

Favourites

Settings

français

search

sign out

Welcome

Welcome

Location

Favourites

Settings

français

search

Location

Favourites

Settings

français

search

sign out

sign out

Location

Favourites

use the perk

locate the perk

Welcome

Settings

français

search

sign out

Home

Welcome Catarina, tell us what you've saved & win!

Brooks Brothers

français

Enroll for your Brooks Brothers Corporate Membership Card and Save 15% on regular price merch…

Tim...

pparel

uto

view details

Enterprise R...

view details

TicketsAtWor...

view details

Mexx

ducation

about the perk

display perks by

distance

ome & Living

use the perk

report an issue

Take charge of your credit today. Make sure your reports are accurate and free of fraud. See your personal…

about the perk

Favourites

Settings

search

français

sign out

Calvin Klein

La Vie en Rose

Get Two Days Free! Purchase a 3 day Disney World Park Hopper Ticket and we will
upgrade it to a 5 day ticket free. Buy a 5 day ticket and get an upgrade to 7 days. Buy a
8 day ticket and get an upgrade to 10 days for free. *Online Only

Vaughan, Ontario 8.28km

Costco...

view details

Last Minute Cl...

view details

ClubLink - CCX Golf Loyalty Club

Receive special pricing on ClubLink's CCX Golf Loyalty Club.
King City, Ontario 29.31km

SUN & Sun Media Community Network

password

Keep score on all the world sports this summer.Save up to 83% off newsstand price when you sign up for a…

LASIK MD

Mississauga, Ontario 7.00km

Enjoy Special savings on Daily, Weekend or Weekly rentals Hertz offers you
year round savings of u...

view details
Ensure you find the right PC with Presale support from Lenovo's highly skilled
sales specialists.

Last Updated: 20 December 2013

Avis
Avis is pleased to offer members up to 5 - 25% off your next car rental. PLUS,
save even more by ta...

Choice Hotels

view details

Costco Wholesale

The Lenovo product line offers the features you need in your choice
of elegantly designed, portable, affordable, or even luxury spacesaving packages. From family-friendly All-in-One systems to our
cutting-edge ThinkPad laptops. Our PCs come in a variety of
shapes and sizes that fit your lifestyle perfectly.
WE BUILD DO MACHINES. Visit our new products
showcase to see our newest innovations.

Milestones Grill + Bar

Hertz

Keep me signed in on this computer.

SAVE $200* on laser vision correction. As a valued corporate member, LASIK MD is proud to offer you and…

Last Updated: 07 January 2014

Award Winning ThinkPad PCs

Become a new Costco member and enjoy dinner on us!$20 bon appétit E-card* voucher when you becom…

Nissan Canada's Vehicle Purchase Program

Welcome to Nissan Canada's Vehicle Purchase Program.As a valued partner of Nissan Canada, you are el…

featuring

Tablets
20% off A Series tablet – wideview android

Configure To Order (CTO) products

Dedicated toll-free telephone number
and website

15% OFF food & non-alcoholic drinks*

Need help signing in?

Members can also save 30% on Orlando hotels and prices as low as
$90/night on vacation homes. *Tickets must be purchased online to
receive free upgrade.
OrlandoVacation.com has been providing discounts for
guests desiring to visit Orlando since 1993. We
specialize in Disney World packages which come
complete with theme park tickets and
accommodations. All of our travel specialist live in
Orlando, and this affords us the opportunity to provide
better customer service and a little local knowledge as
well.
We are very proud of our 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
and our Low Price Guarantee.

Milestones Grill + Bar

10% off ThinkPad Yoga - Multimode business
Plethora of options and accessories
ultrabook
Category: Dining & Food
Most up-to-date portfolio of products
10% off ThinkPad W540 - Mobile workstations
10% off ThinkPad X240 – Thin and Light
30 day price protection
Laptops
Direct access to Lenovo's skilled and
10% off ThinkPad X1 - Thin and Light
Laptops
about
the perk
use thetrained
perk Sales
locate
the perk
Specialists
10% off ThinkPad X1 Touch - Thin and Light
24x7x365 Technical support
Laptops

report an issue

Calvin Klein, one of the most recognizable brands in fashion, offers you 15% off your
next purchase or 20% off your purchase of $150 or more.

sign in

Toronto, Ontario 17.20km

Choice Hotels is proud to offer you a discount of up to 20% at participating
hotels in Canada. Plus,...

suggest a perk

about the perk

Working has its perks. Apple and your company have included you in a special program. You qualify for pr…

20% discount on all facial treatments! also... $25 gift Certificates for only
$19.99

Comfort, Quality, Sleep Inn, Clarion, Econo Lodge

print this perk

Category: Apparel

WorkPerks® account name

Apple Inc.

Amerispa

Last Updated: 17 January 2014

report an issue

locate the perk

Visit m0851, where as a preferred customer, you get 20% off all regular priced products.
Toronto, Ontario 14.65km

Only for you! Get 20% off your purchase on all regular price and sale merchandise (cannot be combined wi…

Last Updated: 31 January 2014

use the perk

m0851

Location

IN THE MARKET FOR A NEW PC? YOUR TIMING HAS NEVER BEEN BETER! Thinking
about a great gift idea or maybe a upgrade to your current office or home PC? You are
in the right place at the right time. Lenovo has great pcs with INSTANT SAVINGS OF
UP TO 25%. Act now and choose a Lenovo PC that was designed with you in mind.
Through September 30th 2014, members can enjoy great savings from Lenovo®. Save
up to 25% on select PCs. Checkout your Lenovo® Page for details.

Budget is pleased to offer Venngo members like you up to 25% off your next
car rental in Canada and ...

suggest a perk

Category: Entertainment, Travel

Equifax

locate the perk
Welcome

Budget

owers & Gifts

ealth & Wellness

Orlando Vacation

Toronto, Ontario 6.37km

recently updated

ntertainment

nancial Services

Toronto, Ontario 16.57km

Carlson Wagonlit Travel

WestJet Vacations: Free Indulgence package** ($79 per person value) includes advanced seat selection, e…

suggest a perk

Category: Computers & Electronics, Business Services

perks nearby

omputers &
ectronics

ning & Food

Apple..

Lenovo

eauty

usiness Services

view details

•• • • • • • • • • •

print this perk
suggest a perk

report an issue

Save 15% off your next purchase or 20% off your purchase of $150
or more. Includes sale merchandise. Not valid on purchase of Gift
Cards or Internet transactions. PVH associates not eligible.

featuring

Calvin Klein is one of the most recognizable brands in
fashion, whose philosophy of modern, sophisticated,
and often minimal designs has remained a staple of
fashion for over four decades. The clean lines of the
brand's designs extend to women's and men's
sportswear, suits, dresses, jeans, underwear,
fragrance and accessories.

Disney World theme park tickets
Orlando vacation packages (lodging
and tickets)
Orlando hotels
Orlando car rentals

featuring
Modern
Sexy
Effortless

Disney World vacation homes
Universal Studios theme park tickets

learn more

SeaWorld theme park tickets
Orlando dinner shows

To join our Preferred program, please visit our
website.

Cruises

visit our website

Free Orlando vacation coupons

Last Updated: 11 July 2014

available at these locations
Calvin Klein

416-620-1027

Calvin Klein

905-532-0518

Calvin Klein (12.7 km)

Easily save $100s to $1,000s a year
with discounts from partners like...
The Co-operators
Being a member of the Ontario College Of Teachers
means you can enjoy convenient, personal service,
outstanding coverage and exclusive benefits all backed
by The Co-operators Claims Guarantee. You’ll also
save more with preferred rates and discounts.

Nissan
Welcome to Nissan Canada’s Vehicle Purchase Program.
As a valued partner of Nissan Canada, you are eligible
for an exclusive deal on almost any new Nissan or Infiniti
vehicle.

Avis
We are pleased to offer members up to 35%* off your next
car rental. PLUS, save even more with our money saving
coupon offers, such as a free weekend day.

Plus another 1,200 discounts from brand
name stores and local shops... visit

oct.ca/memberperks
©Copyright 2014 Venngo Inc. All rights reserved. MemberPerks® is a registered trade-mark of Venngo Inc.
All other trade-marks are the property of their respective owners.
perks and/or discounts may not be as shown, and are subject to change without notice.
*Terms and conditions apply.

Group Insurance
that’s all about you.
Being a member of the Ontario College of Teachers
means you can enjoy convenient, personal service,
outstanding coverage and exclusive benefits all backed
by The Co-operators Claims Guarantee. You’ll also
save more with preferred rates and discounts.

Let us show you the many ways it pays to be
part of your group. Call 1-800-387-1963 or
visit us at oct.ca/memberperks.

Call us or get an online QuickQuote for Auto* or Home insurance and be entered to
win one of four quarterly prizes of $500 PLUS a grand prize of $15,000!†
1-800-387-1963 or oct.ca/memberperks

The Co-operators® used under license from The Co-operators Group Limited. Underwritten by COSECO Insurance Company and administered by HB Group Insurance Management Ltd., member companies of The Co-operators Group Limited. *Auto insurance not available in
BC, MB and SK. †No purchase necessary. For complete contest rules and regulations and information about our privacy policy, visit www.cooperatorsgroupinsurance.ca. Contest closes December 31, 2014.

This group insurance program is only available through our Contact Centre and website.

PABFPCOLE (04/13)

D E C E M B E R 2 014

UPFRONT
9 AT THE COLLEGE
10 FROM THE CHAIR
13 REGISTRAR’S REPORT
14 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
17 CONNECTIONS

In your Profession; In your Classroom;
Tools of the Trade — Top 5 Ted Talks for teachers

PHOTO: MARKIAN LOZOWCHUK; ILLUSTRATION: KATY LEMAY/ANNA GOODSON

DEPARTMENTS

ELECTION SPECIAL

50 Your quick guide to the

2015 College Council elections.

GOVERNING OURSELVES
53 
Regulatory News/Policy Development/Council

Meetings/Appointments/Annual Meeting of
Members/College News/Investigation Committee
Case Study/Hearings

24 GREAT TEACHING

FEATURES

34 SAFETY RULES

When it comes to science, Gabriel Ayyavoo, OCT,
breathes new life into teaching high school biology.

Government, school boards, administrators and
OCTs are working together to create safe schools
for Ontario students.

30 REMARKABLE TEACHER

Hockey superstar P.K. Subban recalls the year his

father was also his principal, and how he achieved
his number one goal thanks to dad’s coaching.

64 FINAL EXAM

CTV’s Consumer Advocate Pat Foran discusses the
financial lessons he wishes he had learned in school.

YOU2015
DECIDE

40 FIRST RESPONSE

The Internet and social media may have changed the

ways and speed at which we communicate in a crisis,
but the core principles remain the same.

RESOURCES
43 REVIEWS

Building Everyday Leadership in All Kids/
Rigorous Reading/Moment to Moment/
Unspoken/Follow Your Money

48 TECH CLASS

Joe Grabowski, OCT, uses a Q&A Skype game to
help Grade 6 students sharpen their mapping skills.
December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

5

/ Perfect Welding
/ Solar Energy
/ Perfect Charging

DECEMBER 2014
Editorial Board
Christine Bellini, OCT (Chair);
Jean-Luc Bernard, OCT; Marie-Louise Chartrand;
Myreille Loubert, OCT (Vice-chair);
Kara Smith, OCT
Publisher
Richard Lewko
Editor-in-Chief
William Powell
Managing Editor
Kristin Doucet
Senior Editor
Leata Lekushoff
Contributing Editor
Véronique Ponce
Copy Editor
Geri Savits-Fine
Reviews
Wendy Harris

www.fronius.ca

IS YOUR SCHOOL INSTALLING A
SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEM?
For an experienced supplier that ensures safe,
reliable and educational solar power systems,
ask for Fronius inverters. Contact us at
905-288-2110 or pv-sales-canada@fronius.com.

Translation
Thomas Brouard, Julie Fournel, Loïc Magnier
Contributors
Gabrielle Barkany, OCT; Serge Brideau, OCT;
Brian Jamieson; Pamela Lipson; Alexandra Madolciu, OCT;
Jamie McLennan; David Millar; Jefferson Ng; Liz Papadopoulos, OCT;
Michael Salvatori, OCT; Patrick Winter; Simon Young
Circulation
Kerry Walford
Art Direction, Design and Production
Studio 141 Inc: Dave Curcio (President and Creative Director);
Lindsey Mrav (Contributing Art Director); Marlo Biasutti (Graphic Designer)
Le
s

ionnelles
fess
pro

20
1

g
hin
lis

Le
s

ionnelles
fess
pro

20
1

g
hin
lis

Le
s

Le
s

20
1

Le
s

ionnelles
fess
pro

ionnelles
fess
pro

ian Business
Pu
nad
b
Ca

n des pulicat
adie
ion
can
s

ionnelles
fess
pro

ionnelles
fess
pro

ian Business
Pu
nad
b
Ca

n des pulicat
adie
ion
can
s

20
1

20
1

g
hin
lis

ian Business
Pu
nad
b
Ca

n des pulicat
adie
ion
can
s

g
hin
lis

Bes
t in

g
hin
lis

Website
of the Year
ian Business
Pu
nad
b
Ca

n des pulicat
adie
ion
can
s

n des pulicat
adie
ion
can
s

20
1

n des pulicat
adie
ion
can
s

eth R. Wilson
enn
Aw
4K

s
ard

Bes
t in

Bes
t in

Bes
t in

Bes
t in

ian Business
Pu
nad
b
Ca

Bes
t in

g
hin
lis

L’élite du sec
teu
r

Magazine
of the Year
Finalist

s
ard

eth R. Wilson
enn
Aw
4K

enneth R. Wilso
n2
ix K
Pr

4
01

Magazine
de l’année
Finaliste

L’élite du sec
teu
r

s
ard

eth R. Wilson
enn
Aw
4K

Magazine
of the Year

enneth R. Wilso
n2
ix K
Pr

4
01

L’élite du sec
teu
r

Gold
Winner

s
ard

eth R. Wilson
enn
Aw
4K

enneth R. Wilso
n2
ix K
Pr

4
01

L’élite du sec
teu
r

Silver
Winner

s
ard

s
ard

eth R. Wilson
enn
Aw
4K

Finalist

enneth R. Wilso
n2
ix K
Pr

4
01

L’élite du sec
teu
r

L’élite du sec
teu
r

eth R. Wilson
enn
Aw
4K

enneth R. Wilso
n2
ix K
Pr

4
01

enneth R. Wilso
n2
ix K
Pr

4
01

Le
s

Cover
Médaille
Médaille
Magazine
Site Web
Finaliste
d’argent
d’or
de l’année
de l’année
Illustration: Katy
Lemay/Anna
Goodson;
Photography:
Anya Chibis

ian Business
Pu
nad
b
Ca

Professionally Speaking is published quarterly by the Ontario College of Teachers
to inform its members about the activities and decisions of the College. The
magazine provides a forum for discussion of issues relevant to the future of
teaching and learning, teachers’ professional learning and standards of practice.
The views expressed in the articles are those of the authors and do not
necessarily represent the official position of the College.
Reproduction, in whole or in part, of articles from this issue of Professionally
Speaking is encouraged. Please credit the Ontario College of Teachers and
Professionally Speaking, December 2014.
Letters to the editor and submissions on topics of interest to the profession are
welcome. Unsolicited manuscripts cannot be returned.
ISSN 1206-8799
Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement No 40064343
Address
Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to:
Professionally Speaking, Ontario College of Teachers, 101 Bloor St. W.,
Toronto, ON M5S 0A1; ps@oct.ca or subscriptions@oct.ca
Advertising
Dovetail Communications
t. 905-886-6640 f. 905-886-6615 e. psadvertising@dvtail.com
Publication of an advertisement in Professionally Speaking does not constitute
an endorsement by the College of any advertiser’s product or service, including
professional learning opportunities.
Printing
Printed with vegetable-based inks on FSC®-certified
stock at Transcontinental Printing, Owen Sound, ON.
Professionally Speaking is proud to participate
in Ontario’s Blue Box Recycling Program
through Stewardship Ontario.

6

Professionally Speaking | December 2014

A New
Perspective on
Scanning





Easily scans bound documents up to 11” x 17” *1
Corrects for curvature of books
Includes “Page Turning Detection” for automated book scanning
Automatically scans and crops up to 10 small documents at once
Scans directly to PDF

■ One touch scanning to PDF

■ One touch scanning to PDF

■ One touch scanning to PDF

■ Scan via USB or Wi-fi
■ 25 double sided pages per minute

■ AC powered or USB powered
through 2 cables

■ Built-in rechargeable battery
and Wi-fi

■ Ideal for the office

■ 12 double sided pages per minute

■ 5 seconds/page (single sided)

■ Ideal for the office or home office

■ Ideal for home office or
mobile applications

For more information please visit www.fujitsu.ca/documentscanner
*1 Maximum thickness of scanned document is 30mm.
*ScanSnap, ScanSnap logo, Rack2-filer Smart are either registered trademarks or trademarks of PFU LIMITED in Japan.
*Windows is either a registered trademark or trademark of US Microsoft Corporation in the United States, Japan and/or other countries.
*Mac and Mac OS is a trademark of Apple Inc.
*Other company names and product names are the registered trademarks or trademarks of the respective companies.

COLLEGE COUNCIL
Chair
Liz Papadopoulos, OCT
Vice-Chair
Marc Dubois, OCT

The College is the self-regulating
professional body for Ontario teachers.
Membership is open to anyone qualified
to teach in the province and required to
maintain an Ontario teaching certificate.
The College is responsible to the public and the
profession for ensuring that teachers receive the training
they need to provide Ontario’s students with an excellent
education now and in the future. It sets standards of
practice and learning for teachers and accredits teacher
education programs and providers.
The College regulates teaching qualifications,
investigates complaints involving members and takes
appropriate disciplinary action.

Some exclusions may apply. Teacher identification required.
®†™† Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V.
Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Co. and Staples Canada Inc.

8

Professionally Speaking | December 2014

Members
Stefanie Achkewich, OCT; Alexander (Sandy) Bass, OCT;
Christine Bellini, OCT; Jean-Luc Bernard, OCT; Shabnum Budhwani;
Marie-Louise Chartrand; Monique Châteauvert; Merzak Damou, OCT;
Angela De Palma, OCT; Irene Dembek, OCT; Gale Dores, OCT;
Elizabeth Edgar-Webkamigad; Dobi-Dawn Frenette; Robert Gagné;
E. Clyde Glasgow; Jacqueline Gray, OCT; Godwin Ifedi;
Allyn Janicki, OCT; Matthew Kavanagh, OCT;
Monique Lapalme Arseneault; Shanlee Linton, OCT;
Myreille Loubert, OCT; Mary Lou Mackie, OCT;
Adannaya Nwaogu, OCT; Terry Price, OCT; Vicki Shannon, OCT;
Louis Sloan, OCT; Pauline Smart; Kara Smith, OCT;
Demetri Vacratsis, OCT; Wes Vickers, OCT; Ronna Warsh
Registrar
Michael Salvatori, OCT
Deputy Registrar
Joe Jamieson, OCT
Directors
Francine Dutrisac, OCT, Investigations and Hearings
Richard Lewko, Corporate and Council Services
Michelle Longlade, OCT, Standards of Practice and Accreditation
Linda Zaks-Walker, OCT, Membership Services

AT T H E C O L L E G E

SPREADING THE WORD

BABY TIME

Julia Lazarito and her 10-month-old baby, Dominic, receive a book
from a staff member at the College booth at the London Baby
Expo in October. The College was there to inform new parents
about the role it plays in protecting the public interest.

A College member receives an OCT pin at the Ontario
College of Teachers booth during Word on the Street,
one of Ontario’s top book festivals. The College was
at the event to spread the word about how it sets the
standard for great teaching.

INDONESIAN DELEGATION

PHOTOS: ANDREA KELLAWAY (BABY EXPO); STEPHANIE MCLEAN (INDONESIAN DELEGATION); FAIZAL SHERIFF/PHOTOGRAPHIC.01 (WORD ON THE STREET)

In September, members from the Indonesian National
Accreditation Board of Schools visited the College to learn
about its role in accrediting pre-service and in-service
teacher education programs. Far left: Michael Saver, OCT,
accreditation administrator; far right: Richard Lewko,
director of corporate and council services.

5000
Free French Resources
Available now!
ACTIVATE YOUR ACCOUNT

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

9

FROM TH E CHAI R

NOT SO
BLACK AND
WHITE

College advisories help teachers
navigate the grey areas.
BY LIZ PAPADOPOULOS, OCT

E

very day teachers are faced
with situations where they need
to consider the consequences of
their decisions. Whether it’s deciding
to accept a Facebook friend request
from a student or dealing with a student
who has suffered an injury in gym
class, teachers are bombarded with
information, opinions and advice on
the best course of action.
Teachers understand that students
depend on them to differentiate between
what is right and wrong. It can sometimes be challenging, though, because
things are not always black and white.
So, how do you navigate the grey areas?
Through its professional advisories,
the College aims to guide members of the
profession in their practice and judgment.
It’s one of our core responsibilities to our
members, and it’s a way in which we mitigate areas of potential risk for them.
These advisories help to clarify teachers’ obligations so they can govern their
conduct and understand what does and
doesn’t meet professional standards.
The advisory topics often come from
concerns that members and the public
report to us. For example, the advisory
on the professional use of electronic
communication and social media was
created because the College was receiving a growing number of complaints
about the misuse of texting and email. It
published its advice to members to help
them avoid situations that could lead to
professional boundary violations.
Last summer, the College held focus
groups with teachers and the public
across the province to obtain feedback

10 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

on our communication products and
services. We also wanted to know what
they thought were the pressing issues
that deserve more of our attention.
During our discussions on professional
advisories, three of six potential topics,
were identified as topics of interest:
communicating with parents, special
education and duty to report.
Communicating with parents
Communicating with parents about
homework or behaviour can be intimidating, especially for newer teachers
who need to establish boundaries on
what, how and when to communicate.
Parents participating in the focus
groups said they like to receive regular
updates about their children’s academics and behaviour.
Both parents and teachers agreed
that an advisory providing guidelines
on how best to achieve effective twoway communication between families
and schools would be helpful.
Special education
You may have noticed that inclusive
policies have led to greater integration of students with special needs
into your classrooms. The teachers we
met said they are creating programs
for an increased number of students
with exceptionalities. They indicated a
need for extra support and guidance,
especially in developing the Individual
Education Plan (IEP) and in managing
their classes.
Furthermore, they recommended
that an advisory on this topic focus

Duty to report
Teachers participating in the focus groups
said they encounter a number of students
during the course of their careers who
may be in need of protective interventions.
Teachers know they have a professional
duty to report suspected cases of child
abuse to the appropriate authority.
Some teachers said they find the
presentations on child abuse prevention
from the Children’s Aid Society helpful,
however, many said these presentations
were not offered in their schools.
Participants said they would benefit
from guidelines on current reporting
practices, a better understanding of
potential barriers confronting teachers, and communication strategies they
could apply to parents and students,
especially after reporting suspicions
of abuse.
The College regulates the teaching
profession in the public’s interest. It
cannot operate in a vacuum. We depend
on all our partners in education to get
the word out to members. The more
voices that broaden teachers’ perspectives, the better. School boards, federations, associations, agencies and other
regulatory bodies all have a part to play
in keeping our students safe.
The Executive Committee has chosen
our upcoming advisory topic. Over
the next few months, the College will
conduct a series of consultations with
experts in the field, our partners and
with stakeholders to develop an advisory
that we hope will address your needs and
support your professional practice. PS

PHOTO: MATTHEW PLEXMAN

on guidelines and best practices for
integrating students with special needs
into regular classrooms.

2015 39th Annual
Language Arts
Conference
Monday, February 9th &
Tuesday, February 10th*
Sheraton Centre Hotel
123 Queen Street West
Toronto, Ontario

DENNIS LEE

MONDAY BREAKFAST KEYNOTE

RICHARD WAGAMESE

MONDAY LUNCHEON KEYNOTE

SHARON ROBINSON

MONDAY BANQUET KEYNOTE

ERIC WALTERS

*NEW
MON/TUES
CONFERENCE
DAYS

TUESDAY BREAKFAST KEYNOTE

ROSEMARY MCCARNEY

TUESDAY LUNCHEON KEYNOTE

East York-Scarborough
Reading Association
readingfortheloveofit.com
416-444-7473

Help students
plan their
next move.
Visit ONTransfer.ca
and learn how students
can transfer their
credits in Ontario’s
postsecondary system.

ONTransfer.ca is funded by the Government of Ontario
and maintained by the Ontario Council on Articulation and Transfer.
Cette information est aussi disponible en français.

@ONTransfer

|

#pathways

R EG I STRAR’S R E PORT

SERVING THE
COMMON GOOD

Interprofessional collaboration enables individuals
and organizations to share insights and work together
to achieve common goals that serve the public interest.
BY MICHAEL SALVATORI, OCT

A

s a language teacher, I have
always been fascinated by the
origin of words. It’s one of the
is for
reasons that I find some of the tactics
used in the College’s public awareness
initiative so stimulating.
To prepare for a recent presentation
on interprofessional collaboration, I looked
up the etymology of the word “collaboration” to spark my
thought process. I learned that “collaborate” is derived from
the Latin word laborare, which means “to work.” “Inter” as a
prefix implies between or among, mutually and reciprocally.
Therefore, “interprofessional collaboration” suggests professionals working together, to which I would add, toward the
achievement of a common goal.
Ontario schools offer excellent examples of collaboration.
Teachers, principals, education assistants, social workers,
early childhood educators, speech language pathologists
and parents — among many others — all come together in
a community of care and commitment with the common goal
of supporting students, helping them to achieve success and
to contribute to our civil society.
Like you, the Ontario College of Teachers collaborates
with its professional partners in the public interest.
Our common goal is public protection, public trust and
confidence. This collaboration takes many forms. For example,
we meet regularly with colleagues from other regulatory bodies
such as the College of Early Childhood Educators, the Ontario
College of Social Workers and Social Service Workers, the Law
Society of Upper Canada and the Ontario College of Trades to
share and develop best practices in policy development, credential
assessment and fair registration. Our collective experiences and
expertise lead to the enhancement of our practices and to better
protection of the public.

Glazier

PHOTO: MATTHEW PLEXMAN

There’s no
telling
when we equip what our student
s will achieve
our teachers
teaching
to excel. We
in Ontario
regulate
by licensin
setting high
g our teacher
professional
approving
and
s,
teacher educatio ethical standards,
and
n program
s. It’s our job

to ensure
that
the right tools the teachers of Ontario
to help our
receive
things, like
students achieve
becoming
great
an expert
installing glass.
in handling
Discover how
and
for great teaching
we set the
standard
at OCT.ca

As regulators, we also work jointly on projects like the very
successful Ontario College of Teachers and the College of Early
Childhood Educators Summer Institute. This past July, the
colleges came together at the Institute to focus on interprofessional collaboration and ethical leadership within full-day early
learning. Early childhood educators and kindergarten teachers
gathered at the College to discuss connections among the ethical
standards and standards of practices between our colleges.
Participants saw the value in using the standards from
both colleges to communicate to the public, and to establish
and maintain effective communication among professionals
working together toward the common goal of educating young
learners. Many of the participants highlighted the importance
of understanding that we all share common values, purpose
and passion in the service of children.
One participant, Irina Alexeeva, RECE, commented, “I’ve
not only learned so much, I also [know] that I’m not alone on
the pathway of the exciting journey of full-day kindergarten.
I’m confident that together we will make it better.”
The companions on the journey metaphor reminded me
of one of my favourite childhood cartoons from the TV series
Schoolhouse Rock! To teach the function of conjunctions,
a catchy jingle “Conjunction junction, what’s your function?”
accompanied an animated train engineer and switching station
with various train cars (“and” or “but”) to link sentences.
Not unlike the animated lesson, collaboration is about
“hooking up cars and making them function.” Schools,
classrooms and learning are improved when professionals
find their junctions. I encourage you to take every opportunity
to collaborate with your colleagues for the benefit of your
students. As you do, know and feel confident that your
professional regulator is doing the same. PS

The College collaborates with these and other regulators in the public interest:

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

13

lettersto the editor

Professionally Speaking welcomes letters and articles on topics of interest to teachers. We reserve the right to edit letters for length
and to conform to our publication style. To be considered for publication, letters must provide the writer’s daytime phone number and
registration number. Address letters to: The Editor, Professionally Speaking at ps@oct.ca or 101 Bloor St. W., Toronto, ON M5S 0A1.

Mixed Messages
BY KIRA VERMO
ND

I

t’s a sunny Sunday
afternoon in June,
and while the school
year is winding down,
Jeremy Durgana’s
“When I’m teachin
fitness routine isn’t.
g these children
Heading back to his
[about the importa
of good nutritio
car after spending
nce
n], they believe
time on the treadmi
the gym, he lowers
me because I look,
ll at
his trim frame through
eat like an athlete
dress and
the door and settles
,” he says. “If I’m
He hasn’t always
in.
preaching someth
looked like this. Durgan
don’t act the part,
ing but
am I credible?”
a, OCT, a Grade
teacher at Trillium
5/6
Woods Public School
He’s credible and
in Richmond Hill,
is the first one to
has an award to
Ont., this year’s
pull out old “before
prove
it. He won one of
provincial Teach
” photos of himself
when he was a bullied,
Nutrition Awards
from
obese child who
nizes
,
which
creativ
recoge
nutritio
weighed 244 pounds.
In fact, he shows
n initiatives in kinderg
these photographs
8. His winning entry
arten to Grade
to his students each
year to prove a point:
— a public service
announcement
anyone who leads
his students wrote,
an unhealthy lifestyle
animated and edited
can trade it in for
a healthy one. If
over the course
a month — merged
he could do it, so
of
Durgana just has
health education
can they.
to convince the student
with technical and
artistic skills.
s the photos weren’t
digitally altered.
“I’m a hands-on
teacher who creates
opportunities for
kinesthetic learner
s,” he explains. “I
want to engage
them.”

32 Professionally Speaking

| September 2014

ASHUKIAN; FOOD

STYLING: SUGAR

Teachers are also
beginning to understand exactly how
multi-faceted the
child
weight issue is. Morriso
n points out that
over the past decade
schools have tried
numerous initiativ
es to stem the trend
of growing waistlin
es, from banning
vending machines
and opening salad
bars in school cafeteri
as, to launching the
daily physical activity
(DPA) program
that gets student
s up and moving
at least
once a day.
There may be a
problem with going
after the issue in
such a methodical
yet
piecemeal way, howeve
r. Children keep
getting bigger and
enthusiasm for some
activity program
s eventually wanes.
So what can teacher
s do to actually
make a difference?
Be a role model,
advocate for change,
Morrison advises,
and learn from other
teachers who work
food and fitness
into their student
s’ daily
lives in innovative
and creative ways.

TART

A weighty issue

It’s no secret that
Canada — and much
of the world — is
A growin g body
facing a children
of evidenc e links
’s
health crisis. Accord
physica l fitness
to academ ic pering to Statistics
Canada, one-third
forman ce and brain
of Canadians aged
health. In one
five to 17 are overwe
Spanish study publish
ight or obese. When
ed earlier this
it comes to teachin
year, researc hers
g students a healthy
found that childre
n
approach to diet
who have advanc
and exercise, innovat
ed motor skills
and
ive cardior espirat
ideas like Durgan
ory capacit y (in
a’s are necessary.
other
words, their hearts
The proliferation
of sugary drinks
are in good shape
(juice, once conside
presum ably becaus
red part of a healthy
e they were fitter)
diet, no longer enjoys
do better in school.
a free pass) and
fatty processed foods
Trying to turn the
in our diet is
tide on such a
partially to blame,
comple x problem
as is an increase
require s an equally
in
sedentary time spent
comple x solutio
n and seismic societa
in front of screens
l
playing video games
change, says Dr.
Kather ine Morris
and watching
on,
TV. Obesity experts
associa te profess
or in the departm
have also pointed
ent
to other factors that
of pediatr ics and
co-dire ctor of the
fuel the weight
problem, such as
MAC-O besity Resear
bigger portion sizes
ch Progra m at
at
restaurants and grocery
McMas ter Univer
sity. “It’s import
stores to getting
ant
less sleep.
to realize there’s
no simple solutio
n
to fix this. That’s
The result of this
just not the nature
misguided eating
and
inactivity? Ill health
of the biology or
sociolo gy of obesity
and poor marks.
,”
she says.

—Patricia Drimmie, OCT, is a Grade
3/4 teacher at Confederation Central
School in Sarnia.

INGRE DIENTS

BUS: Squash, whole
wheat squares, radish,
lentils, split mung
pomegranate seeds,
beans, sesame seeds
raspberrie
beans, honey dew
melon, Swiss chard, PEOPLE: Pumpernickel bread, s, potato skin, purple yam ROAD:
seeds, Prairie rice,
Black beluga
red onion, bran buds,
enoki mushroom
purple yam, beet,
red chili pepper,
carrot, pumpkin seed , iceberg lettuce, green lentils, ShanghaiPumpernickel bread,
red mung
KITE: Strawberry,
style noodles, coriander
lemon TREE: Pea celery, multi-grain crackers, provolone
cheese
shoots BUSHES
cheese, radish skin, string, chive, yellow zucchini SCHOOL
: Frise, broccoli, bok
:
choy, thyme. All food green tea rice noodle SKY:
Cauliflower,
used in this photo
was consumed.

Here’s how to keep your small team of involved parents and
community members happy, engaged and supporting your school.
BY MeLISSa CaMpeaU, wIth fILeS froM MeLISSa MartZ

38 Professionally Speaking | September 2014

In the September 2014 issue there was an excellent feature
article devoted to the importance of healthy eating. In the
article that follows these pages, however, there is a picture of
a volunteer taking part in a bake sale! This creates ambiguity
in the messaging that is being delivered.
­ Serge Brisson, OCT, is principal at École élémentaire

catholique Saint-Thomas-d’Aquin in Sarnia.

As someone who has been an
advocate for healthy living for
my entire career, I was pleased
to see the focus on school
nutrition in the September issue
of Professionally Speaking. The
colleagues who shared their
personal experiences and practices offered great encouragement and practical ideas for those
wishing to embed healthy living into the curriculum.
Our board, Waterloo Catholic, has worked very diligently,
in co-operation with the Region of Waterloo Public Health,
to make healthy eating a priority with our students. The deck
of your article, “Teachers play a big role in shaping students
healthy habits,” is true, but we have learned that it is not just
teachers who influence students’ eating habits, but all adults
who work with students in the school environment.
I was dismayed to see the photo of a volunteer serving
doughnuts, cupcakes with candies and other unhealthy treats to
students. If we as an education system are going to change the
obesity health crisis in this country, then our messaging needs
to be consistent at all times — especially by those who directly
influence the lives of our students.
lose your eyes, everyone,” Trina Tran, OCT, instructs the 17 excited students in
her kindergarten class at Leslieville Junior Public School in Toronto. “Our mystery reader is here!” Parent volunteer Mike McCann, who has willingly rearranged
his workday to visit the school, slips into the room carrying a small stack of books and
takes a seat, cross-legged, on the carpet with the children. “OK boys and girls, open your
eyes,” says Tran. There’s a chorus of giggles and a few shouts of “I know you!” from the
children. McCann’s five-year-old son is beaming, surprised and delighted to see his father.
McCann is on-site to read a new story to the students, something Tran regularly invites
school volunteers to do as part of her Mystery Reader program. She also welcomes parents and involved school and local community members to help with school
trips, fundraisers, special in-class events, as well as everyday activities like
Volunteers in action at the
craft projects, Lego building and science experiments.
annual Picnic for the Arts
Volunteers have become an integral part of the classroom environment
fundraiser at Huron Street
— not to mention they bring different skills and a fresh perspective to the
Public School in Toronto.
learning environment.
In some cases, volunteers not only bring an extra pair of hands to class —
the success or failure of a program depends on them. Bernie Pickett, OCT, who retired
from a 31-year teaching career in 2013, is a big part of why St. Mary’s High School in
Kitchener still has a football team. Coaches for the sport are in short supply, and Pickett
was concerned that the program where he taught for 23 years would suffer. So, he volunteered to help the team. For Pickett, it’s a matter of continuing to use his talents where
they’re needed the most. “Teachers spend their careers developing the skills to help students, parents, colleagues and the school community,” he says. “Why wouldn’t a teacher
want to continue to use and share these qualities?”
Martin Bertrand, OCT, superintendent of Conseil des écoles publiques de l’Est de
l’Ontario (CÉPEO), says his school board counts 862 volunteers on its roster. “These
individuals share their knowledge and skills with the students,” he says. “That’s a
priceless contribution.” Bertrand points out that when students see the helpers in action,
it can inspire them to become volunteers themselves.
photoS: Joanne k

Firstly, I want to thank you for
the many wonderful articles that
are presented to teachers through
Professionally Speaking. “On the road
to great nutrition,” in the September
issue, discussed the importance of good nutrition and was well
written. Unfortunately, the bake sale picture that follows on
page 38 contradicts all that was written in the previous pages. 
Having a picture of a volunteer serving sugar doughnuts with
candy-coated cupcakes gives [the wrong idea] about what our
schools should be promoting. 
 
—Roberto Santos, OCT, is the principal of St. Stephen
Catholic School in Stittsville.

14 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

TEACH ERS PLAY
A BIG ROLE IN
SHAP ING STUD
HERE ARE INSPI
ENTS’ HEALTHY
RED IDEAS FROM
HABITS.
SEVEN OCTs.

PHOTOS: SUSAN

I found it disheartening to see the article “On the
road to great nutrition” in your September issue
followed by a photograph of very unhealthy eating
choices being presented to a young student by a
volunteer in the article “Valuing our Volunteers.”
Several years ago, the Ministry of Education was
beginning to mandate healthier food choices for
bake sales, etc., placing more emphasis on healthy
eating generally in schools.
I hope that this kind of fundraising practice is
not the norm and that the road to great nutrition
continues with the help of educators
who care about what their students
eat at school and at home.

September 2014 | Professionally Speaking

39

—Kathy Doherty Masters, OCT, is a part-time teacher at Holy
Rosary Catholic School in Waterloo, and a part-time Healthy, Active
Living consultant with the Waterloo Catholic District School Board.

LETTE R S

DON’T FORGET …

In the Public Interest?

C O N N E CT

ION S

If you do not pay your
annual College fee through
payroll deduction, please
make sure to pay your 2015
membership fee of $150
directly to the College.

Raise students
’ social awar
that deserve
eness with
these six educ
a spot on ever
ational docu
yone’s mus
t-watch list.
mentaries
CAM PEAU

BY MELI SSA

WU

BROOKLY

ILLUSTRATION:
JANICE

I am disturbed by the endorsement of the film
Waiting for Superman (along with the filmmaker’s discussion guide) in the most recent
issue of Professionally Speaking. Neither
education nor the public interest is served by
suggesting that this film be allowed for classroom screening.
 Waiting for Superman blames bad
teachers and our unions for the problems in
U.S. education, and claims that the solution
lies in using charter schools (which, unlike
public schools, can refuse students) and
increased corporate influence on education.

TOOLS O
F THE TR
ADE

N CASTLE
(101 minutes)
A below-the-p
overty-line schoo
IT’S A GIRL
the unlikely
l in Brooklyn
’S WOR LD
claim to the
lays
(52 minutes)
most nation
pionship titles
The National
al chess chamin the Unite
Film Board
d States. Watch
and students
of Canada
exposes the
how teachers
(NFB)
in this after-s
hidden cultu
chool chess
lurks withi
re of cruelty
budget cuts
program overc
n a group of
and personal
that
ome Witne
popular 10-ye
challenges,
I.S. 318 into
ss the socia
ar-old girls.
and transform
one of the best
l bullying that
each strugg
institutions
Teach it: Make
les
in the city.
for power outsid perpetuates as
your move
and parents’
into chess with
guide at bit.ly
e of their teach
watch.
this startup
/1si1DGj; down
ers’
Teach it: The
School Cultu
load the Grad
student versio
re lesson plan
e 7–10
5- to 10-minute
n features
at to.pbs.org/
Watch it: iTune
six
1okbR6F.
modules that
s, $17.99; Netfl
help your class
social bully,
ix
the victim
spot a
and the bysta
Watch it: nfb.ca
BULLY (98
nder.
minutes)
, $19.95–$34
.95
Director Lee
Hirsch (see
MY PRAI RIE
Professionally
June 2012: “Pop
HOM E (76
Speaking,
Quiz,” bit.ly/
minutes)
a year in the
Listen to Rae
1jnY0sL) follow
lives of five
Spoon, a transg
s
students who
bullied. This
endered music
from Alberta
are being
heartbreakin
ian
who uses the
g documentary
of he or she,
pronoun “they
moments of
discuss growi
captures raw
abuse and isolat
” instead
ng up in an
family in this
ion, and raises
questions about
ultra-religio
NFB docum
critical
us
how schools
entary-musi
about the haras
should tackle
Teach it: Get
cal. Spoon sings
sment they
the issue.
students talkin
endured at
discovering
g about this
with a schoo
school while
their gende
tough topic
l climate surve
r identity.
Teach it: Bring
y, a relationshi
exercise and
p mapping
cyberbullying
serious theme
lesson plans
with a guide
s to students’
Watch it: iTune
at bit.ly/Si3RI
(bit.ly/1tXjw
attention
s, $19.99
P. Pride Educ
v7) that was
written by
ation Netw
ork and Out
Watch it: iTune
FAKI NG THE
in Schools.
s, $12.99; nfb.ca
GRAD E
, $17.95–$24
This CBC docum (60 minutes)
.95
entary prese
WAITING FOR
nts an alarm
statistic: at
SUPE RMA
ing
least 70 per
N (111 minut
students cheat
cent of unive
Award-win
es)
ed in high schoo
ning director
rsity
Davis Gugg
and peer press
l and counted
follows five
enheim
students waitin
family
ure as motiv
charter schoo
ators. The fi
g to be picked
interview essay
l lottery as
lmmakers
in a
hawkers and
he exposes
the U.S. system
spy equipment
who help stude
challenges within
. Prepare to
merchants
nts fake their
be inspired
who fight to
way to highe
Teach it: Be
by the teach
give students
r grades.
aware of all
ers
a better educa
the tricks —
Teach it: Next
clips at bit.ly
catch extra
tion.
time the topic
/1mAmhBZ
sustaining
and sneak
of creating
resource links
a peek at
great publi
and
on
c schools come
prepared! Revie
Watch it: bit.ly/ cheating at bit.ly/1lNm
s up, be
qMq.
w the filmm
TTwD42, free
discussion
akers’ comm
guide at bit.ly
unity
/1rpGj4K.
Watch it: iTune
s, $19.99 PS

September

2014 | Profess

ionally Speaki

Protect your good standing
status and preserve your
ability to teach in an Ontario
publicly funded school.
ng

23

—Jody Dales, OCT, is a teacher with the Durham District School Board.

Alternate Routes

Teaching Overseas

Securing a full-time teaching position
after graduation is a fear many
teacher college graduates like me
have. I was happy to come across the
article “Unearthing Opportunities”
(March 2014) and read about the
success stories of fellow teacher college graduates who chose alternative
routes in their teaching careers. The
article was reassuring for soon-tobe teachers like myself, and opened
my mind to the non-traditional job
opportunities my education degree
can bring.

I was very happy to read the article
“Passport to Learning” in the June issue.
Six months after graduating from York
University’s faculty of education five years
ago, I left for South Korea on a whim and
have been teaching abroad ever since. My
time in accredited Canadian and American
international schools abroad has allowed me
to hone my teaching skills and work in an
ESL environment while immersing myself
in another culture. The international school
experience is a unique one, as teachers come
with training from every corner of the globe
and build upon each other’s strengths.

—Winnie Wong is a B.Ed. student
at the University of Ottawa.

—Andrew Shutsa, OCT, teaches Grade 1 at
the Universal American School in Dubai, UAE.

PS

WAYS
G IVEA

CONGRATULATIONS!

Kate Hancock, OCT, a Grade 6 teacher
at Herb Campbell Public School in the
Peel District School Board, will receive a
signed copy of Our Man in Tehran (see September
2014: “Ken Taylor’s Final Exam,” p. 88), for
tweeting a selfie of her favourite Professionally
Speaking article from our June 2014 issue.

TO PAY YOUR
2015 MEMBER
FEE

PAYMENT IS EASIER
THAN EVER:
Ò Pay online at oct.ca by
debit or credit card.
Ò Pay through your bank
or financial institution.
Use the seven-digit
invoice number we
assigned to you the last
time you paid your annual
member fee as your
online account number.
Please call us if you’ve
forgotten or don’t have it.
Ò Pay via the College’s
mobile app available for free.
Ò Pay by phone.
Call 416-961-8800
(or toll-free in Ontario at
1-888-534-2222) and
follow the prompts.
THE DEADLINE FOR
RECEIPT OF PAYMENT
IS APRIL 15, 2015.

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

15

REGISTER FOR THIS FREE
PROGRAM TODAY!

Power4Bones is a FREE Web-based cross-curricular program
that supports student development of food and physical
activity skills that build strong bones for life.

• Web challenges, comic episodes
and prizes
• DPA suggestions and student
assessment tools

In partnership with:

calling all

Full-Day Kindergarten

Teachers!

BOOK A FREE
WORKSHOP TODAY!
1-866-392-9929 x2015

workshop_request@dfc-plc.ca

(FDK)

Our free FDK Power to Play! nutrition education workshop is a
fun opportunity for the teacher and early childhood educator
team to learn to implement the program.
Each workshop participant receives a kit that includes
• A Teacher Guide that integrates healthy eating into all
six Areas of Learning and provides hands-on explorations
that support inquiry-based learning
• Food picture cards, study prints and pictorial recipe cards
• A CD with child-friendly songs and a DVD featuring superheroes Brock and Coco on healthy-eating adventures
• And much more!

connections

ILLUSTRATION: ADAM JAMES TURNBULL/COLAGENE

... in your profession and in your classroom

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

17

C O N N E CT I O N S

Pop
Quiz

TAKE YOUR
NEXT STEP
PhD, EdD, MA, MEd...
in Educational Studies.

edst.educ.ubc.ca/ocot
Department of Educational Studies
Faculty of Education

with Michele Chaban
BY LAURA BICKLE
Everyone teaches their students to use their brains, but what about their minds?
Michele Chaban, co-founder and director of the Applied Mindfulness Meditation program
(bit.ly/1oh2Yu2) at the University of Toronto’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work,
says that when you integrate mindfulness meditation into your daily practice, it strengthens
the teacher-student connection and is key to helping your students learn to become more
compassionate people. The self-awareness guru shares how meditation can improve your
ability to learn and your overall well-being, training the body and mind to work together.

Q

Q

Q

Q

How would you describe
mindfulness meditation?
Jon Kabat-Zinn, a leader in the field,
defines it as the non-judgmental act of
paying attention to what you experience
in a single moment. If we take that a
step further, mindfulness meditation
can be seen as a series of methods that
include exercising conscious, attention
to breathing, listening, speaking, as well
as non-judgmental awareness. To put
it simply, with this training we learn to
respond rather than react, and it reminds
us to connect rather than correct.

Why is this training a helpful
tool in a school setting?
These practices can strengthen our whole
brain, and increase our ability to teach
and learn. Sharing this with our youth
promotes self-regulation, which impacts
both mental health and wellness — it also
reduces risk taking and anxiety and can
lead to an enhanced awareness of not
only the self but others.
Teachers can use this practice to improve
all forms of communication: written,
verbal and behavioural. It’s also a useful
coaching strategy for parents and peers.
We’ve even seen it reduce incidents of
horizontal violence (intergroup conflict)
by as much as 50 per cent.

18 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

How can mindfulness training
help prevent teacher burnout?
We know that burnout is a combination of
factors, largely due to being ill-informed
about how our bodies and brains integrate.
By learning specific brain-body exercises
associated with mindfulness, we lay down
the neuropathways that lead to improved
health. Research shows that mindfulness
is a model that creates resiliency within
us and around us. A 2012 comparative
employee wellness study, “Meditation or
Exercise for Preventing Acute Respiratory
Infection,” shows that those who practise it
enjoy a 76 per cent reduction in sick days.

Can you give an example of
an exercise teachers can try?
Try this three-minute exercise. Take a
comfortable posture and bring yourself
into the present. Follow your breath —
breathing in and out, gently and naturally
— and let the breath be your anchor in
this present moment. Acknowledge the
thoughts, feelings and body sensations that
you’re experiencing. Take the breath to all
areas of your body. Breathe in to the
sensations. While breathing out, allow a
sense of softening, opening and dissolution. 
Remind yourself that “it’s OK to feel
whatever I’m feeling.” Bring this expanded
awareness into the rest of your day. 

PHOTO: M. LEE FREEDMAN

Connect education, leadership,
and social justice - in theory
and in practice!

IN YOUR PROFESSION

YOUR CHEAT SHEET TO STATS IN EDUCATION

YEAR IN REVIEW

TWEET SHEET

Follow what’s trending in
the education Twitterverse

A look at the College’s 2013 Annual Report stats.
BY STEVE BREARTON

CURRENT MEMBERS
MEMBERS IN
GOOD STANDING

10%

223,667

chose French as their
language preference

238,201

of female OCTs
have principal
qualifications

63,017

25%

20%
20-30
(male

31-40
female

71%

41-50

are female

68%

32%

29%
51-60

The average age
of members:

61+

44

42

)

FOLLOWERS

tvo
@tvo
Does inquiry-based learning
provide a better model for #Ontario
teachers to engage their students?
#onted bit.ly/1CHrRHG

175,184

71%

29%

23.5K

twitter.com/tvo

MEMBERS
BY AGE
75%

Ontario’s public educational
media organization; a source
of interactive content that
stimulates curiosity.

5%

are male

80%

@tvo

MEMBERS
BY GENDER

of male OCTs
have principal
qualifications

chose English as their
language preference

14,534

tvo

male

female

Ontario
Ombudsman

MEMBERS CERTIFIED BY DECADE

@Ont_Ombudsman

Ombudsman André Marin
investigates complaints
about the ON government.

30

10,1OCTs
NEW 013
IN 2

twitter.com/Ont_Ombudsman

6%

1960s

1970s

17%

11%
1980s

FOLLOWERS

40%

24%
2%

26.9K

1990s

2000s

2010s

Ontario Ombudsman
@Ont_Ombudsman
All Ontario teachers should be given
classroom keys, task force says
@torontostar. ow.ly/DxqLO

GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION
TOP 5
COUNTRIES OF INITIAL
TEACHER EDUCATION

PROVINCES OF
INITIAL CERTIFICATION
British
Columbia

61

alia
str
Au
SCOT

INFOGRAPHICS: MARLO BIASUTTI/STUDIO 141

(all members)

113

Alberta

INDIA
LAN D

JA

Quebec

ND
LA

35

E NG

(new members)

Nova
Scotia

23
Ontario

8,570
MA

ICA

(excluding Canada and U.S.)
Source: Ontario College of Teachers, 2013 Annual Report

DON’T FORGET TO FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @OCT_OEEO

World Bank
Education

@WBeducation

One of the largest external
education financiers for
developing countries.
twitter.com/WBeducation

15.4K
FOLLOWERS

World Bank Education

@WBeducation

#SundayRead: The world needs
4 million teachers to get every child
in a classroom. ow.ly/DhN0H
via @HuffPostEdu
December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

19

C O N N E CT I O N S

IN YOUR CLASSROOM
PROFE

SSIO

PRACT NAL
Technology has its
ICE
place in the classroom;
however, at times you may
need to redirect attention from cellphones
to the subject at hand. You can do this with
the help of a hanging shoe organizer. When
high school students neglect to stow away
their mobiles in class, have them place their
devices in one of the pockets. For younger
students, get creative and ask anyone with
a cellphone to pick a hanging pocket and
personalize it. Then establish a routine of
depositing their mobiles into their holder at
the beginning of each class, allowing them
to pick it up only when the lesson is over.
They are less likely to be insulted when you
integrate this as a standard process, and it’s
the perfect opportunity for them to learn
responsible cellphone use at school.
—Brian Adduono, OCT
Barrie North Collegiate, Barrie

➞ Have a classroom tip to share?
Send it to us at ps@oct.ca and if we
choose to publish your helpful tip, you
will receive a $50 Staples gift card!
Check out our Professional Practice
research archive at bit.ly/16mofMi.

—Melissa Campeau
In need of inspiration, organization or both? Click on Pinterest.com for a quick fix.
The virtual bulletin board — where users can set up themed “boards” to collect and
share images (or “pins”) — is a teachers’ gold mine for curriculum-friendly classroom
management tips, lessons and child-approved crafts. These four boards are packed with
ideas to help keep your classroom fresh, and your students engaged and curious.

Refresh your resources
Lesson plans feeling a little tired?
With its focus on images, Pinterest is a
natural home for arts projects. But curated
resource boards are also brimming with
imaginative lesson plans for science, math
and more. Tip: Add the word “Ontario” to
your search to find curriculum-friendly ideas.
Follow it: Madame Aiello’s: Teaching FSL
(bit.ly/1yHzdLU); Ontario Teachers Resource
(bit.ly/Yu5U0d)

Enjoy organizational bliss
Is your crafts drawer a jumbled heap
of mismatched supplies? Reading book
nook full of toppling towers? Colleagues
come to the rescue with clever storage
tips, printable checklists and posters, nifty
clutter-busting ideas and low-effort but
high-impact display ideas for students’ art.

Get students pinning
It’s engaging, so why not make
Pinterest a teaching tool, too? Students
can learn about collaboration by creating
themed boards in teams. Want to introduce
online research? Searching through carefully
collected content is far more manageable
than surfing the entire web.

Connect with other teachers
Finding the time to connect with your
colleagues can be tricky. Use Pinterest to
follow a teacher you admire, then swap plans
and projects. Reach out to someone from
another country for a fresh perspective and
a chance to incorporate international best
practices into your own classroom.

Follow it: Classroom Organization Ideas
(bit.ly/101RpS1); Monica Schroeder’s:
The Schroeder Page (bit.ly/1lPP9GS)

Follow it: Curriculum and Methods Groupies
(bit.ly/1waGVKR); School: Pinterest for
Collaboration (bit.ly/1Dinnrm)

Follow it: Down Under Teacher
(bit.ly/1xEwuTL); Teacher from Italy
(bit.ly/1wc4EMX)

20 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

ILLUSTRATION: MAR HERNÁNDEZ/ANNA GOODSON

A DOSE OF

IN YOUR CLASSROOM

APPS ANALYSIS
Star Chart

Mathcubes

Transform your Android
smartphone or tablet into a
pocket-sized planetarium for access to
more than 88 constellations and 120,000
stars. Hold it up to the sky (day or night)
and watch the names and co-ordinates
of the stars and planets illuminate your
screen. Use the Time Shift feature to see
an accurate depiction of the universe up
to 10,000 years ago (or into the future).
Turn your hand-held toward the ground
to explore the nebulas, galaxies and other
celestial bodies that are visible from the
opposite side of the planet. Purchase
Star Chart Infinite for built-in upgrades,
including the ability to see satellites,
comets, and meteor showers.
DEVICE: Android
SOURCE: Google Play; free to $10.69
RATING: Low Maturity

C O N N E CT I O N S

By Stefan Dubowski

Voice Dream Reader

Lay down a strong math
foundation early with this
multilingual app for ages 3 to 8. IOS users
will literally and figuratively grasp math’s
building blocks as they arrange numeric
cubes to solve addition and subtraction
puzzles. Mathcubes adapts to the players’
abilities, zeroing in on their budding skills
with more challenging problems as they
progress along the way. The program
reads questions and solutions aloud for
those who prefer spoken instruction
and offers an alternate set of exercises
for students with learning difficulties.
Mathcubes encourages education through
experimentation, and its colourful, retro
design makes it fun to use.
DEVICE: Apple
SOURCE: iTunes; 99¢
RATING: 4+

Lighten your reading load
with this Apple app that
reads aloud everything from PDFs to
websites. It’s equipped with 36 VoiceOver
options in 24 languages, including French.
And, if that’s not enough, 146 premium
voices ($1.99 to $4.99 each) are available
as in-app purchases. Customize voice
and reading rates (50 to 700 words per
minute) as you go; then use hand gestures
or onscreen buttons to play and pause.
It even remembers the settings you’ve
selected for each file, so there’s no need
to adjust them when you return. Don’t
like the way the app says “tomato”?
Adjust the software’s pronunciation
dictionary with your own inflection.
DEVICE: Apple
SOURCE: iTunes; $9.99 and up
RATING: 4+

Expand Your
Qualifications
Increase your teaching credentials by earning
an Additional Qualification from Niagara
University. Our online, OCT accredited courses
are offered during the fall, spring and summer
for your convenience.
For more information, call 905.294.7260
or visit www.niagara.edu/aq.

Do more at Niagara.

Offering AQ courses in:

• English as a Second Language
• French as a Second Language

• Guidance and Career Education
• Integration of Information and
Computer Technology in Instruction
• Kindergarten
• Librarianship
• Mathematics Primary/Junior
• Reading
• Special Education
• Adapting Curriculum for the Catholic School System
• Teaching in the Catholic School System
• ABQ — Junior Division
December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

21

Reitman Square, 350 King Street West

DEVELOPING STUDENTS’ MINDS THROUGH FILM

ive
TIFF Learning provides students in grades 1–12 with innovat
ways to engage with the moving image through screenings,
tours and hands-on workshops.
2015.
School Workshops are on sale now! Dates available through June
Join us for another interactive adventure!
digiPlaySpace and March film screenings go on sale January 14, 2015.

Book now!

Find out more at:

Call 1-888-599-8433
or email learning@tiff.net

tiff.net/learningprogrammes

TIFF prefers Visa.

Don’t forget to sign up to receive
TIFF Learning email updates.

TIFF School Programmes are supported by the Slaight Family Foundation Learning Fund and Toronto Port Authority.
TM

Toronto International Film Festival Inc.

BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE PEOPLE BEHIND THE TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

Graduate Studies
in Education
Fostering a community of inquiry
• Full-time M.Ed. on-campus
• Part-time online M.Ed. in Aboriginal and World Indigenous
Educational Studies (on-campus the first July only)
Website http://educ.queensu.ca/study
Email educmed@queensu.ca for M.Ed. information
edphd@queensu.ca for Ph.D. information
edonline@queensu.ca for online professional
programs
Phone 613.533.6000 ext. 78530
Fax 613.533.6057

22 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

• Full-time Ph.D. in Education on-campus
• Online professional graduate diploma and master’s
degree programs
Graduate study is a time for you to explore your
compelling interests in education. We encourage you
to bring your questions and invite you to contact us
for further information about our programs.

TOOLS OF THE TRADE

C O N N E CT I O N S

TEDTALKS

Surround yourself with thousands of beautiful minds and bright ideas
when you visit TED.com. Free knowledge is yours for the taking within
this global community that revolves around short videos on topics in
technology, entertainment, design and more. Prepare to be inspired
by our five top education-related TED Talks.
BY STEFAN DUBOWSKI

1 THE KEY TO

3 BUILD A SCHOOL

5 THE 100,000-STUDENT

After five years of teaching math, Angela
Lee Duckworth came to the realization
that her top performers weren’t always
those with the highest IQs. To determine
what factors into an individual’s level of
success, she went back to school, became
a psychologist, and discovered that
“grit” (a.k.a. stamina and perseverance)
is the better indicator. During her talk,
Duckworth discusses Stanford psychology
professor Carol Dweck’s “growth mindset”
theory and how teachers can apply it to
boost their students’ abilities.

When education researcher Sugata Mitra
left an Internet-connected PC in a New
Delhi slum, he found that the children
in the area began interacting with it.
The 2013 TED Prize winner’s research
showed that young people are driven by
curiosity. Given the proper tools, they’ll
learn through peer-shared knowledge
and self-instruction, or what Mitra has
coined “minimally invasive education.”
Download his toolkit for self-organized
learning environments (SOLEs) at
bit.ly/1A1Xgl1 and test his theories out.

Views: > 5 million
Length: 6:12 minutes
Watch: bit.ly/1AYmnHz

Views: > 2 million
Length: 22:28 minutes
Watch: bit.ly/1usVAQX

2 EVERY KID

4 3 RULES TO

Experience the late Rita Pierson’s talk
on the value of human connection, the
key to boosting student confidence
and achievement. The 40-year teaching
veteran reminds us that “kids don’t learn
from people they don’t like.” She calls on
teachers to be honest in the classroom
(for instance, apologize if you make a
mistake) and points out that difficult
students come to school for a reason —
to connect. “Is this job tough? You betcha,”
she says. “But … we’re educators. We’re
born to make a difference.”

Chemistry teacher Ramsey Musallam
discusses how a heart aneurysm led him to
question his approach to teaching science
and embark on a quest to improve his
practice. During his journey, Musallam
developed three rules to encourage
engagement. His first is that students’
questions should drive instruction. The
second is that although trial and error can
be messy, they’re crucial to the process.
The third is that teachers must take the
time to reflect on their practice, if they
want to create a better education system.

Peter Norvig, a renowned computer
scientist and Google Inc.’s research
director, outlines the lessons he learned
from creating online classes on artificial
intelligence for California’s Stanford
University. Norvig shares his top
takeaways from teaching such a global
classroom and creating material that was
ultimately free to anyone interested in
tuning in. He suggests infusing instruction
with videos (be sure to keep them
between 2–6 minutes long) to hold your
students’ attention. He recommends
quizzing learners throughout each lesson
to increase their levels of information
retention. He supports imposing
deadlines for all assignments — to keep
your students focused — and proposes
fostering classroom collaboration. When
individuals work on a subject at the
same time, they have the opportunity to
participate in rich web discussions about
what they’re learning as a group.

Views: > 3.6 million
Length: 7:48 minutes
Watch: bit.ly/1sLKyZt

Views: > 1.5 million
Length: 6:29 minutes
Watch: bit.ly/1xz9PIk

SUCCESS? GRIT

NEEDS A CHAMPION

IN THE CLOUD

SPARK LEARNING

CLASSROOM

Views: > 850,000
Length: 6:08 minutes
Watch: bit.ly/1usW7Cr

Explore the recently launched
TED-Ed lesson series (ed.ted.com),
a vast collection of educational
videos that have been curated to
help teachers from around the world
get their students excited about new
subjects in a visually engaging way.

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

23

24 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

G R E AT T E AC H I N G

IN
HIS
E L E M E
T
ELEMENT
When it comes to science, Gabriel Ayyavoo, OCT, breathes new life
into teaching high school biology and his professional practice.
BY TRISH SNYDER

ONLINE
To view our Great Teaching
video archive, visit
professionallyspeaking.oct.ca

EXCLUSIVE

PHOTOS: MARKIAN LOZOWCHUK

G

abriel Ayyavoo, OCT, may head the science department at Toronto’s Notre
Dame High School for girls, but he’s not above using a little drama to teach
Grade 12 biology. He hoists a rack of test tubes holding four clear colourless
solutions, each containing mystery ingredients. “Yesterday we learned how to test for
simple sugars with Benedict’s reagent,” Ayyavoo tells his class. “Today, I’ve mixed
a bunch of chemicals together into these four solutions. It’s your job to figure out
which ones contain monosaccharides.”
Intrigued at the challenge, the young women quickly get to work, dividing into
lab groups, sketching observation charts, fetching test tubes and bottles of reagent.
Ayyavoo pulls his white lab coat on and scurries around the classroom. He grins his
approval at hearing one team counting aloud as every drop of reagent trickles into a
solution. He praises others with a “Good technique!” for remembering to set aside a
control and mixing their solutions properly. Suspense builds as the girls hover over
hotplates to watch the liquids change colour. If everyone performs the experiment
correctly, they should end up with two orange solutions and two blue ones.
“Based on the colour, who thinks solution A contains sugar?” Ayyavoo asks.
As hands spring up, he grips the mystery ingredient (a bottle of corn syrup) like a
trophy. “Glucose, yes, excellent!” He reveals other secret components like a meat
tenderizer and sucrose. Although most nailed the experiment, two groups manage
to turn a couple of their solutions pink and purple. Where some might see a misstep,
Ayyavoo sees it as a chuckle and a learning opportunity. “This is good,” he tells them.
“It reminds us that even if a scientific test appears to be easy, we still have to be careful.”
December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

25

Gabriel Ayyavoo, OCT, reviews a biology lesson with two Grade 12 students at Notre Dame High School in Toronto.
Careful — but not because Gabriel
Ayyavoo is a perfectionist or because his
students are obsessed with acing their next
exam, but because this isn’t just about
testing for sugar — it’s about using science
to solve real-life problems. For 25 years,
Ayyavoo has converted average teenagers
into high school scientists through an
innovative assignment he developed called
Scientific Investigative Projects (SIPs).
These are not your average bristol-board
presentations: the girls devise and conduct
their own experiments at bona fide labs in
top facilities such as the Hospital for Sick
Children and the University of Toronto.
Over the years, his students have
investigated just about everything: one
girl determined that waterproof eyeliner
is more likely to cause eye infections than
the regular formulas; another discovered a
new antibacterial agent from moth dung,
while a third studied the impact of broccoli
on breast cancer cells.
With astonishing frequency, his students
have been rewarded for their efforts: by
presenting their findings around the world,
they have won 250-odd science fair medals,
collected hefty university scholarships and
cash awards totalling more than $250,000.
Along the way, Ayyavoo managed to earn
26 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

his PhD in education along with a heap of
teaching prizes, including the 2013 Prime
Minister’s Award for Teaching Excellence.
“He challenges students to think critically
about what they’re learning and about the
world around them,” says colleague and
French teacher Rosemary Paniccia, OCT.
“In an age where everything is standardized,
Gabriel has the courage to be different
in the classroom.”
To declare Ayyavoo a fan of experiential
learning would be like describing the
Grand Canyon as a hole in the ground.
He unpacks scientific concepts with
experiments, excursions and hands-on
tasks the same way a coach trains players
in a sport. Can you imagine teaching
soccer by reading books? “Doing science
is how you understand science!” he says.
That means he might start a lesson on
the merits of microinvertebrates in the
classroom, but then he’ll march everyone
over to a nearby ravine to scoop them
out of the mud. In fact, in 2010, six of his
Notre Dame students collected water
samples from Toronto’s Don River and
used the micro-organisms to study the
water conditions. They published the
results and then presented their paper at
the University of Malaysia in 2011.

It’s hard not to get into science when
Ayyavoo makes the subject so entertaining.
Strict teaching methods were the
norm when he was a boy growing up
in Singapore. Priests lectured, and the
children listened. Since his own enthusiasm
for science sprouted from observing
animals at the park and asking his mom
about plants, he took a different approach
as a Sunday school teacher — he used
collaborative activities and games to get
children bent on learning. “I saw students
learning more about religion on Sunday
than at regular school,” he recalls.
Ayyavoo is the antithesis of his childhood
teachers. He asks and welcomes questions
— even from the student who once dared
him to taste a chocolate-covered cricket
she brought to class. Science and physics
teacher Lisette Santos-DeSousa, OCT,
says his collaborative approach encourages
students to think for themselves. “I believe
that there are two types of teachers: the
sage on the stage and the guide on the
side. Gabe is the latter. He’ll say, ‘Let’s
figure it out, let’s look at this together.’
It’s a different level of communication
that’s much more collegial.”
Since his students are so interested
in technology (he likes to call them

Give a gift that inspires with these
exclusive OCT member deals.
Gifts that inspire endless possibilities and save you more with member
discounts. Visit the Dell perk on the MemberPerks® program to redeem
two exclusive OCT member coupons. Plus, enjoy free shipping.*

For a limited time take advantage of up to $100 in
additional Dell discounts.

oct.ca/memberperks
*Offer is valid Nov 1 to Nov 27 and Dec 2 to Jan 30 2015. Copyright 2014 Venngo Inc. All rights reserved. WorkPerks is a registered trade-mark of Venngo Inc. All other trade-marks are the property of their respective owners. V1_20141016
©

20141022_oct_dell_ad_2.indd 1

®

2014-10-27 10:22 AM
December 2014 | Professionally
Speaking 27

is for

Mycologist
There’s no telling what our students will achieve
when we equip our teachers to excel. We regulate
teaching in Ontario by licensing our teachers,
setting high professional and ethical standards, and
approving teacher education programs. It’s our job

to ensure that the teachers of Ontario receive
the right tools to help our students achieve great
things, like becoming a biologist who specializes
in fungi. Discover how we set the standard for
great teaching at OCT.ca

“digital natives”), he’s been a pioneer in
using IT as a learning tool in the classroom.
Take videos, for example. He’ll lay out
the foundation of a topic in class and
then send students home to do additional
research online and make a video to
simplify a particular concept. (One girl’s
movie about viruses was as gripping as a
Hollywood trailer.) In a sense, Ayyavoo
flips the classroom on its head: “They
post the video, others see it, and then we
discuss it together in class. Isn’t this better
than me standing at the front talking?”
He relies on online discussions to
support different learning styles. The
educational hub Edmodo.com, for
instance, allows students to apply what
they’ve learned by prompting responses
to articles and questions Ayyavoo posts.
He covers everything from the labelling
of genetically modified foods at the supermarket to the environmental hazards
of pharmaceutical waste. This method
encourages those who might stay quiet in
class to contribute freely on screen and
incites healthy debates that help students
to connect the proverbial dots between
what they’re studying at school and
what’s happening around them.
The girls apply their budding scientific
skills by completing annual SIPs. It’s
not by fluke that the assignments are
student-centred: Ayyavoo knows that
when teenagers explore what interests
them — from nutrition to transportation
to women’s health — it fuels their desire
to learn. He coaches them through a
rigorous scientific process that starts with
forming a question they want to investigate,
and then developing a hypothesis and
predicting their results. They design
their own experiment trials by combing
through journals; hunting for research
papers to see what investigation methods
and apparatus other scientists use. He
meets with them regularly to review
their progress and to help scale back any
overly ambitious projects, or change gears
if something doesn’t prove feasible.
To get them plugged into the scientific
community, Ayyavoo asks students to
submit their finished proposals to dozens
of researchers — seeking permission to
perform their trial in a working laboratory.
(His classroom is well stocked with gear,
but even he can’t crack open a catalogue

to place an order for breast cancer cells.)
When a student who’s sent out 40 emails
gets that crucial one that says “yes,”
bystanders can expect to witness jumping
for joy in the hallway. Even in her French
class, Paniccia overhears the girls
discussing their science projects. Seeing
that their work has value feeds their
curiosity — this is why Ayyavoo believes
SIPs are worth the effort, and why he
hopes to join a university’s education faculty
to spread the word to other science teachers.
“These girls are spending their weekends
doing research and they’re so excited to
talk about it,” he says. “That’s when I know
I’ve got them hooked on science!”
After conducting their trials, students
make observations, provide conclusions
and write a full report. They celebrate
their learning at their school science
fair, and many present at larger science
competitions. Instead of letting all that
impressive research get thrown into
the recycling bin when the fairs end,
Ayyavoo founded a science club called
DameDetectives (bit.ly/1sYR6ky).
Students act like the board of a scientific
journal, reviewing peer submissions and
publishing the best ones to inspire others
to pursue science.
For her SIP last year, Rhea, a Grade 12
student at Notre Dame, tapped into
her love of international development:
knowing that hundreds of millions of
people worldwide lack access to clean
water, she investigated an algae that
neutralizes harmful bacteria in untreated
water. She won a Canada-Wide Science
Fair award in 2013 — an invitation to a
youth symposium in Australia, where she
attended a presentation by a Nobel Prize
winner, Skyped with scientists in Geneva
and networked with young people, who
like her are using science to change the
world. “It was life-transforming,” says her
mother Hyacinth Fernandes, OCT. “Rhea
has seen that if she puts in the work she
can pursue her dreams — and she learned
all of this just by doing a science project.
Dr. Ayyavoo really is opening doors for
these girls.” PS
The teacher who is featured in this
department has been recognized with
a national teaching award.

7

A
APPS
T O
TO
T A
TAP

Through the Ministry of Education-funded
Teacher Learning and Leadership Program,
Gabriel Ayyavoo, OCT, is learning how
to better use iPads and laptops to create
lessons and assess student work, not to
mention improve student collaboration and
communication skills. Here’s a sampling of
some of the award-winning science teacher’s
favourite educational apps that he uses
regularly and encourages his students to
explore in and outside of the lab:
Context: (bcontext.com)
Share pictures that are layered with
voiceovers with this interactive whiteboard.

1

YouTube Capture: (bit.ly/1n2WqDO)
Record yourself on video; then edit, crop
and share it via YouTube right from your device.

2

Keynote: (bit.ly/1yv5mTP)
Create presentations with photos,
videos, transitions and animated charts in a
snap. Since the iCloud is integrated, students
can use this tool to collaborate on projects.

3

Socrative: (socrative.com)
Design an interactive activity on any
tablet, phone or laptop. Through its real-time
questioning and instant result tabulation, you
can gauge your students’ comprehension level.

4

BrainPOP: (brainpop.com)
Watch animated content on science,
social studies, English and more; then leverage
the app’s quizzes, games, movies and activity
pages to gauge students’ retention levels.

5

Science360 for iPad: (bit.ly/1twlrbH)
Check out visuals and videos from the
National Science Foundation’s library.

6

TED: (bit.ly/1keZMg2)
Access thousands of inspiring talks
about science issues and other global issues.

7

OCTs are blogging about their experiences
with technology at bit.ly/1D894U9.

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

29

30 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

R E M A R K A B L E T E ACH E R

Hockey superstar P.K. Subban recalls the year his father
was also his principal, and how he achieved his number
one goal thanks to dad’s coaching.
BY RICHARD OUZOUNIAN

PHOTO: RAINA+WILSON

S

ome might question what a principal and a hockey player would have in common,
but when it comes to Montreal Canadiens defenceman P.K. Subban and his father,
Karl, a retired OCT, the list is as long as it is illustrious.
There’s the megawatt smile, the shining, hopeful eyes and the confident carriage of men
who were born to be leaders, whether on the ice or in the classroom. But aside from the
genetic similarities and the name they share — P.K. is short for Pernell Karl — what makes
this father-son duo intriguing is the unique experience they had back in 2001. That was the
year that Karl wasn’t just P.K.’s father, he was also his elementary school principal.
“A lot of people assume that situation would be a recipe for disaster,” laughs P.K. on
the phone from Montreal, “but if you think that, it’s only because you don’t know my dad.
He always knew when to turn the parent off and the teacher on, and vice versa.”
P.K. may be the family member with the celebrity status, but Karl is a man of substantial
achievement in his own right. The 2012 recipient of the African Canadian Achievement
Award of Excellence in Education made a name for himself when he took over as principal
of Brookview Middle School. Situated in one of Toronto’s toughest neighbourhoods, the
school was plagued with problems (fights, chronic absenteeism) and a poor academic standing —
just a few of the issues that Karl improved while there.
One of the educational building blocks that Karl has relied on is, “Know what you want,
and then set out to get it.” This is something that his athlete son heard and acted on from a
very young age. “I always knew that hockey was my goal in life,” says the Habs superstar.
“Nothing else ever really mattered to me.”
As for the patriarch of the Subban clan — who was born in Jamaica and moved to Canada
at 11 years of age — his road wasn’t so clear cut.
“As a youngster growing up in Sudbury, I dreamt of playing in the NBA. I had it all planned
out — that’s how I do things,” says Karl. “My route to the basketball world was going to be
through university, which is why I went to Lakehead.”
December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

31

Not one to walk away from a challenge, at him,” says Karl. “That wasn’t my style.”
Lakehead University wasn’t just
He simply laid out the facts and when the
or a unique situation, Karl adjusted his
known for the strength of its basketball
meeting was over, P.K. shed a few tears.
perspective when he arrived at his son’s
team, but for the training programs that
There’s a long pause as Karl remembers
school, Warren Park Junior Public School
the university students worked on with
that moment with his son.
younger aspiring players, and that’s where in Toronto. “I was no longer a parent
“Children need our love and support, but
when P.K. was at my school,” he explains.
Karl had a revelation. “Working with the
they also need our guidance
basketball camp every
and discipline. Those lines
Saturday morning,
have always been very
it wasn’t long before
clear to me and I’ve tried
I realized that I loved
to make them clear for my
teaching the children
son. That day I wasn’t being
more than I loved
his dad, I was being his
playing the sport.”
principal. And, I think he
Although the senior
knew the difference.”
Subban eagerly entered
Not only did P.K. know
the teaching profession
the difference, he carries his
well-equipped to
father’s life lessons close to
succeed, he nevertheless
him throughout his journey.
learned certain lessons
“He taught me that the easy
the hard way. During
way isn’t always the best
his time at teachers’
way,” recalls P.K. “You have
college, he had a
to give a lot to get a little.”
practicum teacher who
He relates this to a story in
was demanding beyond
which his dad compared
belief; laboriously
power-skating practice to
picking through Karl’s
eating broccoli; teaching
lesson plans, pointing
the young athlete-in-training
out every incorrect
Retired principal Karl Subban with his hockey player sons, Montreal
detail he could find.
Canadiens defenceman P.K. (left) and Boston Bruins goaltender Malcolm. that sometimes you’ve got to
do what you don’t like to get
“One day I asked him
good at what you do.
why he was so tough,”
Karl shared the insights he imparted
“What I mean by that is — I was no longer
recalls the recently retired principal. “He
on his talented son with his other equally
said, ‘Karl, these are the high expectations specifically his parent; in a way I felt like
successful children — P.K.’s hockeyI was a parent to every child, in every
that your students, their parents and your
player brothers, Malcolm and Jordan, as
school I’ve ever taught at.”
colleagues will have, and you have to be
Of course, there’s a token story that the well as his sisters, Nastassia and Natasha,
good enough for all of them.’”
These wise words helped Karl throughout father and son tell — albeit from different who have followed in their father’s footsteps
perspectives but with a similar conclusion as Ontario Certified Teachers. While they
his career but, as insightful as they were,
were growing up, Karl taught each of
— about the troubles that can arise when
they did not cover off the extraordinary
them his secret to success: “Find the thing
your dad is also your principal.”
challenge of having to surpass the
you love in life and pursue it.”
“I’m not perfect by any means,” admits
expectations of your children, especially
But for P.K., his father has added an
P.K. “I was one of the students who had
when they are your students.
additional piece of advice that’s been helpful
high energy and I would sometimes
But, according to P.K., he cleared that
let it spill over a bit too much. I wasn’t
hurdle too. “I was always proud to be
for a young man who’s stepping into the
disrespectful, but every now and then I
around my father at school — he was a
arena of sports superstardom: “Be yourself,
good and fair man. He made time for all of enjoyed myself a little too much.”
because everyone else is taken.”
Karl recalls the time when P.K. was
his students and never played favourites,”
It’s a lesson Karl picked up early on,
clowning around in class, to the point
says the hockey player. “I learned so
at basketball camp, and it’s what
much from watching and listening to him, where he had to meet his son and his
ultimately led him along an impressive
especially the way he treated other students.” teacher to set things straight. “I didn’t yell
path of lifelong learning. PS
32 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

PHOTO: ALARIE PHOTOS

“Children need our love and support, but they also need
our guidance and discipline.”





A SIMPLE PROGRAM YOU CAN USE EVERY YEAR
YOU EARN 50% ON EVERY SALE YOU MAKE
is an awesome fundraising program.
ALL PRODUCTS ARE GUARANTEED “This
We have done a Spring & Fall campaign
so far and everyone is looking forward to our
AVAILABLE IN FRENCH & ENGLISH next campaign.”
Margaret Brooks
St. James United Sunday School,
New Brunswick
ALL SHIPPING IS FREE
Call or click today to receive your FREE Information Kit & Supplies

1-800-363-7333

www.veseys.com/fundraising

CANADA’S GREEN FUNDRAISER

SAFETY

RULES

Government, school boards, administrators and OCTs are working
together to create safe schools for Ontario students.
BY JENNIFER LEWINGTON

I

n early September, before setting foot in the Grade 9 science lab at Sir Winston
Churchill Secondary School in St. Catharines, Hannah and her classmates must pass
a new online safety test. For one question, Hannah and lab partner Jordan examine a
picture of a lab with unsafe goings-on: a student stands on an unsteady stool, flames shoot
from an unattended Bunsen burner and a shattered test tube lies on a counter.
The students get it. “Sometimes you are using dangerous chemicals or substances so you
need to make sure you are safe and hazard-free,” Hannah says. Adds Jordan: “We have to
know how to work with all of this stuff so we don’t have an accident.”
The online safety test is one of several initiatives introduced this fall by the District
School Board of Niagara to sharpen its focus on a cornerstone responsibility for all schools:
the health and safety of students and staff.
Though not alone, the board is seen as a leader in pushing for greater consistency and
vigilance when it comes to managing potentially high-risk activities in technology classes,
science labs, athletics and the sports field. In fact, the board was recognized last year for
“outstanding achievement” on safety by the School Boards’ Co-operative Inc., a not-for-profit
organization that advises 60 Ontario school boards on workers’ compensation.
“We are moving toward that culture of safety-mindedness,” says Frank Kelly, OCT, executive
director of the Council of Ontario Directors of Education, a partner in the Ontario Ministry of
Education’s year-old Student Injury Prevention Initiative. “That is our goal, but we are not there.”
Recent incidents have raised the profile of health and safety as hot-button issues. In
2011, Eric Leighton, a Grade 12 student in the Ottawa Catholic School Board, was killed
in a shop class explosion when he used a grinder to cut open a barrel to make a barbecue.
Earlier this year, a coroner’s inquest issued sweeping recommendations directed at Ontario
government ministries, school boards and others, with responses due in April 2015.
In September, the Ontario Education Ministry announced a health and safety working
group to act on the jury’s 22 recommendations. “It’s a signal that we are ready and know we
are needed to step in to facilitate an approach that is going to bring more safety-mindedness to
the 5,000 schools across the province,” says a senior Ministry official.
Meanwhile, with a growing body of research on youth brain trauma, the Ministry of
Education earlier this year directed school boards to implement concussion prevention
strategies by January 30, 2015.

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

35

“This is no longer a sport problem or
a doctor’s problem; this is a public health
problem,” says Dr. Paul Echlin, a sports
physician, concussion expert and a Ministry
adviser on concussions. “It is not just about
the children who play hockey; it is about
who gets injured on the playground.”
In 2011, sports-related concussions
accounted for 59 per cent of incidents
reported by schools to the Ontario School
Boards’ Insurance Exchange (OSBIE), a
member-owned and operated non-profit
that provides insurance coverage and
risk prevention training. The second-most
frequent injury was slips and falls, which
sometimes result in fractures, accounting
for 21 per cent of all incidents.
Despite almost 96,000 school safety
incidents reported to OSBIE in 2013 —
95 per cent involving students — school
fatalities are rare. In the past 34 years,
the Office of the Ontario Coroner
has conducted only four school-related
inquests, often to “shine the light” on
deficiencies, says Dr. William Lucas, interim
deputy chief coroner for inquests.
Fatal incidents, when they occur, can
shake the education system to its core.
The inquiry into Leighton’s death, says
Dr. Lucas, was “an opportunity not only
for Ottawa Catholic to learn but for all
other school boards across Ontario and the
36 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

country to say ‘maybe it’s time we reexamined and re-evaluated our approach.’”
The coroner’s jury heard that no one at
the school understood the risks of the heat
generated by grinding on a closed container
or the dangers of a cleaner used to remove
peppermint oil from the barrel. The jury
urged adoption of board-approved lists
of student projects, annual inspections,
enhanced safety guidelines, teacher training
and a possible ban on the kind of hot work
project that killed Leighton.
Ottawa Catholic director of education
Julian Hanlon, OCT, says the student’s
death “has had a huge impact” in raising
awareness about safety. “I know in talking
to my fellow directors it is on the top of
everyone’s agenda.” His board responded
with tighter safety guidelines, revised
manuals, added training and a new permit
system for hot work projects.
Responding to the death, the Ontario
Ministry of Labour carried out school
inspections that revealed widespread
deficiencies. In 2011–12, the ministry
toured senior elementary and high
school shop classes and science labs at
more than 900 locations, issuing 6,658
citations that included 283 “stop work”
orders for missing or damaged guards
on equipment and unsafe ladders and
lifting devices. A follow-up blitz of

more than 380 schools last year generated 1,739 citations, of which 60 were
stop-work orders.
In its Student Injury Prevention
Initiative, the Ontario Ministry of
Education provided $9 million last year
and $6 million this year for schools to
address deficiencies, update equipment
and expand training.
Even before the Leighton incident,
some boards had centralized rules on
health and safety in place. That trend
accelerated with one-time ministry
funding and a proliferation of new safety
guidelines, recommended classroom
projects, online training and other material
from the Council of Ontario Directors
of Education, the Ontario Physical and
Health Education Association and other
subject-specific organizations.
Still, concerns remain about sustainable
funding for repairs, training and
inconsistent board practices. “We are
much further ahead than we were back in
2011,” says John Bryden, director of health
and safety services for School Boards’
Co-operative Inc. But he warns: “The safety
culture within the school board system can
be improved.”
As part of its mandate, OSBIE conducts on-site risk management audits of
members to measure their performance

against best practices. Since introduction of OSBIE’s Human Element Loss
Prevention Program in the late 1990s,
school boards have steadily raised
their safety scores, with a provincewide
compliance rate of 89 per cent out of 100
per cent in 2014.

“This [improved record] demonstrates the
ongoing commitment to good risk management practices because risk management
is good business management,” says David
Beal, director of risk management for
OSBIE, though he acknowledges there is
still room for improvement.
Ultimately, responsibility for a safe
school environment lies with the principal.
“That is a constant,” says Karen
Dalton, OCT, associate director of
learning support services for the Thames
Valley District School Board. “What has
changed is a more concentrated, systematic,
co-ordinated effort to be more proactive
and consistent as to how we manage
[safety] from site to site.”
Last year, her board introduced an
online tool for teachers of technology,
science and family studies to inspect the
safety of their classrooms. Science teachers
now have a common guide on storage
and labelling of chemicals. “Everything
is consistent,” says Dalton. “That was not
the case a year and a half ago.”
Tighter safety practices on a wide range
of issues — bullying, student allergies,
fractures and concussions, workplace
violence, handling of hazardous chemicals
and lockdown procedures — are the new
reality for school officials.

“There is so much more on our plate.
It’s overwhelming with all the paperwork,”
observes Tilbury Area Public School
principal Kenneth Gregory, OCT, a school
administrator with the Lambton Kent
District School Board for the past 26 years.
“The focus has to be on being proactive
and creating a school climate that is [safe]
and where children can learn. At the same
time you have to be prepared and know
what to do [in case of an incident].”
He estimates that his current school of
420 students from kindergarten to Grade 8
experiences between six and 12 incidents
of concussion or fractures in a year on the
playground, sports field or due to bad
weather conditions. Playground
equipment, for example, is inspected
annually by the board.
Technology has become a key tool, says
Gregory, in managing safety legislation and
regulations. (For a list of these, please see
the “Requirements and Training” sidebar
below.) For example, Lambton Kent school
staff receives online training, with electronic
records kept by the board to assist principals in
managing their safety obligations.
For elementary principals, the presence
of preschool and kindergarten children in
some schools pose special challenges: for
example, ensuring compliance with provincial

REQUIREMENTS AND TRAINING

PHOTOGRAPHY: ANYA CHIBIS; ILLUSTRATION: KATY LEMAY/ANNA GOODSON

School teachers and administrators are governed by a variety of laws and regulations on health and safety in schools:
Workplace Hazardous Materials
Information System (WHMIS):
➔➔Employers must have a comprehensive
plan for the safe use of hazardous
materials in schools, with appropriate
labelling and storage of products and
training for school staff.
Occupational Health and Safety Act:
➔➔Employers must have policies and
procedures in place to deal with
workplace violence and harassment.
➔➔Sets out legal requirements for
managing exposure to asbestos
in schools.
➔➔Health and safety awareness training
required for every worker and
supervisor under a regulation that
came into force July 1, 2014.

➔➔Employers, supervisors, teachers and
support staff are obliged to ensure
safety in schools, report hazards and
eliminate them.
Ontario Education Act:
➔➔Regulation 298 sets out the duties of
principals, including their responsibility
to conduct regular fire and other
emergency drills through the school
year, carry out regular inspections
of the school, and ensure the health
and safety of staff and students.
➔➔The Safe Schools Act, the Education
Amendment Act (Progressive
Discipline and School Safety), the
Accepting  Schools Act (bullying
and cyber-bullying prevention), and a
provincial Code of Conduct collectively

spell out the legal obligations on
teachers to ensure student safety.
➔➔Under the Ontario College of
Teachers Act, the Professional
Misconduct Regulation (437/97),
lays out the responsibilities of school
administrators and teachers to
safeguard student safety.
Sabrina’s Law:
➔➔Requires school boards to develop
and enforce an anaphylaxis policy
for students at risk of life-threatening
allergic reactions.
➔➔Schools must share information
with parents, students, and their
employees, limit exposure to
threatening allergens and provide
training for teachers and staff.

Sources: Ontario College of Teachers, Ontario Ministry of Education, Ontario Ministry of Labour, school board officials.

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

37

kindergarten now in place at his school,
along with pre- and post-school programs
by child care operators, Creer says there
is an even greater imperative to be
“synchronized” on safety procedures.
“I hope the [safety practices] we put in
place will flow no matter which person
is responsible for them,” he says. “If it is
our lunchroom supervisors, they need to
know our procedures. If it is the daycare
[operators] they need to know too.”

legislation such as Sabrina’s Law. The law,
which took effect in 2006, calls for school
board prevention policies on anaphylactic
shock, a life-threatening allergic reaction
from peanuts, bee stings and other sources.
“I might have three-year-olds walking
into my building and their ability to
manage [severe allergies] is very different
from a high school student who has
been living with them for many years,”
says Peter Creer, OCT, principal of
Williamsburg Public School in Whitby.
He says 38 of the school’s 720 students
(kindergarten to Grade 8) are diagnosed
with severe allergies, requiring them to
carry epinephrine auto injectors.
In addition to regular staff training,
the school office is a central repository for
detailed information — including a photograph — about each child, the diagnosed
allergy and required medication.
“We have to make sure we have the
most accurate information when it comes
to every student,” says Creer. With full-day
38 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

An Ounce of Prevention…
Pressure for increased consistency is part
of a “whole mindset” change for school
officials, says veteran administrator and
former tech class teacher Roch Gallien,
OCT, director of the Conseil scolaire public
de district du Nord-Est de l’Ontario.
“Where things were a little more haphazard
and loose, now we are making sure the
mindset is about safety,” he says.
For his board — geographically vast
with a scattered population of 2,070
francophone students — the challenge
is to provide adequate French-language
resources and access to training. With
other French-language boards, Nord-Est
has developed online videos on safety
procedures and best practices.
At the Niagara board, a commitment to
consistency to reduce injuries and lawsuits
took hold three years ago. “Instead of
taking a heavy hand with administrators,
we needed to have things in place to support
them,” says health and safety officer
Michael Langlois, responsible for staff
and student safety issues.
This fall, the board released teacherdrafted safety manuals for all science
and technology courses, with a checklist
of emergency procedures and approved
practices for storage and the handling of
chemicals and other potential hazards.
In addition, all science and tech students
must pass new online proficiency tests
and, with their parents, sign contracts
committing to safety-mindedness.

“Now we have the ability to electronically keep tabs on every single student
and, at the same time, we also have
consistency on what is being delivered to
the students,” says Langlois.
Veteran teacher Julie Bédard, OCT,
the science program leader at Sir Winston
Churchill, notes the vast improvement
in safety when it comes to the storage of
chemicals and other hazardous materials
today compared to 20 years ago. Now
all schools must keep an inventory of
chemicals under lock and key, outside the
classroom, and follow common procedures
on hazardous materials. At Sir Winston
Churchill, where science classrooms were
recently updated for safety, each room has
an eye-wash stand for students accidently
splashed with a chemical.
Last summer, Bédard and other teachers
drafted a proposed manual for Grade 9
and 10 science labs, with one planned for
Grade 11 and 12 next summer. The Grade
9–10 manual, piloted this fall at Sir Winston
Churchill and several other schools,
lists approved experiments, quantities of
chemical solutions and other guidelines for
teachers. “We are trying to make the labs
fun, exciting and engaging but at the same
time keeping safety in mind,” she says.
Sometimes that’s a challenge. For
example, the proposed board manual
bans a popular whoosh bottle demonstration of the combustion reaction when
alcohol and air ignite inside a plastic
bottle. Performed incorrectly, the showy
experiment has caused student injuries in
several jurisdictions.
“It is a huge tug-of-war,” says Sir
Winston Churchill science teacher Tisha
Barnes, OCT, of the tension between
safety and learning. “Often times it is the
wow factor that falls away because you
can’t come up with a way to do it safely.”
She says teachers have to muster their
professional ingenuity, using less dramatic
experiments to capture student interest.
“The wow factor is not worth a fatality.”

Raising Awareness
Unlike health and safety, concussion
prevention is new phenomenon for schools.
“There’s been a breakthrough in
terms of awareness,” says Thames Valley
District School Board trustee Peter Jaffe,
a professor at Western University’s
faculty of education who teaches a course
on school safety. “People never really
focused on concussions the way they do
now because of the emerging research,
concerns about students’ health and
well-being, and a growing sense about
potential board liability in this area.”
Recent fatalities have raised awareness
about the risk of youth head traumas.
In May 2013, 17-year-old OttawaCarleton District School Board student
Rowan Stringer died from a head injury
— apparently her second in a week —
suffered in a school rugby game.
After reviewing its practices, the board
introduced a concussion procedure this fall
to guide schools on a student’s medically
approved return to class and sports. “We
are removing the option of having teachers
make judgment calls on the sports field as
to whether students are ready to return
or not,” says associate director Walter
Piovesan, OCT. The board is also testing a
device for coaches to monitor hits suffered
by players of high-impact sports.
An early adopter of a systemic approach
to concussion prevention is the Halton

District School Board, which introduced
its protocol in 2009. This fall, the board
incorporated the topic as a mandatory
component of the Grade 9 physical
education curriculum, with a rollout
planned for Grade 3 and 6.
The Halton Student Concussion
Education Program, developed in
co-operation with Dr. Echlin, the concussion
expert, includes an online learning module
used in the classroom.
In a second-floor classroom at Dr. Frank
J. Hayden Secondary School in Burlington,
Grade 9 teacher Krista Caron, OCT,
organizes her all-girl class in teams to
work on the module’s multiple-choice
questions that separate fact from fiction
on concussion. At the end of the activity,
the teams share what they have learned
through a skit, poem or speech.
Chantel, a 14-year-old student at the
school, suffered a concussion two years ago
playing rugby. She says the module taught
her to speak up if friends brush off a head
injury, which can be less obvious than a
fracture. “Now I know a lot more about
what the side effects could be,” she says.
Caron, program leader for Healthy Active
Living at Hayden, helped pilot the module last year and sees it as a tool to change
attitudes about brain trauma. “The biggest
impact is when students learn something new
and they talk about it with their parents,” she
says. “They also change their actions.”

Halton offers the module free to other
boards, says Patricia Jo-Anne Walsh, OCT,
the board’s former instructional program
leader for health and physical education
who co-led its development. She hopes
the module will boost teacher confidence
in providing concussion education to
their students.
Back at Sir Winston Churchill, his
safety test completed, Spencer, a Grade 10
technology student, looks on as tech teacher
Roberto Busca, OCT, demonstrates the safe
operation of a belt sander to the class.
“You have to go over the safety rules
every year no matter how much you know,”
he says. “You need to pay attention to the
rules.” With files from Annik Chalifour. PS

SAFETY

FIRST
In April 2013, the Ontario College
of Teachers published a professional
advisory on student safety. “Safety
in Learning Environments: A Shared
Responsibility” serves as a reminder
to OCTs that they are responsible for
ensuring safe learning environments
for their students. Consult the advisory,
which can be found at bit.ly/112QPE4,
for information about safety legislation,
your professional responsibilities and
how to minimize safety risks.
December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

39

FIRST
RESPONSE
The Internet and social media may have changed the
ways and speed at which we communicate in a crisis,
but the core principles remain the same.

BY JENNIFER LEWINGTON

A

fter a recent violent assault
involving students off school
property, with a risk of in-school
repercussions, officials with the Lambton
Kent District School Board sent out a computerized phone message to inform parents
of actions taken to ensure student safety.
The phone message home is one of
several tools by Lambton Kent, which
relies on a board-level strategic response
plan and school-based emergency
procedures to communicate in a crisis.
The board is also one of the first in
Ontario to provide an app for hand-held
devices for parents and staff to receive
press releases, school closure notices and
other must-have information.
“Our first obligation is to student safety,”
says the board’s director Jim Costello,
OCT, a school and board administrator
for the past 18 years. Having dealt with
suicides, violent incidents, bomb threats
and a variety of false alarms, he identifies
a speedy response time, common
sense, honesty and “utmost regard” for
student safety as the core principles of
managing a crisis.
40 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

Instant Communication
The emergence of social media such as
Facebook, Twitter and text messaging
has had a profound impact on crisis
management.
“The speed with which you move
and how you communicate is different,”
Costello says.
That view is shared by school board
communication veterans and crisis
management experts alike.
Last September, following established
procedure, a Peel District School Board
high school was in lockdown over a report
that two young men showed up in a school
parking lot with a gun. As is his practice,
Peel communications director Brian
Woodland went into high gear to support
those dealing directly with the emergency
(senior board officials, the school principal
and Peel Regional Police) and respond
to worried parents, the media and false
reports on Facebook and Twitter.
In the short time it took the police to conclude there was no gun, rather an L-shaped
camera, “we had tweets out there saying the
police had found a gun,” recalls Woodland.

Even with a false alarm, silence from
school officials is not an option.
“Whether you tell your story or not,
your story gets told,” says Woodland. “The
question is do you want it told with facts or
do you want it told by a couple of [students
hanging out on the school grounds]?”
Ross Parry, former head of communications and public affairs for the Toronto
District School Board, now spends half
his time as a principal at Enterprise
Canada on crisis communications
management for clients in education, the
public sector and industry.
“There has been a massive paradigm
change in terms of crisis communications
because of the Internet and social media,”
he says. “Everyone is a journalist, everyone is a photojournalist, and journalism
takes Twitter and Facebook and uses
those things as part of its story — creating
a new sense of urgency.”
What has not changed are the basic
rules of crisis management: nurture
strong relations with stakeholders before
an emergency, develop a response plan
and stick to it.

ILLUSTRATION: KATY LEMAY/ANNA GOODSON

Don’t expect to develop rapport with
stakeholders — including parents, the
media and community organizations —
in the middle of a crisis, says Woodland, a
20-year veteran at Peel. Part ofthat rapport
is built through honest communication.
During labour stoppages last year,
Lambton Kent held weekly teleconferences
with principals and system leaders “to
keep our folks in the loop,” says Costello.
The board also posted regular bulletins
on its website. “The feedback from parents was that they found it helpful to hear
from the board,” he says.
If a student brings a knife to school,
says Woodland, “there will be a natural
tendency in the organization to say ‘let’s
not talk about the knife.’ [However,] we
will say they brought a knife.”
Dealing with Media
When a crisis hits a school, the media will
be among the first to contact the school
principal for the full story.
Despite protest from some members of
the media, Peel’s Woodland uses his communications department as a buffer between

reporters and the school principal. In addition, board communication officials write the
letter home to parents from the school and
speak on behalf the principal. “Do we media
train 250 principals about complicated legal
issues?” asks Woodland. “[No, we don’t …]
this is where the needs of the school and the
media clash. We have decided that [being a
buffer] is a central function.”
But Parry cautions that rising media
expectations put pressure on boards to
make a principal available for an interview, as happened in September when a
Toronto District School Board principal
spoke to reporters after the fatal stabbing
of a 19-year-old student in the high school
lobby. “[The media] want to talk to the
real McCoy,” says Parry. “They want to
know what the principal thinks and what
his reaction is.”
Defusing a Crisis
Even with a playbook in hand, successful
school leaders look to stay ahead of the
curve in an unfolding crisis.
“There is communication and there
is management, and they are invariably

linked,” says Parry. “A shallow response
to a crisis will never be solved by a great
communication plan, and a poor
communication plan will seriously affect
a very bold response to the problem. They
have to work in tandem.”
In the late 1990s, an on-court fight broke
out among rival basketball teams from two
North York, Ont. schools, exposing racial
and other tensions. The then-North York
Board of Education, where Parry was
manager of communications, immediately
shut down the season for the schools,
added training for coaches and convened
a meeting on high school sports violence
to identify the underlying causes of the
conflict. The combination of short- and
long-term actions defused the crisis.
Above all, Parry says, boards should
practise their crisis response plans, just
like a fire drill, to ensure contact numbers
are up-to-date and procedures are
understood by staff.
“You shouldn’t fear a crisis,” he says.
“If you have never [prepared for] it, then
you will fear it and you won’t do that well
when you face it.” PS
December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

41

ENERGY IQ
TEACHING TOOLS
Presented by Canadian Geographic Education and the
Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, Energy IQ is

LEARNING
CENTRE

INTERACTIVE
QUIZZES

ENERGY
MIX
LIBRARY

ENERGY
GLOSSARY

ENERGY
IN THE
NEWS

INTERACTIVE
ENERGY
MAP

GIANT
FLOOR
MAP

SLIDESHOW
BUILDER

designed to provide teachers and students with a balanced
look at energy across our country, and serve as a valuable
resource for all Canadians.
This growing collection of discussion topics, terms,
backgrounders, and hands-on tools will help you examine
Canada’s present and future energy issues.

EXPLORE IT YOURSELF, AND
POWER-UP YOUR OWN ENERGY IQ
energyiq.canadiangeographic.ca

reviews

Your guide to recently
released books, CDs and
other teaching resources.

For additional reviews of French-language resources, visit pourparlerprofession.oeeo.ca. With the exception of some classroom sets,
items reviewed are available on loan from the Margaret Wilson Library at the College. Contact Olivia Hamilton at 416-961-8800
(toll-free in Ontario 1-888-534-2222), ext 679 or email library@oct.ca.

Building Everyday Leadership in All Kids
BY MIRIAM G. MACGREGOR

Leadership is a mark of character and character is a key building
block for ethical and responsible citizenship. As teachers, we
play an important role in fostering leadership in our students
so they can contribute constructively to their classrooms, their
school communities and to the societies they live in. Building
Everyday Leadership in All Kids is a prime resource for learning
how to teach these critical skills.
With its hands-on and practical approach, the book shows
how to encourage the self-confidence that is so essential to positive
group interaction. Each activity is clearly laid out and presented
in a sequential manner so that students can explore and analyze
their assumptions and ideas about leadership. Aimed at students
in the primary and junior years, the activities can be incorporated
into a daily program whether you have 10 minutes or 45 minutes
to dedicate to structured leadership activities and games.
For example, the leadership acrostic lesson not only incorporates
leadership awareness skills but also a poetry lesson. Likewise,

the balloon train focuses on the
importance of teamwork and collaboration skills while touching on the
science of static electricity.
The book clearly shows that leadership
isn’t exclusively for the people we
regard as “leaders” — it is for everyone.
Leadership leads to enhanced social
skills, a deeper understanding of bullying behaviours and
greater empathy for the people around us. Although the book is
aligned with American core standards, it is a valuable addition
to any curriculum and can be easily adapted to any program.
Printable blackline masters and graphic organizers attached to
the many activities provide additional support.
Cheryl Woolnough, OCT, is a Special Education teacher with
the Peel District School Board.

Building Everyday Leadership in All Kids: An Elementary Curriculum to Promote Attitudes and Actions for Respect and Success,
Free Spirit Publishing, Minneapolis, 2013, softcover, ISBN 978-1-57542-432-3, 208 pages, US$29.99, freespirit.com

Rigorous Reading

PHOTOS: STEPHEN FERRIE

BY NANCY FREY AND DOUGLAS FISHER

Finally there’s
a book that
successfully
reaches across
many grade
levels to guide
our instruction of
reading complex
texts. Rigorous
Reading outlines
an instructional plan that focuses on five
key access points for teaching students
how to dive deeply into texts for maximum
comprehension and pleasure.
The first access point describes the

purpose of rigorous reading, with
teachers being expert guides to model
how it’s done, using teacher think alouds
to illustrate the process. Next is scaffolded
reading instruction in which small chunks
are read closely, while teachers guide
their students through the analysis of text.
The third component is collaborative
conversation among peers to amplify
understanding. The fourth is encouraging
students to read widely and independently
to build knowledge and to apply new
reading skills. Performance is the final
access point so that teachers can assess
and provide feedback to show their students where they are now in the reading
process, and guide them toward what they

need to work on. The assessment process
allows students to show their grasp of text
in many creative and authentic ways that
mesh with their understanding.
This book is a helpful tool for teaching
reading comprehension at all levels. In
addition, it offers access to video footage
or clips using codes found in the margins
of the text. An online facilitator’s guide
provides PowerPoint modules for
professional development and teacher
training in faculties of education.
Dorothea Bryant, OCT, has retired from
teaching in the University of Windsor’s
Faculty of Education and now tutors ESL
and primary/junior-level reading and writing.

Rigorous Reading: 5 Access Points for Comprehending Complex Texts, Corwin, Thousand Oaks, CA, 2013, softcover, ISBN
978-1-4522-6813-2, 256 pages, US$24.95, corwin.com

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

43

R EVI EWS

Moment to Moment
BY JOEY MANDEL

Moment to Moment argues that children
who display challenging behaviours haven’t
learned how to behave appropriately,
and that teachers can create a learning
opportunity for students who consistently
make bad choices in their conduct. Once
teachers recognize the escalating pattern
that leads to poor behaviour, they can
apply a calm and consistent approach
toward supporting their students in
mastering more appropriate behaviour
choices for the future.
Mandel’s book is structured using a
four-step plan: 1. looking beyond the
behaviour to figure out what the triggers
say about the deficits of a child;
2. understanding social-emotional skills
so that specific skills can be taught;
3. introducing these skills in classroom
activities, a strategy she calls “active skill
development”; and 4. providing momentto-moment support to individual children
who are practising their new skills.
Using profiles of students throughout

the book to explore how various strategies
can be used to address misbehaviour,
the author explores how to actively help
students develop the physical, language,
social, emotional and cognitive skills to
alleviate the problem. Most useful is the
section on how to address meltdowns
and de-escalate challenging behavioural
incidents. Mandel carefully explains how
specific teacher praise can show children
what verbal and non-verbal skills they
are performing well so that they can then
apply them to other academic and social
situations with their peers.
Mandel’s approach is very proactive.
Much of the advice is common sense,
like modelling how a child might act
in order to calm a situation down. She
also includes games and activities to
target specific social skill deficits. Many
of these tools are useful for teaching
younger students how to be courteous
and how to act in order to gain respect
during discussions, group work and
playtime. The book is most suitable for
educators who work with children in

the K to Grade 6 range. It would also be
useful for special educators and those
who support students with special needs
at the higher levels.
Mary Shaughnessy, OCT, is an adjunct
instructor at Queen’s University in Kingston.

Moment to Moment: A positive approach to managing classroom behavior, Pembroke Publishers, Markham, 2013, softcover,
ISBN 978-1-55138-287-6, 160 pages, $24.95, pembrokepublishers.com

Unspoken
BY HENRY COLE

If a picture is worth a thousand
words, this book is the exemplar.
Told in a series of highly detailed
pencil sketches, it allows readers to
see the story with their own eyes and
to hear it with their own words and
voices. The story is simple: A young
farm girl somewhere in the American
South, prior to the emancipation of
the slaves, is faced with a dilemma
when she spots the eye of a runaway
in her barn. Following her heart, she
decides to help him as he follows the
North Star toward freedom.
The author, who grew up in Virginia
hearing relatives tell stories of the American Civil War, uses basic
graphite line illustrations to create texture and build energy.
Following the maxim that the eyes are windows to the soul, the

illustrations form the lens through
which all the characters are viewed,
particularly those of the runaway slave.
All anyone ever sees is his eye, and
even then it is seen only if the reader
looks closely enough through the
landscape of ordinary life. Appropriate
for readers ages 9 to 11, the beautifully
illustrated pages are rich in imagery,
from the signal quilt hung on the fence
to the checkerboard napkins and the
wanted poster. A profound silence
settles over this wordless story that
perfectly captures the secrecy and danger of the Underground Railroad.
Anne Marie Landon, OCT, is a teacher with the Renfrew County
Catholic District School Board.

Unspoken: A Story from the Underground Railroad, Scholastic Press, New York, 2012, hardcover, ISBN 978-0-545-39997-5,
36 pages, $18.99, scholastic.ca

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

45

R EVI EWS

Follow Your Money
BY MICHAEL HLINKA, CO-WRITTEN AND ILLUSTRATED BY KEVIN SYLVESTER

What is the true cost of that movie at the
theatre? How much does your homemade
lunch cost? What is the cost of extracting
and refining gas for our cars? Written for
elementary and middle school students,
Follow Your Money is an insightful and
easy to understand book that not only
answers those kinds of practical money
questions but describes more esoteric
concepts like banking, credit card use,
interest, taxes, spending and how money
drives our economy. Using examples
that relate to the stuff children want, like
cellphones, new sneakers, blue jeans, pizza
and movie tickets, the book looks at the
route money follows to buy everything
— the raw materials for manufacturing,
the salaries for employees, the transportation, packaging and advertising. It asks

questions like what is the value of a
consumer good and what is it worth —
questions that are deceptively simple
and alarmingly complex. More than 20
practical scenarios are included and each
could be used individually as a minilesson in financial literacy and budgeting. The examples also make numerous
connections to multiple subject areas —
social studies, health, English, math and
physical education.
An extensive website supports the
book and includes a series of podcasts, a
workshop video trailer, teacher guide and
lesson plans to assist in the classroom.
With so many advertisers marketing
directly to our children, we owe them the
information they need to become savvy
shoppers and consumers.

Teresa Ross, OCT, is a technology, computer
science and business teacher at Lakeshore
Catholic High School in Port Colborne.

Follow Your Money: Who gets it, Who spends it, Where does it go?, Annick Press, Toronto, 2013, softcover,
ISBN 978-1-55451-480-9, 56 pages, $14.95, distributed by Firefly Books, annickpress.com

HELP SHAPE THE FUTURE OF YOUR PROFESSION
The Ontario College of Teachers’ Standards of Practice and Education Unit needs
your input. If you are interested in participating in any of these areas, please email
standardsinfo@oct.ca by January 30, 2015.
ETHICAL LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE
To support the College’s mandate to develop Ethical
Standards for the Teaching Profession, an Ethical
Leadership Institute for members of the profession
is being offered on March 14, 2015, at the Ontario
College of Teachers’ office at 101 Bloor St. West,
Toronto. Teachers interested in exploring the ethical
standards, ethical decision-making processes, as
well as ethical leadership knowledge and practices
are invited to attend this experiential institute.
PRINCIPAL QUALIFICATION PROGRAM
(PQP) 2015 REVIEW
We would like teachers and members of the public to
share their experiences, insights and recommendations
for the review of this important leadership role in
education.

46 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING FRAMEWORK
2015 REVIEW
The Professional Learning Framework for the
Teaching Profession articulates the diverse ways
that members of the teaching profession engage in
ongoing professional education and learning. We
are interested in hearing about your professional
learning experiences.
SUPERVISORY OFFICERS’ QUALIFICATION
PROGRAM (SOQP) 2015 REVIEW
We would like members of the teaching profession
and the public to share their experiences, insights
and recommendations for the review of this important
senior leadership role in education.

Elementary & Secondary
Principals & Vice-Principals
An education champion. A leader in supporting student success.
The Peel District School Board is one of the largest school boards in Canada, with more than
155,000 students in 242 schools. Outstanding educators dedicated to teamwork, excellence,
equity and innovation are invited to provide leadership for our elementary and secondary
schools. You must hold Ontario Principal qualifications, and be a member in good standing
with the Ontario College of Teachers.
For application forms and detailed information about these opportunities, including sessions to
prepare for the Peel promotion process, please visit the Job Board in the ‘Jobs’ section of our
website. Application deadline: December 5, 2014.
We appreciate the interest of all applicants, but will only be interviewing selected candidates. For the safety of students, all
school board staff need to provide a satisfactory criminal record check prior to commencement of employment.

For more information, and to register, go to our website.
The Peel District School Board is committed to equity in employment. We will provide reasonable
accommodation, based on any of the human rights protected grounds, during the hiring process
if advised in advance.
www.peelschools.org
P92-COM-123B_SET_FIN_REV.indd 1

2014-10-07 3:21 PM
December 2014 | Professionally
Speaking 47

TECH CLASS

WORLDLY MATTERS

A Grade 6 teacher uses a Q&A Skype game to help students
sharpen their mapping skills and broaden their horizons.
BY STEFAN DUBOWSKI

YOU CAN DO IT TOO!
WHAT YOU’LL NEED:
• An Internet-connected computer
or tablet
• a Skype account
STEPS TO TAKE:
1) Register for Mystery Skype at
bit.ly/1vJCYKt.
2) Find another teacher in the Mystery
Skype list and arrange a date and
time for the game.
3) Assign students roles: questioners,
mappers, and note-takers.
4) Have students conclude sessions
with presentations on their cities,
countries and cultures.

Joe Grabowski, OCT, uses Mystery Skype to teach students about different countries.
THE CHALLENGE: Help students hone
their proficiency with maps, improve their
critical thinking and learn about different
parts of the world.
THE SOLUTION: Use Mystery Skype
to link your classroom to others in far-off
cities, countries and continents. Challenge
students to figure out where the class on the
other side of the Skype session is located.
LESSONS LEARNED: Last year, Joe
Grabowski, OCT, wanted to help his
Grade 6 students at St. John Catholic
School in Guelph broaden their cultural
knowledge and learn not only through
books, but also through experiences. He
signed up for Mystery Skype, a global
guessing game in which teachers and
students use Skype, the free online
video-conferencing service, to connect
with people in other parts of the world.
Players on each side ask questions to
pinpoint the other side’s location.

For Grabowski’s class, sessions would
last 20 minutes to an hour with students
playing specific roles: questioners ask the
questions during the game, mappers use
atlases or Google Earth or Maps on iPads
to verify location data, and note-takers
record questions and answers to help the
class stay on target.
“We started with a simple exchange,
just 20 yes or no questions, switching back
and forth with the other class each time,”
Grabowski says. “We had our atlases and
we went from there with questions like,
‘Are you in the Eastern Hemisphere?’ We
would narrow it down to a country, then
locations within a country.”
For the final few minutes of each
session, students would give short presentations about their city and country, or
exchange further questions and answers
to learn more about the children on the
other side of the Skype call.
Grabowski used his laptop to connect
to Skype. He also plugged the computer

OBSERVATIONS: The students quickly
grasped which questions would yield the
most useful information, such as, ‘What time
zone are you in?’ That’s how his students
managed to figure out where a particularly
hard-to-find classroom was situated.
“We had a really good [game] with a
class on the little English Channel Island
of Alderney. It’s only three miles by a
mile and a half … That was probably our
toughest one, but [the students] got it in
fewer than 15 questions.”
The Grade sixers also learned about life
in other places. They Skyped with classrooms
in France, El Salvador and — memorably
— Uganda, where students in an orphanage
concluded the call with a traditional dance
demonstration. “They were thousands of
miles away and it was as if we were in the
room with them,” Grabowski recalls.
As for Grabowski, the teacher learned
that sometimes it’s best to step away and let
the students take control. It’s not easy to refrain from feeding questions to students that
would help them identify the other class’s
location. “You have to bite your [tongue]
and let them figure out what’s going on. If I
kept [helping them], they wouldn’t grow. PS

HELPFUL HINT: Use Mystery Skype to support lessons. When Guelph teacher Joe Grabowski, OCT, was teaching students about
Canada’s trading partners, he set up Skype calls with classrooms in the countires with which Canada has trade agreements.
48 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

PHOTO: MATTHEW LITEPLO

into his classroom’s interactive whiteboard,
making the board into a big screen so his
students could see the other children clearly.

YOU2015
DECIDE
Now is the time!
If you’ve thought about seeking a seat on Council or
know a perfect candidate, run or nominate today.
Nominations for 23 elected positions on the College
Council close at 5 p.m. on December 5, 2014.
As an Ontario Certified Teacher, you are
eligible to serve as a representative of the
region in which you live or school system
in which you are a member of the regular
teaching staff.

Don’t miss this opportunity to
serve your profession!
Learn more at

oct.ca ➝ Council Election 2015

YOU2015
DECIDE

MARCH 2– APRIL 7, 2015

SEE HOW YOU CAN MAKE
A DIFFERENCE —
AS A MEMBER OF COUNCIL
Wondering what you might be involved in and the difference
you’ll make as a member of Council? Here are a few examples
of the issues, activities and decisions that influence the
direction of teacher professionalism in Ontario.
• Establishing vision, mission, values
and strategic priorities for the
College. Through a strategicplanning process, Council members
determine the College’s direction
and the activities that it will engage
in that align with its vision,
mission, values and legislated
mandate. In October, for example,
Council approved “Trusted to
regulate the teaching profession”
as the vision for the organization.
• Interacting directly with Ontario’s
Minister of Education. During one of
the four Council meetings held during
the year, Council participates in a

face-to-face dialogue with the Minister
of Education about current issues in
education in the province.
• Reviewing and recommending
regulatory change. Council members
had oversight regarding regulatory
changes required to implement the new
enhanced teacher education program,
which will take effect in Ontario’s
faculties of education on September
1, 2015. This is the biggest change to
initial teacher education in 30 years.
• Engaging in dialogue with members.
Council members meet with members
annually to report statutory committee

achievements, answer questions and talk
about issues of concern. Council members
also attend focus groups to hear directly
from members and the public.
• Ruling on content. Council members
make decisions on content guidelines for
Additional Qualification courses that are
available to all members of the profession.
• Advancing teacher professionalism.
Council members oversee the
provision of three $2,000 scholarships
annually to teacher candidates, and
have directed that scholarship funding
program, made possible through donations, be self-sustaining. The program
identifies exemplary role models and
pays direct financial assistance to those
with a passion for and dedication to the
highest ideals of teaching.
• Ensuring responsible financial
governance. Council members are
responsible for overall College financing. For example, Council members
set policy direction and approve the
organization’s budget to ensure the
College maintains its commitment to
responsible spending and resource
management on behalf of its members.

2015 ELECTION Q&A:

YOU WERE ASKING…
Since publication of the election call in the September issue of Professionally
Speaking, many members have called or written to seek additional information
to help them decide whether to run or nominate a colleague for one of the 23
elected positions that will be contested this coming spring.
Among more specific, individual questions, you wanted to know:

growth and leadership opportunities. If
you have to attend a meeting during the
summer, you will receive an honorarium
of $150 per day of service or $75 for
meetings or preparation time that are
less than three hours.

Q. Are Council positions paid?
A. No. Your commitment to serve on
Council is a commitment to serve the
public interest. That said, the College
will compensate your employer for release time and cover travel, accommodation and meals related to the work of

Q. Am I able to run even though
I am not employed full-time by
a school board?
A. You must have worked at least 10 days
in a classroom for a district school board
in the year preceding the election to be

50 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

Council and its associated committees.
Election has other rewards, including
the ability to participate in debate and
decisions governing the future of teaching in the province, networking with
like-minded certified professionals and
public appointees, and professional

YOU2015
DECIDE

MARCH 2 – APRIL 7, 2015

eligible for a part-time or full-time
regional position. Elected part-time
members must remain employed
and provide proof of teaching a
minimum of 10 days each year to
remain in office.
Q. What does being on Council
entail in terms of a time
commitment?
A. The time you spend on
Council business and related
committees will depend to some
degree on the work of the committees themselves. There are
at least four Council meetings
during a calendar year. Two days
are set aside for each meeting and
Council members are compensated
for the time required to prepare.
In addition, Council members

typically serve on at least two of
Council’s statutory, standing or
special committees. As an elected
Council member, you will require
between 20 and 60 days of leave per
school year, on average. On occasion, work may occur on weekends
and during the summer.

Q. I’m eligible for two
positions. Can I run for both?
A. Although it’s possible to be
eligible to run in more than one
category, you can only stand for
nomination in one. You must also
have signatures from at least 10
colleagues who are also members
in good standing and who are
eligible to stand for nomination in
the same category.

KNOW YOUR

CANDIDATES
Make your vote in the 2015 Council
election an informed one.
An election forum and individual
candidate blogs will be available online
at oct.ca on January 7, 2015. Get to
know what the candidates think and
where they stand on education issues,
and ask them specific questions.
You can also access the forum and
blogs from your mobile device via the
College’s new app available for free
on iPhone, Android and Windows
phone platforms.

THE CANADIAN TRILLIUM COLLEGE
Principals & Teachers
JOIN A TEAM OF DYNAMIC EDUCATORS IN CHINA
With 3 Ontario registered secondary school campuses in China – The Canadian
Trillium College is searching for Ontario qualified principals and teachers for
the 2015 – 2016 academic school year beginning September 1, 2015.
Two new ESL programs have also been started
The courses to be taught are: Terms of Employment:
• English 10, 11 & 12;
• Mathematics 11 & 12;
• Social Sciences – 11 & 12;
• Business/Accounting – 11 & 12;
• Physics, Chemistry
– Grade 12
• ESL (Levels 2 – 5)

• 2 semester contracts
(renewable)
• Return air (for 2 semester
contracts)
• Private accommodation
• Some financial assistance
for medical insurance
• Competitive salary &
bonus – paid in Canadian
dollars

School Locations:
• Jinhua City –
Zhejiang Province
(southwest of
Shanghai)
• Quanzhou City –
Fujian Province
(close to the sea
across from Taiwan)
• Shanghai City –
Pudong District

This is an ideal opportunity for retired educators, educators on funded leaves
and beginning teachers.......
Apply now! Send a cover letter and resume to:

Supervising Principal
The Canadian Trillium College (CTC),
323 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario M6P 2K6
Fax: 416 – 763 – 5225 • E-mail: dmfolz@hotmail.com

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

51

OECTA’s new modular AQ courses are an effective way to
enhance your professional development. Modular learning lets
you take a course one module (or section) at a time – that means
a smaller time commitment and less workload. You can complete
just one module as professional development, or take them all
within two years to receive a full AQ credit...the choice is yours.
Modular courses available this fall:

(Student) Assessment and Evaluation
n Integration of Information and Computer
Technology in Instruction / Part 1
n Reading / Part 1
n Religious Education / Part 2
You must have completed Part 1 to enrol
n Teaching Students with Communication
Needs (Autism Spectrum Disorders)
n

Modules run continuously
throughout an AQ session
For more information
and to register, visit
oecta.on.ca

governing ourselves
Governing Ourselves informs members of legal and regulatory matters affecting the profession. This section provides updates
on licensing and qualification requirements, notification of Council resolutions and reports from various Council committees,
including reports on accreditation and discipline matters.
REGULATORY NEWS

SASKATCHEWAN TAKES NEXT STEP
TOWARD TEACHER REGULATION
A new organization is expected to be in place to regulate
Saskatchewan teachers by the fall of 2015.
An eight-person transition committee has been established to develop a new regulatory body to handle teacher
certification and discipline. The committee includes members from the Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation (STF),
the Saskatchewan School Boards Association (SSBA),
the League of Educational Administrators, Directors and
Superintendents of Saskatchewan (LEADS), the Federation
of Saskatchewan Indian Nations, First Nations Directors of
Education, and the Ministry of Education.
This committee will consult and meet with stakeholders
including teachers, students and parents to develop bylaws and
structure for the new body. When established, the body will
regulate who will be a member of the profession and oversee
disciplinary functions for misconduct or incompetence.
Teachers in Saskatchewan are currently certified by
the Ministry of Education. Complaints and disciplinary

measures concerning members of the STF are currently
handled by the STF.
Saskatchewan Education Minister Don Morgan said
the new body will enhance the integrity of teachers and
increase transparency.
“The Ontario College of Teachers has worked closely with
the registrars for teacher certification in each of the Canadian
provinces and territories for many years,” said College CEO
and Registrar Michael Salvatori. “I look forward to working
with the members of the new regulatory body once it is
established and to continuing to work with our colleagues to
serve the public interest.” 
Ontario is currently the only province in Canada to have
a self-regulatory body for the teaching profession. British
Columbia had a similar regulatory body that was dissolved
in 2011, after which the B.C. Ministry of Education Teacher
Regulation Branch assumed responsibility for regulation of
the profession in that province. PS

POLICY DEVELOPMENT

DISTANCE EDUCATION POLICY CHANGE
Distance education is a positive development in the efforts to make education
accessible to those in remote areas or
who are otherwise unable to physically
attend classes. For this reason, and
because of advances in technology
such as interactive synchronous video
conferencing (through Skype or Adobe
Connect), the percentage of distance education in an applicant’s teacher education
program is no longer being assessed.

On September 1, 2014, the College began
recognizing initial teacher education
programs completed entirely by distance
education outside of Ontario provided
the following requirements are met:
• the program includes a face-to-face
practicum meeting the College’s current
requirement of a minimum of 40 days; or
• the applicant has had one year of
teaching experience subsequent to
the teacher education program while

certified in that jurisdiction.
To be eligible for certification, the applicant
would still have to meet the academic and
language proficiency requirements.
As early as 2007 the College began
recognizing up to 60 per cent of an
internationally educated teacher’s (IET)
teacher education program successfully completed by distance education. The remaining
40 per cent had to be delivered in a face-toface format and include any methodology
December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

53

G OV E R N I N G O U R S E LV E S
POLICY DEVELOPMENT (CONT.)

courses in the program, in order for the
applicant to be certified. The requirement
for a face-to-face practicum was a key
component of the 60 per cent threshold.
In November 2013, the College accredited
an Ontario teacher education program
offered entirely by distance education for
the first time. However, this created an
inequity in that internationally educated
applicants could only have 60 per cent of
their program recognized if delivered by
distance education. The new policy change
to recognize distance education courses
creates a more equitable certification
process for all Ontario and IET applicants.
Because of the change in accepting full
programs completed by distance education,
applicants who were denied between
March 1, 2012, and August 31, 2014, and
have since become registered with the
College, may be eligible for additional
teaching qualifications. Members who
have not received teaching qualifications
based on methodology coursework
completed by distance education in their
initial teacher education program may
request a reassessment in writing to the
attention of Evaluation Services. PS

APPOINTMENTS

NEW COUNCIL
MEMBER
The College Council welcomes new Council
member Merzak Damou, OCT. Damou has
taught Grades 7 to 12 mathematics, science and
geography courses over the last seven years with
the Conseil des écoles publiques de l’Est de
l’Ontario (CEPEO).
Damou was part of a team that wrote booklets
on effective instruction in mathematics for the
Intermediate Division of Ontario’s Ministry of
Education. He has served on several Education
Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) committees and is an examiner for the International
Baccalaureate Diploma Programme and the Middle Years Programme.
In addition to these roles, Damou also mentors new teachers, has served as a department
head and initiated a professional learning community in numeracy. He coaches and
trains colleagues in the use of new technology and advises on resources to help students
master technology skills for the 21st century.
Damou has presented numerous workshops for the Ontario Ministry of Education,
Summer Institutes, professional development days and staff meetings, and has volunteered
on a number of parent involvement panels and committees.
Damou was appointed by Council in October 2014 to fill the French-language Public
Board Elementary or Secondary position vacancy. He holds an M.Sc. and PhD from
the University of Manchester, a B.Ed. from the University of Ottawa, and has also
completed Part 1 of the Principal’s Qualification Program. PS

COUNCIL MEETINGS

SUMMARY – OCTOBER 1-2, 2014
At its October 1­–2, 2014, meeting,
College Council:

• appointed Merzak Damou, OCT, to fill
the Council vacancy for the Frenchlanguage Public Board Elementary or
Secondary position
• approved a vision for the College as
follows: “Trusted to regulate the
teaching profession”
• received a deputation from the Ontario
Teachers’ Federation regarding the
College’s mandate
• approved amendments to the
Teachers’ Qualifications Regulation
including a requirement for a
54 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

minimum of 10 days practicum in the
first session of a multi-session
program; added new Schedule
College Additional Qualifications
including Classroom Management,
Safe and Accepting Schools,
Teaching LGBTQ Students and
specific FNMI languages
• amended College bylaws to establish a
Council Governance Committee and
delete the Nomination and Election
committees effective July 1, 2015
• approved amendments to the
Accreditation Regulation re: panel
size, composition and changes to the
appeal process

• approved amendments to the Teachers’
Qualifications Regulation and the
Accreditation Regulation including
permitting those who hold a degree
and who meet the requirements for
admission to a program of technological education to take one option
in a broad-based technology and
one option in general studies at the
Intermediate/Senior level
• struck an ad hoc committee comprising
the Chair of Council, two appointed
members and two elected members
to study the Council compensation
policy and bring recommendations to
Council’s December meeting. PS

G OV E R N I N G O U R S E LV E S
ANNUAL MEETING OF MEMBERS

The Ontario Human Rights Commission’s Dora Nipp addresses College members.

TOWARD INCLUSIVITY
AND COLLABORATION
Inclusivity was a touchstone topic for
many of the speakers at the Ontario
College of Teachers’ 2014 annual meeting of members, held on October 1 at
the College.
Whether they spoke about diversity in
the classroom, the College’s new guiding
principles or provincewide focus groups
to assess awareness and opinion, presenters
highlighted the value and necessity of a
full range of voices.
Keynote speaker Dora Nipp, a lawyer,
ethnologist and human rights education
and change specialist with the Ontario
Human Rights Commission, comes from
a family that helped build the Canadian
Pacific Railway.
At the Commission, Nipp develops
human rights curricula and e-learning
and training programs, encouraging
students to learn about their rights

and responsibilities under the Ontario
Human Rights Code. For Nipp, whose
presentation covered diversity, equity,
anti-racism and anti-oppression, teaching human rights in the classroom can
be a starting point for lifelong learning
about inclusion and the value of
respecting the dignity and worth of
all Ontarians.
“An equitable and inclusive classroom
gives students a physical, social and
emotional environment that is welcome,
safe, supportive and respectful,” Nipp
said. “Students see themselves reflected
in the curriculum, physical surroundings
and the broader environment where
diversity is valued.”
Inclusivity is also an integral part of
the College’s set of values, noted Council
Chair Liz Papadopoulos, OCT, who spoke
about 2013 milestones, including the

strategic-planning process to determine
those values. “For the first time in College
history, council members and senior staff
met to establish a mission, vision, values
and strategic priorities for this
organization,” said Papadopoulos.
Council and the College conducted
extensive research with a diverse range
of people. “Our deliberations were
informed by the results of a broad
consultation process with the Ministry
of Education, faculties of education,
education thought leaders and fellow
regulators,” Papadopoulos explained.
“We surveyed the College staff and
held provincewide focus groups with
College members and parents. These
first-hand conversations helped frame
our planning process.”
The plan will set the course for the
College over the next three to five
years. “It will focus our efforts, allow
us to anticipate change and guide our
decision-making,” added Papadopoulos.
The College and Council achieved
another milestone in 2013: The
development of a new public awareness
initiative. During his presentation,
Registrar Michael Salvatori, OCT,
highlighted the College’s efforts in
conducting extensive focus groups
across the province, revealing a need to
provide more information to the public
about the College and its role.
“In 2013, we also did more to connect
with First Nations communities
interested in becoming providers of
Additional Qualifications courses
in specialized areas related to First
Nations, Métis and Inuit education,”
said Salvatori. “Elders, educators and
students participated in discussions
to inform the development of these
course guidelines.”
Salvatori noted the importance of a
collaborative and inclusive approach,
as the College continues to evolve.
“No profession is static,” he said. “As
long as we continue to move forward
and learn together we will continue
to set the standards for great teaching
and maintain the public’s trust every
step of the way.” PS
December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

55

G OV E R N I N G O U R S E LV E S
COLLEGE NEWS

COLLEGE REGISTRAR
RECEIVES REGULATORY
EXCELLENCE AWARD

College Registrar and CEO Michael Salvatori, OCT, (right) accepts the 2014 CLEAR
Regulatory Excellence award from CLEAR Past President Darrel Crimmins.

The Council on Licensure, Enforcement
and Regulation (CLEAR) has honoured
College Chief Executive Officer and
Registrar Michael Salvatori, OCT, with
its 2014 Regulatory Excellence Award.
The award recognizes an outstanding
contribution to the enhancement of
occupational or professional regulation
and celebrates exceptional leadership,
vision, creativity, results and outcomes
beyond the regular functions of the job
or expectations.
The association took note of the
Registrar’s perseverance during times of
challenge and commended his commitment
to continuous improvement and positive
change in the public interest. As the
driving force behind the establishment
of a Pan-Canadian Assessment Tool for
teachers, the Registrar leveraged his skills
in negotiation and diplomacy to achieve
national consensus. His emphasis on the
positive value of professional mobility
has led Ontario’s Fairness Commissioner
to site the College as an exemplar to
be followed by other regulatory bodies.
Internationally, regulators look to the
College as a leader, while the Registrar is
seen as the go-to resource on education
systems and standards of practice for the
teaching profession. PS

COLLEGE AWARDED
SILVER FOR GREEN BUILDING
The College’s member-owned office space at 101 Bloor St. West in Toronto was recently
awarded LEED silver certification by the Canadian Green Building Council. The
office includes eco-friendly practices consistent with the requirements of the LEED
(Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) program.
“The College shares the vision of many of our members for a clean energy future
and that’s why we have switched to renewable energy,” said Richard Lewko, the
College’s director of corporate and council services, “By finding opportunities to
reduce our own environmental footprint, we help make a difference.”
In 2010, the College purchased eight floors in an existing, 40-year-old decommissioned
building at 101 Bloor St. West and carried out extensive renovations to ensure that
our new refurbishing was greener. As part of this initiative, we embraced the principles
of sustainable design, quality construction and efficient building operation.
Being environmentally responsible is a high priority for the College. Through the
LEED certification program, we are reducing our energy and water consumption
as well as operating costs, and reducing our overall environmental footprint. PS
56 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

G OV E R N I N G O U R S E LV E S
INVESTIGATION COMMITTEE CASE STUDY

AFTERMATH OF A YOUTUBE POSTING
The College’s Investigation Committee considers all complaints made to the College about its
members and reviews all information resulting from investigations. The committee can dismiss
a complaint or refer the matter, in whole or in part, to the Discipline or Fitness to Practise
committees for a hearing.
The Investigation Committee may also caution or admonish the member in writing or in
person, or provide written reminders or advice or ratify a Memorandum of Agreement reached
through the complaint resolution process.
By law, cases under investigation are confidential. For the education of members, the following
account, based on facts from real cases, raises important questions about teacher conduct such
as what’s appropriate and what isn’t. Details have been altered to respect confidentiality.

A principal produced and posted a
video on YouTube with disparaging
comments about particular staff of the
school, senior administration, parents
and students. It contained multiple
expletives and other inappropriate
vocabulary that maligned their
ethnicity and culture.
It was also alleged that the video —
which was viewed by over 100 viewers —
insulted the school board and its various
practices and procedures.
The principal admitted the video was

offensive, in poor taste, and that it
demonstrated a serious error in judgment
on his part. He indicated that he created
the video to use humour to boost staff
morale and had no malicious intent.
He posted the video believing it was
password protected.
The principal’s employer suspended
him without pay for nearly two months.
He successfully complied with the
employer’s direction to complete two
courses, at his own expense, on setting
boundaries and on the College’s

Professional Advisory — Use of Electronic
Communication and Social Media.
The principal was required to read an
apology to the entire school staff and
senior administrators.
He was also required to enrol in
counselling, which he did. During the
counselling sessions, he presented himself
in a very open and co-operative manner,
and stated numerous times that he took
full responsibility for his error in judgment,
and that he had developed strategies
to manage stress and prevent future
impulsive decisions.
The Investigation Committee reviewed all
the relevant information about the matter
including the video, letters, emails, interviews
with staff members, and correspondence
from the member’s legal counsel.
If you were a member of the
Investigation Committee,
what would you do?

member clearly acknowledged that his
actions were inappropriate and that the
discipline measures imposed by the board
were comprehensive.
They considered reminding the member

The committee decided not to refer the
matter to the Discipline Committee.
Members of the committee noted that the

Three-member panels of the Discipline Committee conduct public hearings into cases of alleged
incompetence or professional misconduct. The panels are a mix of elected and appointed
Council members. Members found guilty of incompetence or professional misconduct may have
their certificate revoked, suspended or limited. In professional misconduct matters only, the
committee may also reprimand, admonish or counsel the member, impose a fine, order
the member to pay costs, or publish the order in Professionally Speaking.
Discipline Committee panels have ordered that summaries of these recent disciplinary cases
be published in Professionally Speaking. Copies of the full decisions are available at
oct.ca/members/complaints-and-discipline/decisions.
Also available online are decisions and memorandums of agreement ratified by Investigation
Committee panels that explicitly stipulate that documents will be made available through the College’s
library or Quicklaw, a legal subscription service, or other means.

Member: Jeffrey Tavis Bussineau, OCT
Registration No: 467352
Decision: Suspension,
reprimand, conditions
A Discipline Committee panel suspended
the certificate of Algoma District School
Board’s teacher Jeffrey Bussineau for
failing to maintain appropriate
boundaries with a female student.
Bussineau, who was certified to teach
in June 2003, was represented by a
lawyer and attended the hearings that

THE OUTCOME

of his responsibilities, but felt that it was
not necessary given that he apologized
to his staff and senior administrators, and
was aware that he made a mistake that
should not be repeated. PS
HEARINGS

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

57

G OV E R N I N G O U R S E LV E S
HEARINGS (CONT.)

were held on July 8 and 9, November 14,
December 18, 2013, January 14 and 15,
and August 7, 2014.
During the 2009–10 academic year,
Bussineau had an inappropriate personal
relationship with the student, which included
engaging in electronic communication with
her via Facebook and calling her “hon”
and/or “cutie pie.”
The Discipline Committee panel
found the member guilty of professional
misconduct based on the evidence,
onus and standard of proof, and
legal submissions.
The panel ordered that his teaching
certificate be suspended for one month
and that he appear before the panel to
receive a reprimand.
In addition, Bussineau was directed
to complete a course of instruction in
boundary violations at his own expense.
The panel was of the opinion that the
member did not seem to be aware of the
Professional Advisory — Use of Electronic
Communication and Social Media issued
by the College. This advisory addresses the
numerous challenges and the ramifications
associated with the use of electronic communication and social media.
The member acknowledged that engaging
in electronic communication with the
student constituted an inappropriate
personal relationship.
In its written decision, the panel said,
“[He] needs to take a specifically created
boundaries course which addresses his
professional shortcomings and will assist
him in modifying his behaviour, should he
return to the classroom … The public can
be assured that the College takes very
seriously the professional misconduct
demonstrated in this matter.”
Member: Andrew Stuart Campbell, OCT
Registration No: 185224
Decision: Suspension,
reprimand, conditions
A Discipline Committee panel reprimanded
Grand Erie District School Board teacher
Andrew Stuart Campbell and ordered his
certificate be suspended with conditions for
engaging in inappropriate conduct over a
number of years.
58 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

Campbell, who was certified to teach
in 1993, did not attend the public hearing
on June 30, 2014, but was represented by
legal counsel.
The panel heard that in February
2008, Campbell struck a female student
on the back with a volleyball and hit
her on her shin with his knuckles. The
Children’s Aid Society investigated the
matter and confirmed his behaviour was
inappropriate. During the same academic
year, while teaching at a different
school, Campbell grabbed the arm of
a male student and applied physical
pressure to move him out of a room.
The panel also heard that during the
2005–06 and the 2007–08 academic years,
Campbell used sexualized and abusive
language toward students and inappropriate
teaching materials for school-aged children.
His behaviour was unchanged despite multiple warnings, suspensions, counselling and
transfer to another school.
Based on the evidence, onus and
standard of proof, an agreed statement
of facts, a joint submission on penalty,
a guilty plea, and the submissions
made by legal counsel, the panel found
Campbell guilty of professional
misconduct and directed the
Registrar to suspend his Certificate of
Qualification and Registration for two
months. Furthermore, Campbell was
ordered to appear before the panel
following the hearing to receive a
reprimand, and required to successfully
complete, at his own expense, a preapproved course of instruction covering anger management and sensitivity
training within three months.
The panel agreed that the member
needed to understand the serious nature
of his misconduct, and the need for
appropriate professional judgment in
his practice and respectful treatment of
children. Protection of the public interest
is reflected in the member’s suspension,
reprimand and coursework.
Publication of the member’s name
assures the public that the College will
not tolerate such behaviour and will ensure
that this type of repeated misconduct will
garner such a penalty.

Member: Martin Careen
Registration No: 291611
Decision: Revocation
A Discipline Committee panel revoked
the certificate of Martin Careen, a former
member of the College and a former
teacher in British Columbia, related to a
criminal conviction for sexual exploitation.
Certified to teach in February 1994,
Careen did not attend the May 30, 2014,
hearing nor was his lawyer present.
On July 13, 2011, Careen was found
guilty of sexual exploitation following a
trial before the Honourable Mr. Justice
Terence Schultes, in British Columbia.
Careen had sent sexually explicit text
messages to a student.
In his judgment, the judge noted, with
respect to the text messages, “I am
satisfied beyond a reasonable doubt that
Mr. Careen at the time of these
communications intended that (the
student) would receive his words as an
invitation, incitement or counselling to
engage in sexual activity with him.”
On May 16, 2012, Careen was sentenced
to a 60-day jail sentence to be served
intermittently at three-week intervals.
Careen pleaded guilty to the allegations
of professional misconduct made against
him by the College.
Having considered the evidence, onus
and standard of proof, an agreed statement of facts and a joint submission on
penalty as well as College counsel submissions, the panel found Careen guilty of
professional misconduct and directed the
Registrar to revoke his certificate.
In its written decision, the panel
affirmed that “such behaviour represents
an egregious breach of trust between a
teacher and a student under his care.
The member has therefore forfeited the
privilege of holding a teaching certificate
and being a member of the profession.”
Member: Richard William Cole
Registration No: 423638
Decision: Revocation
A Discipline Committee panel revoked
the certificate of Rainbow District School
Board teacher Richard William Cole
related to a criminal conviction for

G OV E R N I N G O U R S E LV E S
HEARINGS

copying sexually explicit photos from
students’ computers and downloading
pornography on his school-assigned
computer during work hours.
Licensed to teach in February 2000, Cole
did not attend the June 16, 2014, hearing
but was represented by legal counsel.
On or about June 23, 2006, a school
technician, while performing maintenance
activities, found sexually explicit images
on Cole’s computer. In addition to his
teaching duties, Cole had a supervisory
role of the operations of the school’s
computer network.
A board technician later confirmed
that Cole’s computer contained 379
sexually explicit pictures that he had
copied from students’ computers. The
technician also confirmed that Cole was
surfing and downloading pornographic
material on his work laptop.
In April 2013, the member voluntarily
agreed to have his teaching certificate
rescinded and pleaded guilty in the
Ontario Court of Justice to interfering
with the lawful use of data.
Having considered the evidence,
onus and standard of proof, an agreed
statement of facts, a joint submission on
penalty, a guilty plea, and submissions
of College counsel and counsel for the
member, the Discipline Committee panel
found the member guilty of professional
misconduct, and directed the Registrar
to revoke his Certificate of Qualification
and Registration.
The panel found that “The member
abused his position of authority by not
reporting to administration that he found
pornographic images in a student’s file”
and “copied these images onto his school
computer. He “also copied pornographic
images, movies and explicit materials
from other students’ pictures files.”
Further, “the member’s conduct was
unacceptable, disgraceful and illustrated
an abuse of power and trust.”
Member: Karl Dreger, OCT
Registration No: 195939
Decision: Reprimand, conditions
A Discipline Committee panel directed
Karl Dreger, a principal of the Sudbury

who was certified to teach in June 1993,
Catholic District School Board, to
attended the July 3, 2014, hearing without
receive a reprimand in connection with
legal counsel.
a criminal conviction for altering a
Between June 2008 and January 2010, the
medical prescription.
member crossed the boundaries of profesDreger, who was certified to teach in
sional teacher-student conduct by texting
June 1995, attended the June 30, 2014,
hearing, and was represented by a lawyer. excessively with a student during late hours
in the evening and during holidays, and
In October 2010, Dreger altered a
referring to the student as “babe.” Between
medical prescription from 30 to 80 tablets
February 2009 and January 2010, about
of Percocet, leading the pharmacist to determine he had forged it. In February 2011, 2,200 text messages were sent between the
member and the student.
he was criminally charged and pleaded
The member resigned from the board
guilty to forgery in April of the same year.
in January 2011 and has not been
The Discipline Committee panel found
employed in the education sector since.
the member guilty of professional
Based on the evidence, a statement of
misconduct based on the evidence,
uncontested facts, a plea of no contest,
onus and standard of proof, an agreed
a joint submission on penalty, and the
statement of facts, a joint submission on
submissions made by College counsel
penalty, and a guilty plea.
and the member, the panel found the
He was directed to appear before
member guilty of professional misthe panel immediately following the
conduct. She was ordered to appear
hearing to receive a reprimand. As well,
before the panel to receive a reprimand
the member was ordered to complete a
pre-approved course
at his own expense
regarding professional ethics.
In its written
decision, the panel
said, “The member
SCHOOL TOURS + WORKSHOPS
altered a medical
prescription … this
PERFECT FOR GRADES 2 TO 12!
is unethical and unStudents engage in the design process
acceptable behavthrough active observation, real-life
iour for a member
applications and hands-on activities.
of the teaching
profession.”

DESIGN EXCHANGE

Member: Not
identified
Decision:
Reprimand, suspension, conditions
A Discipline
Committee panel
suspended a Toronto
District School
Board teacher for
one year for crossing
the boundaries of
professional teacher-student conduct.
The member,

BOOK YOUR
CLASS VISIT
TODAY!
Generously supported by

DESIGN EXCHANGE | 234 BAY STREET | TORONTO
DX.ORG | @DESIGNEXCHANGE | 416.216.2111

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

59

G OV E R N I N G O U R S E LV E S
HEARINGS (CONT.)

following the hearing.
The member’s Certificate of
Qualification and Registration was suspended from July 2, 2013 to July 2, 2014,
for a period of one year. Furthermore,
she was required to successfully complete, at her own expense, a pre-approved
course of instruction covering appropriate
boundaries with students and boundary
violation issues.
Information about the disciplinary
action appears on the College website at
bit.ly/1iDZ7nQ and bit.ly/1oAIukT.
Member: Milka Ivanova, OCT
Registration No: 493470
Decision: Suspension,
reprimand, conditions
A Discipline Committee panel ordered
Toronto District School Board
elementary teacher Milka Ivanova to
receive a reprimand, have her certificate
suspended for one month and complete
a course in classroom management skills
at her own expense for inappropriately
disciplining students.
Ivanova joined the teaching profession
in August 2005. She attended the July 22,
2014, hearing with legal counsel.
During the 2008–09 and 2009–10
academic years, Ivanova was required to
attend classroom management courses
and anger management counselling for
forcibly grabbing students, putting Scotch
Tape over their mouths and directing
them to sit or kneel on the floor using
their seats as desks, as a discipline measure.
She also placed a heater within reach of her
students, causing a student to burn his hand.
Ivanova was also required to move to
another school.
During the 2012–13 school year, the board
suspended her for 10 days without pay for
pushing a student after he and another
student threw a pencil at each other.
Having heard the evidence, onus and
standard of proof, an agreed statement
of facts, a joint submission on penalty, a
guilty plea and the submissions of legal
counsel, the panel found Ivanova guilty
of professional misconduct.
The panel noted that publication
with her name was appropriate in the
60 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

circumstances, given the young age of the
students, the seriousness of her actions
and her continued pattern of behaviour
despite having received previous warnings
and a discipline letter from her board.
Member: Not identified
Decision: Conditions
A Discipline Committee panel ordered
a Toronto District School Board teacher
to complete coursework in classroom
management to maintain an effective
learning environment for students.
The member, who was licensed to teach in
June 1988, attended a June 5, 2014, hearing
with legal counsel. The member admitted
that he failed to keep a record of students’
marks in the school board’s computerized
record system during the 2006–07 school
year and, on one occasion, improperly
offered daily physical activity to students.
Based on the evidence, a statement of
uncontested facts, a plea of no contest,
a joint submission on penalty, and
the submissions of legal counsel, the
Discipline Committee panel found the
member guilty of professional misconduct.
He was ordered to complete a pre-approved
course in classroom management, with an
emphasis on organizational and recordkeeping skills, conducted one-on-one and
at his own expense within 120 days of the
date of the order. He also has to provide
written proof to the Registrar within 30
days of its successful completion.
The panel said the allegations were on
the low end of the spectrum and reflected
conduct that occurred seven years ago.
Further, the member had no prior
misconduct in a 26-year career.
Information about the disciplinary
action appears on the College website at
bit.ly/14d5dLn.
Member: Not identified
Decision: Reprimand
A Discipline Committee panel reprimanded
a Wabaseemoong Education Authority
teacher for professional misconduct.
Licensed to teach in June 1992,
the member attended the July 29–30,
2013, and April 17, 2014, hearings with
a representative.

During the 2010–11 school year, the
member interrupted a class in progress
to retrieve some boxes and engaged in a
verbal altercation with the class’s teacher
and one of her students. The incident was
reported to the school administration.
Having considered the evidence, onus
and standard of proof, the member’s
plea and the submissions of College
counsel and the representative for the
member, the Discipline Committee panel
found the member guilty of professional
misconduct, and ordered that she appear
before the panel immediately following
the hearing to receive a reprimand.
The panel found that the member did
not set a professional example in front
of students and a colleague. In its written
statement, the panel noted, “The reprimand
by her peers and on behalf of the profession will act as a specific deterrent to the
member … [Publication] of the findings
and order of the Committee, in summary,
without the name of the member provides
general deterrence to the profession and informs the public that there is a consequence
for this type of conduct.”
Information about the disciplinary
action appears on the College website at
bit.ly/1iDZ7nQ and bit.ly/1oAIukT.
Member: Dennis Alan McDermott
Registration No: 240529
Decision: Revocation
Discipline Committee panel revoked the
certificate of Dennis Alan McDermott,
a Peel District School Board teacher, in
connection with a criminal conviction for
sexual exploitation.
Certified in June 1978, McDermott did
not attend the June 5, 2014, hearing, nor
was he represented by legal counsel.
The panel heard evidence that, in July
2012, the member had an inappropriate
personal relationship and sexual
relationship with a former female student.
In April 2013, he was sentenced to 30 days
imprisonment and 12 months of probation.
Having considered the evidence,
onus and standard of proof, and the
submissions of College counsel, the
panel found McDermott guilty of professional misconduct and directed the

G OV E R N I N G O U R S E LV E S
HEARINGS

Registrar to revoke his certificate.
The panel agreed with the Honourable
Justice P. Tetley in his judgment, who
stated that “While the incident in question
occurred after the student/teacher
relationship had expired and the
complainant in the matter had graduated,
those facts do little to diminish the
seriousness of the offence.’’
In its written decision, the panel called
McDermott’s conduct “unacceptable and
in conflict with the duty of a teacher to
protect students.’’
Member: Alex Stanley Owen
Registration No: 333745
Decision: Revocation
A Discipline Committee panel revoked
the certificate of former Scarborough
District School Board teacher Alex
Stanley Owen in connection with a criminal
conviction for indecent assault of a child
and possession of child pornography.
Certified in June 1959, Owen, who
retired from teaching at the board in
1987, represented himself, but chose not
to attend the July 9, 2014, hearing.
Owen acknowledged that, on seven to
10 occasions, he fondled a child’s penis by
reaching inside his pants. These assaults
took place between 1962 and 1967, while
the child was in his care. In addition, Owen
admitted possessing 9,600 unique images
of child pornography.
In August 2012, he pleaded guilty to
indecent assault of a child and possession
of child pornography. In October of the
same year, he received two conditional
sentences of 12 months and six months, to
be served consecutively, followed by two
years of probation.
A prohibition order is in place for five
years to ensure that he is not in the presence of any child under 16.
Having considered the evidence, onus
and standard of proof, and the submissions of College counsel, the panel found
Owen guilty of professional misconduct
and directed the Registrar to revoke his
Certificate of Qualification and Registration.
In its written decision, the panel said that
Owen “has brought the profession into disrepute and has lost the trust of the public.’’

Member: Not identified
Decision: Suspension,
reprimand, conditions
A Discipline Committee panel suspended
the teaching certificate of a College member
for massaging a student’s foot.
The member, who was certified to teach in
June 1983, attended the June 10, 2014, hearing, and was not represented by a lawyer.
Between October 2011 and July 2012, the
member — with the consent of his student’s
parents — had weekly meetings with his
student who had an individual education
plan. Arrangements with the parents were
made to have these meetings at the member’s home and at the school’s library.
The panel heard that during these
meetings the member touched the student’s
foot. The member stated that this was part
of his professional technique intended to
assist with sensory processing. However, the
member failed to provide the student’s parents with information about this technique.
The Discipline Committee panel found
the member guilty of professional misconduct based on the evidence, onus and
standard of proof, a statement of uncontested facts, a joint submission on penalty,
a plea of no contest, and legal submissions.The member was directed to appear
before the panel to receive a reprimand.
The panel also directed the Registrar
to suspend the member’s Certificate
of Qualification and Registration for
one month beginning on June 10, 2014.
As well, the member was ordered to
complete two pre-approved courses at
his own expense regarding appropriate
boundaries and boundary violation issues,
and on the instruction of students with
special education issues.
In its written decision, the panel said,
“the professional misconduct relates to
the fact that the member did not
communicate clearly with the parents
prior to employing the techniques with
their child … Publication of the findings
in summary form, without the name of
the member, will be sufficient to meet the
needs of specific and general deterrence.”
Information about the disciplinary
action appears on the College website at
bit.ly/1pX6z6m.

You know where
you’re going.
The UBC MET
program meets
you there.
International and online, the
UBC Master of Educational
Technology program prepares
educators for 21st century
teaching & learning.

Learn Anywhere.
MET.UBC.CA | @UBCMET

Faculty of Education

ADD THE OCT APP
to your mobile device

Get the
OCT Membership
app to carry out
transactions and
enjoy services while
on the go. From
Find a Teacher
and Find an AQ to
the ability to pay
membership fees
and access your
membership card,
the app provides
one-stop
convenience
at the tap of a
finger. It’s available on the iPhone,
Windows Phone and Android platforms.

December 2014 | Professionally Speaking

61

G OV E R N I N G O U R S E LV E S
HEARINGS (CONT.)

Member: Rowan Edwin Seymour, OCT
Registration No: 194351
Decision: Suspension, reprimand,
conditions
A Discipline Committee panel suspended
the teaching certificate of Lakehead
District School Board principal Rowan
Edwin Seymour and reprimanded him in
connection with a criminal conviction for
repeatedly smuggling prohibited devices
not permitted under the Customs Act.
Seymour, who was certified to teach in
June 1990, attended the January 30, 2014,
hearing with his lawyer.
Between August 1, 2010, and June 11,
2011, Seymour entered Canada from
the United States by vehicle with replica
firearms, handguns, assault rifles, sniper
rifles and submachine guns. He smuggled
these items into the country so that his
underage son could use them for a sport
called Airsoft and sell them.
In June 2012, he pleaded guilty to one
smuggling charge and was sentenced to 12
months of probation and fined $5,000. The
court also required him to participate in lectures to students with respect to the dangers
of possession and use of replica firearms. He
complied with this requirement and resigned

from the board on June 21, 2012.
The Discipline Committee panel found
Seymour guilty of professional misconduct based on the evidence, onus and
standard of proof, an agreed statement
of facts, a joint submission on penalty, a
guilty plea, and legal submissions.
He was ordered to face the panel
following the hearing to receive a
reprimand. The Discipline Committee
panel directed the Registrar to suspend
Seymour’s Certificate of Qualification and
Registration for two months beginning on
June 22, 2012. As well, Seymour was ordered to complete a pre-approved course at
his own expense regarding ethical expectations of teachers and education leaders.
In its written decision, the panel said,
“It is important to indicate to the profession and the public that behaviour that
breaches the standards of the profession
will be sanctioned appropriately by the
College, even if the behaviour occurs
outside of the classroom.”
Member: Douglas Kenneth George
Thompson, OCT
Registration: 437151
Decision: Reprimand, conditions

DO YOU KNOW SOMEONE

— A PARENT, STUDENT OR FRIEND —
INTERESTED IN THE WORLD OF TEACHING?
They can subscribe to Professionally Speakingfor insightful articles
and current reports on the teaching profession in Ontario.
Four issues only $10/year in Canada (outside Canada $20/year).
To subscribe, visit e-Services at

oct.ca

eservices

For subscription information contact subscriptions@oct.ca, 416-961-8800
(toll-free in Ontario 1-888-534-2222) ext 656. For members of the College,
Professionally Speaking is included in your annual membership fee.

A Discipline Committee panel
reprimanded Halton District School
Board teacher Douglas Kenneth
George Thompson for making
discriminatory comments and
displaying a discriminatory attitude.
The member, who was certified to teach
in August 2000, attended the July 3, 2014,
hearing, and was represented by a lawyer.
From September to November 2010,
Thompson made discriminatory comments
toward students with disabilities, displayed
a discriminatory attitude toward students
with respect to their sexual orientation,
and expressed negative comments to
students and parents about the school
and the administration.
The panel heard that he was saying that
students were unlikely to achieve academic
success, and that his students were of
generally low intelligence. He was also
speaking negatively about a student’s
chances of being admitted to postsecondary studies.
In February 2011, the board
disciplined Thompson and ordered
him to complete a six-session course on
establishing and maintaining appropriate
boundaries with students.
The Discipline Committee panel
found the member guilty of professional
misconduct based on the evidence,
onus and standard of proof, a statement
of uncontested facts, a joint submission
on penalty, a plea of no contest, and
legal submissions.
The member was directed to appear
before the panel immediately following
the hearing to receive a reprimand. The
member was also ordered to complete a
pre-approved course at his own expense
regarding boundary violation issues within
90 days of the order.
In its written decision, the panel said,
“discriminatory comments regarding
sexual orientation and disabilities warrant
publication with name and will not be
tolerated by the profession.” PS
Copies of the full decisions are
available at: oct.ca/members/
complaints-and-discipline/decisions

62 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

FI NAL EXAM
NAME:

Pat Foran

• Born in St. Augustine, Ont. on May 10, 1965
• His mom, Helen, was an educational assistant and
his dad, Gordon, was a farmer; he has nine siblings
• Attended St. Joseph’s Elementary School in Kingsbridge,
Ont. until Grade 6; St. Patrick’s Elementary School in Lucan,
Ont. for Grades 7–8 and Medway High School in Arva, Ont.
• Received his diploma in broadcast journalism at
Fanshawe College in London, Ont.
• Began his career in broadcasting as a CKCO Kitchener
reporter/camera operator in 1986
• Worked as a news correspondent based in northern
New Brunswick for ATV Halifax from 1988–90
• Hired as a CFTO reporter in 1990; covered high profile
stories like the Paul Bernardo trial, as well as interviewed
Sarah Ferguson, Wayne Gretzky and John Candy
• CTV’s Consumer Advocate since 2000; hosts CTV
Toronto’s popular feature segment Consumer Alert,
which investigates the consumer world
• Wrote four national bestselling books on consumer
and financial issues; his latest The Smart, Savvy Young
Consumer helps Canadian youth spend and save wisely

MONEY MAN

• Served on the federal government’s Task Force on Financial
Literacy from 2009–11; appointed to the National Steering
Committee on Financial Literacy in 2014, which aims to
help Canadians become better savers and spenders

CTV’s Consumer Advocate Pat Foran discusses the
financial lessons he wishes he had learned in school.

• Currently pursuing his political science degree online
from Alberta’s Athabasca University
• Follow @PatForanCTVNews on Twitter

Describe your school-aged self.
I was curious — not surprisingly for
someone who’s now a reporter.
Which subjects did you excel at?
Writing and public speaking.
Any subject that you struggled with?
Calculus.
Who are your favourite writers?
One of my favourite books is Call Me
Ted by Ted Turner. I read a lot of financial
self-help books and highly recommend
Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki.
What are you currently reading?
I am finishing up Ayn Rand’s Atlas
Shrugged. I’m also reading Alice Munro’s
My Best Stories, The High Road by Terry
Fallis and Winning by Jack Welch.
Who do you count as your heroes?
I count Nelson Mandela, Terry Fox and
Ted Turner as my heroes.

Which teacher did you most admire?
Mr. Fred Moroz, my Grade 9 history and
Grade 12 world religions teacher. He spoke
to our class about religion, politics and
sexuality with a depth and frankness I was
not used to — it opened my eyes to what
a good teacher he was. Mr. Moroz also
suggested that I read Atlas Shrugged —
it took me almost 30 years but I finally
got around to it!
What do you wish you had been
taught in school but weren’t?
Financial literacy — I’ve always thought
that it should be mandatory. A Grade 9
general business course came close but I
would have preferred a stand-alone one
to prepare me for the important financial
decisions (mortgages, car loans, RRSPs,
for instance) that I eventually would have
to make upon graduation.

If you could learn any language,
which would you pick?
My wife is French and my daughters are
all bilingual. Being able to speak the language has opened so many doors for them.
Lessons learned in kindergarten?
Being respectful of others and listening
while people speak.
What was your dream career?
I was torn between business and journalism.
That’s probably why I ended up a consumer
reporter writing financial books.
Best advice from your school years?
A wealthy farmer who I worked for told
me that the secret to success is to make
the right decisions every day. This may
sound glib but if we think about the daily
decisions we make, and take extra time and
care to choose the right ones, you can’t help
but be successful. PS

Tweet @OCT_OEEO [include #FinalExam] a selfie of you with your favourite Professionally Speaking article
from our September issue for a chance to win a Pat Foran-signed copy of The Smart, Savvy Young Consumer.
64 Professionally Speaking | December 2014

PHOTO: CTV NEWS TORONTO

BY LAURA BICKLE

Combining home and auto
isn’t always a good idea

Except when it comes to getting
up to 50% off home insurance
An exclusive offer for education employees
Some things are better together. Like purchasing both your car and home insurance
from OTIP. When you do, you will save up to 50% on your home insurance.

Call 1-866-437-6847 or visit otip.com/offer to complete a quote
This is a one-time discount (of up to 50%) and is only applicable to new multi-line home and auto policies underwritten by Traders General
Insurance Company, part of the Aviva Insurance Company of Canada. OTIP and Aviva have the right to withdraw this offer at any time.
Must reside in Ontario to be eligible for this discount.

®