TA B L E

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The Mission ................................................................................3

The Beginning ............................................................................4

The Organizers ...........................................................................5

The Presidents ............................................................................9

Our Progress...............................................................................27

Timeline .....................................................................................27

Profiles .......................................................................................49

Lifetime Members.......................................................................57

Be a 25th Anniversary Angel ......................................................59

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SUBJECT

CREDITS:
Writers: Sam Diaz, The Washington Post Veronica Garcia, Los Angeles Times Frank Gómez, Founder Peter Ortiz, Freelance writer, New York City Frances Robles, The Miami Herald Fernando Quintero, The Rocky Mountain News Editor: Joanna Hernandez, New York Times Regional Media Group Assistant Editors: Lisa Goodnight, National Association of Hispanic Journalists Iván Román, National Association of Hispanic Journalists Cover: Robert Holst, New York Times Regional Media Group Layout: Paul Fisher, Fisher Design
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MISSION/LA

MISION

The

Mission

La

Misión

The National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) is dedicated to the recognition and professional advancement of Hispanics in the news industry. Established in April 1984, NAHJ created a national voice and unified vision for all Hispanic journalists. The goals of the association are: 1 To organize and provide mutual support for Hispanics involved in the gathering or dissemination of news. To encourage and support the study and practice of journalism and communications by Hispanics. To foster and promote fair treatment of Hispanics by the media. To further the employment and career development of Hispanics in the media. To foster a greater understanding of Hispanic media professionals’ special cultural identity, interests, and concerns.

La Asociación Nacional de Periodistas Hispanos (NAHJ) se dedica al reconocimiento y al desarrollo profesional de los hispanos en la prensa. Fundada en abril del 1984, la NAHJ constituye una voz a nivel nacional y una visión unida para todos los periodistas hispanos. Las metas de la NAHJ son: 1 Organizar y proveer una red de apoyo mutuo a los periodistas hispanos dedicados a la recopilación y a la diseminación de noticias. Fomentar y apoyar entre los hispanos el estudio y el desempeño del periodismo y de la comunicación. Impulsar y promover el trato justo de los hispanos en los medios de información. Promover el empleo y el desarrollo profesional de los hispanos en los medios de difusión. Fomentar un entendimiento mayor de la identidad cultural, los intereses y las preocupaciones de los profesionales hispanos que trabajan en los medios.

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NAHJ

IN

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BEGINNING....

Nothing was easy about putting together a national organization to represent the interests of Latino journalists - and the cultures of people from more than 20 nations. In the beginning, everything was up for debate: The use of the word Hispanic over Latino; how to classify “real” journalists and where they would fall among the various categories of membership; even where to locate the headquarters. The National Association of Hispanic Journalists was born of the California Chicano News Media Association. Many held that being a strong promoter of the idea of a national organization, it was a natural for NAHJ’s location to be at CCNMA’s offices at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Others argued for Chicago, largely for its accessibility to both coasts and growing number of Latino journalists. The argument that made the most sense was to have the national headquarters in the nation’s capital, where we would seek to influence federal policy makers, trade associations and major media. There we would also join with other national Hispanic organizations to help shape attitudes and policies to advance the community’s agenda. And still, there were many uncomfortable with the notion of another group that would be drawing from the same dwindling pool of funds and grants. Difficult discussions were met face on, like when questions arose whether a Puerto Rican from New York could represent Puerto Ricans from the island. Ultimately, islanders were added to the committees. In any case, overcoming these and many other differences required patience, diplomacy, resilience, perseverance and commitment. but they were overcome. And NAHJ became a reality because of those qualities in the founders.

— Frank Gómez

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Organizers: In

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Quotes from the 15 Latino journalists who put their names on the line, signing the National Association of Hispanic Journalists' Articles of Incorporation.

Some organizers and founding members gathered for a picture in 1982. Bottom row, from left, Teresa Abate Rodriguez, Guillermo Martinez, Elisabeth Perez-Luna, Maria Elena Salinas and Juan Gonzalez. Top row, Frank Newton, Charlie Ericksen, Manuel Galvan, Jesús Dávila, Henry Mendoza, Gerald Garcia, Victor Vazquez, Julio Moran, Phil Sisneros and Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez.
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ORGANIZERS

JAY RODRIGUEZ
He was then the VP of Corporate Information for NBC. “I headed a panel discussion at the San Diego meeting. ...We held our meetings at various cities around the country to seek information from interested journalists on what kind of organization would serve their interests, and also to see if there was need for the organization. There was unanimous approval that it would serve the Latino community for many reasons.”

EDITH SAYRE AUSLANDER
She was an assistant professor of journalism at the University of Arizona. “After the 1982 conference, it became clear that we needed a national organization. With the help of Gerald Sass and the Gannett Foundation, 15 of us met with Hispanics in key U.S. locations to determine the support for a national organization. The reaction was overwhelmingly positive. “

MARIA ELENA SALINAS
Back then, she was a reporter, anchor and public affairs host for KMEX-TV in Los Angeles and board member of CCNMA. “The 1982 meeting in San Diego was the second time Hispanic journalists from across the country got together for a conference. It has always been considered the first because it included those who worked in mainstream media. It was impressive to see that so many Latino journalists responded to both the conference and the creation of NAHJ. The rest is history, and history in the making.”

CHARLIE ERICKSEN
Along with his wife Sebastiana Mendoza, and their son, Hector, he co-founded Hispanic Link bilingual news service. “When the Gannett Foundation’s Jerry Sass suggested ... that Hispanic journalists organize nationally-and then offered foundation funding to help-it was a prayer answered.”

HENRY MENDOZA
He was a reporter at the Los Angeles Times and recent past president of the CCNMA. “The Gannett Foundation’s Jerry Sass urged us to ask for a grant to explore interest in a national group for Latino journalists. My role led to my election as chair of the committee leading this effort, an experience that remains my proudest professional achievement. Only after two more years of meetings throughout the country, a lot of work by a committee that was representative of our Latino cultures and all phases of media and communications, plus much debate and soul searching, were Articles of Incorporation signed.”

GUILLERMO MARTINEZ
He was a columnist and on the editorial board of The Miami Herald in 1982. “There was a lot of skepticism about starting a national organization. There were people who thought a) it wasn’t needed; or b), if it was needed, it wasn’t possible. It wasn’t easy, but we overcame. We needed a national journalists association to make the media in this country understand that Hispanics were just as important as blacks, as women, as any other group in the newsroom.”

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PAULA MAES
She was the Public Affairs Director for KOB-TV, the NBC affiliate in Albuquerque, N.M. “We talked about getting New Mexico involved because of the large Hispanic population. CCNMA was feeling a lot of pressure to start a national group, but their purpose was to serve Southern California, the journalists in the Los Angeles area. They were really the only organized Hispanic media group in the country and they were very visible. That’s kind of where the people wanting a national organization migrated to, maybe because I was in the Southwest. We were devoted to the pursuit of minorities in the media. We traveled to Chicago, Miami, Dallas, San Francisco-invitations were sent out to all of these journalists in those communities to meet with us over a two-day period. They would come in and tell us what they thought the organization should be, what needs needed to be met. Out of that came NAHJ.”

FRANK GOMEZ
He was the Deputy Assistant U.S. Secretary of State for Public Affairs, invited at the request of Charlie Ericksen. “I’ve always believed that the media shapes perception, perceptions shape attitudes and attitudes shape policies and decisions. Given that we were so under represented in the media, the perceptions of Hispanics across the country were distorted. NAHJ has been a voice, a consistent voice. We are in a position of influence today that we could only dream about.”

JUAN GONZALEZ
At the time, he was a reporter at the Philadelphia Daily News. “One of my biggest challenges in the meetings of that initial organizing committee became helping to resolve the ethnic rivalry between Chicano, Cuban and Puerto Rican journalists that kept simmering below the surface, and which sometimes erupted into open shouting matches... Despite such occasional conflicts, all of us on the organizing committee became very close friends, and remain so to this day. In retrospect, it was all part of both the pain and the ecstasy that comes with giving birth to anything worthwhile.”

NORMA SOSA
She was a reporter and editor at the Chicago Sun Times. “When I was asked to consider sitting on the committee formed to organize the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, it took no deliberating about whether such a group could do any good. I signed on without a second thought. In the mid-1980s, there were few of us working in newsrooms and there were very wide information and experience gaps about minority populations in general and about Hispanic Americans in particular among those who controlled the mass media.”

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ORGANIZERS

JUAN M. GARCIA-PASSALACQUA
He was an attorney for an educational foundation in Puerto Rico. “In 1982, I was visiting New York for official business. I touched base with my good Puerto Rican friends, Juan Gonzalez and Jesús Dávila.... They invited me to a meeting of 15 Mexican-American, Cuban and Puerto Rican journalists that might need an attorney to write articles of incorporation to organize an association of Hispanic journalists. Frank del Olmo, then editorial writer for the Los Angeles Times, had taken the red-eye to meet on the other side of the country with us. Frank Gómez was chairing the meeting, and María Elena Salinas was the guiding spirit. I gladly accepted, and was very impressed when the whole group had a lot of cross-cultural, but essentially, Hispanic fun.”

GUSTAVO GODOY
He was vice president and news director of the Spanish International Network. SIN later became Univisión. “We said, ‘We’re a minority, we have to struggle together, we have to get a plan together.’ This is a land of information and opportunity and our people have to be informed. If we pool our resources together, we’re going to be able to say, ‘Hey, we’re here,’ and not be secondguessed all the time.”

JESUS DAVILA
He was a reporter for El Diario/LaPrensa in New York. “One of my main concerns as a member of the committee, and later as a member of the board, was ethics. I think I would offend no one if I tell you that I was the person mainly responsible for the adoption of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists’ code of ethics. It took some work, but we put together of good code of ethics.”

ROBERT ALANIZ
He was the manager of community affairs for KCBS-TV in Los Angeles and president of the California Association for Latinos in Broadcasting. “We agreed in principle that if Hispanics were ever to get ahead in the newsrooms of America, we needed to create a national voice that would gain respect and a permanent audience with those that ran the news business in America.”

MAGGIE RIVAS-RODRIGUEZ
She was a reporter for the Boston Globe. “One of the biggies for me was when those of us who had worked on that first conference made the commitment to go for a national organization. That was pretty bold. I sent out a bunch of letters to the Hispanic journalists I knew in Texas, announcing the venture. Got a note back from one of the longtime San Antonio journalists saying that the creation of a national group had been attempted four or five times before; good luck! I’m glad his pessimism wasn’t contagious!”

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CELEBRATING 2 5 YEARS OF TAKING THE LEAD

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PRESIDENTS

Rafael
2006 to present

Olmeda

NAHJ has a history of pushing for First Amendment issues, including calling for the passage of a federal shield law and encouraging more open government legislation. Last October, for the first time, members of the board and staff partnered with the non-profit group Free Press to discuss two issues with congressional staffers. The first was media consolidation, which can be affected by government action in the form of relaxing FCC regulations. We believe that putting more of the media in the hands of fewer owners will have a negative effect on minority ownership and coverage of minority communities, two areas that are important to our mission. We asked the government to conduct a study on minority media ownership, and when we were turned down, Free Press conducted a study of its own. Free Press found that greater media concentration does, in fact, decrease opportunities for minority ownership. Other studies showed that higher rates of local ownership were related to higher rates of minority ownership, and that local ownership is related to stronger local coverage. The second issue we tackled was network neutrality, the principle that Web sites are restricted only by their own

resources. There is a movement afoot to make the Web less friendly to smaller, individual content providers in favor of larger corporations and businesses that can pay a premium to make their sites more accessible to the general public. The Internet starts off as a level playing field for everyone who puts up a site. Minority groups have an interest in maintaining network neutrality to ensure all groups have equal access to the Internet. Neither of these are partisan issues. In fact, the issue of network neutrality has united groups as disparate as Moveon.org and the Christian Coalition. We at NAHJ are interested in these issues because they have an impact on the opportunities available to our people, the quality of the news programming we receive, and our abilities as individuals and community groups to have equal access to the resources of the next generation of communication. It’s important work that we must do to remain relevant in the coming years.

From left, NAHJ President Rafael Olmeda, left, greets Tina Griego and John Temple of the Rocky Mountain News, as well as Elizabeth Aguilera of the Denver Post. Aguilera is director of Region 7.
CELEBRATING 25 YEARS OF TAKING THE LEAD

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Verónica
2004 to 2006

Villafañe

When I took over the helm of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists at the UNITY convention, I never imagined that my biggest challenge would be to lead a journalism organization in times of change, downsizing and uncertainty in the media industry. Knight-Ridder, the second largest newspaper chain in the country, would become history, after a forced sale by investors. The dismantling of the highly regarded company, a champion of diversity, has many journalists still in a state of disbelief. Layoffs and buy-outs in many of the media companies were continuously announced during my term, including Spanishlanguage powerhouse Univisión, which positioned itself for a sale. Hundreds of jobs were eliminated. We aggressively advocated for retention of Latino journalists in the newsroom and pursued more hiring opportunities through our Parity Project, with incredibly favorable results. But I felt it was never enough. As a journalist who started her career in Spanish-language media, I was constantly disappointed at the lack of programming in Spanish at the convention. That changed, with an emphasis during my presidency to pay more attention and provide much needed services to our

previously unattended Spanish-language membership. These efforts resulted in an increase in members who work in Spanish-language media. In order to keep up with the changes in the industry, NAHJ has had to evolve. Everyone’s talking digital. Well, we listened and included more multimedia programming opportunities, to better prepare our members for new onthe-job duties as online journalism takes over newsrooms. Promoting diversity, advocating for better coverage of Latino issues, elevating the importance of Spanish-language media within our organization and increasing opportunities for our more seasoned journalists have been at the core of my mission during my two-year term. When I was elected president, I had already been part of the board of directors for three years. But leading was certainly different. People look to you for guidance. And you want to the best job possible. Needless to say, leading NAHJ was a great learning experience.

From left: Verónica Villafañe and Gov. Bill Richardson in Fort Lauderdale in 2006.

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Juan
2002 to 2004

Gonzalez

No profession or institution makes systemic change without a firm kick in the butt. Thanks to the fantastic support of NAHJ’s members, we shook up American journalism during my term as president, accomplishing goals others thought impossible.

Stopping the FCC’s plan to deregulate media ownership was by far the biggest achievement because it affected our entire profession. But fashioning through the Parity Project a whole new approach to diversity in news coverage and hiring was certainly the most innovative endeavor.

John Quiñones, left, Nancy Quiñones, Juan Gonzalez and María Elena Salinas at the Ritz-Carlton in Washington, D.C., during Noche de Triunfos in 2004.

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Cecilia
2000 to 2002

Alvear

NAHJ at 25. If this organization were a person, it would be ready to take on the world. In many ways we have done that. We have broken barriers, opened doors, diversified newsrooms, improved the quality of American journalism, raised our voice to defend journalistic principles. We have earned our rightful place at the table. We have come a long way, chicas y chicos. But we have not yet reached the top. However, I know we will succeed. As Al Martinez of the L.A. Times and other pioneering Latino journalists leave the business, NAHJ must intensify its pressure on media companies to promote Latinos to leadership posts. As things stand now, there are no Latinos on the mastheads of the New York Times, the Washington Post or the Los Angeles Times. No Latino presidents or evening news anchors at the TV networks. No Latinos in the front offices of the media companies. No Latino ownership of the two major Spanish-language networks. No high

ranking Latinos at PBS. Yet, many of those media companies are launching efforts to attract more Latino viewers or readers. This is the time to expand the Parity Project and make diversity at the top a major priority. And speaking of priorities, it is no coincidence that the motto of this convention is “NAHJ@25: Building Today, Shaping Tomorrow” and that it meets in the heart of Silicon Valley. The opening plenary will bring together new and old media players to analyze the digital divide and explore ways in which we can become the leaders, the content providers and the owners of online journalism properties. We may have been latecomers to the world of print and broadcast media but now we are right on time. It is up to us, the members and the leadership of the NAHJ, to get to the top of this brave new world. HAPPY 25TH BIRTHDAY NAHJ!

Cecilia Alvear, left, at a silent auction with Carolina Garcia, executive editor of The Monterey Herald.

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Nancy
1998 to 2000

Baca

Those were the years of growth for NAHJ within the national office and as an essential part of Unity '99. We took our conventions from Miami to Seattle to Houston. The second Unity convention, held in Seattle in 1999, presented challenges and rewards. The convention drew more than 6,000 journalists of color demonstrating a sizeable force for change in the news business. The convention made headlines with a speech by presidential candidate Al Gore. Candidate George W. Bush changed his schedule to make an unannounced appearance at the convention job fair.

communications director Joseph Torres. Through his efforts, NAHJ was able to craft immediate responses to news affecting our membership. Membership reached 1,500. I ran for president after serving on the board as a region director and vice president for print. My focus centered on recruiting young Latino journalists. I continued that worked as president, attending numerous job fairs and conventions.

Nancy Baca, left, with Laura Bush in 2000.

Making the convention happen brought a new sense of teamwork among the four minority journalism organizations. We found through differences of opinion and approach regarding how we would handle Washington state's approval of anti- affirmative action legislation. The dialogue and work to produce the convention made us stronger. I served as president of the Unity board for the year 2000. In the national office we added support staff including

At the 2000 convention, we again made headlines with a keynote address by presidential candidate George W. Bush. I was honored to serve the membership at a critical point in the history of Latino journalists. During this time, our focus turned from simply encouraging Latino students to choose journalism as a career to nurturing the growing ranks of Latino managers, editors, publishers and news directors. Now, it is crucial to retain our membership and motivate them to stay in the business.

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Dino
1996 to 1998

Chiecchi

Every two years, NAHJ reinvents itself a bit. Shortly after becoming president, it became evident the organization’s infrastructure needed attention. I knew many of these efforts would not be apparent to the general membership, but keeping the lights on was crucial to NAHJ’s existence. We learned that Policies and Procedures had not been updated since its creation in 1987. Executive board members, with the help of NAHJ’s attorney, spent a great deal of time bringing NAHJ upto-date in 1996. The P&P was so well crafted, other journalism organizations have used it as a model. We realized the reserves fund had missed much of the stock market ride because of poor investments. We rectified that by taking bids from investment firms and investing more wisely.

NAHJ is heavily funded by corporate donations. We acknowledged that to maintain and expand our revenue level, and improve our services, we needed to expand our base of contributors to include consumer-product companies. An important change was the use of board members to help raise money. We also began having the spring board meeting the week of the scholarship banquet, cutting back on travel for the board and staff. None of these changes occurred without support from board members. And none of this could have happened without competent executive directors. NAHJ’s future is secure with the systems put in place during 1996-1998, and the tone set by the board and executive director.

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Gilbert
1994 to 1996

Bailón

The mid-90s were marked by rapid growth in NAHJ membership and the rising stature of Hispanic journalists nationally within the media industry. The formulating stages of the first Unity conference were rocky at times, but leaders stayed the course in those years to lay the foundation for the historic convention in 1999. NAHJ created more programs and outreach to students, academics and Spanish-language journalists. That converged at the 1995 national convention in El Paso, entitled “Sin Fronteras: Window of Opportunity A bilingual, bicultural event.”

That year the first student campus, which became the role model for the industry, was conducted at the University of Texas at El Paso. Convention sessions were held in El Paso and Ciudad Juarez. At night at a charreada, a Mexican rodeo, replete with mariachis and great food, offered a new, authentic experience for many attendees. The Chicago convention demonstrated the growth and influence of Latino journalists in the Midwest. The increase, especially those who work in Spanishlanguage, has been phenomenal since then.

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Diane
1992 to 1994

Alverio

The pressures and uncertainty of the first Unity convention, including the controversial cancellation of the NAHJ convention in Denver in 1993, marked the two memorable years I served as president of NAHJ. They were years of growth and soul searching for both the organization and me. Within months of taking office, I learned that a law discriminating against gay and lesbian residents had been passed in Colorado, the planned site of our 1993 convention. A national boycott was in place and we were called on to join. Board members who had idealistically run for office to do their part to increase the Latino presence in the media, suddenly found themselves in the midst of a national political firestorm. Major media organizations kept calling to ask what we would do. The tough decision was based on the philosophical basis of NAHJ and its financial future. Should NAHJ take a position on such an issue that journalists also had to cover on a regular basis? How would the financial loss of canceling or moving the conference impact the organization? Could we sustain this loss in the tens of thousands? The annual conferences are a major source of revenue for NAHJ.

In the end, we voted to move the conference to Washington DC, a decision some thought compromised our role as journalists while others said we had not acted quickly enough. Our attention next turned to the Unity '94 conference. While it provided an exciting opportunity to capture the industry’s attention, it also posed a tremendous challenge for the four sponsoring organizations. While we were all journalists of color, we learned along the way, sometimes painstakingly, of the many cultural differences among us. We were able to work through those, never losing sight of our joint mission. Among my proudest moments with NAHJ was my work creating “El Noticiero,” the student television training program, and guiding a dedicated board and membership through the unchartered territory of Unity '94 and the national spotlight during the turmoil over Denver. The role NAHJ plays in this country is vital. Those of us past, present and future Latino journalists and other activists must always make sure NAHJ continues to have a voice in the everchanging world of the media. Collectively, through NAHJ, we help pave the road for Latinos in this country in the future.

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Don
1990 to 1992

Flores

I had managerial experience and hoped to bring some expertise to the association. Luckily the membership thought the same and elected me president in 1990. I was lucky to be surrounded by a really good board and officers. It helped that we had good representation of broadcast journalists. We addressed issues including the Puerto Rican plebiscite as well as Cuba-related and Mexican-American issues.

heads of the associations meeting with Gerald Garcia, chair of the minority committee of the NAA. We said that the various associations of journalists of color would support it. It wasn’t a hard sell. We just needed to work out logistical issues, like how to handle money. I also served on the Unity board.

NAHJ should continue to be a very active and proactive association. It needs to push the envelope, to be a NAHJ board members top row, from left: Barbara watchdog, to help Hispanic journalists Gutierrrez, Joe Rodriguez, Iván Román, Rosalind that are out there with the challenges Solis and Dino Chiecchi. Bottom row, from left: they face in the workplace and up the Melita Garza, Don Flores, Evelyn Hernandez, We did a lot of leg work and a lot of career ladder. The issues today are Patrisia Gonzales, Bea Garcia PR work. We worked with ASNE and largely the same issues we had when its diversity committee. It was a time we got started, and when I was there: when we started seeing more Hispanics involved with Pulitzer An ongoing challenge to create enthusiasm among the judging. NAHJ crashed through the glass ceiling during my ranks, and among the media companies to diversify. tenure. NAHJ, along with the CCNMA, a very important partner and We also faced general apathy of our membership. We had a sister organization, has made a significant difference in our share of ups and downs with various media companies. allowing many of us to be successful in our careers. One year they were with you, the next year they were not. There was also inconsistency in their support of hiring and We Hispanics tend to disappear into the framework. We recruiting Hispanic journalists. don’t go out for the limelight—we just do our thing. I hope we can do even more in the future to celebrate and UNITY: Journalists of Color started during my tenure. I remember the remember their accomplishments.

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Evelyn
1988 to 1990

Her nández

I was the first woman elected president of NAHJ, the first Puerto Rican-and the youngest, at age 29. was blessed with hard-working board members, as well as mentors and friends who were generous with their time and counsel. Politics and sexism were issues we tackled in the early days. It's important to note that NAHJ was the first of the major journalism organizations-minority or not-to elect a woman as president. We broke down that barrier. One of my most difficult tasks was changing the structure of the annual convention. Previously, our convention was called the National Hispanic Media Conference & Expo, and we met in conjunction with the National Association of Hispanic Publications and the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences, an association of performing artists. As each grew, putting on a conference that met the needs of all became more difficult. NAHJ was the only group with a staff, and we were responsible for the bulk of the planning, organizing and fund-raising. There was support to break away from the other groups, but some of the criticism was harsh. Some people said that we board members were "anti-Hispanic."But I was convinced it was the right thing to do. We held our first solo conference in 1990.

Edna Negrón, head of the Scholarship Committee, spearheaded the First Journalism Scholarship Banquet, held in March 1989 at the Sheraton Centre Hotel in New York City. Jay Rodríguez, a founder of the association, had helped line up the guest speaker: Tom Brokaw. When it was over, we had raised tens of thousands of dollars for scholarships. With the three former NAHJ presidents, we developed a Five-Year Action Plan that was then approved by the board. The previous NAHJ board had met with the board of the National Association of Black Journalists to discuss holding a joint convention. Soon afterward, the Asian American Journalists Association and the Native American Journalists Association joined the discussion. During my presidency, we formally agreed to hold the first Unity convention in 1994. In 1989, the conference was held in San Juan, P.R. The day before, an explosion on the USS Iowa near the coast caused many journalists working on student projects to leave to cover this major story. People on the board became my friends. We argued a lot, but we laughed a lot, too. People worked hard, all of it as volunteers. We believed the work we were doing was important for Latinos in journalism. I believe that to this day.

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Manuel
1986 to 1988

Galvan

Norma Sosa’s mother and my mother had gone to grade school together in Corpus Christi, Texas. Then there we were, working for rival newspapers in Chicago. Norma asked if I would represent the Midwest at an organizing conference. I did and then found myself elected Midwest Regional Representative.

My tenure was one of diplomacy, smoothing the feelings of CCNMA because NAHJ was running full speed on it own, stressing friendships with NAHP and HAMAS even though NAHJ chose to have it own conventions. We also were building relationships with NABJ that lead to the Unity gatherings.

I served on the NAHJ board under Gerald NAHJ remains essential to assure that Garcia and Guillermo Martinez. I then the mainstream media represents found myself being urged to run for Hispanics accurately. And it serves as a NAHJ president Manuel Galvan with Al president. It was not something that I beacon for our people to show that Fitzpatrick, former president of NABJ. was considering right at that time. But in we have arrived in this country and are the 20 years that I have served on boards, I have found that ready to be mentors for future generations. leadership means stepping forward when you’re called.

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Guillermo
1985 to 1986

Martinez

They said it couldn’t be done. Many stressed the differences between the different ethnic groups that make up what this country calls Hispanics. Mexican, Puerto Ricans and Cubans were different and had widely divergent agendas. A professional association that brought together Hispanic journalists of all ethnic origins was simply an idea whose time had not come, or so conventional wisdom said. In California, the Chicanos had organized CCNMA. They feared they would lose financial support if a national group took away part of its thunder. They had reason to worry. In its first year, NAHJ took Frank Newton away from CCNMA and even though it was done in a professional manner, feathers were ruffled. Back in those early years of the organization, it was important to prove that we could work together. And with

the help of CCNMA President George Ramos, we did that. We had to prove that there were more things that bound us together than those that keep us apart. We did that also. In those early days, we set up programs to help young Hispanic journalism students with scholarships and a professional award to the top journalism story in any type of media by or about Hispanics—the Guillermo Martinez Marquez award. My thanks to Gerald Garcia, our first president, to Manuel Galvan, who replaced me; to Evelyn Hernandez, our first Puerto Rican president. By the first five years, we proved the skeptics wrong. By then, we had an association of Hispanic journalists. Where we came from originally was finally behind us.

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My most vivid recollection of our beginnings is the harsh contrast between our public persona and our backroom power plays. In public, we were a united front. It was starkly different behind closed doors, where egos, personal agendas and personal whims took precedence over the overall needs of the association and its members. It seemed to me that a few of us did not want the national movement to succeed. In fact, if not for Henry Mendoza and a handful of other members from CCNMA, the movement for a national group could have failed. There was strong opposition from some influential Southern California journalists to start a national association. I understood then and I understand now the apprehension from those opposing the formation of a national group. At the time, CCNMA was 10 years strong. It was a powerhouse group. It had most of the top-ranking journalists in the business as members. It had the funding. So, a national group could possibly usurp its status. For those of us who believed a national group was important, it was a constant struggle during those formative months. The back-room discussions were tense. Yet, in public, we were united. We presented a powerful force to media executives and recruiters who were courting our journalistic talents, skills, experience and diverse culture.

In public, it was a pleasure to be your first president. Outside that environment, it was an uncomfortable and unsettling neverending battle. To media executives and recruiters, our strengths were our diverse backgrounds— Latinos, Mexican-Americans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Central Americans. In our meetings, our diversity, our differences, our varied differences of opinion, it seemed to me were almost our most deadly enemies. Somehow, we accepted our roles and moved forward as one. But there were times during my tenure that I thought all was lost, particularly when some of us could not accept the realities of the time. But the perseverance of most of our members, particularly Henry, who championed a national group though his strong ties to CCNMA, patience by some of us, angry outbursts by others and me, we made it work. I am extremely humbled, privileged and honored that you allowed me to be your first president. And thanks to all of you, believers or not, who helped make it happen. I am so proud of us.

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Steps in the right direction, with many miles to go
As the National Association of Hispanic Journalists celebrates its 25th year of existence, it also faces a media landscape that its founders couldn’t imagine in 1982-and it has left many of the members reevaluating what it means to be a journalist. The concerns of a quarter of a century ago-whether Latino journalists of many different countries could unite as one in a national organization-seem almost insignificant today, though it once threatened the birth of NAHJ. Today’s newsrooms have been reshaped by the prevalence of online media, placing new demands and challenges on journalists. Media consolidation and the overall failure of the industry to meaningfully diversify its newsrooms have forced NAHJ to continue diligently in its mission-almost to the point of its members becoming newsroom activists in order to affect change.
Back in the day: Panelists in 1982.

Existence once meant “keeping the lights on and paying the bills on time,” wrote Dino Chiecchi, NAHJ president from 1996 to 1998. A decade later, NAHJ still deals with limited resources, but the largely volunteer organization has made great strides in raising record amounts for scholarships and in creating greater opportunities for Latino journalists. Even with this progress, there is still an urgent need

By Peter Oritz NAHJ member

T imeline 2007
June
25th annual National Association of Hispanic Journalists convention in San Jose, Calif.

March
NAHJ board resigns in protest from Accrediting Council of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, questioning its efforts to ethnically diversify journalism schools.
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February
NAHJ protests a WWII PBS documentary that excludes the Latino experience. Filmmaker Ken Burns agrees to rework the project, but it’s not clear what will be done.
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to raise awareness and advocate the importance of having diverse voices in print, online and in broadcast. NAHJ continues to voice the concerns of Latino journalists, who serve as watchdogs of their communities. Many members credit veteran journalist Juan Gonzalez, a columnist for the New York Daily News, for reenergizing the organization during his term from 2002 to 2004as well as for creating the Parity Project. Gonzalez notes the biggest achievement during his presidency was “stopping the FCC’s plans to deregulate media ownership...because it affected our entire profession ... but fashioning through the

Parity Project a whole new approach to diversity in news coverage and hiring was certainly the most innovative endeavor. “No profession or institution makes systemic change without a firm kick in the butt,” Gonzalez says. “Thanks to the fantastic support of NAHJ’s members, we shook up American journalism during my term as president, accomplishing goals others thought impossible.” While there are veteran journalists like Gonzalez to thank for paving the way for future generations, it is his peers who have become the newsroom’s latest casualties. Charlie Ericksen, a founder of

Miguel Perez, right, reacts favorably to Phillip Sanchez's comments in 1985.

Just like today, NAHJ members in 1984 voice their opinions.

2006
November
The San Jose Mercury News joins the Parity Project.

October
NAHJ submits comments with the FCC opposing the agency’s effort to rewrite our nation’s broadcast ownership regulations.
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NAHJ calls upon Congress to pass a federal shield law to protect journalists from forcibly revealing confidential sources.
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NAHJ and co-founder and publisher of Hispanic Link News Service, expressed anger when he recently recounted the “retirement” of Al Martinez, longtime columnist for the Los Angeles Times. After more than 30 years with the paper, Martinez felt that he was forced to take a buyout. Martinez, a vocal critic of media consolidation, sent an email to newspaper colleagues at the end of May explaining that he was a victim of the paper’s “buyout/layoff frenzy,” noted LAObserved.com.

“If we are really concerned about getting Hispanics into the business of journalism, we ought to do a better job of convincing them to be bold, to become change agents in their newsrooms,” Ericksen says. “You have to do that if you want to live with yourself and feel that your profession still has some honor to it.” NAHJ’s current leaders need only look to the organization’s roots and growing pains as it deals with today’s challenges. The idea of a national organization germinated in 1982 at the first National Hispanic Media Professionals Conference in San Diego. There were mixed feelings among the members of the California Chicano News Media Association, the prominent Latino journalist organization at the time. A national group seemed a difficult concept for many journalists, who

Some things never change - El Gran Baile!

June
24th annual convention, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., with satellite conversation with Ricardo Alarcón, president of Cuba’s national assembly.

The New York Times announces launch of multimedia training institute for student members of NAHJ.

May
NAHJ holds its first online elections

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were reluctant to let go of their geographic and ethnic roots, whether they were MexicanAmericans in Los Angeles, Puerto Ricans in New York or Cuban-Americans in Miami. But two months after the San Diego gathering, Gerald Sass, then senior vice president of the Gannett Foundation-now the Freedom Forum—told the leaders of CCNMA that Gannett would support a national organization with or without their blessing. “Jerry Sass just told them, ‘Hey, we are going to go ahead and do it,” Ericksen recalls. “So a few of them defected and decided to join the national association.’ “ Ericksen credits Sass and Newton for helping jump-start and guide the new organization even as tension simmered. Gannett awarded NAHJ $50,000 in

1983 to organize and a year later it officially became an organization. The CCNMA “did not want us to exist, they did not want us around because they feared we would take their funders and they would be out of business,” Ericksen says. In 1990, NAHJ put on its first convention of its own in San Francisco. And CCNMA continues to flourish to this very day.

Al Gore speaks at the Unity '99 convention in Seattle.

Overcoming differences and solidifying a national identity served as a source of pride for Latinos at a time when few— if any—were in newsrooms. Rubén Rosario, who started his 30-year career with the New York Daily News, is now a columnist with the St. Paul Pioneer Press. “I joined in terms of pride and to have something you can identify with because when we broke in ... we were pretty much the lone wolf,” Rosario says. “To have an organization of

April
The Orlando Sentinel becomes partner in the Parity Project.
NAHJ announces partnership with Hispanic National Bar Association.
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March
NAHJ and the Puerto Rico Journalists Association hold a press conference in Washington, D.C., denouncing FBI’s aggressive tactics against journalists in Puerto Rico.

February
The Salt Lake Tribune becomes Parity Project partner.

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numbers was a great comfort to me.” Latino journalists’ widespread growth across the United States mirrors the growing and diverse Latino population, which comprises the largest minority group in the nation. The Latino population grew 3.4 percent between July 1, 2005 and July 1, 2006, for a total of 44.3 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Much of that growth occurs in cities like St. Paul that previously drew hardly any attention. Now the newsroom has people like Rosario, who calls himself a “Minne-Rican,” a combination of his Minnesota and Puerto Rican roots. As time evolved, the organization realized how much power was gained in numbers. This eventually led to the organization joining with the National Association of Black Journalists, the Asian American Journalists Association and the Native American Journalists Association to hold the first UNITY: Journalists of Color

conference in 1994. Félix Gutiérrez, who helped secure the 1983 Gannett developmental grant to start NAHJ, praises concrete efforts such as the Parity Project. Since its inception, 150 Latino journalists have been hired and the participating companies collectively saw a 45 percent net gain of Latinos in their newsrooms. Gutiérrez, professor of journalism at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Communication, also is encouraged by NAHJ’s stance against media consolidation and the loss of jobs that have plagued journalism. He said too many newsroom decisions are being made by the business side, by people with little or no respect for editorial integrity. These are the folks willing to sacrifice coverage and eliminate jobs if it means

Mariachis entertain the audience in Dallas in 1988.

2005
November
E. W. Scripps Company’s broadcast television station group partners with the Parity Project.

September
NAHJ sets up assistance plan for Latino journalists affected by Hurricane Katrina

June
NAHJ converts membership dues to calendaryear renewal structure.

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increased shareholder value. NAHJ and its members can’t afford to remain silent, he says. “We have been trying to help them [media industry] do the right thing, we have been trying to help them catchup to where they should be,” Gutiérrez says. NAHJ’s current efforts follow a tradition of pushing for First Amendment issues, such as calling for a federal shield law and encouraging more open government legislation. Rafael Olmeda, NAHJ’s current president, says that the organization joined with the nonprofit group Free Press in October to

address congressional staffers with their concerns over the emergence of media consolidation aided by the government easing FCC regulations. A year earlier, in 2005, the NAHJ board passed a resolution that opposed further deregulation of the nation’s broadcast ownership rules until the FCC addressed how this could hurt minority ownership opportunities. Another resolution supported municipalities that wanted to build their own wireless broadband networks in response to commercial Internet providers who were neglecting their communities. “We believe that putting more of the media in the hands of fewer owners will have a negative effect on minority ownership and coverage of minority communities, two areas that are important to our mission,” Olmeda writes. Iván Román, executive director of NAHJ, echoes these concerns. If many

María Elena Salinas interviewed Mexico's President Vicente Fox in Tijuana, at the 2002 San Diego conference.

June
23nd annual Convention, Fort Worth, Texas. Los Angeles Mayor-elect Antonio Villaraigosa addresses Town Hall. Close to 1,600 attend.

May
CNN Awards $335,000 to the Ruben Salazar Scholarship Fund

April
The first NAHJ chapters started in central Florida and in Charlotte, N. C.

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journalists weren’t able to make the connection between media consolidation and jobs five years ago, there is little doubt today. “Now it’s right in your face,” Román says. “Media consolidation has a direct effect on the number of journalism jobs out there, and we can see over the years ... [jobs] have gone down dramatically.”
Charlie Ericksen, one of NAHJ’s founders, has been a mentor to many NAHJ students.

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke in Fort Worth in 2005.

Another concern revolves around the principles of network neutrality. In short, network neutrality symbolizes an equal playing field for all

web content providers. If large Internet service companies succeed in lobbying efforts to require web content providers pay a premium for better access, the Internet may become prohibitively expensive for many smaller providers. Román likens it to the “redlining of broadband access ... and segregation of information.” Joseph Torres made it his business to

March Three Scripps newspapers in Florida—The Stuart News, The (Fort Pierce) Tribune, and the Press Journal in Vero Beach—join the Parity Project.
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The Tampa Tribune and WFLA-TV become Parity Project partners.

January
Three California papers—the Napa Valley Register, the Hanford Sentinel and the Santa Maria Times—join the Parity Project.

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understand the consequences of efforts to stifle media access even if these efforts didn’t resonate with mainstream journalists or the public at large. Torres was NAHJ’s Students of journalism learn lessons of objectivity. deputy director for communications and media policy before leaving in March to work as the government relations manager at Free Press. Media consolidation has severely limited the number of radio and television stations owned by different entities and the ability for people of color to be owners, Torres says. It also led to layoffs for many Latino journalists who gave a voice to communities of color. Torres fears that now the Internet is under assault.

“I think you are messing with the ability of people to receive news from a diversity of places, and it ultimately will hurt our community because we don’t have the economic means to compete or the money to make sure our sites will be seen faster,” Torres says. NAHJ has shown it can play a crucial role in the changing media landscape with the help of partners. Torres points to April 2006 when NAHJ wrote Carlos

Newsday's Eli Reyes chats with Walter Middlebrook during a scholarship banquet.

2004
December
The Daily Camera in Boulder, Colo., joins the Parity Project.

October
KCNC-TV in Denver becomes first U.S. NAHJ Parity Project broadcast partner

September
Corpus Christi Caller-Times joins the Parity Project.

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M. Gutierrez, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce, asking why the National Telecommunications and Information Agency had not done a study on the state of minority broadcast ownership since 2000, even though it had done so in the past. When the NTIA wrote they had no plans to do a report, the Free Press took up the task. The Free Press study found that in 2006, people of color owned just 3.26 percent of all local television stations in the United States compared with 3.31 in 1998. NAHJ’s

advocacy also attracted the attention of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, which cited NAHJ’s concern in a letter it sent to the Senate leadership urging a study on minority media ownership. “The decisions about Former co-workers John Quiñones tomorrow are being made and Bertha Coombs. today,” Torres says. “It is an issue of our survival and to ensure that our communities are empowered to be their own storytellers.” Throughout its history, NAHJ has played watchdog. The organization has taken a stance on wide-ranging issues including calling on the media to correct the use of offensive racial and ethnic information. NAHJ also advocates for balanced media coverage of the Latino community. It does not stand for any kind of discrimination, a fact demonstrated one year when the annual convention had to be moved

Applauding our efforts.

August
Unity’s third convention is NAHJ’s 22nd annual, held in Washington. More than 8,000 attend. Presidential candidates John Kerry and incumbent George W. Bush speak.
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Geraldo Rivera pledges $100,000 to NAHJ and Unity.

May
NAHJ gets $1 million grant from McCormick Tribune Foundation to expand Parity Project

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from a state that had passed legislation that discriminated against gays and lesbians. Our conventions draw live appearances from U.S. presidents, and in 1998 the NAHJ board met privately with Bill Clinton in the White House to discuss the growing Latino President Bush spoke to NAHJ members in Houston in 2000. population. Román says the organization widened its advocacy role, especially in the last five years. But he wants members to adopt that role in a way that might have discomforted an older generation of journalists in the mainstream media. He notes many Latino journalists were at one time reluctant to cover Hispanic issues fearing it might pigeonhole their careers. “There were so few of us entering the mainstream newsroom, that we felt we needed to accommodate specifically to

the rigidity of notions in the newsrooms,” Román says. “We had to endure many years of being told we had to leave our Latino heritage at the door.” Often times those notions meant white men deciding what was newsworthy. The lack of diversity has resulted in newsrooms failing to gauge what communities of color value as important. Román attributes this lack of diversity to why many Englishlanguage publications and broadcasters were surprised about the large

TV Host Cristina Saralegui and many admirers

Pulitzer Newspapers, Inc. becomes a partner in NAHJ’s Parity Project. NAHJ approves creation of chapters

February
NAHJ names a permanent award in the honor of the late Los Angeles Times editor and NAHJ member Frank del Olmo.

January
North County Times in California joins the Parity Project.

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immigration protests last year. But even if Latino journalists can’t always win in advocating for better coverage, more and more are emboldened to let their editors know that being a journalist and Latino are not mutually exclusive. “Bringing your ethnicity and your experience to journalism is OK,” Román says. NAHJ also has spoken out on how some media outlets taint their coverage and color their viewers’ or readers’ perceptions. One notable example is the use of “illegal aliens” and use of “illegals” as a noun. The organization says that such language dehumanizes immigrants and creates an atmosphere that effectively removes the person from the debate while giving more credence to anti-immigrant proponents. “We wouldn’t challenge the antiimmigrant activist for saying what he

Cultures are celebrated at NAHJ.

says. He can say whatever he wants to say; this is the United States,” Román says. “But what we would challenge is a medium that allows them to just say whatever they say without offering the balance or fairness in the coverage.” Stella M. Chávez learned she wasn’t alone when she started attending NAHJ conventions. The annual event

2003
December
Three Texas dailies—the San Angelo StandardTimes, the Times Record News and Abilene Reporter-News—become Parity Project partners.
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September
Naples (Fla.) Daily News joins the Parity Project

June
21st annual NAHJ convention, New York, NY. About 2,000 attend.

Ventura County Star becomes a Parity Project partner.
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introduced her to other Latino journalists, who like her, embraced their ethnicity and culture in the newsroom. “I felt that growing up Latina-being a daughter of immigrant parents-that I had insight into that world that maybe other people didn’t,” Chávez says. NAHJ “is like a support group for journalists like me.” Chávez, a reporter for The Dallas Morning News, remembers watching her father, an immigrant from Mexico, reading the newspaper she now writes for even though his English was poor. Chávez’s father asked his daughter for help understanding stories and later when she attended college, he clipped and mailed her articles on immigration and the Latino community.

Though her newspaper doesn’t use the term “illegal alien,” Chávez would have no problem vocalizing her objections to such language. She is grateful that NAHJ lends its voice to this and other issues about Latinos. She advocates on a community level with her involvement in a local Latino media group that issues scholarships for students. Still, Chávez wonders if she will have a job in five years and laments friends who have left the business. “I can’t see myself doing anything else, and at the end of the day I want to be able to tell stories that are not being told,” Chávez says, still drawing inspiration from her father. “I think about my dad sometimes when I write stories, and sometimes when I’m writing stories, it’s like I’m writing about my dad. So that keeps me going.” Like Chávez, Nancy San Martin credits NAHJ for serving as a crucial network

2002
April
The Parity Project launches at The Rocky Mountain News in Denver.

December
NAHJ joins a coalition of 16 journalism groups to urge the Bush Administration that in the event that Iraq is invaded, it abide by guidelines the Pentagon and media groups established after the 1991 Persian Gulf War.
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The NAHJ board approves the Parity Project as an initiative.

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and for being “directly responsible for launching my career as a journalist.” San Martin graduated from stuffing bags as a volunteer at her first convention in 1986 to board member from 1991 to 1994. Through an NAHJ convention she secured an internship with The Miami Herald while attending college. Today she is a foreign correspondent for the Herald. One of NAHJ’s biggest roles is ensuring

newsrooms adapt journalistic principles to their online website operations, San Martin says. Today’s journalists are better equipped to handle multimedia demands, but they also need to understand economic factors that are reshaping newsrooms, she says. “As much as we We enjoy the food. want as journalists to do only journalism, the reality is that newspapers are businesses,” San Martin says. “Unfortunately, we have to figure out how to stay in business while still doing all those things that journalists do.”

We partied hardy at the beach party in Fort Lauderdale.

2001
June
20th annual NAHJ convention, San Diego, at same city and hotel where the first national gathering of Hispanic media professional was conducted. Mexico President Vicente Fox speaks at the opening night of the event in Tijuana, Baja California.
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September
Many NAHJ members are involved in covering the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City — writing, reporting, editing and/or shooting
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photographs and video. NAHJ raises funds for the children of TV employee Isaias Rivera, a native of Puerto Rico and 30-year employee of CBS who died that morning working from the station’s transmitter room at the top of the Twin Towers.
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NAHJ conventions have offered many training workshops.

San Martin touts the convention as a “kind of university” to help educate new and older generations of journalists to adapt to change. NAHJ has focused more attention providing multimedia and online journalism training at its conventions. “We can’t rely on the industry to make us better journalists,” San Martin says. “We have to take it upon ourselves to be the very best that we can be, and that is how workshops, panels and education opportunities help Hispanic journalists continue to hone their skills as journalists.” Every year San Martin helps organize convention workshops, and this year

she will organize two, including one on immigration. For some, the convention is perceived as a party despite its job fair and educational workshops. But for San Martin and many others, the convention is the best way to meet face-to-face with potential employers. “I hope that [party] perception has changed because it certainly has evolved into a leading journalism organization,” she says. “I think we’ve

And there’s always time to mingle.

2000
June
19th annual NAHJ convention, Phoenix, Ariz. More than 1,500 attend. Mexico’s Foreign Minister Jorge Castañeda is a convention speaker.
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NAHJ board passes resolution calling for news organizations to provide domestic partner benefits to their employees.

June
18th annual NAHJ convention, Houston, Texas. Almost 1,400 attend. Gov. George W. Bush speaks opening night. NAHJ inducts first three honorees into its new Hall of Fame, including
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had a direct role in ensuring diversity in the newsroom and ensuring that those newsrooms are reflective of the community.” Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez, an NAHJ founder, was instrumental in starting NAHJ’s first student newspaper, The Latino Reporter, at the 1988 convention in Dallas. It would serve as a model for the other organizations for journalists of color. Today RivasRodriguez teaches journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. “It seemed like the most natural thing to do, have a newspaper,” RivasRodriguez says of her 1988 experience. NAHJ created a newsroom in the convention hotel restaurant so students could publish a daily newspaper with help from professional journalists. From that start it expanded and now includes English and Spanish print

newspapers, television, radio and an online news Web site. This year, for the first time, students will participate in a convergence project, where they will work together across different media platforms. The student project runs about $150,000 to $180,000 every year and is paid out of NAHJ’s operating budget with no outside support. Rivas-Rodriguez continues to ensure Latinos are represented in media, but in a different way. She has helped lead a

Steve Montiel answers a question on a panel.

Rubén Salazar, Los Angeles Times columnist and news director for Spanish-language station KMEX, who was killed by a sheriff’s deputy in 1970 while covering a protest.

April
More than 120 journalists attend NAHJ’s first conference in Los Angeles for Spanishlanguage journalists.

March
About 100 top-level Mexican and U.S. Latino journalists meet in Mexico City for the “Mexico 2000: Media and Democracy at a Crossroads” conference, sponsored by Region 5 and the
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Remember the typewriter?

coalition of Latino organizations, including NAHJ, in demanding that a PBS World War II documentary feature Latinos. Before the group’s involvement, the Ken Burns’ documentary, “THE WAR,” scheduled for release during Hispanic Heritage Month, contained no interviews with Latino veterans. PBS has since reversed course and promised to re-edit the program to include Latino veterans. “It all has to do with making sure that Latinos are represented fairly and accurately,” she says. Rivas-Rodriguez also worries about NAHJ staff burning out from fighting on so many fronts. She encourages greater involvement by members. “It’s wonderful to say NAHJ needs to

take a position, that it needs to do this, it needs to do that, but our membership really have to take some responsibility because we can’t expect the staff to do everything,” RivasRodriguez says. Román leads a small staff that is very busy during preparation for the convention. But he says if NAHJ hopes to remain relevant, it has to push on many different fronts. To make that work, NAHJ has focused more attention on diversifying its fundraising base to more non-media companies, foundations and individual members, especially in the last three years. The organization raised $222,000 from individuals from June 2005 to June 2006 as part of Challenge Grant II, a joint effort by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Ford Foundation and Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation. NAHJ is on track to reach

1999
Dallas-Fort Worth Network of Hispanic Communicators. All three of Mexico’s top presidential candidates speak at this historic event.

February
The 11th annual NAHJ Scholarship Banquet at the Plaza Hotel in New York City sets a record, raising more than $200,000.

January
The NAHJ board votes to end its four-year boycott of California sparked by the passage of Proposition 187 that called for denying

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the $12.6 million mark by 2008, money aimed at supporting educational and professional development, increasing advocacy efforts centered on coverage of Latinos and partnering with media companies to help them reach newsroom parity. “If you depend on a few funding sources and one of them goes, you are in real deep trouble,” Román says. “And for a long time that is what NAHJ did.” Román says that the organization has not seen a measurable decline in what media giants donate because of positions it takes on issues such as media consolidation, but adds “that does not mean ... [it] can’t happen.” “So it is all the more important to diversify your funding sources,” Román says.

NAHJ’s inhouse advocacy includes its annual Network Brownout Report, which examines how Latinos are portrayed by evening network television news. In 2006, it released its 10th annual report and started a new study of magazine coverage, showing just 1.2 percent of stories in Time, Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report in 2005 were mainly about Latinos. NAHJ also partners with groups on important issues so it doesn’t expend major resources that come with leading the charge.

Evelyn Hernandez, left, Veronica Garcia and Michele Salcedo chat between workshops.

1998
public schooling, health care and social services to undocumented immigrants. The proposition had been struck down by the high courts.

June
The 17th annual NAHJ convention is held in conjunction with the second Unity convention in Seattle. About 7,000 from all four minority journalism organizations attend.
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16th annual NAHJ convention, Miami. More than 1,400 attend.

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NAHJ and NABJ members gathering to discuss Unity.

Through UNITY, an organization that joins all four organizations for journalists of color, the groups are unifying on some issues and maximizing their advocacy efforts. Tracie Morales symbolizes an energy and boldness many hope to see more of as NAHJ continues to evolve. The 22-year-old worked as an intern for Hispanic Link in March when she covered a diversity session at the American Society of Newspaper Editors’ annual convention in Washington D.C. Throughout the convention, she

noticed that nearly all the speakers and panelists were white men. At the diversity session, Morales commented to the panel participants about the lack of diversity among the speakers for the various workshops. Then she questioned the failure of the ASNE to achieve its own diversity goals it set in 1978 when it committed to achieving parity by 2000. Instead the numbers keep declining. Minorities represent 10.9 percent of newsroom supervisors, a drop from last year. ASNE readjusted their parity goal date to 2025, but many journalists of color are skeptical. Morales thanked her editor, Charlie Ericksen, for entrusting her to cover large issues such as Attorney General Alberto Gonzales’ Senate hearings, a

1997
Spring— NAHJ board meets with President Clinton at the White House. Topics include rising prominence of Hispanic population and Cuba.

1996
June
14th annual NAHJ convention, Chicago. More than 1,100 in attendance. Strong focus placed on new media and technology. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton welcomes attendees at opening night reception.
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June
15th annual NAHJ convention, Seattle. More than 1,000 attend.

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speech by President Bush and news conferences on immigration. A senior at the University of Texas at Arlington, Morales is interning for The Oregonian this month. “I feel my responsibility is more than just as a reporter ... and to come up

with story ideas,” Morales says. “I feel if people are more vocal about it [diversity] and start pushing, we will see [more] people of color working in newsrooms. I definitely see myself as an advocate for that cause.”

1995
NAHJ conducts the first “Network Brownout Report,” with the National Council of La Raza, documenting the number of times Latinos are covered on network TV news. Results show dismal performance by networks.
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Fall
For the first time, NAHJ raises membership dues and other fees.

Audit conducted back to 1992; financial structure reorganized.

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1994
November
NAHJ board votes to keep all meetings out of California to protest passage of Proposition 187. NAHJ drops San Diego and two other California cities as possible sites for its 1998 convention. Other Unity partners join the boycott, as does National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association, which canceled its convention in Beverly Hills.

January
NAHJ board votes to move the 11th annual convention from Denver to Washington, D.C. Many members had threatened to boycott the convention after Colorado voters approved a constitutional amendment that allowed discrimination against gays and lesbians in that state.

1992
April
10th annual NAHJ convention, Albuquerque, N.M. NAHJ begins mid-career workshops. President George H.W. Bush addresses the convention via satellite. Mexico author Carlos Fuentes addresses the conference. NAHJ membership approaches the 1,200 mark. With a $10,000 grant from NPR, NAHJ produces Radio Ondas, the student radio project, for the first time.

June
13th annual NAHJ convention, El Paso, Texas. Electronic Town Hall meeting links panelists on both coasts of the United States, in Mexico and South America to discuss differences in journalism practices and ways to combat media stereotyping. NAHJ launches its first student campus project at the University of Texas at El Paso, a hands-on workshop for 100 students before the convention, with the help of a $100,000 grant from the Freedom Forum.

July
Unity ‘94, Atlanta, Ga., is the first gathering of the four major minority journalist organizations— NAHJ, NABJ, AAJA and NAJA. This marks NAHJ’s 12th convention.

1993
June
11th annual NAHJ convention, Washington, D.C.

1991
April
9th annual NAHJ convention, Times Square, New York City.

April
NAHJ denounces Howard Stern for offensive comments about the slaying of MexicanAmerican singer Selena and about the community in general. The outrage prompts NAHJ to create a plenary at its next convention in El Paso titled “Latinos and Talk Radio: Estamos Escuchando.”

May
Unity ‘94 issues “Kerner Plus 25: A Call for Action,” blasting the news industry for providing little more than “lip service” when it comes to hiring and promoting journalists of color; it offers specific plans for diversity.

1990
April
NAHJ has its first convention on its own. It’s held in San Francisco and is called the 8th annual convention.

March
Spurred into action by the coverage of a Peruvian couple hired by a President Clinton nominee for attorney general, NAHJ Issues Committee revamps campaign to eliminate the use of the term “illegal alien.”

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1989
January
NAHJ board decides to hold its own convention, separate from the National Media Conference, the following year.

March
NAHJ holds its first Scholarship Banquet in New York City. NBC anchor Tom Brokaw is the keynote speaker. Jazz greats Dave Valentin and Oscar Hernandez provide entertainment. About 250 people attend and NAHJ raises more than $30,000.

April
7th National Hispanic Media Conference, San Juan, P.R. More than 1,000 attend. Photojournalism panels canceled after photographers are called to cover explosion at USS Iowa on Puerto Rico’s east coast. For the first time, NAHJ produces “El Noticiero,” the TV training project, with Diane Alverio in charge.

1987
October
NAHJ holds its first international conference with colleagues from Mexico in Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo. More than 400 journalists attend.

1986
April
4th annual National Hispanic Media Conference, Miami, Fla. More than 1,000 media professionals attend.

April
NAHJ establishes a standing Issues Committee to focus on monitoring and correcting offensive racial and ethnic information in the media. The committee also addresses ways to achieve more balanced coverage of the Latino community. 5th annual National Hispanic Media Conference, Los Angeles. A record 1,600 media professionals are in attendance.

September
NAHJ staff doubles from two to four, including the person in charge of the new employment referral service, which would eventually become an online job and resume exchange and data base. The service helps place 50 people in jobs and internships during its first year.

1988
April
6th National Hispanic Media Conference, Dallas. Nearly 1,200 people attend. NAHJ publishes the first Latino Reporter daily convention newspaper, with Maggie Rivas at the helm of a host of volunteers.

1985
September
NAHJ vacates interim headquarters in Los Angeles and moves across the country to the National Press Building in Washington, D.C.

October
First joint meeting of the boards of NAHJ, NABJ, AAJA and the Native American Press Association (now NAJA) takes place in Baltimore.
CELEBRATING 25 YEARS OF

May
NAHJ grants its first two scholarships, each in the amount of $1,000.

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June
Board agrees to launch an annual award for journalism excellence. It originally honors Guillermo Martinez Marquez, a founder of the Inter American Press Association.

May
NAHJ membership tops 330.

April
3rd National Hispanic Media Conference, Tucson, Ariz. More than 600 Hispanic media professionals attend.

January
NAHJ launches its first national High School Writing Contest in 15 cities. Betty Cortina, left, Maria Elenas Salinas and Carl Quintanilla at the 2006 Noche de Triunfos.

1984
April
NAHJ files its articles of incorporation, signed by 15 organizers, creating the country’s first nationwide organization dedicated solely to Hispanic journalists. More than 80 people sign up as founding members that first year. 2nd annual National Hispanic Media Conference, Washington, D.C. More than 500 attend. First members of the NAHJ national board of directors chosen.

1983
Gannett gives NAHJ a $50,000 developmental grant to help Hispanic journalists get organized on a national level. This is the first of a long history of substantial annual grants to aid the organization in its mission.

1982
December
First National Hispanic Media Conference, San Diego, Calif. About 300 attend.

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Profiles
The NAHJ family
People join the National Association of Hispanic Journalists for different reasons. Some come seeking support as they enter the field of journalism. Others are in the mid-career phase of their lives and are seeking guidance. There are also the veterans who understand the need of mentoring our future talent. Then there are the community activists, seeking to promote fair treatment of the Latino community in the media. Twenty-five years of dedication-and the fruits of the founder’s labor continue. Here are some profiles of just a few of our members-as varied as the more than 20 Spanish-speaking nations of our origins.

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LEONOR

AYALA
assert herself, an experience that helped her pursue and land television news jobs. “I didn’t really want to go back to print because my heart was always in television,” Ayala says. After a short stint at CBS News, ABC asked Ayala in 2002 to serve as a bilingual production associate to research immigration issues for a Peter Jennings documentary. “I was the only Latina there and [my boss] wanted to make sure that if there was something I had a problem with, that I was vocal about it,” Ayala says. “I learned from some of the best [producers] in long form [journalism].” As her career advanced, Ayala continued to give back to NAHJ through involvement with the Region 2. She helped gather print and broadcast news reports from Latino journalists who covered 9/11 in New York City. From that she helped produce a video tribute about these Latino journalists that was shown at the NAHJ Scholarship Banquet in New York City in 2002. “I saw the value in the organization and I wanted to give back and help as much as I could,” Ayala says. After working with ABC News, MSBNC and on the NBC network news assignment desk, Ayala moved to Dateline in January 2005. —Peter Ortiz, freelancer, NYC

Two undocumented immigrants lived in obscurity when Leonor Ayala helped them share their story with a national television audience. Through these two brothers, construction workers living in Colorado with 16 other family members, the 30-year-old associate producer for Dateline NBC gave voice to an underclass distrustful of a media that has often dehumanized or ignored them. The trust she and another Latina associate producer nurtured with the two brothers and their family over eight months opened the door for Tom Brokaw to air a one-hour special in December 2006. The story marked a high point in Ayala’s nine-year journalism career that developed when she secured a job at the NAHJ Miami convention in 1998. That experience also marked the beginning of a relationship with other NAHJ members who encouraged Ayala to stick with journalism. Ayala graduated from Rutgers University in 1998, attended the NAHJ convention in June and started working at The Record in Hackensack, N.J., in July. The New Jersey native, one of 10 children from a Puerto Rican household, quickly progressed from writing obits at The Record to covering small towns. But disappointed with her own personal progress as a writer, she yearned for something different and in 2000 left the paper to work at Girls Inc., which focuses on nurturing and mentoring girls. There, she learned to network and really
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ROBERT

HERNANDEZ
“That was the first time where NAHJ really, really resonated with me, when this city kid went to this really ‘Ag’ town,’ he said. “Eighty percent of the community was Latino and no one on staff spoke Spanish. At the time, they used to hire translators.” No longer a student, he was back at NAHJ the next year and volunteered on the spot to work on a convention Web site. By the following year, he was codirecting the online student project. It’s a job he would keep for the next five years - working to help the youngest NAHJ journalists recognize the importance of this increasingly critical skill for delivering the news. This fall, he’ll celebrate his fifth anniversary with the Times - each of those years working on the online side of the operation. “I had to decide whether I was going to go print or online,” he said. “I picked online pretty early. I felt I could be more of a pioneer there.” -Sam Diaz, The Washington Post

NAHJ taught Robert Hernandez a thing or two about the importance of diversity in America’s newsrooms. And Hernandez, senior producer for news at The Seattle Times’ Web site, is teaching NAHJ about the importance of online journalism in today’s newsrooms. A Los Angeles native, Hernandez had just returned home after spending his high school years living with his mother in El Salvador, when he learned of NAHJ’s student projects. At first, he said, he wondered whether to apply. “Just because I was a person of color, was it fair for me to take advantage of this?” he said. “In L.A., I didn’t have any concept of how other cities would be. L.A. was pretty diverse.” That year in Chicago and two years later in Miami, Hernandez participated in the student projects. In the summer of 1999, he landed an internship at the Yakima (Wash.) Herald Republic.

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LUIS

CRUZ
helps critique students’ tapes at NAHJ conferences, where he also gives his tapes to prospective employers. “I always leave the conference with more confidence,” he says. His commitment to the organization led him to become a lifetime member of NAHJ in 2006. The San Francisco native, who had worn thrift-store clothes as a boy, went on to become news director at KYMATV in Yuma, Ariz. There he led the news team that won a regional Edward R. Murrow award for spot news coverage of a bomb-laden Harrier jet crash into a Yuma neighborhood in June 2005. Among his mentors is Rigo Chacón, who will be inducted into NAHJ’s Hall of Fame at the San Jose conference. Cruz, then 17, met Chacón while working as a co-host of a teen talk show on San Francisco’s KGO-TV in 1993. And now Cruz is doing the same for others. He often speaks to students in Las Vegas today, Cruz says, because words Chacón told him years ago still ring: People in high-profile positions should use them to do good in their communities. —Veronica Garcia, Los Angeles Times

Luis Cruz gives this advice to students: “Don’t let circumstances now affect where you go in life.” The co-anchor of the morning weekend news programs at KVBCTV in Las Vegas knows of what he speaks. From humble beginnings living in a San Francisco studio apartment with his parents and three older brothers, Luis has gone from being a shy, poor kid to earning a bachelor’s degree in political science at UC Berkeley to becoming a TV newscaster in a growing market. “My mom gets a kick out of watching me on TV,” says Cruz, 31. Although his parents can’t watch his programs live, he takes tapes to them when he makes his biannual visits to Mexico. His parents moved to Teocaltiche, Jalisco, to be near relatives about two years ago after his mother suffered two strokes and now uses a wheelchair. He credits his mother with sparking his interest in journalism, though NAHJ and mentors have helped guide him in the profession. “NAHJ has been there as a great resource throughout my career,” Cruz says. While in college, he participated in student projects, beginning with the TV project at Unity ‘94 in Atlanta, and received an NAHJ scholarship. These days, he

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MAGGIE

RIVAS-RODRIGUEZ
Rivas-Rodriguez started out as a copy editor at UPI in 1977, and soon became the first Hispanic reporter at The Boston Globe. The MexicanAmerican has worked in TV, in Peru, covering business, and for eight years was the border bureau chief for The Dallas Morning News. Those were years of plenty of “firsts.” Rivas-Rodriguez was on the committee that founded NAHJ in 1984, and she initiated both The Latino Reporter in 1988 and the now-defunct high school essay contest. In 1990, she won NAHJ’s first president’s award. “There is something incredibly empowering about all those Latino journalists in the same place,” she said. “It’s been a really big part of what has shaped me as a journalist.” Looking back at her 30 years in the business, she is relieved to see that the stories Latino journalists once had to fight for are now everyday news. “I am seeing a normalization of news concerning Latinos,’’ she said. “That’s largely because of Latinos in newsrooms who said, ‘Hey man, I want to do those stories. That’s not just a Latino story, it’s good journalism.’ ‘’ —Frances Robles, The Miami Herald

Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez’s résumé says associate professor, but it is storytelling that’s in her soul. She has combined her 17 years as a professional journalist and a doctorate in mass communications to produce a dual career: University of Texas at Austin journalism professor, and the woman behind a nationwide oral history project chronicling the testimonies of World War II-era Latinos. Rivas-Rodriguez gave up America’s newsrooms, but she didn’t stop telling the stories.

“When I meet people, I always say ‘former’ journalist,’’ she said. “But when you are doing interviews and editing, that’s journalism. Maybe it’s not working in a newsroom, but it’s journalism. When there’s a big story that I feel either there’s an angle the media is not using or perspective they are not seeing, that’s when I miss it and do something about it.’’ Rivas-Rodriguez did something about Ken Burns’ WWII documentary, which lacked the Latino experience. She helped lead a coalition of Latino organizations, including NAHJ, in demanding that Latinos be added. PBS reversed its stance and promised to add the stories of Latino veterans.

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PROFILES

M A R I LY N

GARATEIX
After that summer in Seattle, the University of Miami graduate went on to reporting gigs at the Fort Myers News Press and The Miami Herald. She eventually became an assistant city editor there, and later education editor and city editor at The Boston Globe, where she helped guide 9/11 coverage. In St. Pete, she supervises 30 managers and reporters, including the ones who covered the Terry Schiavo right-to-die case. Garateix has also left her mark on NAHJ, where she has been a regional director, secretary, at large officer and vice president for print. Garateix has worked on at least a dozen editions of The Latino Reporter and organized the 1998 conference in Miami. “The contacts and friendships I have made through NAHJ over the years have been invaluable. They have made me a better reporter, editor and person. My career and life is richer for it,” she said. —Frances Robles, The Miami Herald

Marilyn Garateix was frustrated with journalism and on the verge of packing it in, when she made a quick pit stop that changed her life. On her way home to Miami after a discouraging one-year internship in California, she stopped at the 1988 NAHJ convention in Dallas. There, this Cuban-American student saw people who looked just like her. And she found people who cared. “I was very frustrated with journalism, unsure if I would even continue with it,” Garateix said. “I wasn’t there for the whole convention - just the job fair-but it was enough for me to get inspired and really realize that I wanted to be in journalism, and I wanted to be a Hispanic in journalism. That job fair netted an internship at The Seattle Times, the summer job that kick-started a rising career and NAHJ leader. Garateix is now metro editor at the St. Petersburg Times in Florida.

“NAHJ was there for me at a very key moment in my life when I could have quit journalism and done something else,” she said.

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F U LV I O

CATIVO
Pulitzer prize winning journalist for the Los Angeles Times. In 2003, Cativo joined The Latino Reporter, NAHJ’s student newspaper project, at the New York conference. In 2004 he worked on the UNITY student project in Washington D.C. The conventions served as reenergizing pit stops along Cativo internship track, which included the Courier-Journal in Kentucky in 2003, The Plain Dealer in Cleveland in 2004 and The Washington Post in 2005. Cativo’s network of mentors and contacts also grew and provided an invaluable resource. Cativo singles out Kevin Olivas, NAHJ Parity Project Director, for providing career advice and writing letters of recommendation. “Just being involved with the NAHJ network helped me get in contact with leaders in the business,” he says. NAHJ asked Cativo in 2004 to speak at its annual Scholarship Banquet in New York City. At the time he was serving his internship in Kentucky and realized the fortune of working at a paper where there were few Latinos. —Peter Ortiz, freelance writer, NYC

Fulvio Cativo’s journalistic ambitions started at his Maryland elementary school newspaper, but the 24-yearold points to NAHJ as a steady partner in nurturing that dream. “The way I see it, I always wanted to be a journalist since the sixth grade, but I didn’t know how to pursue a career in journalism until I met folks through NAHJ,” he says. NAHJ created a journalism pipeline that neither Cativo’s father, Miguel, a heavy machine mechanic in the cement industry, and mother, Vivian, a nurse administrator, could provide their son. That pipeline first took form after Cativo’s senior year in high school when The Washington Post in sponsorship with NAHJ, awarded Cativo a $10,000 scholarship. Now an education reporter with the Hartford Courant, Cativo found in NAHJ a willing financial, educational and mentoring partner. Cativo lived in El Salvador until age 10, when he emmigrated with his family to the United States in 1993. Cativo grew up in Maryland. He interned at The Dallas Morning News’ Washington D.C. bureau in 2001 and a year later he attended the NAHJ conference in San Diego. There he spent a week with other students learning the craft from George Ramos, a three-time

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PROFILES

Polly

Baca
Before joining LARASA, Baca served as regional administrator of the General Services Administration. She had also served as a special assistant to President Bill Clinton and director of the United States Office of Consumer Affairs in Washington, D.C. She was the first Hispanic woman elected to the Colorado State Senate, where she served for 12 years. She was also the first Hispanic woman to co-chair a National Democratic Convention, in 1980 and 1984. Today, she runs a nonprofit organization that has worked since 1964 to improve the quality of life for Latinos throughout Colorado. She advocates boycotting companies that advertise on news programs and in publications that encourage bigotry and racism. “We learned from the civil rights days that you have to hit these companies where it hurts - the pocketbook,” Baca said. She blames a lack of newsroom diversity for the misinformation and bigotry against undocumented immigrants that has filled the airwaves as the issue of illegal immigration is covered and debated. —Fernando Quintero, The Rocky Mountain News

As a former state senator and business woman, activist Polly Baca has fought for years for minority representation in newsrooms. Now, the executive director of the Latin American Research and Service Agency (LARASA) in Denver is taking her battle to the boardroom. Baca is a member of the Parity Project’s advisory committee in Denver, providing guidance for NAHJ’s ongoing missions to both increase the number of Latino reporters and improve coverage of Hispanics. A community member who took part in the Town Hall meeting that launched the Parity Project, she was invited by Juan González, then NAHJ president, to join the venture. She also serves on the Hispanic advisory council that works with The Rocky Mountain News and KCNC, Denver’s CBS affiliate, where she was a political commentator during the 2004 elections. “I think the Parity Project is important because I’ve always thought that a democracy is absolutely dependent upon a free press that fairly and accurately covers the community it serves,” Baca said. “Without representation of that community in newsrooms, you can’t have fairness and accuracy.”

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NAHJ

LIFETIME

MEMBERS

NAHJ

LIFETIME

MEMBERS
Lou Dobbs, CNN Charles Ericksen, Hispanic Link News Service Victor Escobedo, Cortazar Michele Fazekas, NBC Luis Alberto Ferre Rangel, El Nuevo Día (Puerto Rico) Angelo Figueroa, TuCiudad Veronica Flores, San Antonio Express-News Juan Forero, National Public Radio Diana Fuentes, Laredo Morning Times Ernie Garcia, The Journal News Veronica Garcia, Los Angeles Times Eldra Gillman, CBS Corporation Frank Gómez, Educational Testing Service Raymond Gomez, KGNS-TV (Laredo, Texas) Vince Gonzales Juan Gonzalez, New York Daily News Joe Grimm, Detroit Free Press Liza Gross, The Miami Herald Hernan Guaracao-Calderon, Al Día (Philadelphia) Felix Gutiérrez, USC Annenberg School of Journalism Joanna Hernandez, The New York Times Regional Media Group Jodi Hernandez, KNTV-TV (San Jose, CA) Jorge Hidalgo, Telemundo Jonathan Higuera, Arizona State University Marina Hinestrosa, County of Santa Clara Claudia Hinojosa, KXTX Telemundo 39 (Dallas) Mark Hinojosa, Chicago Tribune Alberto Ibargüen, John S. and James L. Knight Foundation Maite Junco, New York Daily News Michael Limón, Salt Lake Tribune

There are currently 123 Lifetime Members and 31 individuals who have pledged to become Lifetime Members within the next year. Javier Aldape, Hoy Claudio Alvarez Dunn, Primera Hora (Puerto Rico) Cecilia Alvear, former NAHJ president Alfredo Araiza, Arizona Daily Star Rose Arce, CNN Gustavo Arroyo, California State Senate Jim Avila, ABC News Nancy Baca, former NAHJ president Gilbert Bailón, Al Dia (Dallas) Geraldine Berrios, The Miami Herald Mary Kay Blake, The Freedom Forum Frank Blethen, The Seattle Times Ybeth Bruzual, Central Florida News 13-Telemundo (Orlando) Gloria Campos Brown, WFAA-TV (Dallas) Romeo Cantu Jr., KGBT-TV (Harlingen, Texas) Jose Carreño, El Universal, Mexico Dora Casanova de Toro, La Prensa (Longwood, Fla.) Nelson Castillo, Castillo Law Firm PLLC David Cazares, South Florida Sun-Sentinel Sergio Chapa, Al Día (Dallas) Gary Clark, The Denver Post Angela Clemmons, The Denver Post Yamila Constantino-Méndez, Bloomberg Peter Copeland, Scripps Media Center Christopher Crommett, CNN en Español Carolyn Curiel, The New York Times George de Lama, Chicago Tribune Araceli De Leon, KWHY-TV (Glendale, CA) Frank del Olmo* Sam Diaz, The Washington Post Cathleen Farrell, Page One Media Celeste Diaz Ferraro

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NAHJ

LIFETIME

MEMBERS

Jacqueline Llamas Espinoza, KWHY-KVEA Telemundo (Los Angeles) Anna Lopez, former NAHJ executive director Delton Lowery, The Fresno Bee Lavonne Luquis, National Education Association Tony Marcano, South Florida Sun-Sentinel Mekhalo Medina, KNBC (Los Angeles) Regina Medina, Philadelphia Daily News Ruth Merino, El Nuevo Día (Puerto Rico) Oralia Michel, Oralia Michel Marketing & Public Relations, Inc. Walter Middlebrook, The Detroit News Steve Montiel, Institute for Justice and Journalism Antonio Mora, WBBM-TV (Chicago) Frank Moraga, Ventura County Star/Mi Estrella Ibra Morales, Telemundo Station Group Rosa Morales, Michigan State University School of Journalism Sylvia Moreno, The Washington Post Mireya Navarro, The New York Times Edna Negrón, The Ramapo College of New Jersey Rafael Olmeda, South Florida Sun-Sentinel Larry Olmstead, Leading Edge Associates Ralph Ortega, Star-Ledger Edgar Ortega-Barrales, Bloomberg News Maria Padilla, Freelance Writer O. Ricardo Pimentel, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Gary Piña, Fort Worth Star-Telegram Fernando Quintero, Rocky Mountain News John Quiñones, ABC News Max Ramirez, Max Ramirez Photography George Ramos, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Eli Reyes, Newsday Denice Rios, South Florida Sun-Sentinel Robert Rivard, San Antonio Express-News

Elaine Rivera, WNYC Geraldo Rivera, Fox News Channel Frances Robles, The Miami Herald Cindy Rodriguez, The Detroit News Rick Rodriguez, Sacramento Bee Iván Román, National Association of Hispanic Journalists Rossana Rosado, el diario/LA PRENSA Albor Ruiz, New York Daily News Inez Russell, Freelance Michele Salcedo, South Florida Sun-Sentinel María Elena Salinas, Univisión Network Nancy San Martin, The Miami Herald Evelyn Santa Cruz-Tipacti, PR Newswire Roberto Santiago, The Miami Herald Fernanda Santos, The New York Times Clemson Smith Muñiz, Smith Muñiz Productions, Inc. Dianne Solís, Dallas Morning News Sheila Solomon, The Chicago Tribune Alicia Sotomayor Ernest Sotomayor, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism Rafael Suarez, The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr., The New York Times John Temple, Rocky Mountain News Mercedes Torres, CNN Ricardo Vazquez, University of California Verónica Villafañe, Independent Producer Roberto Vizcón, WTMO Telemundo (Orlando) Xochitl Yañez, State Farm Insurance Elizabeth Zavala, The Dallas Morning News *=deceased

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This year marks 25 years that a group of Latino journalists first met in San Diego to create what has become the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. To commemorate this special year, NAHJ has created a 25th Anniversary Fund seeking to raise $250,000 from members and supporters like you through Dec. 31, 2007. Each person that donates $2,500 or more will be recognized as a 25th Anniversary Angel. In addition, they will automatically become a Lifetime Member of NAHJ. Your support will further our efforts to diversify America's newsrooms, strengthen the leadership capacity of Latino journalists and bring more young people into the profession. NAHJ can arrange a payment schedule that best suits you. For more information please contact NAHJ Development Director, Azuree Salazar, at 202-662-7482 or asalazar@nahj.org.

DONATE

TODAY!

P.S. Your company may have a matching gift program, which will enable your donation to go even further.

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