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Common name

Chemical name

Elements contained

salt

sodium chloride

Na

Cl

magnesia

magnesium oxide

Mg

cinnabar

mercuric sulfide

Hg

laughing gas

nitrous oxide

blue vitriol

cupric sulfate

Cu

simple names of compounds with two elements


Name of compound
sodium chloride

Elements contained
sodium and chlorine

Latin endings in names of compounds


Name of compound

Elements contained

mercuric sulfide

mercury with more sulfur

mercurous sufide

mercury with less sulfur

nitric oxide

nitrogen with more oxygen

nitrous oxide

nitrogen with less oxygen


Chemical Names for Compounds

We will spend some time later in this course working with the intricacies of chemical
names. But there are a couple important things you should learn now. One is the reason
for having a systematic method for naming chemical compounds. The other is
identifying the elements contained in compounds, which is the first step in determining
the formula and composition of compounds.
As chemists learned more and more about the composition of simple compounds, it
became important to develop a system for naming these compounds in a way that
showed their elemental composition. Common and descriptive names like salt,
cinnabar, laughing gas, and blue vitriol tell us nothing about what is in a compound.
Chemical names like sodium chloride, magnesium oxide, mercuric sulfide, nitrous oxide
and cupric sulfate do a better job of conveying information about what elements are
contained in a compound.
Generally when two elements combine, the name of the compound contains the names
of both elements with the ending on the second element changed to "-ide."
When the elements can form two compounds, the ending on the first element is
changed to indicate how much of the second element it has combined with. The "-ic"
ending indicates that the first element has combined with a large amount of the second
element. The "-ous" ending indicates that the first element has combined with a small

amount of the second element. The terms "large" and "small" are, of course, relative
and they are related to the ratios in the Law of Simple Multiple Proportions.
Sometimes you will see a Roman numeral
in parentheses attached to the end of the
Roman numerals in names of compounds
first element. These are Stock names and
iron (in a +3 state) with
the Roman numeral tells us about the
iron(III) oxide
oxygen
condition (charge or oxidation state) of the
element it follows. We will have to deal with iron(II) oxide iron (in a +2 state) with
oxygen
that when we talk about how atoms bond to
one another later in this course.
When an "-ate" ending is found in a name,
it indicates that oxygen has combined with
the other two elements.

Compound names with -ate endings


cupric sulfate

copper with sulfur and


oxygen

Sometimes names will contain


prefixes. The prefix is used to indicate the
relative amounts of each element
Names containing prefixes
expressed in a way that I will soon discuss.
1 carbon with 2
For the moment, let's just leave it at the
carbon dioxide
oxygens
understanding that carbon dioxide contains
both carbon and oxygen. In time you will
learn which types of compounds have
prefixes in their names and which do not.

Common Name

Chemical Name

acetone

dimethyl ketone; 2-propanone (usually known as acetone)

acid potassium sulfate

potassium bisulfate

acid of sugar

oxalic acid

ackey

nitric acid

alcali volatil

ammonium hydroxide

alcohol, grain

ethyl alcohol

alcohol sulfuris

carbon disulfide

alcohol, wood

methyl alcohol

alum

aluminum potassium sulfate

alumina

aluminum oxide

antichlor

sodium thiosulfate

antifreeze

ethylene glycol

antimony black

antimony trisulfide

antimony bloom

antimony trioxide

antimony glance

antimony trisulfide

antimony red (vermillion)

antimony oxysulfide

aqua ammonia

aqueous solution of ammonium hydroxide

aqua fortis

nitric acid

aqua regia

nitrohydrochloric acid

aromatic spirit of ammonia

ammonia in alcohol

arsenic glass

arsenic trioxide

azurite

mineral form of basic copper carbonate

asbestos

magnesium silicate

aspirin

acetylsalicylic acid

baking soda

sodium bicarbonate

banana oil (artificial)

isoamyl acetate

barium white

barium sulfate

benzol

benzene

bicarbonate of soda

sodium hydrogen carbonate or sodium bicarbonate

bichloride of mercury

mercuric chloride

bichrome

potassium dichromate

bitter salt

magnesium sulfate

black ash

crude form of sodium carbonate

black copper oxide

cupric oxide

black lead

graphite (carbon)

blanc-fixe

barium sulfate

bleaching powder

chlorinated lime; calcium hypochlorite

blue copperas

copper sulfate (crystals)

blue lead

lead sulfate

blue salts

nickel sulfate

blue stone

copper sulfate (crystals)

blue vitriol

copper sulfate

bluestone

copper sulfate

bone ash

crude calcium phosphate

bone black

crude animal charcoal

boracic acid

boric acid

borax

sodium borate; sodium tetraborate

bremen blue

basic copper carbonate

brimstone

sulfur

burnt alum

anhydrous potassium aluminum sulfate

burnt lime

calcium oxide

burnt ochre

ferric oxide

burnt ore

ferric oxide

brine

aqueous sodium chloride solution

butter of antimony

antimony trichloride

butter of tin

anhydrous stannic chloride

butter of zinc

zinc chloride

calomel

mercury chloride; mercurous chloride

carbolic acid

phenol

carbonic acid gas

carbon dioxide

caustic lime

calcium hydroxide

caustic potash

potassium hydroxide

caustic soda

sodium hydroxide

chalk

calcium carbonate

Chile saltpeter

sodium nitrate

Chile nitre

sodium nitrate

Chinese red

basic lead chromate

Chinese white

zinc oxide

chloride of soda

sodium hypochlorite

chloride of lime

calcium hypochlorite

chrome alum

chromic potassium sulfate

chrome green

chromium oxide

chrome yellow

lead (VI) chromate

chromic acid

chromium trioxide

copperas

ferrous sulfate

corrosive sublimate

mercury (II) chloride

corundum (ruby, sapphire)

chiefly aluminum oxide

cream of tartar

potassium bitartrate

crocus powder

ferric oxide

crystal carbonate

sodium carbonate

dechlor

sodium thiophosphate

diamond

carbon crystal

emery powder

impure aluminum oxide

epsom salts

magnesium sulfate

ethanol

ethyl alcohol

farina

starch

ferro prussiate

potassium ferricyanide

ferrum

iron

flores martis

anhydride iron (III) chloride

fluorspar

natural calcium fluoride

fixed white

barium sulfate

flowers of sulfur

sulfur

'flowers of' any metal

oxide of the metal

formalin

aqueous formaldehyde solution

French chalk

natural magnesium silicate

French vergidris

basic copper acetate

galena

natural lead sulfide

Glauber's salt

sodium sulfate

green verditer

basic copper carbonate

green vitriol

ferrous sulfate crystals

gypsum

natural calcium sulfate

hard oil

boiled linseed oil

heavy spar

barium sulfate

hydrocyanic acid

hydrogen cynanide

hypo (photography)

sodium thiosulfate solution

Indian red

ferric oxide

Isinglass

agar-agar gelatin

jeweler's rouge

ferric oxide

killed spirits

zinc chloride

lampblack

crude form of carbon; charcoal

laughing gas

nitrous oxide

lead peroxide

lead dioxide

lead protoxide

lead oxide

lime

calcium oxide

lime, slaked

calcium hydroxide

limewater

aqueous solution of calcium hydroxide

liquor ammonia

ammonium hydroxide solution

litharge

lead monoxide

lunar caustic

silver nitrate

liver of sulfur

sufurated potash

lye or soda lye

sodium hydroxide

magnesia

magnesium oxide

manganese black

manganese dioxide

marble

mainly calcium carbonate

mercury oxide, black

mercurous oxide

methanol

methyl alcohol

methylated spirits

methyl alcohol

milk of lime

calcium hydroxide

milk of magnesium

magnesium hydroxide

milk of sulfur

precipitated sulfur

"muriate" of a metal

chloride of the metal

muriatic acid

hydrochloric acid

natron

sodium carbonate

nitre

potassium nitrate

nordhausen acid

fuming sulfuric acid

oil of mars

deliquescent anhydrous iron (III) chloride

oil of vitriol

sulfuric acid

oil of wintergreen (artificial) methyl salicylate


orthophosphoric acid

phosphoric acid

Paris blue

ferric ferrocyanide

Paris green

copper acetoarsenite

Paris white

powdered calcium carbonate

pear oil (artificial)

isoamyl acetate

pearl ash

potassium carbonate

permanent white

barium sulfate

plaster of Paris

calcium sulfate

plumbago

graphite

potash

potassium carbonate

potassa

potassium hydroxide

precipitated chalk

calcium carbonate

Prussic acid

hydrogen cyanide

pyro

tetrasodium pyrophosphate

quicklime

calcium oxide

quicksilver

mercury

red lead

lead tetraoxide

red liquor

aluminum acetate solution

red prussiate of potash

potassium ferrocyanide

red prussiate of soda

sodium ferrocyanide

Rochelle salt

potassium sodium tartrate

rock salt

sodium chloride

rouge, jeweler's

ferric oxide

rubbing alcohol

isopropyl alcohol

sal ammoniac

ammonium chloride

sal soda

sodium carbonate

salt, table

sodium chloride

salt of lemon

potassium binoxalate

salt of tartar

potassium carbonate

saltpeter

potassium nitrate

silica

silicon dioxide

slaked lime

calcium hydroxide

soda ash

sodium carbonate

soda nitre

sodium nitrate

soda lye

sodium hydroxide

soluble glass

sodium silicate

sour water

dilute sulfuric acid

spirit of hartshorn

ammonium hydroxide solution

spirit of salt

hydrochloric acid

spirit of wine

ethyl alcohol

spirits of nitrous ether

ethyl nitrate

sugar, table

sucrose

sugar of lead

lead acetate

sulfuric ether

ethyl ether

talc or talcum

magnesium silicate

tin crystals

stannous chloride

trona

natural sodium carbonate

unslaked lime

calcium oxide

Venetian red

ferric oxide

verdigris

basic copper acetate

Vienna lime

calcium carbonate

vinegar

impure dilute acetic acid

vitamin C

ascorbic acid

vitriol

sulfuric acid

washing soda

sodium carbonate

water glass

sodium silicate

white caustic

sodium hydroxide

white lead

basic lead carbonate

white vitriol

zinc sulfate crystals

yellow prussiate of potash

potassium ferrocyanide

yellow prussiate of soda

sodium ferrocyanide

zinc vitriol

zinc sulfate

zinc white

zinc oxide

Naming Positive Ions


Monatomic positive ions have the name of the element from which they are formed.
Na+
Ca2+
K+

sodium
calcium
potassium

Zn2+
H+
Sr2+

zinc
hydrogen
strontium

Some metals form positive ions in more than one oxidation state. One of the earliest
methods of distinguishing between these ions used the suffixes -ous and -ic added to
the Latin name of the element to represent the lower and higher oxidation states,
respectively.
Fe2+
Sn2+
Cu+

ferrous
stannous
cuprous

Fe3+
Sn4+
Cu2+

ferric
stannic
cupric

Chemists now use a simpler method, in which the charge on the ion is indicated by a
Roman numeral in parentheses immediately after the name of the element.
Fe2+
Sn2+
Cu+

iron(II)
tin(II)
copper(I)

Fe3+
Sn4+
Cu2+

iron (III)
tin(IV)
copper(II)

Polyatomic positive ions often have common names ending with the suffix -onium.
H3O+
NH4+

hydronium
ammonium

-1 ions
bicarbonate
acetate
nitrate
nitrite
permanganate
cyanide

HSO4ClO4ClO3ClO2ClOOH-

hydrogen sulfate (bisulfate)


perchlorate
chlorate
chlorite
hypochlorite
hydroxide

O22CrO42Cr2O72HPO42-

peroxide
chromate
dichromate
hydrogen phosphate

AsO43-

arsenate

-2 ions
carbonate
sulfate
sulfite
thiosulfate
-3 ions
phosphate
borate

At first glance, the nomenclature of the polyatomic negative ions in the table above
seems hopeless. There are several general rules, however, that can bring some order
out of this apparent chaos.
The name of the ion usually ends in either -ite or -ate. The -ite ending indicates a low
oxidation state. Thus,the NO2- ion is the nitrite ion.
The -ate ending indicates a high oxidation state. The NO3- ion, for example, is the
nitrate ion.
The prefix hypo- is used to indicate the very lowest oxidation state. The ClO- ion, for
example, is the hypochlorite ion.
The prefix per- (as in hyper-) is used to indicate the very highest oxidation state. The
ClO4- ion is therefore the perchlorate ion.
There are only a handful of exceptions to these generalizations. The names of the
hydroxide (OH-), cyanide (CN-), and peroxide (O22-) ions, for example, have the -ide
ending because they were once thought to be monatomic ions.
hydro -ic
acid
hydrochloric
Clchloride
HCl
acid
hydrofluoric
Ffluoride
HF
acid
hydrosulfuric
S2sulfide
H2S
acid
Acids containing ions ending with ate usually become -ic acid
CH3CO2acetate
CH3CO2H
acetic acid
Acids containing ions ending with ide often become

CO32BO33NO3SO42-

carbonate
borate
nitrate
sulfate

H2CO3
H3BO3
HNO3
H2SO4

carbonic acid
boric acid
nitric acid
sulfuric acid
perchloric
ClO4
perchlorate
HClO4
acid
phosphoric
3PO4
phosphate
H3PO4
acid
permanganic
MnO4permanganate
HMnO4
acid
2CrO4
chromate
H2CrO4
chromic acid
ClO3chlorate
HClO3
chloric acid
Acids containing ions ending with ite usually become -ous acid
ClO2chlorite
HClO2
chlorous acid
NO2
nitrite
HNO2
nitrous acid
SO32sulfite
H2SO 3
sulfurous acid
hypochlorous
ClOhypochlorite
HClO
acid
Complex acids can be named by indicating the presence of an acidic hydrogen as
follows.
NaHCO3
NaHSO3
KH2PO4

sodium hydrogen carbonate (also known as sodium


bicarbonate)
sodium hydrogen sulfite (also known as sodium
bisulfite)
potassium dihydrogen phosphate

Compounds
Name based on shape
Barrelene

(C8H8), the name derives from the resemblance to a barrel.[6]


Basketane

(pentacyclo[4.4.0.02,5.03,8.04,7]decane) (C10H12), a polycyclic alkane with


a structure similar to a basket.[3]
Churchane

A polycyclic alkane named for looking superficially like a church.[3]

Cubane

A hydrocarbon whose eight carbon atoms occupy the vertices of a


cube.[7]
Dodecahedrane

A Platonic hydrocarbon shaped like a dodecahedron.


Fenestrane

A class of compounds with a 'window pane motif' (the name fenestrane


derives from the Latin word fenestra, meaning window), comprising
four fused carbocycles centred on a quaternary carbon resulting a
twice over spiro compound. The illustration at right shows a generic
fenestrane as well as the specific examples [4,4,4,4]fenestrane and
[5,5,5,5]fenestrane. Fenestranes are of considerable interest in
theoretical chemistry though comparatively few have actually been
synthesised.
Housane

A polycyclic alkane named "housane" due to looking superficially like a


house.[3]
Ladderane
An organic molecule that looks like a ladder because it contains two or
more fused rings of cyclobutane.
Olympiadane

A mechanically-interlocked compound based on the topology for the

Olympic rings.
Olympicene

Refers to the fused 5-benzene rings, C19H11, which is reminiscent of


the Olympic Flag.[8]

Prismane

An isomer of benzene with the carbon atoms arranged in the shape of


a triangular prism.
Quadratic acid

A square-shaped organic compound, also called squaric acid.


Tetrahedrane

A Platonic hydrocarbon shaped like a tetrahedron.


Named after people
Buckminsterfullerene

Or buckyballs, a form of carbon named after Buckminster Fuller


due to its resemblance to Fuller's geodesic domes. The term was
coined by Harold Kroto. The alternative name Footballene was
coined by A.D.J. Haymet because the molecule also resembles a
football.[3]

Bullvalene

(tricyclo[3.3.2.02,8]deca-3,6,9-triene) (C10H10), was named by


organic chemist Maitland Jones, Jr. for William "Bull" Doering who
predicted its properties in 1963. Within a specific temperature
range the molecule is subject to rapid degenerate Cope
rearrangements with the result that all carbon atoms and
hydrogen atoms are equivalent and that none of the carbon
carbon bonds is permanent.
Dickite

(Al2Si2O5(OH)4), a clay-like material with a number of


manufacturing uses, one of which is as a coating for high-quality
bond paper. It is named after its discoverer, Dr. W. Thomas Dick.

Josiphos

A well-known catalyst, named after Josi Puleo, the technician who


first prepared it. Mandyphos and Taniaphos also exist.

Named after fictional characters


Alcindoromycine An anthracycline antibiotic agent named after the character Alcindoro
in La Bohme.
Bohemamine

An anti-tumour agent named after the Puccini opera La Bohme.

Collinemycin

An anthracycline antibiotic agent named after the character Colline in


La Bohme.

Ranasmurfin

A blue protein from the foam nests of a tropical frog, named after the
Smurfs.

Mimimycin

An anthracycline antibiotic agent named after the character Mim in La


Bohme.

Musettamycin

An anthracycline antibiotic agent named after the character Musetta in


La Bohme.

Marcellomycin

An anthracycline antibiotic agent named after the character Marcello in


La Bohme.

Pikachurin

A retinal protein named after Pokmon character / species Pikachu

Rudolphomycin An anthracycline antibiotic agent named after the character Rodolfo


(Rudolph) in La Bohme.
Sonic hedgehog A protein named after Sonic the Hedgehog

Sounding like vulgarisms


Arsole

(C4H5As), an analogue of pyrrole in which an arsenic atom replaces


the nitrogen atom.[16] The aromaticity of arsoles has been debated for
many years. The compound in which a benzene ring is fused to arsole
typically on the carbon atoms 3 and 4 is known as benzarsole.[3]
Bastardane

A close relative to adamantane and its proper name is ethano-bridged


noradamantane. Because its unusual ethano-bridge was a deviation
from the standard hydrocarbon caged rearrangements, it came to be
known as bastardanethe unwanted child.[3][18]

Crapinon

An anticholinergic drug, one side effect of which is constipation.[3]

Cumene

The common name for isopropylbenzene; derived from cumin


(Cuminum cyminum)
Cummingtonite ((Mg,Fe)7Si8(OH)22), a magnesium-iron silicate hydroxide, first
identified in Cummington, Massachusetts.[3]
DAMN

Diaminomaleonitrile, a cyanocarbon that contains two amine groups


and two nitrile groups bound to an ethylene backbone.
DuPhos

A class of asymmetric ligands for asymmetric synthesis. The name


DuPhos is derived from the chemical company that developed this
type of ligand (DuP, DuPont) and the compound class of
phospholanes (Phos) it belongs to.

(C6Cl5NO2), also called Quintozene, some of the many names for


pentachloronitrobenzene, a fungicide.[19]

Earthcide,
or Fartox
Fucitol

(C6H14O5), an alcohol derived from Fucus vesiculosis, a North Atlantic


seaweed. Its optical isomers are also called D-fuc-ol and L-fuc-ol.[3]
fucK

The name of the gene that encodes L-fuculokinase, an enzyme that


catalyzes a chemical reaction between L-fuculose, ADP, and Lfuculose-1-phosphate.[3]

Fukalite

(Ca4Si2O6(CO3)(OH, F))2, a rare form of calcium silicocarbonate mined


in the Fuka region of Japan.[3]

Ru(Tris)BiPyon-a-stick

Shorthand form of (trans-1,4-bis[(4-pyridyl)ethenyl]benzene)(2,2'bipyridine)ruthenium(II).[20]

Pizda

A substance first synthesized by a group of Australian chemists. In


some Slavic countries, the word pizda is a vulgarism for "vagina" (see
Appendix:Proto-Slavic/pizda).
Related to sex
Fornacite
Orotic acid

A rare lead, copper chromate arsenate hydroxide mineral


(Pb2CuCrO4AsO4OH), named after its discoverer, Lucien Lewis Forneau.[3]

Pyrimidinecarboxylic acid has been referred to as vitamin B 13. Often


misspelled "erotic acid".[3]
Rhamnetin

A flavonol dye derived from buckthorn (rhamnus).


SEX

An abbreviation of sodium ethyl xanthate, it has structural formula


CH3CH2OCS2Na, IUPAC name sodium O-ethylcarbonodithioate, and it is a
flotation agent used in the mining industry;

Spermine,
Spermidine,
or
polyamine
growth factors involved in cellular metabolism.[3]
Related to body (mal)functions
BARF

(tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate), a fluoroaryl borate


B(Ar(CF3)2)4, used as a non-coordinating anion[23]
catP

The name of the enzyme responsible for chloramphenicol resistance in


various species of bacteria.

Constipatic
acid
[2-(14-hydroxypentadecyl)-4-methyl-5-oxo-2,5-dihydrofuran-3-carboxylic
acid], an aliphatic acid derived from the Australian Xanthoparmelia
lichen.[3][24]
Nonanal
(C9H18O), an aldehyde derived from nonane.
Uranate

The chemical term for an oxyanion of the element uranium.[3]

Uranocene

U(C8H8)2, a uranium sandwich compound similar to ferrocene (Fe(C5H5)2)


with two co-ordinating aromatic and anionic cyclooctatetraenide rings
sandwiching the U atom (formally in its +IV oxidation state).
Vomitoxin

A mycotoxin occurring in grains.[3]


Related to death and decay
Cadaverine
A foul-smelling diamine produced by putrefaction of dead animal
tissue.[3][25]
DEAD,
DEADCAT

An apt acronym, given that diethyl azodicarboxylate is explosive; shock


sensitive; carcinogenic; and an eye, skin, and respiratory irritant.[3]
Putrescine
A foul-smelling diamine produced by the putrefaction of dead animal
tissue.[3]
Related to religion or legend
Angelic
acid
An organic acid found in garden angelica (Angelica archangelica),
Umbelliferae, and many other plants.
Diabolic
acid

A series of long-chain dicarboxylic acids with chains of different lengths.


Named after the Greek word diabollo meaning to mislead.[26]

Draculin

An anticoagulant found in the saliva of vampire bats.


Miraculin

A glycoprotein found in Miracle Fruit that makes sour foods taste sweet after
contact with taste buds.

Sounds like a name (person, brand or organization)


Adamantane

(tricyclo[3.3.1.13,7]decane), a crystalline cycloalkane,[29][30] an isomer of


twistane. Name resembles that of English pop star Adam Ant.[3]
Irene

Hantzsch-Widman nomenclature for a monocyclic, heterocyclic compound


with three ring atoms.[31]

Naftazone

(C11H9N3O2), a vasoprotective drug. The NAFTA free-trade zone is the


area covered by the North American Free Trade Agreement.[32]

PEPPSI

PEPPSI is short for Pyridine-Enhanced Precatalyst Preparation


Stabilization and Initiation.

A part sounds like an English word


Complicatic acid

A sesquiterpenoid antibiotic derived from Stereum complicatum,


this is also known as dehydrohirsutic acid.[34]

Germane

The simplest hydride of germanium, analogous to methane and


silane.
Germanic acid

(Ge(OH)4), the hydrated form of germanium dioxide

HeH+

Chemical formula of the helium hydride ion, a polyatomic ion


containing the noble gas helium.[35]
Hirsutene

[36][37]

Is also named after an animal, a goat (Hircus).

Magic acid

A superacid consisting of a mixture, most commonly in a 1:1


molar ratio, of fluorosulfuric acid (HSO3F) and antimony
pentafluoride (SbF5).

Megaphone

A ketone derived from the root of Aniba megaphylla.[38]

Moronic acid

[3-oxoolean-18-en-28-oic acid], a natural triterpene


Mucic acid

A product of nitric acid oxidation of galactose or galactosecontaining compounds


Muscovite

A phyllosilicate mineral of aluminium and potassium.


Noggin

A signalling protein involved in embryonic development.

Performic acid

A strongly oxidizing acid related to formic acid.

Periodic acid

Or per-iodic acid, is pronounced /pr.adk/ PURR-eye-OD-ik


and not */prdk/ PEER-ee-OD-ik. It refers to one of two
interconvertible species: HIO4 (metaperiodic acid), or H5IO6
(orthoperiodic acid - illustrated at right). The per- prefix in the
name denotes that iodine is present in its highest possible (+VII)
oxidation state.
Picket Fence Porphyrin (5,10,15,20-tetrakis(alpha,alpha,alpha-2pivalamidophenyl)porphyrin), used to model heme enzyme
active sites.
Piranha solution

A strongly oxidizing mixture of hydrogen peroxide and sulfuric


acid used to remove organic residues from substrates and
glassware. The name refers to the voracious appetite of the
Amazonian piranha fish.

Psicose

(C6H12O6), a rare low-calorie sugar that provides 0.3% as much


energy as sucrose.
Rednose

A sugar derived from the degradation of rudolphomycin.[14]

Rhamnose

A sugar naturally occurring in buckthorn (rhamnus).


Titanic acid

The hydrated form of titanium dioxide.

Traumatic acid
A substance occurring in plants, with a role in healing damaged
tissue.
Just sounds silly
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FOOF

Dioxygen difluoride, O2F2, an extremely unstable compound which


reacts explosively with most other substances the nickname "FOOF"
is a play on its formula.[citation needed]
Furfuryl
furfurate

Furfural is an industrial chemical compound derived from a variety of


agricultural byproducts, including corncobs, oat and wheat bran, and
sawdust. The name furfural comes from the Latin word furfur, meaning
bran, referring to its usual source.[3]
Gossypol

A toxin found in cottonseed used as a male oral contraceptive.[3]


HArF

chemical formula of argon fluorohydride, the only known neutral


compound of the noble gas argon.[39]
Horseradish
peroxidase

An enzyme used extensively in molecular biology applications primarily


for its ability to amplify a weak signal and increase detectability of a
target molecule.

Other
Carbonite

Dinocap

(CO22), an unstable anion and


carbene derived from carbonous
acid.[citation needed]

(C18H24N2O6), a miticide and


contact fungicide used to control
powdery mildew in crops.
Fluoboric acid

(HBF4), tetrafluoroborate or
tetrafluoroboric acid.[citation needed]
Homocubane

Any molecule synthesized from


cubane.

Methionylthreonylthreonylglutaminylarginyl...isoleucine The IUPAC name for Titin. This


is the largest known protein and
so has the longest chemical
name. Written in full, it contains
189,819 letters.[40]
Periplanone B

A pheromone of the female


American cockroach. Named
after the scientific name of this
species, Periplaneta americana,
not because of
periplanarity.[citation needed]
Thebacon

Dihydrocodeinone enol ace