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Juniper Networks Contrail Announcement Q&A

ABOUT CONTRAIL ......................................................................................................................................... 2


COMMERICAL & OPEN SOURCE .................................................................................................................... 2
SDN STRATEGY AND CONTRAIL..................................................................................................................... 5
PRODUCT AND ROADMAP ............................................................................................................................ 5
PRICING AND LICENSING............................................................................................................................... 7

ABOUT CONTRAIL
Q: When will the Contrail be available?
A: Both the open and commercial versions of Contrail are available Sept. 16, 2013.

Q: Are any of Junipers customers using Contrail and if so, how?


Yes, we have over 40 customers who are participating in our Beta program. We see a lot of interest from
traditional network service providers and cloud service providers, as well as enterprises. At a high level,
Contrail is used to increase network agility to enable the Cloudfor service providers and cloud
providers this means offering new and innovative services. For enterprises this means speeding their
adoption of both private and hybrid cloud environment.
We will have several case studies and whitepapers available at launch that provide more detail on how
specific customers are using Contrail.

Q: Originally, product was named JunosV Contrail now it is Contrail. Why change the name?
We realized that the term Junos was creating confusion that these products were based on the Junos
operating system, so for simplicitys sake we are trimming it down to purely Contrail.

COMMERICAL & OPEN SOURCE


Q: Why are we offering a commercial product AND open source offering?
By providing an open source controller, we are helping to drive innovation and adoption of software
defined networking (SDN) and aligning with a cloud technology ecosystem that increasingly expects
open source platforms. At the same time, the majority of our customers will require the service and
support that comes with a fully supported commercial offering. With Contrail and OpenContrail we are
serving both market needs.
As more background, the cloud ecosystem is increasingly dominated by open source products. The
orchestration systems that Contrail integrates with are open source; the server operating systems and
hypervisors are open source; Contrail itself is built on top of hundreds of open source components.
Open source facilitates the kind of tight knit integration between many different components required
to automate modern data centers.
After carefully evaluating the landscape Juniper decided that it can best serve its customers by open
sourcing the Contrail network virtualization software. This includes all the components necessary to run
a data-center overlay: the virtual-router; controller, orchestration API, analytics and management
console. The source code and documentation will be available via the web at opencontrail.org.
We believe that publishing the software as open source is the right thing to do in todays ecosystem. It is
the norm. It also creates the opportunity to reach distribution channels that would not be accessible
otherwise extending the reach of the Juniper brand as establishing Juniper as the thought leader in the
space.

As open source software has matured it has become clear that it can be a net plus in terms of
monetization. Juniper Contrail pricing has not changed with the decision to open source the software.
We maintain the same structure with licensing plus support that we would have otherwise used in a
conventional commercial product. We expect that the added visibility and easier distribution will allow
us to reach a much larger customer base.

Q: What is the difference between OpenContrail and Juniper Networks Contrail?


A: Juniper Networks Contrail is a commercial SDN controller which ships as a 1 year, Term Based,
subscription license under the Juniper Software Advantage (JSA) pricing and licensing program and is
priced at $1000/ CPU/Socket, including support. OpenContrail is an Open Source version of the same
SDN Controller and is distributed under the Apache v2.0 license. By providing an open source controller,
OpenContrail, we are helping to drive innovation and adoption of software defined networking (SDN)
and aligning with a cloud technology ecosystem that increasingly expects open source platforms. At the
same time, the majority of our customers will require the service and support that comes with a fully
supported commercial offering, Juniper Networks Contrail. With Contrail and OpenContrail we are
serving both market needs.

Q: Why would a customer choose the commercial product over the open product and vice
versa?
A: We expect customers leveraging Contrail in their production networks will choose the commercial
offering due to the service and support that comes with itsome customers do not want to trust their
business to the products without standard vendor support. OpenContrail on the other hand will make it
easier for customers to experiment, trial and customize.

Q: What is the benefit to Juniper of providing an open source version?


A: The primary benefit we expect to see is increased adoption. Customers who leverage the open source
version are more likely to move to the commercial version, and also are more likely to buy into Junipers
cloud network model based on BGP and MPLS. We also have the ability to monetize by selling more of
our hardware with a stronger better together story. Please access the OpenContrail FAQ for more
information.

Q: Do the open source and commercial versions compete with one another?
A: Realistically, no. Most customers who are deploying this as part of their production network will
require the service and support that are only available with the commercial version.

Q: How is Juniper supporting the developer community? What tools, guidance, etc. will you
provide?
A: We will build out a website and community forum at www.opencontrail.org with all the tools,
documentation and support developers need to build on OpenContrail and will be similar to other open
source project sites such as the various Apache Software Foundation pages, or OpenStack.

Q: Does the release of OpenContrail mean you are abandoning OpenDaylight?

A: Juniper Networks firmly believes that open source and open standards lead the way to greater levels
of innovation, and Juniper continues to actively participate and contribute to key standards bodies
associated with SDN including OpenDaylight and the Open Networking Foundation. As such, we plan to
work with IBM to submit the OpenContrail source code to OpenDaylight project. The Contrail launch
announcement reinforces Junipers commitment to open, industry collaboration while continuing to
deliver on our clear 4-step SDN roadmap.
Q: Why would anybody go for OpenContrail rather than OpenDaylight?
A: Juniper is a strong believer that open source is not a zero sum gameopen source projects are
designed to foster innovation and further the rate of technology advancements. There arent any
winners or losers.
That said, we feel its important that customers and developers have a choice of platforms to develop
on, and eventually deploy. OpenContrail is different from existing open source SDN platforms in a
few ways. From an architectural perspective, Contrail is based on proven, stable networking protocols
such as BGP and MPLS. This will be important to customers and developers who value interoperability
and integration between physical and virtual networks. Additionally, with OpenContrail we have opened
up significantly more relevant functionality in our source code disclosure. This should make it easier to
use for testing and supporting and building a much broader range of customer relevant use cases than
current open source alternatives.
Q: Juniper talked about an open source controller back in Sept. of 2012 as a way to compete

with Cisco and VMware then backed off this strategy later. Why the flip flop?
A: Since then we have realized that the two approaches (open source and commercial) need not be
mutually exclusive, and really the best way for the industry and for our customers is to provide both
options: an open source controller that will help drive rapid adoption and foster innovation; and a fullysupported commercial controller that comes with all the services and support our customers require for
such a critical component of their business.

Q: How can customers access OpenContrail?


A: Source code for Open Contrail is available today and can be downloaded from www.
opencontrail.org.

Q: Why doesnt Contrail leverage Open Flow?


A: Open Flow is simply a protocol that allows controllers to speak with physical and virtual network
elements. We dont believe Open Flow is the ideal protocol because it doesnt provide a very high level
of abstraction and as a result is not very scalable and hard to manage. There are existing protocols that
can be applied to solve the same problem in a more scalable and efficient manner. Contrail leverages
protocols such as BGP, MPLS and XMPP, which are proven, stable and supported on almost all physical
networking devices todayproviding seamless integration with existing physical infrastructure.
That said, we recognize that other solutions in the industry will chose to implement Open Flow, and its
for this reason that Juniper is an active member of ONF and implements OF on various hardware
products (MX, EX, etc.).

SDN STRATEGY AND CONTRAIL


Q: When will Juniper start seeing success from Contrail?
Contrail is in Beta with over 40 customers and will GA on September 16, 2013. We will share wins
internally. Stay tuned for first Winning Edge and Pit Stop trainings post GA.

Q: What will it take for SDN to be widely adopted?


We expect the evolution to SDN to be a process that plays out over several years like any other trend
in our industry, there isnt going to be a single light switch moment. That said, we are seeing interest
and evaluation from customers across all geographies and market segmentsas evidenced by the over
40 beta trials currently underway.
We believe the keys to SDN adoption are openness and simplicity, and these are key aspects of our
Contrail offering. Openness is important, so customers have the ability to deploy SDN solutions on their
choice of hypervisors, using their choice of orchestration platforms, and with any physical network
infrastructure. Simplicity is likewise important. It needs to be simple to integrate SDN technologies with
existing networks, which we provide via our support of stable and proven networking protocols, and it
needs to bring advanced networking capabilities into the cloud, while hiding the complexity from nonnetwork IT staff. This we also provide through our integration with orchestration tools and the notion of
SDN as a compiler.

PRODUCT AND ROADMAP


Q: Will there be support for additional hypervisors?
A: Yes. We are working on building support for more hypervisors like HypervV as we speak. We will
share the roadmap via product updates as they become firm. The timeline for building support for
additional platforms is dependent on how much and how soon a particular vendor is willing to share
product libraries.
Q: Why dont we support ESXi? It has the biggest market share.
A: We are open to supporting ESXi but VMware is not exposing its APIs and proves that they are still a
proprietary and closed system. This is a significant weakness of VMware NSX and ESXi story and should
be exploited in discussions with our customers and prospects. The VMware strategy is based on
proprietary customer lock-in, which is expensive from both a CapEx and OpEx perspective and inflexible.
With open-sourcing Contrail, we have achieved the ultimate transparency and openness that is unique
to all complete SDN solutions in the market.
Q: What are the minimum requirements to install Contrail?
A: Below are the minimum requirements for installing and running Contrail in your environment:
Orchestration Systems: OpenStack, CloudStack
Hardware: 64-bit Dual x86 processor, Minimum memory: 12GB RAM
Storage: 30GB SATA, SAS or SSD, Volume storage: 2 disks w/2TB SATA
Network: 1GB interface card (1)
OS: Linux OS - CentOS, RHEL 6.4, Ubuntu 13.x

Q: How exactly does Contrail integrate with the MX Series? Does it also integrate with Junipers other
hardware lines?
A: Contrail leverages industry-standard routing protocols like BGP and MPLS over GRE to speak with
routers such as the MX Series. Its this use of standard routing protocols that enable Contrail to leverage
the MX Series as a physical gateway element, eliminating the need for a separate software gateway as
required with competitors solutions. Additionally Contrail supports NetConf which can be used to push
configuration changes to the MX.
Q: I have noticed VMware ESXi and HyperV are not supported; what was the rationale behind this?
A: We are open to supporting ESXi, but VMware is not exposing its APIs, proving they are still a
proprietary and closed system. This is a significant weakness of VMware NSX and the ESXi story and
should be exploited in discussions with our customers and prospects. The VMware strategy is based on
proprietary customer lock-in, which is inflexible and expensive from both a CapEx and OpEx perspective.
By open sourcing Contrail, we have achieved ultimate transparency and the openness that is unique to
all complete SDN solutions in the market.
We are working on building support for more hypervisors like HyperV as we speak. We will share a
roadmap with product updates as they become firm. The timeline for building support for additional
platforms is dependent on how much and how soon a particular vendor is willing to share product
libraries. We currently support Open Hypervisors KVM and Xen.

OPENCONTRAIL
Q: What is the code review process?
A: The code review process is going to remain very simple anyone can submit a pull request using
Github. We will populate the reviewer community with module developers from Juniper that will review
any code submissions. Over time, we will elect reviewers and approvers from the open source
community.
Q: How does one contribute to the project? Is it code submission, documentation, promotion,
reporting bugs, vulnerabilities?
A: Initially, there will be three types of submissions to the project:
Additional features
Bug fixes
Documentation improvements
In addition, we will allow the community to submit bugs using the Github issue tracker. Patches to bug
fixes, new features, and documentation enhancements will need to come through a pull request using
Github. The same applies to API documentation that is auto generated from the source code.
Q: When people contribute code, where does the copyright go?
A: The contributor retains the copyright to their contribution, and they grant a broad license back to the
Juniper and any recipients, as is standard under the Apache 2.0 Contributor License Agreement.

Q: As the product is released to the general audience, will there be 2 separate release lines (one for
Contrail and one for Open Source Community)?
A: The Open Source community will regularly get new functionality and/or fix bugs from Juniper
developers. We plan to move all our development to a public release line within 2 months of the public
launch and will release the commercially supported and validated releases every 3 months with
intermediate maintenance releases as dictated by our commercially supported customers.
Q: Are we going to having specific coding conventions and code contribution agreements?
A: Yes, all developers will be expected to follow coding and documentation conventions for their code to
be accepted, and we will post the coding convention to OpenContrail.org at launch time. We are going
to evolve the documentation convention and make it available within 3 months of the launch.

PRICING AND LICENSING


Q: How will the controller be licensed?
A: The commercial version of Contrail is available today and is offered as both a perpetual and
subscription software license. The perpetual license is priced at $1,700 per socket and the 1 year
subscription license at $1,000 per socket. The number of sockets represents the number of
servers/vRouters that Contrail is managing.
The unrestricted use of Open Contrail is available via an Apache 2.0 license and can be downloaded at
www.opencontrail.org.
Q: What does a customer get when paying $1,700 per socket? Which parameters did you use to come
to this pricing?
A: A customer gets perpetual rights to use the software as opposed to term based rights (rights to use
the software end with the term) with the subscription model.
A customer would actually pay the equivalent of a perpetual license + 5 years of Software maintenance
in about 3.5 years, if they were to buy a subscription model.
All licensing rights are exactly the same irrespective of the license term. Software maintenance is an
additional fee in the perpetual model, while it is included in the subscription fee.
The parameters used to come to this pricing include typical virtual network deployment costs in various
markets, such as managed service providers and enterprises. The key drivers of the price are the cost
savings by the use of Contrail and the propensity to pay by the customer in those various deployment
scenarios.
Q: Could you help us link the number of sockets to the factors driving them? How should we think
about the average deal size here?
A: Each typical server is about two sockets. The average deal size varies with the size of the deployment.
A typical 1000 server deployment (2000 sockets) would cost around $1M US per year. The typical target
market is about 1000-5000 servers.

Q: Is there any difference in the features provided by different Contrail SKUs?


A: No. All the SKUs have the same feature set.
Q: Is there a tool that will help me calculate the number of sockets needed for my customers?
A: No. There is no tool at present. Please let us know if one would be helpful, and we will create one.
Q: Is there a TCO/ROI calculator for my customers?
A: No. There is no TCO/ROI calculator at present. We would need to have a few customer deployments
in order to create a valid and accurate calculator. Please reach out to us if you have a customer who is
willing to participate in this case study.
Q: How do we plan to monetize Contrail if there is an open source model?
A: The business model for monetizing open source software has been well proven by many companies
probably the best known is Red Hat, but others including Apple, Adobe and Oracle, as well as emerging
software companies (MySQL, MongoDB, Opscode, SugarCRM, Alfresco) have also successfully gone to
market with dual open source and commercial offerings.
Essentially, it comes down to service and support. Large companies are unlikely to deploy a product that
is unsupported and will most likely adopt the commercial version which will be supported by Juniper,
thereby providing us with the incremental revenue, as well as support and services opportunities.
OpenContrail is intended to drive a rapid adoption for our controller, which in-turn will give us the
opportunity to sell more of our systems as we will build strong linkages between our controller and
systems with strong troubleshooting, diagnostics and analytics tools for cloud networking environments.
Q: Is there a hotline or an email alias that I can use to get help with licensing and pricing questions?
A: Please email licensing-help@juniper.net if you have questions regarding licensing or pricing for
Contrail.

SALES QUESTIONS
Q: How can my customers order Contrail?
A: Commercial version of Contrail is available on our price list and is ordered like any other Juniper
product.
Customers who wish to evaluate the product can download the open source version of Contrail from
www.opencontrail.org
Q: Is there any sales training available for selling SDN/Contrail?
A: There will be a sales training available for selling SDN/Contrail. A notification will be emailed for the
same. You can also access recorded pitstop:
Enterprise Pit Stop https://learningportal.juniper.net/juniper/user_activity_info.aspx?id=8148
Service Providers Pit Stop
https://learningportal.juniper.net/juniper/user_activity_info.aspx?id=8123

Q: Where can I learn more about Contrail and how to stay in touch?
A: Collateral and supporting documents are all posted on Salesforce and can be searched using Contrail
tag. The best way to stay in touch is to join Software Defined Networking (SDN) Chatter group
(Chatter/Groups/SDN).

COMPETITIVE AND SALES PROCESS


Q: Who are the Contrail competitors?
A: Our major competitors are:
1. VMware (NSX platform)
2. Cisco (Insieme)
3. Alcatel Lucent (Nuage Networks)
There are a number of startups coming up like PLUMgrid, Big Switch networks, etc., that we are
watching closely. If you do find a new name in the field, please let us know.
Q: How is Junipers approach to SDN different from its competitors?
A: It comes down to simplicity, openness and agility.
o Simple: Our simple approach makes it easy to connect networks and provision underlying services in
the virtual world.
A unique, Layer 3-based approach brings the same networking technologies used in the
physical network into the virtual network
SDN as a Compiler approach hides the complexity of the network from IT staff by translating
abstract commands into specific automated sequences of events (e.g., insert a firewall
service between point A & B).
Service chaining or NFV now makes it easier to provision and manage any network and
security services
o Open: Junipers solution eliminates vendor-lock-in by interoperating seamlessly with a wide range
of
Hypervisors (multi hypervisor support)
Open orchestration systems (OpenStack, CloudStack)
Any underlying physical infrastructure with an a virtual overlay solution that interoperates
seamlessly via use of industry standard networking protocols
And we are also demonstrating the ultimate openness via open sourcing Contrail with Open
Contrail.
o Agile: Contrail has unique capabilities that speed the connection of virtual resources and clouds,
including
Fast interconnection of physical and virtual networks due to Contrails use of standard
network protocols
Rapid troubleshooting and diagnostics via unique analytics capabilities
Quick turn-up of new services, because Contrail automates & orchestrates provisioning of
networks to connect virtual resources

Q: What competitive tools are available to help me pitch against our competition?
A: Battlecards with high-level competitive information and competitor specific, Hot Sheets are posted
on Salesforce. Hot Sheets are available for the following competitors:
VMware (NSX platform)
Cisco (Insieme)
Alcatel Lucent (Nuage Networks)
Q: How does this compete with open source controllers like Floodlight and OpenDaylight?
A: Juniper is a strong believer that open source is not a zero sum gameopen source projects are
designed to foster innovation and further the rate of technology advancements, there arent any
winners or losers.
That said, we feel its important that customers and developers have a choice of platforms to develop
on, and eventually deploy. OpenContrail is different from existing open source SDN platforms in a few
ways. From an architectural perspective, Contrail is based on proven, stable networking protocols such
as BGP and MPLS. This will be important to customers and developers who value interoperability and
integration between physical and virtual networks.
Additionally, with OpenContrail we have opened up significantly more relevant functionality in our
source code disclosure. This should make it easier to use for testing and supporting and building a much
broader range of customer relevant use cases than current open source alternatives.
Q: Whats your perspective on Ciscos SDN strategy? They also champion open programmable
network environments isnt part of your approach similar to theirs?
A: Cisco has several fundamental problems with its SDN strategy. First, it has a very fragmented
software platform base to build upon. Its a company that has been built through the last two decades
of acquisitions with a low priority placed on unifying underlying operating systems and organization
silos. This lack of cohesion leaves them with an almost impossible basis to build a similar platform and
architecture that Juniper has outlined with its SDN strategy.

Second, a company with so much legacy business to protect is structurally incapable of fully embracing a
new technology or more importantly a new business model. For Juniper, SDN represents a chance to
further expand and grow our business. Much of the focus for SDN will be in the data center where we
have 3% market share today. By contrast, the picture looks very different for the dominant networking
vendor in the data center with 70% share. For them, SDN poses a threat to a $15B data center
networking business they want to protect. They have every reason to slow-roll the evolution of SDN.

Our approach is in no way similar to Ciscos. Juniper is embracing SDN with a comprehensive approach,
clearly defined principles, a four-step roadmap to help customers adopt SDN within their business, and
the networking industrys first and only software-centric business model.

Q: On one hand we are partnering with VMware on its NSX platform, and on the other, we are
positioning Contrail against NSX. How do I deliver separate message to my customers? What is the
benefit for supporting NSX?
A: VMware has a dominant position in Enterprise data centers and will continue to be dominant for a
while. We recognize that customer choice will be driven by a need/desire for ESXi and supporting
technologies/platforms. By supporting an SDN approach that has us partner with VMware, we are in a
good position to get our foot in the door and are consistent with our messaging of No rip-and-replace.
There is, however, an upcoming market opportunity with alternative solutions gaining ground. A lot of
Enterprise environments have multiple, hypervisor environments. We can position Contrail for nonVMware environments with these customers. Our positioning for these environments will be to pursue
an overlay approach with superior capabilities using open standards.
This also helps us differentiate our message from Cisco in a way that has us come off more positive and
less defensive and helps us make revenue in VMware based environments.
Q: VMware has dominant position in Enterprise datacenter market. How do I compete against them?
A: VMWare is by far the dominant player in the enterprise virtualization space and this is unlikely to
change in the foreseeable future. Its important to listen to customers needs and desires to understand
when to compete and when to partner. The options are as follows:

Cap and grow: Some customers are growing tired of VMware, and looking to migrate to a less
costly, open source based virtualization platform. This is the ideal opportunity to insert Contrail,
which doesnt require them to abandon VMware entirelythey can pursue a cap-and-grow
migration strategy
Sell hardware: For customers who are tied to VMware, this is where our integration partnership
is important. You can continue to sell Juniper routers and switches while waiting for an
opportunity to open up for Contrail

For a more detailed analysis, check out our VMware Hot Sheet.
Q: How does this impact Junipers relationship with VMware? You announced a partnership on the
hardware side, yet this directly competes with NSX.
A: Its really all about choice and protecting customers from lock-in. Junipers message and strategy
around SDN Controllers has been consistent. Almost a year ago, we clearly stated that a robust and
viable open source controller would be required by the market. At the same time, we recognize that
there are a variety of controllers on the marketsome open, and some proprietaryand we have also
committed to ensure our hardware platforms are interoperable with a wide variety of controllers.
Q: Big Switch announced they were shifting their strategy, so its solution can better merge the
physical and virtual worlds. How does this differ from Junipers approach?
A: Big Switches move further reinforces our approach to SDN, given we have advocated from the start
that the physical world needs to be more tightly integrated with the virtual world. In fact, Juniper
Networks Contrail, with its proactive overlay approach based on standards based protocols and our
recent partnership with VMware are both designed to do just that.

PARTNER PROGRAM
Q: You announced several SDN partnerships. What else are you doing to train and incentivize the
channel?
A: In terms of go to market (GTM) partners who will sell SDN solutions, we have added Contrail as an
authorization within Juniper Partner Advantage. This has two specific implications:
1. As an authorization, we will provision specific training for partners to ensure partners are able to
sell and support SDN solutions to a high level of customer satisfaction. We will bring JNSS and
JNSA SDN training online in the Learning Academy in Q1 2014, as well as create a JNCIX-SDN
post sales certification. Both will be required to qualify as an SDN authorized partner.
2. Contrail will be a restricted product, so the SDN authorization allows us to restrict access to
these products to SDN authorized partners. This creates real differentiation in the Juniper
partner program and incents partners to develop their SDN expertise and practices.
In the interim, before the SDN courses become main stream, we will run SDN boot camps to enable a
number of specially selected partners to increase their SDN expertise. These partners will be able to sell
SDN solutions until the permanent SDN authorizations become main stream, but they will be expected
to gain full authorization within one quarter of these courses being available in their geo.
Finally, SDN is one of the key requirements for partners to participate in the newly created Cloud
Specialization within the Juniper Partner Advantage. This is an invitation only specialization and
represents one of the key go to market sales plays for SDN. It includes the normal discretionary partner
support elements such as MDF, collateral, reference architectures plus a dedicated Juniper Cloud
Community of Interest.
Q: Why is it important for Juniper to partner with cloud solution providers?
A: Customers want choice, experience and simplicity when planning and migrating to cloud networks.
Thats why Juniper Networks is working with industry leaders such as, Citrix, Cloudscaling, IBM, Mirantis
and Red Hat, etc. With this collaboration, customers will have access to complete cloud-based solutions
based on OpenStack or CloudStack and built on open standards, virtualization protocols and
management of compute, storage and, for the first time networking capabilities to take private and
public clouds to new levels of performance.
Q: How does Juniper Networks Partner Advantage Cloud specialization support existing roadmaps and
market vision for technologies like data center, security, and SDN?
A: Juniper Networks Partner Advantage Cloud specialization delivers programming that encompasses a
holistic perspective across critical cloud infrastructure technologies, such as data center, security and
SDN, to help partners create cloud solutions and prepare for future product innovations.
Q: What is Juniper Networks Partner Advantage Cloud specialization?
A: Juniper Networks recognizes and understands the evolution and growth of cloud opportunities for
partners and has carefully crafted support for the channel by extending the Partner Advantage program
to help create cloud revenue and growth opportunities.

With this announcement, Juniper Networks is laying the foundation for a complete and compelling set
of cloud-enabling technologies and programming to help our partners prepare and deliver solutions for
evolving customer needs and demands for cloud-based scenarios.
The Partner Advantage Cloud specialization leverages key elements of Juniper Networks Partner
Advantage program and will recognize and reward partners who have either an existing Cloud or
Managed Service Provider (MSP) offering or wish to invest in developing their cloud capability.
To ensure partners can maximize their benefit from the Partner Advantage Cloud specialization, Juniper
Networks has defined three specific types of cloud partners, including:
o Cloud Infrastructure Partners (CIP) A partner that has the ability to sell Juniper
Networks cloud hardware and software solutions, including the companys Contrail SDN
product.
o Cloud Systems Integrators (CSI) A partner that has the assets and skills to implement
and deliver fully functional, customized cloud solutions, including professional services
to cloud service partners (CSPs) or private cloud providers, to end-user customers.
o Cloud Services Partners (CSP) A partner that sells and provisions cloud-based or
managed services based on Juniper Networks software and hardware products.
Q: What is the market opportunity or challenge Juniper Networks is addressing with Partner
Advantage Cloud?
A: With the Partner Advantage Cloud specialization, Juniper Networks is making a strategic investment
in the companys partner relationships to enable customer success in future cloud and SDN solutions
and services.
Juniper Networks is creating programming to help partners build their cloud practices and services to
better serve their customers in deploying Juniper Networks cloud solutions.
In addition, Juniper Networks is supporting SDN products and solutions through new training and
product authorizations providing partners access to industry-leading technologies and enabling them to
create advanced cloud solutions and services for customers.
Q: What are the specifics around Junipers partnership with IBM?
A: We are announcing a joint IBM/Juniper solution to enable customers to build enterprise-class private
clouds, with a focus on integration between the Juniper controller (Contrail) and IBM Orchestration
(Smart Cloud Orchestrator). IBM is a marquee partner with product and integration capabilities
spanning several of the above segments. We will announce a special partner relationship with IBM
focused on product level integration between IBMs Smart Cloud Orchestrator and Contrail. Specific
elements of the partnership include:
1. A reference architecture showing IBM/juniper cloud collaboration
2. Quotes and PR from IBM exec(s)
3. Availability of a Proof of Concept showing the 2 products jointly in action

Q: Some of the technology partners we announced compete with Juniper products (e.g., CheckPoint)?
Why are we doing this?
A: A platform like Contrail has to work with a range of virtualized applications. We cant assume that
customers are going to pick a purely Juniper solution. Contrail has to work in heterogeneous
environments. As such, integration will be importanteven with products that compete with Juniper
solutions. That said, we are working to ensure there is better together functionality between Contrail
and Juniper platforms and services.

Q: What retains partners like Riverbed if they interface thru Northbound APIs (like anybody else)?
A: Northbound APIs provide the ability to create a "single pane of glass" orchestration/management
system for the partner service in a virtual network setup. A validated solution (consisting of northbound
integration) ensures that a partner service can seamlessly operate and integrate with a customers
virtual network setup. This opens up opportunity for the partner within existing and potential Contrail
deployments.
Q: Where can I get more information about SDN technology partners?
A: An SDN Technology Partner cheat sheet is available with an overview, joint value proposition and
integration path listed for each technology partner.