Puyallup Tribal Fisheries 2008-2009 Annual Salmon, Steelhead, and Bull Trout Report (Main Body) | Rainbow Trout | Salmon

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Chinook salmon

B

oise Creek is a significant tributary to the White River, converging with the White River at RM 23.5, just upstream of where highway 410 crosses the river north of the city of Buckley. In contrast to most of the Puyallup/White River Watershed which falls within Pierce County, Boise Creek lies within South King County, with much of the lower creek flowing south within the city of Enumclaw. The creek drains an area of approximately 15.4 mi2; with its headwaters locate in a well forested area of the Grass Mountain Range. Boise Creek has often proven to be highly productive tributary over the past several years despite its numerous impairments. A good deal of the lower 4.5 miles of the creek provides suitable habitat for several anadromous and resident species including spring and Fall Chinook (top photo), coho, pink, sockeye, steelhead and cutthroat trout. Since 2003, chum spawning has become more prevalent in the lower 1.5 miles of the creek. In August of 2003, the city of Tacoma removed its 99 year old concrete pipeline crossing located at RM 23 on the White River. The concrete and rebar structure had long been suspected of in njuring salmon and limiting upstream migration of weaker swimmers like chum salmon. The removal of the old concrete structure has resulted in increased

number of chum salmon being able to access Boise Creek. During the 2008 season, 41 chum were observed in the lower 1.5 miles of the creek. A 12-ft bedrock falls at RM 4.5 marks the upper extent of adult salmon and steelhead migration (below). Cutthroat and rainbow trout have been observed above the falls; although, no data is available on the size or range of the population(s). Above the falls the gradient increases becoming a small cascade/step-pool configuration. The channel upstream of the falls, to where Boise crosses under highway 410, was altered back in the mid 1930’s to accommodate for the construction of the highway. Upstream of 410, the creek passes through the old Weyerhauser mill site which is still a large source of sedimentary input. For approximately 0.2 miles below the falls, Boise flows through a lower gradient riffle-pool channel bordered by a dense second growth forest; several spawning opportunities exist throughout this stretch. Spawning densities for all species are often high within this section. Continuing downstream of the forested area is a low gradient reach flowing for approximately 0.5 miles within the golf course in the city of Enumclaw. The riparian zone alongside this section is exceptionally sparse; the banks are merely rip-raped and bordered by maintained turf grass, blackberry, and small deciduous trees.

Boise Creek falls (@260 cfs.).

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 1

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

There is, however, a short section located within the golf course below RM 4.0 with an intact har hardwood riparian zone. Spawning is noticeably r reduced throughout the entire reach of the creek tire flowing within the open range of the golf course (bottom left photo). Downstream from the golf stream course, Boise Creek begins to flow through res residential and agricultural lands. This more deve developed reach extends from approximately RM 3.7 imately down to RM 0.3; much of the stream along this stretch is incised to depths of 20 feet or more. E cised Extensive tracts of land bordering Boise Creek below sive RM 3.5 are primarily used for maintaining cattle taining and other livestock. Although spawning activity for nearly all species occurs throughout the entire 4.5 miles, as out much as 65-70% of Chinook, coho, and pink spawn, ing may occur above RM 2.2. From 1999 to 2007 . 2007, an average of 63.8% (range 53.5%-83.3%) of steel83.3%) head spawned above RM 2.2. During the 2005 ing season, the first significant numbers of chu salbers chum mon were observed in Boise Creek, as high as RM
The upper Boise Creek channel within the golf course course. This photo was taken two days after the January, 2009 flood event.

1.5. Boise has continued to support a large number of Chinook spawners over the past several seasons (2000-2008). Carcass sampling data shows that a significant number of Chinook, as high Lower 4.5 miles of Boise Creek as 64% (in 2006), that spawn in Boise Creek are hatchery oriha gin Fall Chinook. This corre responds with DNA sampling studies of Chinook in the White River; nook Ford et al. (2004), showed an approximately 60% a falls and 40% Spring Chinook component in the lower river (below RM 24.3). The pink salmon returns to Boise in 2005 and 2007 were unprecedented. Estimate calculations put the actual escapetions e ment at nearly 16,000 fish in 2005, and almost 28,000 in 2007. Spawning opportunities for all ing o species is considerably reduced in the lower 0.3 duced miles of the creek. The gradient throughout this throu short stretch is steeper, the banks are confined by per, co high sheer walls, and the substrate consists of su mostly boulders and large cobble. ers Chinook, coho, and steelhead are especially vulvu nerable to poaching and harassment in this urban stream. In addition, surrounding agricultural land urrounding use continues to impact channel and water quality conditions. Other limiting factors affecting Boise ing fa include the loss of historic flood plain and streamside riparian, channel confinement and realign, confin ment, temperature and other water quality issues; erature w as well as reduced LWD inputs and the removal of LWD by land owners. Tremendous improvements to riparian and stream channel conditions are possible but require willing land owners, technical expertise and fundfun ing. Despite its many habitat related shortcomshortco ings, Boise Creek continues to support returns of wild steelhead, a remarkable fact in light of the basin-wide decline over the past decade. wide
Page 2

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Boise Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
450 LIVE DEAD 400 REDDS

350

300
NUMBER OBSERVED

250

200

150

100

50

0 8/27/08 9/5/08 9/15/08 9/24/08
DATE SURVEYED

10/3/08

10/14/08

10/14/08

Boise Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1994-2008) (19941,000 903 LIVE DEAD REDDS 732 800

900

NUMBER OBSERVED

617

600

440

351

315

318

229

170 155

150

153

200 81

147

160

100

100 70

89

75

41 11 10

35 24

46 30

58

100

63 44

67

89

226 205

215

221

300

261

28

0 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

27

32

Page 3

325

400

344

440

500

552

633

700

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Boise Creek Coho Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
250 LIVE DEAD

200

NUMBER OBSERVED

150

100

50

0 9/15/08 9/24/08 10/3/08 10/14/08 10/24/08
DATE SURVEYED

11/20/08

12/2/08

12/9/08

12/18/08

(1993Boise Creek Coho Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1993-2008)
3,500 3,285 LIVE 3,000 DEAD

NUMBER OBSERVED

2,000 1,513 1,500 1,083

2,155

2,500

1,000 697 483 558 601

841

394

282

251

208

222

158

108

233

500

327

335

445 30 2007 95 2008 Page 4 109

99 20

51

90

43

40

0 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
YEAR SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

12

21

30

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2009 Boise Creek Steelhead Spawning Ground Counts
10 LIVE DEAD 8 REDDS

9

7
NUMBER OBSERVED

6

5

4

3

2

1

0 3/20/09 4/20/09 4/29/09 5/13/09
DATE SURVEYED

5/26/09

6/9/09

6/22/09

(1995Boise Creek Steelhead Redd Counts Seasonal Comparisons (1995-2009)
120

STEELHEAD REDDS
100 88 80
NUMBER OBSERVED

79 74 63

60

56 44

40 32 27 20 18 18 16 30 29 25 15

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
YEAR SURVEYED

Redd locations for Boise Creek steelhead can found in Appendix C.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 5

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

BUCKLEY: BUCKLEY:
USACE FISH TRAP WHITE RIVER

T

he U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE)

fish trapping facility is located at RM 24.3 near Buckley (top left photo). Salmon, steelhead, bull trout, and other native fish (whifishes tefish, rainbow trout) migrating to the uppe upper White River, enter this trap and are transported above Mud Mountain Dam. Fish not allowed u upstream include hatchery released Chinook and steelhead; with the exception of White River stee steelhead acclimated and released from the Muckl Muckleshoot hatchery. The Corps’ trapping facil facility is uniquely integrated into a diversion dam and flume intake that was, up until January 2004, used to divert water from the White River to generate power. Since PSE ceased power production, some measure of water has continued to be diverted from the White River to maintain the wat levels hite water and water quality in Lake Tapps. Engineering and ake development is currently underway way to replace the existing stru structure with a new diversion dam and version fish trapping facil facility. The USACE facility offers unpacility ralleled access to leled Adult bull trout significant nu nificant num-

bers of salmonids, which has been invaluable tool for research, salmon recovery and escapement essearch, e timates. During the months that salmon, steelmates. stee head and bull trout return to the upper White RivRi er, the USACE empties the trap daily, the trap is th hoisted to a tanker truck, and fish are released , from the trap into the truck. Fish are then transtran ported above Mud Mountain Dam and released back into the White River at RM 33.6; four miles above the dam and about one mile below the conco fluence with the Clearwater River. ith Species of salmonids captured in the trap ini clude spring and Fall Chinook, coho, pink, sockeye, Chinook chum, steelhead and bull trout. Puyallup Tribe Fisheries staff samples the contents of the trap once a week throughout the entire year. Species sampled regularly include Chinook, steelhead, Chinook sockeye, and bull trout. During the Spring Chinook/sockeye/bull trout run (late May- early Octo/sockeye/bull ber) PTF staff sample the trap 1 to 5 days per week; the frequency is dependent on the number of fish captured throughout the entire run. SteelStee head are sampled regularly by PTF staff from late January through June. All fish sampled are dipdip netted from the trap and placed into a 30 gallon water filled stainless steel bin and anesthetized bi with MS-222. All fish are examined for fin–clips; h fin in addition, Chinook and steelhead are sampled for coded-wire tags with a metal detector. Additional sampling includes measuring each fish for fork length and collection of DNA and scale Steelhead on measuring scale samples from Chinook, steelhead, and bull trout. DNA sampling trout involves removing a small amount of the anal fin and preserving it in 95% ethanol (C2H5OH) for later analysis. In addition to DNA and scale samples, sis. bull trout are floy tagged and transported above Mud Mountain Dam (lower left). Wild steelhead left are transported above Mud Mountain dam, while Mou non White River hatchery reared steelhead are returned back to the White River below the USACE b trap as per agreement with the Muckleshoot InI dian Tribe and the State of Washington. Was
Page 6

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1941-2008) Chinook Transported Above Mud Mountain Dam (1941-2008
5,431 6,000

5,000

3,736

4,000
NUMBER OF CHINOOK

1,292 1,546 2,002

2,394 1,945 2005

3,000

2,584

3,692

1,470 1,841 1,370 1,849

1,893

2,000 1,101

794 374 245 261 528 505 164 447 658 969 639 684 465 534 557 393 392 137 388 488 229 66 140 72 61 175 20 26 10 27 6 117 127 111 221 277 406 409 392 605 702 422 402

719 842 931 633

1,000

0 1941 1943 1945 1947 1949 1951 1953 1955 1957 1959 1961 1963 1965 1967 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2007 Page 7

YEAR

2008 Buckley Trap Chinook Returns N=3,154

2008 Buckley Trap Wild (NOR) Chinook Returns N=1,442 Jacks 73 5%

Hatchery 1,189 38%

Wild 1,442 46% Adults 1,369 95%

Acclimation Ponds 523 16%

2008: Total number of Chinook captured in the USACE fish trap including wild, acclimation and White River hatchery. 2008 Buckley Trap Acclimation Pond Returns N=523 5 year old, 6, 1% 6 year old, 2, 0% 3 year old, 37, 7% 4 year old 437 84% Jacks, 41, 8%

2008: Breakdown of adult and jack NOR’s (natural origin return) captured in the USACE fish trap. 2008 Buckley Trap Wild Chinook Age Composition N=467 5 year old, 10, 2% Jacks, 29, 6% 3 year old, 43, 9%

4 year old, 385, 83%

2008: Breakdown of adult and jack acclimation pond Chinook captured in the USACE fish trap.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

2008: Age breakdown of wild adult and jack Chinook captured in the USACE fish trap.

803

1,551

1,965

4,634 4,565

4,603

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2007 Buckley Trap Chinook Returns N=6,533 White River Hatchery

2007 Buckley Trap Wild (NOR's) Chinook N=2,844

Jacks, 67 , 2%
Wild (NOR)

1,967 30%

2,844 44%

Acclimation Ponds,

1,722 , 26%
2007: Total number of Chinook captured in the USACE fish trap including wild, acclimation and White River hatchery. 2007 Buckley Trap Acclimation Pond Returns N=1,721

Adults, 2,777 , 98%
2007: Breakdown of adult and jack NOR’s (natural origin return) captured in the USACE fish trap. 2007 Buckley Trap Wild Chinook Age Composition N=563

Jacks, 48 , 3% 4 year old, 173, 31%

5 year old, 4, 1%

Jacks, 12, 2%

Adults, 1,674 , 97%
2007: Breakdown of adult and jack acclimation pond Chinook captured in the USACE fish trap.

3 year old, 374, 66%
2007: Age breakdown of wild adult and jack Chinook captured in the USACE fish trap.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 8

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1941Coho Transported Above Mud Mountain Dam (1941-2008)
25,000
21,591

20,000
NUMBER OF COHO TRANSPORTED

16,476

12,484

9,698

7,500

7,988

6,739

6,503

3,811 4,992

2,733

5,000
1,467 717 1,003

1,961 3,403 2,094 2,031 3,448 1,398 1,098 1,992 1,429 4,090 1,810 3,756 2,506 1,639 1,537 1,688 1,818 2,972 796 1,081 546 833 1,090 493 320 335 1,237 522 408 403 1,349 599 1,746 3,231 820

3,623

5,840 4,558

5,671

0
1941 1943 1945 1947 1949 1951 1953 1955 1957 1959 1961 1963 1965 1967 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007

14 18

YEAR

(1999Bull Trout Transported Above Mud Mountain Dam (1999-2009)
100
The low number of bull trout captured in 2008 is likely due to significant comcomplications which occurred with trapping operations; thereby, preventing capture and/or generating migratory delays.

927

1,782 1,065

1,469

1,264 1,379

6,022 6,370

91

90

NUMBER OF BULL TROUT TRANSPORTED

80

70

60 49 40 40 29 31 41 37

50

47 39 36

30

20 14 10

0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
YEAR

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 9

7,482

10,000

8,420

12,620

15,000

14,341 13,894

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1941Adult and Jack Steelhead Transported Above Mud Mountain Dam (1941-2009)
2,500 2,166

2,000

1,902

NUMBER OF STEELHEAD

1,662

1,381 1,364 1,298 1,122

1,155 1,021

1,031

906 828

960 912

1,234 726 691 638 683 535 368 156 162 280 203 458 264 347 683 624 1989 1991 896 1987 1993 1995 460 433 367 405 373 328 253 369 435 524 162 183 152 136 276 183 153 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 7 5 5
YEAR

1,500

822

1,000

1,304 1,211

447 476 482

437

477

500

0 1941 1943 1945 1947 1949 1951 1953 1955 1957 1959 1961 1963 1965 1967 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 2009 45 11 10 4 Page 10

The graph above details the number of steelhead transported above Mud Mountain Dam. Additional steelhead captured in the trap since 2006 have been utilized as brood-stock for the White River steelhead supplementation pilot project; bringing the total number of steelhead captured for the past four years to: 163 (2006), 303 (2007), 207 (2008), and 165 (2009).

(1980Adult Sockeye, Pink, and Chum Salmon Transported Above Mud Mountain Dam (1980-2008)
127,541 43 137 39 39 41 16 15 21 21 16 14 28 1,000,000

351 260 192 220 381 249 279 286 326 274

205

228

YEAR

Sockeye
100,000

1,971

Pink

Chum
13,190 33,346

NUMBER OF ADULTS TRANSPORTED

10,000

378

1,000

114

19

15

20

39

100

59

63

12

13 9

10

1

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

223

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

C

spring and summer for juvenile Chinook, steelhead, and cutthroat to feed on. Adult fluvial bull trout are a also known to forage in the smaller tributaries of the lower Puyallup, including Canyon Creek. Chum salmon are the only species observed spawning in significant numbers from late NovemNove ber through January. Adult coho are periodically seen in the same reach as chum, but no surveys are conducted for coho by the Puyallup Tribe given their escapement numbers are extremely low. Canyon low lacks any real habitat complexity such as LWD, off channel habitat, or variation in stream channel type. The greater part of the lower reach of the creek consists of a flat low gradient channel with few hydraulic breaks. However, there are approximately 450 feet of suitable spawning habitat in habi Canyon Creek, this section flows along Canyon road upstream of Pioneer Way (left photo). Nonetheless, this very small stretch has proven to be productive for chum over the past several seasons. seasons The channel gradient increases substantially above the culvert crossing under Canyon Road. The culvert itself doesn’t appear to be an encumbrance to chum, since they are often observed spawning on the fine gravel within the culvert. However, the steep gradient above the culvert does impede chum, as no fish are observed above the culvert during the peak of the run. The main channel above the culvert (below) has anyon Creek is a small tributary within the been engineered with the placement of log weirs to larger 12.1 mi2 Clear Creek Basin (10.0022). retain gravel. They appear to be only moderately etain The Clear Creek Basin drains the plateaus effective because the amount of fines in the entire and flatlands running along the southern valley of reach is excessive. Downstream of Pioneer, the the lower Puyallup River, just west of the city of channel substrate consists of fine sand and extremeextrem Puyallup. Canyon Creek doesn’t appear on the h hyly compacted small gravel. Storm and ground water drology of most common mapping systems, inclu includrunoff along the east side of Canyon Road flows into ast ing USGS Quads. Furthermore, it is not listed in Canyon Creek next to the WRIA catalog of streams for area 10 and has not the downstream end of og been assigned a designated WRIA number. the culvert. Large numLittle stream complexity exists within Canyon bers of chum are often Creek, and seasonal flows are rarely, if ever, ade, drawn up this small quate to allow access for adult Chinook or steelhead drainage channel during to spawn. However, it is highly likely that juveniles high water events, only from adult spawners in Clear and Swan c ult creeks util- to be stranded in thick ize Canyon Creek, especially for foraging and overdeep mud and sediment wintering. There is often an abundance of chum fry when the instream flow during the spring, as well as coho fry throughout pring, diminishes.

CANYON CREEK

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 11

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Canyon Creek Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
50 LIVE DEAD 40

45

35
NUMBER OBSERVED

30

25

20

15

10

5

0 11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08 12/22/08 12/31/08 1/15/09 1/22/09
DATE SURVEYED

(2001Canyon Creek Chum Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (2001-2008)
600 LIVE 488 DEAD

500

393

400
NUMBER OBSERVED

343

292

300

200

172

280

335

391

66

59

100 21 43 46

99

0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

56 Page 12

111

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

CANYONFALLS CREEK 10.0410

C

anyonfalls Creek is a small tributary ente nyonf entering the Puyallup River at approximately RM 16.2, near the town of McMillin (north of Orting). Canyonfalls is primarily a spring fed stream that has relatively consistent instream tent flows, even in late summer. Although the stream length is three mile, nearly all spawning activity for species common to the creek takes place below the culvert under McCutcheon Rd. at RM 0.5. The gradient quickly increases above the culvert, but there are several pockets of usable spawning gravel just upstream of the culvert. In 2003, a large cement . box culvert replaced the old culvert under McCu McCutcheon Road. Approximately 400 feet upstream of the culvert, the creek rapidly climbs nearly 300 feet in elevation to where it’s discharged from a privately owned ha hatchery (Trout Lodge). The creek is diverted to meet the needs of raising trout for planting in regional lakes. Above the hatchery the creek continues to climb through a forested area. As mentioned, the lower anadromous reach of the creek extends downstream of McCutcheon road; the substrate is a combination of sand and gravel within a low gradient pool-rifle channel. In the rifle summer of 2002, 220 cubic yards of 1-to inch to-3 spawning quality drain rock was deposited directly downstream of the McCutcheon road culvert. The

rock was distributed along an approximately 0.2 mile stretch of the creek. The rock was deposited as a result of a settlement agreement between the Puyallup Tribe and Fennel Resources which has a gravel mining operation located on Fennel Creek. cated Nearly all spawning activity observed occurs within this short 0.2 mile stretch of the creek. Below this th point the substrate consists primarily of fines, fines which is more typical for this stream type, but unu fortunately is rarely suitable for spawning. The riparian is primarily alder and salmonberry. The salmonber width of the riparian zone along the right bank is limited due to the extremely close proximity of cl McCutcheon Rd. Canyonfalls creek also benefits from small amounts of woody debris inputs (left photo); as well as excellent coho habitat created by frequent beaver (Castor canadensis) activity. Although in 2004, a beaver dam below the survey n reach prevented Chinook from accessing the spawnspaw ing habitat in the creek. Chinook, coho and chum are the most prevalent , species observed spawning in the creek. Coho juveniles and fry are present in the creek year round, and are often observed during adult spawning sursu veys (chum and pink migrate to marine waters soon ma after emerging from the gravel). In addition to gravel these key species, pink salmon were also observed in 2003, 2005, and 2007. In the past, steelhead . past were documented spawning in the creek on a consistent annual basis. Unfortunately, similar to many streams within the Puyallup and White River Wahin W tershed, few live steelhead or signs of spawning aca tivity have been observed over the past several served years. Bull trout utilization within this spring fed drainage is unknown; however, adult bull trout have been caught by sport anglers in the Puyallup angler River near the mouth of Canyonfalls. Spawning activity by bull trout has not been documented, yet Canyonfalls does offer excellent foraging and overwintering opportunities for all wintering species, including bull trout.
Page 13

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1997Canyonfalls Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1997-2008)
10 LIVE 9 DEAD REDDS 8 7 7
NUMBER OBSERVED

6 6

6

5 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 4 4

0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

SEASON SURVEYED

(1999Canyonfalls Creek Coho Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1999-2008)
80 LIVE 70 DEAD 60

56

NUMBER OBSERVED

50

46 39 35

44 36

40

30

28

28

20 10 10 1 0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

12 9 6 7 9 5 5

2008 Canyonfalls Creek coho graphs were generated using survey data collected by WDFW biologists.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 14

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Canyonfalls Creek Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
140 LIVE DEAD 120

100
NUMBER OBSERVED

80

60

40

20

0 11/17/08 12/2/08 12/9/08 12/16/08 12/30/08
DATE SURVEYED

1/6/09

1/15/09

1/23/09

1/28/09

(2001Canyonfalls Creek Chum Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (2001-2008)
1,200

1,000

800
NUMBER OBSERVED

981

LIVE

DEAD

632 600 407 400 246 289 232 398 557

289 327

108

0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

2008 Canyonfalls Creek chum graphs were generated using survey data collected by WDFW biologists.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 15

96 69

108

200

178

213

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

but averages approximately 300 ft. The resulting ages channel is only moderately diverse with a pool riffle nel d character. Spawning gravel exists in limited quantiracter. quant ties and is utilized by all species of salmonids present, although not in the numbers observed in the upper reaches. From RM 3.0 to the mouth of South Prairie Creek at RM 6.0, the river is constrained by a e levee along the south bank. Large natural bluffs hold the Carbon along its northern bank allowing the river to migrate over a channel of up to 0.5 miles wide. This reach contains multiple channels and many woody debris jams throughout its length. The spawnroughout spaw ing and rearing habitat is more improved throughout ing this reach and the highest spawning densities of all species are observed along this stretch of the river. cies The reach above South Prairie Creek, from RM h 6.0 to 8.5, is again constrained by both levees and natural bluffs along the north bank. This reach has bank a slightly higher gradient than the lower river and as a result contains less spawning habitat. There The lower Carbon River (photo 1). are portions that are utilized by Chinook and steels he Carbon River is a major tributary of the head, but not in the densities observed in the reach Puyallup River, entering the Puyallup at RM above Voights Creek (RM 4.0). Above RM 8.5, the 17.9; just north of the city of Orting. The Carst Carbon River flows through a narrow canyon for bon River and its associated tributaries provide exce excelseveral miles before becoming unconstrained below lent spawning and rearing opportunities for salmon, nities the Mt. Rainier National Park boundary. This canca steelhead, and bull trout. In the past, steelhead have yon reach supports Chinook and steelhead spawnbeen documented as high as the Mt. Rainier National ing, however, chum and pink salmon have not been Park boundary. However, the majority of spawning observed for all species within this drainage, with the exce excepThe terminal of the above RM Carbon Glacier tion of bull trout, occurs in South Prairie Creek and 8.0 (photo 3) the lower 11 miles of the mainstem Carbon. The The Mt. lower 3 miles of the Carbon River are constrained by Rainier Naearthen levees. Failures along this levee system du durtional Park ing the November 2006 flood event reinforces the inforces boundary is need for levee set-backs, which would help address located at the need for improved fish habitat and increase the RM 23 (lowflood basin er left phoThe Upper Carbon within this to). From River (photo 2) drainage. the park Currently, boundary, up the lower to approximately RM 26, the gradient remains low river enough to provide some spawning opportunities channel along channel margins and pool tail-outs. Several varies consmall and moderate debris jams occur throughout siderably this reach. Above this, the gradient gradually ini in width, creases to the terminus of the Carbon glacier (right). glac

CARBON RIV RIVER 10.0413

T

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 16

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

There is less channel braiding in this section and the substrate is considerably larger providing far fewer spawning opportunities. Several primary tributaries of the Carbon River providing critical habitat for fish include South Prairie Creek, Voights Creek, Ranger, and Ipsut creeks. South Prairie Creek is the largest tributary of the Carbon River, entering the Carbon near RM 6. South Prairie Creek is considered one of the most productive streams in the Puyallup/White River Watershed and is one of the index streams in the Puyallup Watershed surveyed for Chinook, pink and steelhead by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Puyallup Tribe Fisheries staff surveys the creek in winter for chum. From RM 0.0 to RM 12.6 the stream is pool-riffle in character with many deep pools and a few higher gradient cascades. Spawning gravel is excellent and plentiful throughout this stretch. Above river mile 12.6, the stream is higher gradient and moderately to extremely confined within a deep canyon. Upstream migration is blocked at approximately RM. 15 by a large bedrock cascade. Spawning gravel becomes scarce in this upper reach and many heavily scoured bedrock sections exist. Chinook spawning occurs primarily in the lower 8 miles, while coho show increased usage in the middle and upper sections of the anadromous reach. Chum utilize the lower 3 miles heavily but have been observed well above RM 10. Steelhead utilize the entire stream below the falls with reduced usage in the canyon reach below the falls. The riparian zone changes dramatically over the 15 miles of anadromous stream. The upper canyon reach flows through a commercial forest and streamside vegetation consists of second growth fir and alder. Buffer widths along recent harvest areas are generally wider than the state regulated minimum due to steep, potentially unstable slopes along the canyon. From there to RM 6.0 the riparian zone is relatively intact, consisting of mature hardwoods with some fir. Occasional residential development exists along this reach. Wilkeson Creek (10.0432), a major tributary to South Prairie, enters at approximately RM 6.7. Below this point, to the confluence, there exists many diked reaches and streamside residential development is common. Much of the lower

6 miles flows through active agricultural land. Alder and cottonwood are the most common streamside tree species. Voights Creek is a tributary to the lower Carbon River, entering the Carbon at RM 4.0. Voights is currently only surveyed for steelhead due to the presence of a state salmon hatchery at RM 0.5. There are just less than 4 miles of anadromous habitat available in Voights Creek, an impassable falls at RM 3.9 blocks any further upstream migration. Steelhead are often observed spawning throughout the entire creek, right up to the falls. Unfortunately, steelhead escapement in Voights Creek has fallen dramatically over the past few years. During higher autumn flows, coho, and occasionally Chinook, easily bypass the hatchery and spawn throughout the entire creek up to the falls. The stream channel varies in complexity from wide, braided channels, to confined narrow gorges. Nearly the entire 3.9 miles below the falls contains excellent, although somewhat sporadic patches of gravel within a moderate gradient stream channel. However, below the water intake for the state hatchery at RM 1.0 the gradient decreases, the substrate size is more consistent although smaller and somewhat compacted. The riparian zone is a mix of 2nd growth conifer and deciduous trees. There is a moderate amount of small and medium woody debris recruited, and minute amounts of LWD present, what little is present is generally quite old. Ranger Creek is a small left bank tributary of the Upper Carbon River. Ranger is an excellent salmonid stream in many ways; it has approximately 0.5 miles of anadromous habitat and is located entirely within Mt. Rainier National Park. The riparian zone consists of old growth cedar, fir and hemlock which contribute essential woody debris and diversity to the channel. The lower 0.4 miles are low gradient with several deep pools, small but plentiful gravel exists throughout the reach. Above 0.4 miles the gradient increases significantly. Ipsut Creek is a moderate gradient left bank tributary to the Upper Carbon River. Ipsut is pristine in many ways; it has approximately 0.7 miles of anadromous habitat and is located entirely within Mt. Rainier National Park. The riparian zone consists of old growth cedar, fir and hemlock which conPage 17

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

tribute large amounts of woody debris and diversity to the channel. There is a large falls located at a approximately RM 0.7, which is a barrier to any fu hich further upstream migration. Ipsut Creek campground is located along the lower stretch of the creek at RM 0.2. The Carbon River road bridge also crosses the creek at the campground site. Ipsut has been surveyed for Chinook coho, Chinook, steelhead and bull trout, yet no salmon or redds have been observed. However, Ipsut does host a population of cutthroat trout, as do many of the upper tributaries in the park. Reasons for the absence of anadromous fish are likely related to the stream’s location high within the basin, and the general lack of suitable spawning gravel. Much of the substrate within the lower fish accessible reach consists of flat angular stones. Bull trout usage has been documented by National Park Service biologists. Winter steelhead stocks have been in serious decline for the past several years. bal and state fisheries managers are currently working on a recovery plan to improve future steelhead returns and hope to implement this plan within the next few years. Continuing efforts are being made by the tribe and WDFW to increase and expand the

survey coverage area in order to improve escapee ment estimates. During the 2005, 2006, and 2008 mates. steelhead survey season, WDFW biologists and Puyallup Tribe fisheries staff increased the survey ries i coverage along the Carbon by making regular helihel copter surveys of the river from the NPS boundary at RM 23, to its confluence with the Puyallup River. fluence

Carbon River Drainage
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 18

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1991Carbon River Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1991-2008)
3,225 3,500 3,289

LIVE 2,707 DEAD 2,509 2,513 2,123 1,503 1,044 811 944 899 1,868 599 647 624

3,000

2,865

NUMBER OBSERVED

2,000

1,500 1,091 1,124

1,234

2,149 849 541 660 565

2,226 855

2,500

1,000

2,498

2,625

260 217

305 125 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 14 STEELHEAD REDDS 12 7 8 6 5 3

500

483

0 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

(1995Carbon River Steelhead Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1995-2009)
60 54 50 49

40
NUMBER OBSERVED

30

29

21 20

10 5 4

8

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
YEAR SURVEYED

The 2008 & 2009 redd data is incomplete due to extremely poor survey condition which prevented a regular full season of surveys. PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 19

160 57 3

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

CLARKS CREEK 10.0027

C

larks Creek is an urban tributary flowing into the lower Puyallup River, entering the Puy Puyallup at RM 5.8. The Clarks Creek Basin drains the plateaus and flatlands running along the southern valley of the lower Puyallup River, just west of the city of Puyallup. The basin drains a 13 asin 2 area, with an average flow of nearly 60 cfs (Bami sin Gauge #12102075). Clarks has several smaller tributaries, including Diru and Rody c creeks; both of which are salmon bearing streams supporting Chinook, coho, chum, steelhead, and bull trout. Woodland Creek and Meeker Ditch contribute additional flow. Several salmonid species are known to utilize es Clarks creeks for spawning, rearing and forag reeks foraging. These include ESA threatened Chinook steelhead Chinook, and bull trout; as well as non-listed species such as coho, pink, chum and cutthroat trout. Brown trout, a non-native species is also present in the basin. Several fish and habitat limiting factors ass h associated with Clarks include; channel confinement, complete fish barriers, no off-channel habitat, floo channel flooding and channel erosion, absent or deficient riparian cover, water quality (pH & bacteria), conveyance of storm water run-off, and the significant growth of elodea (Elodea canadensis). In addition, there is considerable development along the creek, primarily ble rural residential.

The anadromous reach of Clarks is a low gradient spring-fed stream (Maplewood Springs) with a pool-riffle character. The surveyed reach of the riffle Clarks Creek (RM 3.4 to 3.7) provides abundant spawning opportunities for all species; however, upstream migration is blocked by a dam at RM 3.7 da (left). Consequently, the dam also prevents the fluvial movement of gravel downstream to critical spawning areas. Salmonberry, maple, and alder dominate the overstory riparian zone along much of the upper surveyed reach. The remaining stream channel beb low the surveyed reach (RM 3.4) contains little gravel and the substrate consists of fine sand and mud, subsequently, little or no spawning has been obntly, o served below this point. WDFW operates a fish hatchery near the barrier dam on Clarks. The state operated hatchery raises trout for stocking local out lakes. Gravel was introduced into the channel from RM 3.5 to 3.7 in the fall of 1997, and again in the 1997 summer of 1999. In addition to gravel inputs, sevse eral log weirs have been placed above the interpreplace tive bridge to aid in gravel retention. This has greatly enhanced the spawning opportunities for Chinook, pink, coho and chum salmon. Unfortud U nately, adult steelhead spawning activity has seldom been observed in Clarks Creek since 1997. ved However, steelhead are occasionally captured or observed in tributaries of Clarks. Due to limited availability of spawning habitat, increased spawning densities of Chinook and chum ncreased often results in considerable redd superimposition throughout this short reach. There is often an abundance of chum fry during the spring (pink fry on odd years); as well as coho and Chinook fry throughout spring and summer for cutthroat and pring juvenile Chinook to feed on. Adult fluvial bull trout are also known to forage in the smaller tributaries of the lower Puyallup, including Clarks Creek. In the spring of 2004, the Puyallup Tribe comhe T pleted construction of a Fall Chinook salmon hatchery on Clarks Creek (RM 1.0). The hatchery was constructed in order to address several fish manma agement issues, one of which includes minimizing the straying of adult Fall Chinook reared by the tribe.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 20

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Clarks Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
300 LIVE DEAD 250 REDDS

200
NUMBER OBSERVED

150

100

50

0 8/26/08 9/4/08 9/11/08 9/19/08 9/29/08 10/8/08 10/17/08 10/27/08
DATE SURVEYED

(1994Clarks Creek Chinook Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1994-2008)
600 533 LIVE DEAD REDDS

500 418 396 400
NUMBER OBSERVED

300

200 145 131 116

191

289

319

103

101 103

109

137

87 100

93 74

96 78

58

63 59

100 16 10 10

78

42 27 18

30

12

22

11

53 34

50

46 38

34

35

50

0 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

10

SEASON SURVEYED

Note: A high proportion of the Chinook observed in 2007, were jacks.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 21

11

103

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Clarks Creek Coho Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1993-2008) (1993120 107 LIVE DEAD

100

80
NUMBER OBSERVED

60 46

40 26 27 24 24

14

20

22

11

43

82

7

6

8

8 9

5

6

4

2 3

4

2

2

3

5

5 1 2007 2 2008 Page 22

0 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
YEAR SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

1

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Clarks Creek Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
140 LIVE DEAD 120

100
NUMBER OBSERVED

80

60

40

20

0 11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/16/08 12/22/08
DATE SURVEYED

12/31/08

1/15/09

1/22/09

2/2/09

Clarks Creek Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1991-2008) (19913,000 LIVE DEAD 2,067 2,000
NUMBER OBSERVED

2,500

2,433

1,174

1,207

1,500

1,552

866

936

1,040 864 544 466

675 633

531 479

311 411

528

403 352

374 352

390

628

794

1,000

255

136 246

215 254

500

0 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

97 163

SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

198 237

Page 23

368 296

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

cfs. Each of the four ponds has approximately 12,000+ cubic feet of water volume, two ponds are ic concrete lined and designed to hold adult and juveniles, while the other two are natural acclimation natura ponds. In addition, the Puyallup Tribe operates seven acclimation ponds in the Puyallup Watershed. Three of the acclimation ponds are used for reestabhe lishing Fall Chinook and coho into a 30-mile reach 30 in the Upper Puyallup River above Electron Dam. A fish ladder was constructed and completed in fall of 2000; for 97 years prior to the completion of the fish ladder the Electron diversion dam had been an anadromous barrier. Five additional acclimation ponds are located in the Upper White River draidra nage. These ponds are used for reestablishing White River Spring Chinook back into their endemic range. All ponds have approximately 10,000 cubic e feet of rearing space and between 1 to 3 cubic feet per second flow. A new 35,000 cu. ft. Spring Chinook acclimation pond was completed in the sumsu mer of 2007 near George Creek. Capable of holding 07 Creek over 500,000 Spring Chinook, the construction of Chinook larks Creek Salmon Hatchery is a Puyallup the acclimation pond was funded by the City of TaT Tribe of Indians facility located at RM 1 on coma as a result of a mitigation settlement Clarks Creek (10.0027), a tributary to the The Puyallup Tribe’s restoration goal is to rer Puyallup River. The Clarks Creek hatchery (below) build depressed Chinook stocks and remove them was constructed in order to address several fish from ESA listing. Using acclimation ponds, limiting management, and water supply issues including; es harvest, and making substantial gains in habitat minimizing the straying of adult Fall Chinook restoration, the tribe will be able to accomplish this reared by the tribe; providing space for rearing and task. Levee setbacks, oxbow reconnections both ini acclimating White River Spring Chinook chum and ter tidal and upland, Commencement Bay cleanup, Chinook, winter steelhead if necessary; creating an indepe indepenand harvest cutbacks have already been initiated. initia dent and self sustaining fall and Spring Chi Chinook Only the jump-starting of Chinook in habitat areas program for the tribe; as well as providing a reliable devoid of fish has remained one of our biggest chalcha water supply to rear and expand fish production. lenges. Acclimation ponds are a proven method in Water is supplied from five vertical turbine increasing fish numbers on the spawning grounds. pumps, each 20-horsepower. Each pump has a flow Hatchery rearing 200,000 Fall Chinook for release horsepower. capacity of 1,600 gpm. Each pump is capable of on station and 200,000 for acclimation ponds in the supplying one of four ponds with approximately 3.6

CLARKS CREEK Salmon Hatchery

Puyallup Tribe of Indians Salmon Hatchery

C

Clarks Creek salmon hatchery

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 24

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

upper Puyallup River for a combined 6,857 pounds of fish. Historically, Fall Chinook have been reared since 1980 with a variety of stocks, goals, and obje objectives.

The incubation building houses 32 incubator stack capable of holding up to 77,000 Chinook eggs, for a p total capacity of approximately 2.5 million eggs imately (lower left). Once fish are ready to be moved from the incubators, they can be place in one of the 16 Spring Chinook Hatchery Production aluminum raceway-troughs and hand feeding can troughs The five-acclimation ponds the Puyallup Tribe acclimation begin (upper right). The troughs are 16 feet in operates are satellite facilities to the White River length with a flow rate of up to 25 gpm. When the and Minter Creek Hatcheries Spring Chinook hatfish are approximately 500/lbs., they are transferred cheries. The acclimation ponds are located in the . to one of the upper White River Watershed on the Clearwater cement lined River, Cripple Creek (currently non- operation , operational) ponds. two ponds on Huckleberry Creek, and the newly ry Holding constructed Greenwater River pond near George the Chinook in Creek. Production levels vary, but average around , the cement 400,000+ smolts; however, numbers of available pond is only smolts fluctuates based on available brood brood-stock. temporary unThey have a rearing capacity of approximately til they are up 837,000 zero age smolts (less than 1 year old). to a large Raceway troughs aceway enough size, usually sometime during late March to time Current Fall Chinook Hatchery Production early April, to be massed marked with an autoaut In 2004, the Puyallup Tribal Fisheries Depar Departmated tagger (lower right). The automated fish ment began acclimating and releasing Fall Chinook tagging trailer is operated by the Northwest Indian from the Clarks Creek Fisheries Commission (NWIFC) out of Olympia. A sion facility, discontinuing proportion of the all Chinook releases young Chinook are from the Diru Creek implanted with a hatchery. Adult and coded wire tag (CWT) jack Chinook begin and the adipose fin is moving into the hatremoved. The rechery holding pond in maining fish are all September and contin- massed marked by September, ue to arrive well into removing the adipose late October Ripe October. fin only. The mark(ready to spawn) adults ings and CWT’s will are collected 2-3 times a week. Eggs and sperm, at . be used to identify a 1male-to-1 female ratio, are mixed in a small male these Chinook as hatAutomated fish tagger bucket to induce fertilization (above). Once the eggs chery origin fish in the future when they return to have been fertilized, they are placed into an incub incuba- the hatchery, are caught by fisherman, or are obo tor tray until served on the spawning grounds. The CWT is inthey hatch In hatch. scribed with a specific code that will identify the early 2005, co con- particular hatchery where the fish was tagged. ry stru struction of a Once tagged, the fish are planted in one of the two new incubation natural acclimation ponds. The young Chinook are . building was fed regularly to increase their size until they are com mpleted at ready to be released into the creek in late May or to Egg incubators Clarks Creek. early June.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 25

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Fall Chinook Return @ Clarks Creek Hatchery
300

256 250 242

Total rack return: 1,084 Adults 827 Jacks
220

Males Females Jacks

200

NUMBER OF CHINOOK

160 150

156

122 104 100 69 57 50 39 54 49 37 27 2 0 20-Aug-08 09-Sep-08 16-Sep-08 22-Sep-08 23-Sep-08
DATE SPAWNED

86

88

84

46

9 1 30-Sep-08 07-Oct-08 14-Oct-08

3

21-Oct-08

(2005Clarks Creek Salmon Hatchery Fall Chinook Rack Return (2005-2008)
1,600 ADULTS 1,400 JACKS

1,200
NUMBER OF CHINOOK

1,084 1,000 827 800 723 634 600 440 400

195 200 22 0 2005

174

2006
YEAR

2007

2008

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 26

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Clarks Creek Hatchery Fall Chinook Salmon Smolt Releases (2004-2009) (20041,800,000

Fall Chinook Smolts
1,600,000 1,538,977

1,400,000
Number of Fall Chinook Smolts Released

1,200,000

1,000,000

800,000

600,000

523,000 462,328 418,240

400,000 240,630 200,000 163,880

0 2004 2005 2006
Year

2007

2008

2009

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 27

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

CLEAR CREEK
10.0022

C

Puyallear Creek is a tributary to the lower Puya lup River, joining with the Puyallup at RM 2.9. The Clear Creek Basin (12.1 mi2) drains the plateaus and flatlands running along the sout southern valley of the lower Puyallup River, between the cities of Puyallup and Tacoma. Clear Creek h has several tributaries which include; Swan Creek e entering at RM 0.2 on the left bank, Squally Cre inCreek flowing at RM 1.4 on the left bank, Canyon Creek at RM 1.6, and an unnamed tributary entering at RM 3.05 on the right bank. Only Swan, Squally and Canyon creeks tributaries are accessible to adult reeks salmon. Several salmonid species are known to utilize re Clear Creek for spawning, rearing and foraging. This includes ESA threatened Chinook steelhead Chinook, and bull trout, as well as non-listed species inclu listed including coho, pink, chum and cutthroat trout. Various limiting factors involved with Clear Creek include; volved low flows, channel confinement, an anadromous barrier, lack of spawning habitat, aquatic noxious weeds, flooding and channel erosion, conveyance of storm water run-off, water quality (dissolved oxygen & bacteria); as well as absent or poor riparian co cover. Clear Creek flows as a low-to-moderate gradient moderate pool-riffle stream above Pioneer Way before para riffle paralleling the road for several hundred feet. The upper et. anadromous reach contains good spawning gravel from RM 1.7 to 1.9. Although a significant section of the riparian area is not intact, there are undercut banks and moderate amounts of in-stream cover. A ream

high density of reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) and other vegetation (watercress) chokes approximately 300 feet of the spawning channel every summer; effectively trapping a significant amount of fine sediment which covers the available spawning gravel by several inches. An anadromous blockage in the form of a cement diversion dam is located at RM 1.9 (top left); the dam is in place to ensure pathogen free water for hatchery raised rainbow trout at the Trout Lodge facility. Consequently, this also prevents the fluvial movement of gravel downstream to critical spawnnt spaw ing areas. The reach above the dam is not surveyed; however, suitable spawning habitat does exist and could be utilized if access were established. The draw off of water by the hatchery, specifically durdu ing the summer and fall seasons, significantly remmer r duces the water throughout the bypass reach. The reach bypass reach is the section of stream from the water intake for the hatchery, to its discharge point downdow stream. Chinook are often observed holding in a large pool located at the hatchery discharge outlet. chery Unfortunately, the low flows resulting from the hatchery draw regularly prevent Chinook from accessing the bypass reach where suitable spawning habitat is available. Late fall and winter flows are regularly sufficient for chum (right) to spawn in the 0.2 miles of available habitat below the dam at RM 1.9. Adult steelhead and coho also utilize Clear Creek; however, escapement for theses two species is low. The lower Puyallup tributa ributaries often experience an abundance of chum fry during the spring, as well as coho fry throughout spring and summer for cutthroat, steelhead, and juvenile Chinook to feed on. Adult fluvial bull trout are also known to forage in the smaller tributaries of the lower Puyallup, including Clear Creek. Although bull trout spawning activity has not been documented, Clear Creek does offer excellent foraging and overwintering opportunopportu ities for bull trout and other salmonids. salmonid

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 28

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Clear Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
40 LIVE DEAD 35 REDDS

30

NUMBER OBSERVED

25

20

15

10

5

0 8/26/08 9/11/08 9/19/08 9/29/08
DATE SURVEYED

10/8/08

10/17/08

10/27/08

Clear Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1999-2008) (199960 LIVE 50 46 DEAD REDDS

40
NUMBER OBSERVED

34

30 26 21 20 17 14 10 10 8 3 1 0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

25 22

11 11 7 8 5 1 2 8 8 9

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 29

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Clear Creek Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
300 LIVE DEAD 250

200
NUMBER OBSERVED

150

100

50

0 11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08 12/22/08
DATE SURVEYED

12/31/08

1/15/09

1/22/09

2/2/09

(1994Clear Creek Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1994-2008)
1,088 1,200

LIVE DEAD

1,000

800
NUMBER OBSERVED

788

600 478 460 426 436 479

642

680

796

303

400

340

260

196

201

233

276

163 114

166

382 2007 2008 Page 30 162

122

131

83

110 29 1997 50

200

0 1994 1995 1996 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

4 0

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

CLEARWATER RIVER 10.0080

T

he Clearwater River is a large tributary to the Upper White River, draining an area of , 2. The Clearwater is a nonnearly 40 mi glacial river and originates on Bear Head Mou Mountain, just west of the White River (south of Gree Greenwater). From Bear Head Mountain, the river flows just over 10.5 miles to its confluence with the White River at RM 35.3. The upper 5 miles of the per river runs through a steep narrow channel within the Snoqualmie National Forest. The low 5.5 lower miles of the Clearwater, flows within a broader va ter, valley plain located within the privately owned White River tree farm (Hancock). Limited amounts of LWD are present in the lower channel, and much of what is present is u undersized or hardwood in origin. There are a series of cascades just above Lyle Creek at approximately RM 4.5; these ca cascades are cons considered a block to further upstream migration. Howe However, much of the spawning takes Chinook place in the lower 2

miles of the river, although fish and redds are often , observed and documented in the upper reaches latcumented la er in the season. The substrate throughout much of the lower reach of the river consists of small cobbles and flat angular stone, with smaller spawning size gravel in the many of the lower gradient riffles and tailn tail outs. The riparian area is primarily second growth conifer forest; however, recent clear cutting is evident along several areas of the upper and lower survey reach. The Clearwater River hosts several tributaries; such as, Falls, Mineral, Byron, Lyle, , Lilly, and Milky creeks. There is some limited coho reeks. and pink spawning in both Byron and Mineral ning creeks. Mineral Creek is also the water source reeks. used for the Spring Chinook acclimation pond located along the Clearwater River (see map on next page). Some of the habitat and fish limiting factors associated with the Clearwater River include, water quality issues, timber harvesting (heavier silt load

introduction)

Pink salmon carcasses (2007)

and channel confinement by logging roads which continues to affected the rivers natural morphology. Channel confinement has reduced the adequacy of off channel habitat critical for adult spawning, as well as overwintering for juvenile juve Chinook, steelhead and coho. In addition, low in, coho stream flows are often encountered during the late summer and early fall, often preventing Chinook from advancing beyond the lower 1 or 2 miles of the river to spawn. Chinook, pink and coho are often , seen holding in pools in the lower river for exlowe tended periods of time before increased flows allow further upstream migration. Despite these shortshor comings, the Clearwater River continues to support a substantial number of Chinook, coho, pink and Chinook steelhead spawners. It’s important to note that all adult salmon and steelhead that spawn in the Clearwater River were captured at the USACE fish trap in Buckley, and
Page 31

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

transported above Mud Mountain dam. Since pr precise escapement numbers for the upper White Ri River drainage are known, surveys are conducted to determine fish distribution and spawning success. This is especially important regarding Spring Chinook, since adult production monitoring is part of , the White River Spring Chinook recovery pl plan. Puyallup tribal fisheries biologists survey the Clearwater annually for Chinook, coho and pink , salmon. Coho have been observed in the Clearw ClearwaMap of the Clearwater River

ter since surveys began for Chinook in 1991, but were not surveyed for until 2002. Coho survey data is often incomplete because it’s often difficult to survey the river when late autumn and winter flows increase. The first pink salmon surveys were conducted beginning in 2003 and continued in 2005 and 2007 (right photo on previous page). Prior to 2003, few or no pinks were captured at the Buckley trap. Biologists with WDFW regularly survey the ologists Clearwater for steelhead in the spring. As part of the Spring Chinook recovery plan, the Puyallup Tribe has operated a Spring Chinook acclimation pond located at RM 3.2 since 1995. Approximately 200,000 plus Spring Chinook from the Muckleshoot White River hatchery are transported to the Clearwater pond in early spring, and released in late May. All fish are mass marked with left or right ventral fin clips. Odd brood years are marked with left ventral clips, and even years with right ventral clips. These acclimation pond fish are easily identified in the future when caught as adults or jacks at the USACE fish trap in Buckley, and can be passed above Mud Mountain dam to spawn naturally.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 32

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Clearwater River Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
100 LIVE 90 DEAD REDDS 80

70
NUMBER OBSERVED

60

50

40

30

20

10

0 8/28/08 9/8/08 9/17/08 9/25/08
DATE SURVEYED

10/2/08

10/10/08

10/23/08

(1995Clearwater River Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1995-2008)
400 LIVE 350 DEAD REDDS 272 274 231 222 300 278

NUMBER OBSERVED

200 140 145 139 43 19 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Page 33 43

125

70 80

76 78

72

73

78

100

87

99

60

61

27 31

29 20 25

30

7

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

6

17

SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

18 29

18

26

33

50

47

53

121

125

150

219

250

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(2000Clearwater River Chinook Run Timing (2000-2008)
180

2008 2007

160

2006 2005

140

2004 2003 2002

NUMB ER OF FISH OBSERVED

120

100

2001 2000

80

60

40

20

0
Aug 15-25 Aug 26-Sept 5 Sept 6-Sept 15 Sept 16-Sept 25 Sept 26-Oct 5 Oct 6-Oct 15 Oct 16-Oct 25 Oct 26-Nov 5 DATE

Clearwater River Chinook Carcass Sampling (2002-2008) (2002100 CARCASSES SAMPLED 90 CHINOOK WITH CODED WIRE TAG & ADIPOSE CLIP (FALL/HATCHERY ORIGIN) CHINOOK WITH ADIPOSE CLIP ONLY (HATCHERY ORIGIN) WILD UNMARKED ACCLIMATION POND (VENTRAL CLIP) 63 60 60 55 51 50 46 42 40 32 30 19 10 10 7 6 1 0 2002 2003 2004 2005
SEASON SURVEYED

80

70
NUMBER OF CHINOOK

60 53

38

39

37

20

5 1 2

4

3

2

2

4

2

2006

2007

2008

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 34

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Clearwater River Juvenile Spring Chinook Acclimation Pond And River Plants (1996-2009) (1996400,000 POND PLANTS 350,000 RIVER PLANTS

300,000 237,900
NUMBER OF FISH PLANTED

226,500

237,800

198,800

199,000

250,000

149,980

200,000

150,000 72,600

100,000

50,000

0 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
YEAR PLANTED

Approximately 200,000+ Spring Chinook from the Muckleshoot White River hatchery are transported to the Clearwater pond in early spring, and then released in late May. All fish are mass marked with left or right ventral fin clips. Odd brood years are marked with left ventral clips, and even years with right ventral clips. Road and pond damage (Jan. 2009 flood event) prevented fish from being planted in the Clearwater pond during the 2009 acclimation season. (1999Clearwater River Steelhead Redd Counts Seasonal Comparisons (1999-2009)
120 105 100 89 83 80
NUMBER OBSERVED

32,300

127,498 120,393

175,000

STEELHEAD REDDS

77

60

56

58

40 29 19 12

The 2009 redd data is incomplete due to high water conditions which prevented a regular full season of surveys. 22

20

193,375 207,870

217,000

5 0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
SEASON SURVEYED

All survey data for Clearwater steelhead was collected by WDFW biologists.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 35

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

COAL MINE CREEK 10.0432A

C

Creek, oal Mine Creek, which derived its name from the local areas profound history in the coal mining industry, is a small tributary to Wilk Wilkeson Creek (10.0432). Wilkeson Creek in turn is a major tributary to South Prairie Creek (10.0429). The creek flows southwest for just over a mile before entering Wilkeson Creek near RM 5.7 just south of ar the community of Wilkeson. Coal Mine is one of 5 index streams in the Puya Puyallup Watershed that is surveyed for coho by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. State biologists use the coho escapement from five “I capement “Index” tributaries (Coal Mine, Spiketon, Fiske, Fennel and Canyonfalls) to estimate the total escapement for the Puyallup River. Surveys of the creek over the past decade have yet to document adult Chinook or steelhead spawning utilization. Low instream se seasonal flows in Wilkeson, as well as Coal Mine, are likely the strongest limiting factors preventing these species from reaching the stream to spawn. Although inconsistent from season to season small season, numbers of chum have been observed spawning in Coal Mine during the month of December Bull December. trout utilization within this small stream is unknown. Coal Mine is a small order short run stream with moderately low gradient; making it somewhat ideal

for coho and chum. Unfortunately, the majority of the steam has little complexity; several portions of the creek have minimal natural bank protection, little or no instream woody debris or quality spawnde ing gravel. However, the creek does provide good quality rearing and overwintering conditions for juj venile salmonids. Coho juveniles are frequently ob. o served throughout the entire surveyed reach of the t creek. Cutthroat are also ever-present in this small ever rural stream. It is likely that juvenile steelhead, the offspring from adult spawners in Wilkeson Creek, utilize Coal Mine for rearing, foraging and overwintering as well. exist Moderate rural development exists along the lower 0.5 mile section of the creek; consisting prition marily of private family homes, county and private roads, as well as a rock quarry and public school. The creek flows through a fish passable cement box ish culvert approximately 0.15 miles up from the mouth, and a second culvert near RM 0.6. When vert the fish passable box culvert was installed under Railroad Avenue several years ago, some complexity ilroad ago had been added to the creek via a small restoration project which included the placement of small sill placem logs, root wads, boulders, along with native tree and vegetative plantings. The alder along the banks . have since grown to provide improved coverage of the stream (top left photo). Spawning opportunities are noticeably reduced downstream of the culvert crossing at Railroad Ave. due to a narrow confined channel, in addition to a channel absence of suitable spawning gravel (right photo). Most of the substrate through this section consists of fine silt, sand, and exceedingly small patches of undersized gravel; however, relatively abundant spawning gravel exists above the culvert. Nevertheless, several silty deposits exist throughout the entire surveyed section. The rock and gravel quarry site located near the creek is one of the suspected sources of the silt.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 36

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Coal Mine Coho Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
25

LIVE DEAD

20

NUMBER OBSERVED

15

10

5

0 11/5/08 11/14/08 12/2/08 12/9/08 12/16/08 12/30/08 1/6/09 1/15/09 1/23/09 1/28/09
DATE SURVEYED

2008 Coal Mine Creek coho graph was generated using survey data collected by WDFW biologists. Coal Mine Creek Coho Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1998-2008) (1998250 231 208 200 198 195 172 159
NUMBER OBSERVED

LIVE DEAD

153

150

139

100

90 81 66 60 43 22 4 8 42 29 16 17 2 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

50

0 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002
SEASON SURVEYED

2008 Coal Mine Creek coho graph was generated using survey data collected by WDFW biologists.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 37

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

suitable spawning substrate (right). The gradient along the lower 1.2 miles is moderate with numernume ous deep pools. The substrate throughout a great . through deal of this spawning reach consists of small bouldboul ers, cobble, and flat angular stone; though, several pockets of good spawning medium are often located along the stream margins and pool tail-outs. Unfortunately, anadromous salmon were unable to access Deer Creek for nearly a century due to the reek streams location upstream of the Electron diversion dam on the Puyallup River. With the completion of the Electron fish ladder (@ RM 41.7) in the fall of 2000, anadromous fish passage was restored for the first time since 1904. Restoring anadromous access to the upper Puyallup River has made approximately 26+ miles of spawning, rearing, and foraging harearing bitat above the diversion available for several spesp cies including Chinook, coho, pink, steelhead, and , bull trout. Deer Creek is part of the surplus adult Chinook eer Creek is a left bank headwater tributary and coho planting program. Deer Creek is one of to the Puyallup River; entering the upper ; the few streams in late summer and early fall with Puyallup at mile 45.7, approximately 0.6 adequate water flow to plant adult Chinook. Surequate miles below Swift Creek. This high mountain plus adult Chinook from the WDFW hatchery lol stream flows northwest through a steep narrow gla- cated on Voights Creek are planted during late cial valley along the lower western slope of Mt. summer to early fall, and coho in late fall when Rainier. Nearly the entire 6.5 miles of the Deer available (left). The Puyallup Tribe has been haulhau Creek drainage flows within the Mount Baker Bakering surplus adults from Voights Creek and planting Snoqualmie National Forest and is non non-glacial in them in the upper Puyallup Watershed since1997; origin. Instead, its sources originate from snowpack unfortunately no natural returns of Chinook or coho accumulations; as well as surface and groundwater have been documented in Deer Creek as a result of from the surrounding valley. The primary s . surface these efforts. However, natural returns of adult co. water sources consist of three tributaries including ributaries ho have occurred in Rushingwater, Niesson, and Rushingwa Big Creek and two unnamed tributaries Unfortutributaries. Kellog creeks. Deer Creek is not surveyed regularsur nately, these tributaries do not add any beneficial ly; rather, it is spot checked to see how successful s spawning or rearing habitat given their locations en the adult plants were. The creek does; on the other well above natural anadromous barriers. hand, have a resident population of cutthroat trout. , Past forestry operations along the creek; primar primari- It is also suspected that bull trout may be present, t ly timber harvesting and road construction had im- since they are construction, pacted portions of the stream. Currently a benefiurrently, known to popucial riparian buffer zone of conifers and mixes dec decilate the Mowich duous trees exists along the majority of the creek. River and upper The creek channel is confined by moderate to steep erate Puyallup; howevvalley walls, with an impassable falls located at ap- er, bull trout proximately RM 2.7. Spawning is significantly represence or utiliduced upstream of RM 1.2 due to the substantial zation has not increase in gradient, flow velocities, and the lack of been documented. ,

DEER CREEK 10.0865

D

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 38

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1997Deer Creek Surplus Adult Chinook Plants (1997-2008)
200 MALE CHINOOK 180 FEMALE CHINOOK 160 150 150

NUMBER OF FISH PLANTED

140 120 120 93 100 80 56 40 24 37 14 20 0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 13 23 47 60

2008

YEAR PLANTED

(1997Deer Creek Surplus Adult Coho Plants (1997-2008)
2,500

2,000

NUMBER OF COHO PLANTED

1,500

2,031

ADULT COHO

1,026

1,000 671 645 697 524 417 2004 2005 2006 305 2007 2008 Page 39

500

0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003
YEAR PLANTED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

500

506

1,020

1,048

132

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

DIRU CREEK
Puyallup Tribe of Indians Salmon Hatchery 10.0029

D

iru Creek Hatchery is located on Diru Creek (Rainbow Springs), a tributary to Clarks Creek in Puyallup, Washington. Water is supplied from two pumped wells (800 gpm) and gravity flow out of Diru Creek (200-500 gpm). Incubation consists of 20 vertical stacks of 12 trays. Initial rearing uses 16 shallow troughs in the hatchery building. Additional rearing contai containers include four 50’x5’x5’ raceways, two 6696 cubic foot ponds (UP1 and UP2), and one 13,000 cubic foot pond (below, left) that are also used for holding returning adults, as well as juveniles. In addition, the Puyallup Tribe operates seven acclimation ponds in the Puyallup Watershed. Three of the acclimation ponds are used for reestablishing Fall Chinook and coho into a 30 30-mile reach in the Upper Puyallup River above Electron Dam. Electron Dam has been an anadromous ba barrier for 97 years. A fish ladder was constructed, and completed in fall of 2000. Three other acclim acclimation ponds are located in the Upper White River re drainage. These ponds are used for reestablishing White River Spring Chinook back into their ende endemic range. All ponds have approximately 10,000 c cubic feet of rearing space and between 1 to 3 cubic feet per second flow. A new 35,000 cu. ft. Spring Chinook acclimation pond was completed in the summer of 2007 near George Creek. Capable of holding over 500,000 Spring Chinook, the constru , construction of the acclimation pond was funded by the City of Tacoma as a result of a mitigation settlement tion settlement. The Puyallup Tribe’s restoration goal is to r rebuild depressed Chinook stocks and remove them

from ESA listing. Using acclimation ponds, limitlimi ing harvest, and making substantial gains in habihab tat restoration, the tribe will be able to accomplish this task. Levee setbacks, oxbow reconnections both inter tidal and upland, Commencement Bay cleanup, and harvest cutbacks have already been initiated. Only the jump-starting of Chinook in starting habitat areas devoid of fish remains the largest challenge. Acclimation ponds are a proven method enge. in increasing fish numbers on the spawning grounds. Hatchery rearing 200,000 Fall Chinook for release on station and 200,000 for acclimation ponds in the upper Puyallup River for a combined 6,857 pounds of fish. Historically, Fall Chinook have been reared since 1980 with a variety of stocks, goals, and objectives. Spring Chinook Hatchery Production The five acclimation ponds the Puyallup Tribe operate (Greenwater, Huckleberry, Huck Aerial, A Cripple, and Clearwater) are satellite facilities to the White River and Minter Creek Hatcheries. Production levels have been around 400,000 smolts; however, it fluctuates based on available tuates brood-stock. They have a production capacity of 837,000 zero age smolts. Fall Fall Coho Hatchery Production Currently, 200,000 coho yearlings are imprinted and released in the Upper Puyallup Watershed. Coho originate from Voights Creek Hatchery where 100,000 are adipose clipped and coded wire tagged. Fish are released at 20 fish per pound, for a total biomass of 10,000 pounds. Chum salmon fry Winter Chum ProHatchery Production The Puyallup Tribe currently raises 1.5 to 2.3 million chum smolts for release into the lower Puyallup River. This program significantly augments a Tribal river fishery and All Citizen purse seine fishery in
Page 40

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Fertilizing chum eggs

East and West Pass in Puget Sound. This stock originated initially from Chambers Creek. Puya Puyallup Tribal Fisheries releases 1000 to 3000 pounds es annually based on available brood- stock returns to Diru Creek Hatchery. The program was started in 1991 and has become self-sustaining. Current Fall Chinook Hatchery Production In 2004, the Puyallup Tribal Fisheries Depar Department began acclimating and releasing Fall Chinook from its Clarks Creek facility, thereby discont discontinuing all Chinook releases from the Diru Creek Hatchery. In early 2005, construction of a new i incubation building was completed at Clarks Creek. ng The incubation building houses 32 incubator stack; each stack is capable of holding up to 77,000 Chinook eggs. This provides for a total c capacity of a apFall Chinook proximately

2.5 million eggs. Once fish are ready to be moved from the incubators, they can be place in one of the cubators, 16 aluminum raceway-troughs and hand feeding troughs can begin. The troughs are 16 feet in length with a flow rate of up to 25 gpm. When the fish are apa proximately 500 to the pound, they are transferred transferr to one of two cement lined rearing ponds. Holding the Chinook in the cement pond is only temporary until they are up to a large enough size, usually in late April, to be massed marked via an automated tagger. Once tagged, the fish are planted in one of the two natural acclimation ponds until they are al released in late May or early June. White River Winter Steelhead Production In 2006, the Puyallup Tribe, in partnership with WDFW and the Muckleshoot Tribe, began artifiartif cially propagating White River winter steelhead. steelhead Rearing young steelhead is an integral part of the White River winter steelhead pilot project, a propr gram designed to increase winter steelhead escapement in the White River. With the temporary closure of WDFW’s Voights Creek hatchery in January of 2009, the Puyallup Tribe has assumed the majority of responsibility for continuing this imporimpo tant restoration effort. Steelhead brood-stock (apbrood proximately 10 males and 10 females) are collected from the White River USACE fish trap in Buckley and are currently held, spawned, incubated, and reared at the Puyallup Tribe’s Diru Creek hatchery for a Juvenile White River winter steelhead year. After rearing for a year and fish are of size (approximately 17 fish per pound), the pre-smolts are transpre ported to the Muckleshoot hatchery on the White ha River to acclimate before being released into the White River. The project goal is to release between be 35,000-40,000 steelhead pre-smolts annually. This ,000 pre project has already seen some success; several s marked (coded wire tag) steelhead were captured and passed above Mud Mountain dam in 2009.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 41

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(2002Diru Creek Adult Chum Salmon Rack Return (2002-2008)
22,500

2002
20,000

20,635

2003 2004
17680

17,500

2005 2006 2007

15,000
Number of Chum

12,500

2008

12620 11393

10,000

9686

7,500

7150

5,000 3942 2,500

0 8-Nov 13-Dec 20-Dec 15-Nov 22-Nov 29-Nov 27-Dec 6-Dec 3-Jan 10-Jan 17-Jan 24-Jan 31-Jan 2008 2,494,894 2009 Page 42 2,690,200

Date

(1995Diru Creek Chum Salmon Smolt Releases (1995-2009)

CHUM SMOLTS

2,385,220

2,330,996

NUMBER OF CHUM SMOLTS RELEASED

1,927,970

1,774,280

2,135,125

1,738,599

1,229,960

1,235,328

990,690

1,295,739

1,763,137

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001
YEAR

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

487,990

2007

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

2,315,090

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1995Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Outplants (1995-2009)
DIRU 10.0029 COWSKULL 10.0680 HYLEBOS 10.0013 MOWICH 10.0624 WILKESON 10.0432
NUMBER OF FISH RELEASED 1,008,200 1,538,977 462,328 96,500 9,708 418,240

CLARKS 10.0027 RUSHINGWATER 10.0625

771,350

395,000

231,163

231,163 127,600 90,200

38,093 134,500 200,200

173,693

240,680

90,641 134,053 19,359

82,150 125,856 74,144

110,900 110,973 16,269

108,000

2,000 103,200 11,100

100,400 10,119

163,880

523,000 70,700 12,227

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

YEAR PLANTED

20,243 550,000 382,300

Juvenile White River And Minter Creek Spring Chinook Outplants (1995-2009) (1995-

HUCKLEBERRY 10.0253 CLEARWATER 10.0080 COWSKULL 10.0680 MOWICH 10.0624
NUMBER OF FISH RELEASED

CRIPPLE 10.0086
496,700

GREENWATER 10.0122 HUCK AERIAL 10.0253

464,980

356,000

175,650 226,500 37,346 201,536 104,760

254,550 166,550

243,000 199,000

237,900

237,800

247,891

401,245

218,631

217,450

223,740

189,720 149,980

182,440 198,800

185,798

217,000

514,000

86,950 145,900

99,736170,850

99,800 99,800

121,460

135,990

33,516 82,450

72,600

68,000

1995

1996

1997

1998

32,300

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

55,750

2004

2005

2006

71,450

2007

93,804

2008

2009

YEAR PLANTED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

181,386

Page 43

946,596

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1998Voights Creek Fall Juvenile Coho Salmon Outplants (1998-2009)

149,970

COWSKULL ACCLIMATION POND 10.0680 RUSHINGWATER ACCLIMATION POND 10.0625 LAKE KAPOWSIN

NUMBER OF FISH RELEASED

101,400

96,790 100,350

99,400 100,450

104,500 104,500

93,000 84,000

71,980

39,935

34,850

55,053

60,100

93,000

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003
YEAR PLANTED

2004

2005

2006

20,100

2007

2008

2009

Pre(2007White River Winter Steelhead Pre-Smolts Released from White River Hatchery (2007-2009)
80,000 STEELHEAD PRE-SMOLTS PRE70,000
NUMBER OF STEELHEAD PRE-SMOLTS RELEASED PRE-

60,000

56,378

50,000

40,000 31,900 30,000 25,631

20,000

10,000

0 2007 2008
YEAR

2009

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 44

21,000

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

D

the creek channel, combined with the low summer flow (approx. 2-3 cfs.) prevented bull trout from migrating beyond this point. However, higher flows would undoubtedly provide access to the upper reach. The remaining 0.5 miles of the creek ning meanders through the edge of the forested area along the White River floodplain (upper left photo). The creek channel gradient increases slightly, as well as the stream complexity due to some small debris jams and LWD input. The surrounding T riparian consists of primarily mature conifers with a limited number of mixed deciduous trees. Near RM er 0.5 the creek turns sharply into the base of a small valley ridge. 2007, From 2005-2007, PTF biologists conducted extensive bull trout migration telemetry studies and redd surveys along the upper White River and West Fork White River; focusing heavily on the headwa; headw ters located within Mt. Rainier National Park. The iscovery iscovery Creek is not officially identified or study results determined that the cold high mounnamed; this small tributary has no NPS or tain streams located within the National Park, ini WRIA designation and is referred to as Di Dis- cluding Discovery, provide the majority of the criticrit covery Creek by PTF staff. Discovery Creek is a . cal bull trout spawning habitat in the basin. In ada small right bank tributary to the upper White River; dition, bull trout spawning was less frequent in this ull this small creek was discovered in 2007 while contributary comducting telemetry and spawning ground survey for pared to that obsurveys bull trout, hence the name. As with most of the served in several headwater tributaries of the White, the elevation of significant headthis creek is likely too high for Chinook coho and Chinook, water tributaries pink salmon. Discovery Creek originates from an located along the underground spring at the base of a small ridge White River, such running parallel to the White River access road. as Klickitat and No Discovery Creek enters the White River just u upSpawning bull trout Name. stream of Shaw Creek at approximately RM 69.5 69.5, Spawning activity has been observed in the lower and provides 0.5 miles of exceptional habitat cond condi- 150-200 feet of the creek over the past two seasons tions for bull trout rearing and spawni spawning. (2007 & 2008). During the 2007 season, bull trout tro The first 150-200 feet of the creek is low grad gradient were observed spawning in Discovery Creek during Dis and flows within the channel migration zone of the mid September. Two of the bull trout observed White River (lower left photo). The habitat within spawning were part of the migration telemetry this section offers study (right photo). Both bull trout were surgically . suitable spawning implanted with LOTEK Nano radio tags and reconditions for bull leased near the Greenwater River (RM 45) in late June. The fish were then tracked to the creek trout. However, spa during the 2007 and where they were observed spawning together be2008 survey season, neath a channel spanning piece of LWD in the lower 75 feet of the creek. a 2-3 foot jump in 3

DISCOVERY CREEK

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 45

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Discovery Creek Bull Trout Spawning Ground Counts 10 9 8 7
NUMBER OBSERVED

LIVE DEAD REDDS

6 5 4 3 2 1 0 9/9/08 9/19/08
DATE SURVEYED

9/26/08

Raw spawning data for Discovery Creek can be found in Appendix D.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 46

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

and steelhead; as well as coho, cutthroat and rainbow trout are diverted down the flume and into the fore bay annually. Many of the juvenile fish diverted into the fore bay are drawn to the penstocks (intake) of the powerhouse, and are subsequently destroyed. Adults are too large to pass Fish by-pass trap through the penstock screens. ens. In 2001, PSE completed construction of a fish bypleted pass facility to help address the fish losses in the fore bay. Even after the fish trap went on-line, Chi. on nook and coho losses have continued to range beb tween 60-80%; with coho rates being slightly higher 80%; slight than Chinook. Continuing efforts are being made tinuing by the Puyallup Tribe and PSE to reduce these ribe r losses. Upon entering the forebay, water flow is diverted towards the fish trap by large steel plates suspended by buoys. An exForebay (background) and the fish by-pass trap pping facility clusionary guide Hydroeuget Sound Energy’s (PSE) Electron Hy net is also in place lectric facility utilizes water diverted from across the fore bay during the annual smolt migramigr the Puyallup River at RM 41.7 (bottom photion period. Many of the smolts caught during this to). The diverted water is channeled 10.1 miles period are fish that have escaped from holding through a flume and settling pond before collecting ponds above the diversion dam. These efforts are sion into a small reservoir, or forebay (upper left). The made to direct the fish into the trap where they are rect water held in the forebay is used to generate power crowded into a hopper, and then deposited into a via four turbines located in the power house appro approxlarge holding tank (right cen ). Fish are dipnter imately 800 feet below the fore bay. Thousands of . netted from the holding tank and placed into a salmonids including threatened Chinook, bull trout, ed smaller container and anesthetized, anesth identified and measured. Finally, fish are placed into a water trailer for tra transport down to the powerhouse where they are released back into the in Puyallup River at RM 31.2. 31.2

ELECTRON FISH BYPASS FACILITY
PUGET SOUND ENERGY PUYALLUP RIVER DIVERSION

P

The Electron fish ladder (left side of photo), diversion dam (center), and headworks (Winter 2008).
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 47

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Average Fork Length of Chinook and Coho Captured in the Electron Fish Bypass Facility (2008)
200 180 160
COHO 1+ (U) CHIN (U) CHIN 0 (M) COHO 0 (U)

140 120
Length (mm)

100 80 60 40 20 0 January February March April May June July
Month

August September October November December

M: Marked Fish (fin clip), Hatchery Origin - U: Unmarked Fish, Wild Origin - 0: Young of the Year - 1+: 1 Year+ age Fish

Number of Chinook and Coho Captured in the Electron Fish Bypass Facility (2008)
39,724 45,000

40,000

CHIN 0 (M), 83, 2%

CHIN 1+ (M), 1, 0%

35,000

CHIN (U), 329, 10% CUT 28 1%

30,000
Number of Fish Captured

COHO 0 (U) 2475 74%

25,000

COHO 1+ (U), 428, 13%

1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
14,805 12,743 14,805 9,560 0 0
Page 48

20,000

Percentage of Juvenile and Smolt Salmonids Captured in the Electron Fish Bypass Facility (2008)

15,000

9,386

10,000

3,334 177 2,531 6,137 1,064 21 29 83

7,660 2,792 3,841 3,928 4,922 3,126 1,123 252 2,475 86 306 2,628 1,350 786 580 897 223 414 428 2,452 1,401 5,587

5,000

1,029 45 1,144 587 64 10 3 17 329

0 CHIN (U) CHIN 0 (M) CHIN 1+ (M)
Species

9 1 1 2 4 0 0 1

2,116

COHO 0 (U)

COHO 1+ (U)

COHO 1+ (M)

M: Marked Fish (fin clip), Hatchery Origin - U: Unmarked Fish, Wild Origin - 0: Young of the Year - 1+: 1 Year+ age Fish PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

3,192

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

channel containing excellent, if somewhat unstable som spawning gravels; as well as much lower amounts of LWD and less channel complexity then what is found upstream. Approximately 0.2 miles upstream of the McCutcheon Bridge is a short run spring fed tributary, Fennel Tributary, which connel Tri tains excellent spawning gravel and frequently supning ports high densities of adult chum spawners. The upper anadromous reach of Fennel Creek is a complex, moderate gradient, pool-riffle/step-pool pool stream flowing through a broad valley (left photo). Victor falls, at RM 1.9, blocks any further upstream migration. The riparian zone is well intact due to little or no agricultural or residential land use ded velopment along most of the creek channel; the overstory riparian consists of a mature hardwood and conifer forest with a dense understory of salh sa monberry and vine maple. Throughout the upper 1.5 mile anadromous stretch, abundant LWD lies in and adjacent to the channel; as well as several small ennel Creek (Kelly Cr.) flows nearly 8 miles in-stream logjams. Spawning gravel is abundant stream from its source of wetlands and lowland and excellent throughout this reach, as are numerlakes located on the plateau near Bonney ous deep resting pools for juveniles and adult mijuvenile Lake and HWY 410; to its eventual convergence al grants. with the Puyallup River near Alderton at RM 15.5. Uniquely, Fennel Creek experiences an early With a drainage area of over 6.5 square miles Fenmiles, run of chum salmon each year; with fish often enterente nel Creek provides approximately 2 miles of anaing the creek in late October, nearly three weeks , dromous usage. A natural 100 foot barrier falls earlier than most lower Puyallup tributaries. Also (Victor Falls) is located at river mile 1.9. The an ananoteworthy, is the unprecedented number of Chidromous reach provides abundant suitable habitat nook adults observed spawning in the creek during for Chinook, coho, pink, chum, and steelhead. Pink , the 2007 season. Although carcass sampling samplin and chum salmon are undoubtedly the most prolific showed that around 85% were hatchery origin; over species to spawn in the creek; unfortunately, stee nfortunately, steel150 adult Chinook were counted in the creek, dwarfhead escapement has dropped precipitously over the ing the average seasonal count of 6 (range 1-14). past decade. Bull trout utilization in Fennel Creek Coho and chum seasonal totals on the following is unknown; however, it is assumed that Adult ; pages include both Fennel Creek, and Fennel TribuT fluvial bull trout which are often caught in the tary data combined. Puyallup River near Fennel, and are known to f foIn May of 2009, a 9.75-acre land conservation re rage in the smaller tributaries of the lower Puyalarea along Fennel Creek in Bonney Lake was lup, likely exploit prey species in Fennel Creek as created through a cooperative partnership between well. Other species present throughout Fennel inPierce County, the City of Bonney Lake and the clude cutthroat trout, sculpins, sticklebacks, and Cascade Land Conservancy. The land conservancy . lamprey. will protect habitat along Fennel Creek and will wil The lowest reach of the creek, extending from the eventually be the location of the Fennel Creek mouth to McCutcheon Rd. Bridge (0.3 miles), flows Trailhead. For more information on Fennel Creek, primarily within the Puyallup River flood plain. or if you would like to support preservation efforts This section of the creek consists of a low gradient on the creek, go to www.fennelcreek.org.

FENNEL CREEK 10.0406

F

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 49

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Fennel Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
15 14 13 12 11 10
NUMBER OBSERVED

LIVE DEAD REDDS

9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 9/4/08 9/11/08 9/19/08 9/29/08
DATE SURVEYED

10/8/08

10/17/08

10/27/08

(1999Fennel Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1999-2008)
LIVE 160 153 DEAD REDDS 140 124 120
NUMBER OBSERVED

100

80

60

53

40 28 21 20 8 1 0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

14 9 3 3 8 6 9 4 5 2 4 4 5

13 2 4 2

10

7 2

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 50

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2003Fennel Creek Chinook Carcass Sampling ( 2003-2008)
120 CARCASSES SAMPLED 103 100 CWT & ADIPOSE CLIP (FALL/HATCHERY ORIGIN) ADIPOSE CLIP ONLY (HATCHERY ORIGIN) WILD UNMARKED 80
NUMBER OF CHINOOK

86

60

40

20

15 5 1 2004 4

2 0 2003

2

2

1 1 2005 2006
SEASON SAMPLED

2 2007

2 2008

2

Fennel Creek Coho Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1998-2008) (1998275 300 LIVE DEAD

250

237

200

NUMBER OBSERVED

186

150

100 72 75

133

32

50

39

56

26

16

11

12

28

57

5

3

6

1

11 2008 Page 51 1

0 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

SEASON SURVEYED

2008 Fennel Creek coho graph was generated using survey data collected by WDFW.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

11

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Fennel Creek Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
200

180

LIVE DEAD

160

140
NUMBER OBSERVED

120

100

80

60

40

20

0 10/27/08 11/5/08 11/17/08 12/2/08 12/9/08 12/16/08 1/6/09 1/15/09

DATE SURVEYED

2008 Fennel Creek chum graph was generated using survey data collected by WDFW and PTF.

2008 Fennel Tributary Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
80 LIVE 70 DEAD

60

NUMBER OBSERVED

50

40

30

20

10

0 11/17/08 12/2/08 12/9/08 12/16/08 1/6/09 1/15/09
DATE SURVEYED

2008 Fennel Tributary graph was generated using survey data collected by WDFW and PTF.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 52

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1998Fennel Creek and Fennel Trib Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1998-2008)
8,975 10,000

9,000

LIVE

DEAD

8,000

7,000
NUMBER OBSERVED

5,308

6,000 4,911 4,501

5,253

5,000

3,867

4,292

4,472

4,000

3,571

4,537 2,655

3,000

1,199

2,000 859 914 658 478

874 972

1,759 2,381

1,000

0 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

2008 Fennel Creek and Fennel Tributary chum graph was generated using survey data collected by WDFW and PTF biologists.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

678 437 Page 53

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

from the mouth, make is less than ideal for chum. ake Bull trout are known to utilize the mainstem river; however, it’s currently unknown what bull trout utilization is, if any, within Fiske. in Fiske Fiske Creek is a small stream flowing just over 2 miles, with a small unnamed tributary entering its right bank at RM 1.0. The upper headwaters reach is primarily cascades/step pool, with a substrate /step pool consisting primarily of large cobble and boulders. The lower reach of the creek consists of a low to r moderate gradient pool-riffle channel with moderate riffle riparian cover from the surrounding conifer and deciduous forest. Relatively abundant spawning gragr vel exists throughout most of the stream, but is somewhat compacted in the lower portion of the channel There are several limiting factors affecting fish f and habitat within Fiske. The creek channel is conhe fined due to natural channel cutting, steep banks and rip-raped banks. Along the road and within the iske Puyaliske Creek is a small tributary to the Puya boundaries of private property, the channel is slightly t lup River, entering the Puyallup at appro approxincised and lacks any real complexity or off-channel d imately RM 26.6. Fiske Creek, (fiske is a habitat such as wetlands, side channels, or large channels Swedish word meaning “fish”) is one of 5 index woody debris. Moderate amounts of residential and streams in the Puyallup Watershed surveyed for other land use development exist along the creek, coho by the Washington Department of Fish and including private forest management. Land use Wildlife. State biologists use the coho escapement along the lower reach from five “index” tributaries (Coal Mine, Spiketon, consists mostly of priFiske, Fennel and Canyonfalls creeks) to estimate vate family residences the total escapement for the Puyallup River. and a county road Coho are the only species observed spawning (Brooks Road) which within Fiske Creek in significant numbers although mbers, often intersects the those numbers are relatively low (average 37, range creek. In addition, wa0-141). In the past, steelhead and chum have been ter is regularly diverted documented spawning in the creek as well. Unfo Unforfrom the creek into a tunately, seasonal flows within Fiske Creek are o ofprivate pond on the ten inadequate to allow access for Chinook or steellower reach. The creek head to passes through a couple spawn, of small, yet fish passable culverts (lower left), as and the well as a low narrow bridge located approximately row appro streams 0.3 miles up from its mouth. location Several years ago, some complexity was added to ome complexi in the wathe creek via a small restoration project which inration wacluded the placement of small sill logs and boulders tershed, (top left). However, tremendous improvements are im nearly 27 possible to stream channel habitat and instream miles flows.

FISKE 10.0596 CREEK 10.0596

F

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 54

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Fiske Coho Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing 25
LIVE DEAD

20

NUMBER OBSERVED

15

10

5

0 10/22/08 11/5/08 11/14/08 12/2/08
DATE SURVEYED

12/9/08

12/30/08

2008 Fiske Creek coho graph was generated using survey data collected by WDFW biologists. (1998Fiske Creek Coho Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1998-2008)
160 LIVE 141 140 DEAD

120

NUMBER OBSERVED

100

80 61 60 40 40 33 25 20 16 15 12 16 10 3 0 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

25

29 23

2

5

5

6

2008 Fiske Creek coho graph was generated using survey data collected by WDFW biologists.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 55

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

ings are imprinted and released from the acclimation ponds, or are planted directly into the lake. All fish are marked with an adipose fin clip and approximately half (100,000) are implanted with a coded wire tag, in addition to an adipose fin clip. , clip From its confluence with the Puyallup River, to approximately RM 0.3, Fox is a low gradient poolpool riffle stream flowing through a moderately dense forested area consisting mostly of alders. There is abundant spawning habitat; coho, chum and steelstee head redds have been observed within this lower reach. Beyond this, from RM 0.3 to 0.5 the creek meanders through a grassy area with little riparian cover and moderate amounts of fine materials obmaterial scuring the gravelly substrate (center right). The channel is relatively narrow and incised, yet coho spawning is prolific throughout the entire segment. This “middle reach” often has the highest spawning densities. Beyond RM 0.5, Fox becomes a moderate gradient step-pool/riffle stream with good pool frefr ox Creek joins the Puyallup River at RM quency, along with adequate small conifer and 29.5. Fox Creek is primarily a coho stream, hardwood riparian cover. There are few mature with fish likely ascending as far up as the conifers in this reach, although many young Grand Kapowsin tree farm’s 6 Rd; however, the majority of firs have been spawning occurs within the first mile of the creek creek. planted as a restoFox Creek flows within the Kapowsin tree farm ration effort. (Hancock Forest Resource Group), where roads and A substantial timber harvesting have impacted several portions of amount of beaver the stream in the past. The most suitable spawning (Castor canadensis) habitat exists from the mouth, up to the Roa 1 Road activity exists Bridge. Although infrequent, chum and steelhead throughout Fox spawning activity has been observed in the p past. Creek. Beaver dams, some up to six feet in height Extensive sampling of coho carcasses for coded (lower right), often completely block and prevent wire tags and fin clips (lower left photo), has refish from migrating upstream. Dams located along vealed that a large percentage of the adult spawners the lower mile of the creek are often breached durdu in Fox are Voights Creek hatchery origin fish. As ing the beginning of the coho season to allow fish juveniles, these fish access to the spawning habitat above. Currently, o were relocated from the lower reach of the creek (RM 0-0.15) is a low 0 Voights Creek hatgradient channel flowing within the open channel chery to acclimation migration zone of ponds in the upper the Puyallup RivPuyall River Puyallup er floodplain, and (Cowskull and R Ruis repeatedly mashingwater) or Lake nipulated by Kapowsin Each Kapowsin. mainstem river spring as many as spring; incursions (top Coho carcass sampling 200,000+ coho year yearl- left).

FOX CREEK 10.0608

F

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 56

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Fox Creek Coho Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
100 LIVE DEAD

90

80

70
NUMBER OBSERVED

60

50

40

30

20

10

0 10/14/08 10/23/08 10/28/08 11/5/08
DATE SURVEYED

11/17/08

11/26/08

Fox Creek Coho Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1995-2008) (19951,400 1,230 LIVE 1,054 DEAD

1,200

1,000
NUMBER OBSERVED

721

800

732

745 540

600 429 461

112

67

21 7

18 17

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

2 1

9

39

44

49

111 72 Page 57

104

200

151

304

400

355

378

382

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(2001Fox Creek Coho Run Timing (2001-2008)
500

2008 2007

450

2006 2005 2004

400

NUMBER OF COHO OBSERVED

350

2003 2002

300

2001

250

200

150

100

50

0 Sept. 20-30 Oct. 1-10 Oct. 11-20 Oct. 21-31 Nov. 1-10 Nov. 11-20
DATE

Nov. 21-30

Dec. 1-10

Dec. 11-20

Dec. 21-31

Fox Creek Coho Salmon Carcass Sampling Results (2002-2008) (2002800 721 700 CARCASS WITH ADIPOSE FIN CLIP AND CWT (HATCHERY ORIGIN) 600
NUMBER OF COHO CARCASSES

CARCASSES SAMPLED

540 500 461

CARCASS WITH ADIPOSE FIN CLIP ONLY (HATCHERY ORIGIN) UNMARKED CARCASS (WILD)

460

400 300 300 240 203 200 195 173 183 277

100 44 18 0 2002 2003 2 42

90 66 50 1 2004 2005
SEASON SURVEYED

21 28

49

68

54 30 6 18

2006

2007

2008

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 58

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

flow, there are several smaller nonglacial tributaeveral ries contributing flow along Fryingpan’s nearly 4.7 mile length. The first 1.4 miles of the creek consists of a large active braided channel that is low-to-moderate gradient (lower left). Several patches of excellent . spawning gravel are available throughout this lower reach of the creek. Considerable amounts of LWD ryingpan are present in the channel, although a great deal of e Creek is a it doesn’t interact with the stream during average moderate sized right bank seasonal flows. Nevertheless, ample amounts of tributary to the LWD are embedded in the creek channel creating beneficial fish habitat. In addition to spawning hah Upper White bitat, numerous pools and side channels are located lo River. This throughout this lower reach; providing excellent ; headwater headwaters rearing habitat for juvenile fish. Wright Creek, a ing creek is su surright bank tributary located at RM 1.5, provides ada veyed for bull ditional spawning habitat for bull trout (approx. trout from late August through 0.15 mi.) ; four redds were observed in 2007 near September. Un- the mouth. From approximately RM 1.4 to the falls, the fortunately the fortunately, channel begins to narrow considerably due to the creeks 3700’ 3700’+ confinement created by steep upper valley walls. elevation is likely too high for Chinook and coho. Steelhead surveys conducted in 2001 yet did not r re- The channel assumes a step-pool configuraveal any spawning activity; however, s steelhead are tion from this point quite capable of ascending to this headwa uite headwater tribuon. Throughout this tary to spawn; therefore, this should not preclude final reach of fish the possibility of steelhead utilization within this usage, spawning opstream. Fryingpan does host a population of res resiportunities are redent cutthroat and bull trout; providing excellent rearing and spawning habitat for these two species. duced due to the increased gradient, Fryingpan enters the White River north of S Supredominately larger nrise road at approximately RM 70.5. Fryingpan substrate, and rapid provides approximately 1.7 miles of anadromous y flows encountered. usage. A falls (top left photo) located at appro approximately RM 1.7 blocks any further upstream migr migra- Bull trout have been Upper Fryingpan Creek, 0.3 miles documented ascendtion. The creek is almost entirely bordered by an below the barrier falls. old growth coniferous forest, and the water is cooled ing as far as the base of the falls. In 2006 and 2007, Puyallup Tribal Fisheries year round by staff radio tagged bull trout (9 fish in 2006 & 19 fish glacial melt wain 2007) captured in the USACE fish trap near ptured ter from Buckley. Subsequently, a few of these bull trout Fryingpan were tracked from their release site at RM 45 on the Glacier (right White River (near the town of Greenwater) to photo). In adFryingpan Creek and its tributary Wright Creek. dition to the Spawning was observed in both creeks during the glacial i influenced mainstem month of September.

FRYINGPAN 10.0369 CREEK 10.0369

F

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 59

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Fryingpan Creek Bull Trout Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
10 LIVE DEAD 9 REDDS

8

7
NUMBER OBSERVED

6

5

4

3

2

1

0 8/29/08 9/9/08
DATE SURVEYED

9/19/08

9/26/08

Raw spawning data for Fryingpan Creek can be found in Appendix D.

2008 Fryingpan Creek Water Temperature (August 29-October 13) 29-

Average: 6.04 Max: 11.27 Min: 1.26

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 60

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

dient pool-riffle stream with abundant high quality riffle qual spawning gravel. Much of the river flows through vel. U.S. Forest Service land and the riparian zone conripa sists primarily of second growth conifers, and hardconifer woods. Forestry operations along the river, primarily timber harvesting and road construction, currentconstruction ly and in the past, impacted portions of the stream. por Only limited amounts of LWD exist in the channel, and the average size reflects the surrounding young forest and is therefore generally small in nature. What large wood exists is usually quite old, yet is d old located too far from the river channel. The Greenwater is surveyed for both Chinook and steelhead by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, but not for coho. As with all upper White River surveys; adult salmon and steelstee head that spawn in the Greenwater River were capca tured at the USACE fish trap in Buckley, and transported above Mud Mountain dam. Since prepr cise escapement numbers for the upper White River d he Greenwater River is a right bank tributary drainage are known, surveys are conducted to determine fish distribution and spawning success. The to the upper mainstem White River. The Upper White River coho escapement is derived from Greenwater originates in the Norse Peaks Buc Wilderness area on Castle Mountain and flows wes- counts made at the Army Corps of Engineers’ Buckley trap. terly until it converges with the White R River (RM In the spring of 2007, the Puyallup tribe transtran 46) near the small town of Greenwater The Greenwater. ported 223,740 juvenile Spring Chinook from Chino Greenwater basin drains an area over 73 square ater WDFW’s Minter Creek facility, to the Greenwater miles with an average water discharge of 210 cfs (USGS gauge #12097500). Several significant trib ignificant tribu- River. These fish were planted directly into the taries contribute flow along the Green nwater River’s creek since there was no acclimation pond available on the Greenwater prior to 2007. To address this 21 mile course, including Pyramid, Lost, Maggie Maggie, issue, a new 35,000 cu. ft. Spring Chinook acclimaSlide, and Twenty-eight Mile creeks. Historically, tion pond was completed in the summer of 2007 20 the Greenwater River has supported ESA listed near George Creek (right photo). Capable of holding Spring Chinook, and recently the listed steelhead over 500,000 Spring (2007 ESA listing). In addition to Chinook and Chinook (550,000 in steelhead, the Greenwater supports large runs of pink and coho salmon. Traditionally, the Greenw , Greenwa- 2008 & 830,996 in 2009), the construction ter Basin has also supported a substantial amount of the acclimation pond of recreational Greenwater River was funded by the City use, which has had its impact on of Tacoma as a result of a mitigation settlement. fish and wildlife Design engineering was issues. Acclimation pond The Greenw Greenwa- funded by the Pacific Coast Salmon Recovery ter is a medium Fund (PCSRF). sized, low gr gra-

GREENWATER RIVER 10.0122

T

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 61

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Greenwater River Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
140 LIVE DEAD 120 REDDS

100
NUMBER OBSERVED

80

60

40

20

0 9/11/08 9/18/08
DATE SURVEYED

10/1/08

10/15/08

2008 Greenwater River Chinook graph was generated using survey data collected by WDFW biologists. Greenwater River Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1999-2008) (1999600 559 LIVE DEAD 500 REDDS

400
NUMBER OBSERVED

318

370

390

236

249 244

300

219

275

192

219

277 25 2008 81 Page 62 190

200 122 127

170 107 91 101 2004 26 2005 44 29 2006 116

73

0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2007
SEASON SURVEYED

2008 Greenwater River Chinook graph was generated using survey data collected by WDFW biologists.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

42

49 63

100

80

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Greenwater River Steelhead Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (2002-2009) (200260 56 STEELHEAD REDDS 50 50

41 40
NUMBER OBSERVED

30

27

N o t S u r v e y e d

24

N o t S u r v e y e d

N o t S u r v e y e d

20

10

0 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
SEASON SURVEYED

2009 Greenwater River steelhead graph was generated using survey data collected by WDFW biologists. Steelhead surveys could not be conducted in 2006 and 2008 due to unfavorable and unsafe stream conditions.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 63

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

ing several logjams, as well as free and fixed chanjams, nel spanning structures. Since 1994, the Puyallup Tribe has operated two nce T ponds used for acclimating Spring Chinook which are planted in March, and released in May or early June. The Spring Chinook plants are an integral uckleberry part of the White River Spring Chinook recovery Creek is a plan. The juvenile Spring Chinook originated from tributary to the Muckleshoot White River Hatchery and the Upper White WDFW’s hatchery on Minter Creek. Production River. The creek levels have been around 400,000 smolts; although, origi inates from it fluctuates based on available brood-stock. They tuates brood the Huckleberry have a production capacity of 837,000 zero age basin along the smolts. Between 100,000 to 500,000+ Spring ChiNorth Slope of Mt. nook from the WDFW Minter Creek facility and the Rainier and is Muckleshoot White River hatchery are transported non-glacial (top to the Huckleberry Creek acclimation ponds in early left). The cr creek flows through the spring, and released in late spring. All fish are National P Park and mass marked with left or right ventral fin clips. Odd brood years are marked with left ventral clips, Snoqualmie National Forest lands before meet meeting and even years with right ventral clips. These fish the West Fork of the White at RM 53.1. The lower can later be identified when caught at the USACE caug 0.5 miles consists of a low gradient, occasionally fish trap in Buckley and passed above the Mud braided channel with a large side channel complex breaking off around RM 0.3. The surrounding rip ripa- Mountain dam to spawn. The water intake for the lower Huckleberry pond was destroyed in the NoN rian is a mixture of conifers and deciduous trees. vember 2006 flood event (repaired in summer of The spawning gravel is excellent in the first half ; be mile reach, which consistently supports the highest 2007); preventing fish from being planted in the lower pond during the spring of 2007. densities of Spring Chinook and coho spawners As with all upper White River tributaries, adult each season, and pinks on odd years. Steelhead . salmon and usage has also been documented in Huckleberry; steelhead however, steelhead surveys have not been co conthat spawn ducted for several years. in HuckleThe gradient increases slightly From RM 0.5 to berry 1.5, but the gravel quality remains excellent, a alCreek were though slightly larger and patchy in nature. The captured at riparian corridor consists of old growth conifers u upthe USACE stream of the acclimation pond at RM 0.5, offering fish trap in excellent Buckley, LWD rethen transLower Huckleberry Creek cruitment. ported and released approximately 4 miles above imately In-stream Mud Mountain Dam. Since precise escapement LWD is numbers for the upper White River drainage are moderate known, spawning surveys are conducted to deterdete throughout mine fish distribution and spawning success. This the entire Chinook creek, creat- is important regarding Spring Chinook, since adult production monitoring is part of the recovery plan.

HUCKLEBERRY CREEK 10.0253

H

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 64

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Huckleberry Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
30 LIVE DEAD 25 REDDS

20
NUMBER OBSERVED

15

10

5

0 8/22/08 9/10/08 9/18/08
DATE SURVEYED

9/25/08

10/2/08

Upper White River surveys show distribution and timing. Actual escapement totals are known from the USACE trap counts. Huckleberry Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1999-2008) (1999500 450 400 350
NUMBER OBSERVED

437

LIVE DEAD REDDS

300 250 200 150 100 66 50 50 1 0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

82 60 37 4 32

84 35 5 38 14

89 37 48

77 32 29

68 37 5 5

65

25

24

17

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 65

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1995Huckleberry Creek Spring Chinook Acclimation Pond Plants (1995-2009)
700,000 Spring Chinook Planted in Lower Pond 600,000 Spring Chinook Planted in Upper Huck Aerial Pond Direct Creek Plants 496,700 514,000

500,000
NUMBER OF FISH PLANTED

464,980

400,000

356,000

218,631

217,450

300,000

189,720

175,650

182,440

243,000

121,460

107,850

200,000

145,900

254,550

100,000

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
YEAR PLANTED

Between 100,000 to 500,000+ Spring Chinook from the WDFW Minter Creek and the Muckleshoot White River hatcheries are transported to the Huckleberry Creek acclimation ponds in early spring, and released in late spring. All fish are mass marked with left or right ventral fin clips. Odd brood years are marked with left ventral clips, and even years with right ventral clips. These fish can later be identified when caught at the USACE fish trap in Buckley and passed above the Mud Mountain dam to spawn. The water intake for the lower Huckleberry pond was destroyed in the November 2006 flood event; preventing fish from being planted in the lower pond during the 2007 season. Snow accumulation, in addition to road and pond damage (Jan. 2009 flood event) prevented fish from being planted in the upper Huck Aerial pond during the 2009 acclimation season.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

82,450

93,804 99,736

382,300 Page 66

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

quired in recent years for protection and restorarestor tion. Although spawning frequency is low for all speawning sp cies and inconsistent for some; Chinook, chum, pink, coho, and steelhead have all been observed spawnspaw ing within the surveyed area of Hylebos Creek. In I addition, Hylebos Creek also host a large population of cutthroat trout, as well as other native and nonut, no native species including sticklebacks, sculpins, lamprey and bass. The stream section most often surveyed by the Puyallup Tribe is the Lower West Fork Hylebos extending from 373rd St., upstream to the Montessori school at Hwy. 99 and downstream t rd to the East Fork. The upper extent of from 373 . Chinook spawning is generally a half mile past the convergence of the East and West Forks. Passage beyond this is often difficult due low instream flows preventing Chinook from migrating far up either mig The West Fork of Hylebos Creek just downstream of the Spring Valley Ranch restoration site. fork. Higher instream flows experienced during the fall and winter often allow coho and chum to access ylebos Creek (named after Peter Francis the upper reaches of the Hylebos. Hylebos (1848-1918),original native name original As part of the continuing fish and habitat restohaxtl’, also called “Koch” by early natives)1 ration efforts, the Puyallup Tribe regularly released ” lup is an large, independent drainage from that of the nage between 10 and 20 thousand juvenile Fall Chinook Puyallup/White River system. Draining an area of into the West Fork of Hylebos Creek during the over 18 square miles, the headwater of the Hylebos spring (lower right). Spawning surveys over time system originate in the city of Federal Way and flow have identified these fish on the spawning grounds ate southwest until it empties into the Hylebos Wate Waterdue to fin clips administered at the hatchery prior ha way; one of several waterways located in Comocated release. In addition, the 27 acres above 373rd St., he a mencement Bay within the city of Tacoma The Tacoma. known as the Spring Valley Ranch, was purchased East and West Forks of the Hylebos comprise two of by the Washington State Department of Transporomprise Transpo the three basins within this system, and make up tation (WSDOT) in 2004. Restoration efforts for the upper part of the watershed. The East and tershed. this site were completed in 2007. The restoration 2007 West Forks converge just east of I-5 to form the project restored nearly a quarter mile of creek Lower Hylebos. channel and wetland habitat. The project will also The Hylebos Watershed has been severely i imestablish a riparian buffer zone comprised of native compri pacted by urban development. Land uses over the and trees and plants. In 2008, the City of Federal Way n C past several decades has resulted in an extensive acquired the 22 acre Goldloss of estuarine and wetland habitats, reduction of max property. This acquitats, water quality (303(d) listed) and fish production, as sition will preserve 1,200 well as diminished instream flows and stream feet of creek channel and channel continuity. Nevertheless, the watershed , surrounding land located does have protected areas, and substantial parcels on the West Fork of the Hyof the creek and surrounding land have been a aclebos. For more information about Hylebos Creek, ________________________ 1 Caster, D. 2003. Father Hylebos, St. George’s Indian School and contact Friends of the HyCemetery, and St. Claire’s Mission Church. Prepared for the Hi Hislebos at www.hylebos.org. torical Society of Federal Way. 18pp.

HYLEBOS CREEK 10.0006

H

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 67

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Hylebos Creek Juvenile Fall Chinook and Chum Plants (2001-2009) (2001120,000 100,000 20,243 9,708 2008 2009 Page 68

Fall Chinook Chum
100,000

80,000
Number of fish Planted

60,000

40,000 19,359

16,269

11,100

20,000

0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Year Planted

10,119

2006

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

12,227 2007

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

when other salmon species are experiencing relarel tively good success. . To date, coho (top left) are the predominate spesp cies in the creek. Recovered CWT data has shown that many of the coho spawning in Kapowsin are fish that were released a couple of years earlier as juveniles from the upper Puyallup acclimation ponds (Cowskull and Rushingwater), or are descendants of the net-pen acclimation project in Kapen K powsin Lake. From 1993 to 1997, the Puyallup Tribe fisheries staff transported juvenile coho from WDFW’s Voights Creek hatchery to four net-pens net in Kapowsin Lake to acclimate. Prior to this fish limate. restoration project, few or no coho were observed in r wer Kapowsin or Ohop creeks. Suitable spawning gravel is available throughuitable out the 3.6 mile survey reach of Kapowsin, ala though much of it is sporadic. A number of downed h sporadic trees within the channel along with several sizable logjams create complexity throughout the stream. Cattle and other livestock have been allowed Creek apowsin Creek is a tannic stream originat- access to the stream channel at approximately RM ing from the north shore of Lake Kapo Kapow1.7. Homes and outbuilding are frequently present sin, which sits approximately 3.6 miles u up- within 20 to 40 feet of the banks along the creek stream from the creeks confluence with the Puya Puyal- between RM 0.5 and RM 2.0. Human-made rock nd Human lup River. Kapowsin Creek supports a host of dam structures; as well as sill logs, span the creek logs adult salmon species including; Chinook pink, coChinook, and alter the channel hydrology along this stretch. ho, steelhead and occasionally a few chum. ChiDuring the summer and fall when water levels are nook have not been observed beyond the top of K Ka- low, these structures often cause upstream migramigr powsin Creek where it enters the lake. On the tion issues for adult salmon. In addition to humanmon. other hand, coho, and occasionally a few steelhead made obstacles, the creek experiences frequent move through Kapowsin Lake into Ohop Creek to beaver (Castor canadensis) activity. Beaver dams, dams spawn. Ohop Creek, which enters the south end of often constructed during the low summer flow, the lake, is technically considered the continuation regularly occlude the entire creek channel preventchan of Kapowsin creek. ing upstream migration. Most of the stream has a Unfortunately, steelhead escapement in Kapo Kapow- dense riparian zone consisting of fir, cedar, alder, fir sin is low, however, this drop in escapement is not cottonwood, and salmonberry. salmonberry uncommon; winter steelhead stocks in the Puyallup Pierce County completed construction of the new basin have been declining since 1990. The precipi precipit- Orville road bridge over the head of Kapowsin ous decline within just the past few years has Creek in early 2006. In addition, the 2006 flood created serious con- event destroyed extended portions of the levee along cern among fisheries Orville Rd. near Kapowsin Creek. Currently, the Creek managers. Factor(s) lower segment of the creek (RM 0-0.2) is a low gra0 responsible for the dient channel flowing within the open channel midecline in steelhead gration zone of the Puyallup River floodplain, and is escapement are u unrepeatedly manipulated by mainstem river incurincu known, especially sions.

KAPOWSIN CREEK 10.0600

K

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 69

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Kapowsin Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
20 LIVE 18 DEAD REDDS 16

14
NUMBER OBSERVED

12

10

8

6

4

2

0 8/27/08 9/15/08 9/24/08 10/3/08
DATE SURVEYED

10/14/08

10/22/08

(1993Kapowsin Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1993-2008)
50 LIVE DEAD 45 REDDS 38 36 35
NUMBER OBSERVED

40

38

30 30 26 25 22 20 17 15 12 10 9 7 5 4 4 2 2 0 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

28 26

19 17 15

20 17 15

20

21 20

21 19

12 10 9 5 8 8

10

10 8 5 2 7 4

4

3

2

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 70

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Kapowsin Creek Coho Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
180 LIVE DEAD

160

140

120
NUMBER OBSERVED

100

80

60

40

20

0 10/3/08 10/14/08 10/23/08 10/28/08
DATE SURVEYED

11/5/08

11/24/08

12/3/08

(1993Kapowsin Creek Coho Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1993-2008)
2,500 LIVE 2,023 DEAD

2,000

NUMBER OBSERVED

1,500

1,000

521

491

446

498

410

319

500 121

210

368

442

446

153

138

115 46

110

125

18

21

99 22

55 31

62

29

33

77

176 2008 Page 71 16

11

0 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

YEAR SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

5

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Kapowsin Creek Steelhead Spawning Ground Count
10

LIVE
9

DEAD REDDS

8

7
NUMBER OBSERVED

6

5

4

3

2

1

0 3/23/09 4/16/09 4/28/09
DATE SURVEYED

5/13/09

6/9/09

Kapowsin Creek Steelhead Redd Counts Seasonal Comparisons (1995-2009) (199520 STEELHEAD REDDS 18

16

14
NUMBER OBSERVED

12

11

10

9 8 8

8 6 6 4 4 2 2 1 3 3 6 5

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
YEAR SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 72

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

KELLOG CREEK 10.0621

K

ellog Creek is a headwater tributary to the Puyallup River, entering the Puyal Puyallup at approximately RM 39.7. Kellog is a short run stream with nearly three miles of accessible habitat; however, the anadromous spawning usage extends approximately the first 2 miles of the creek creek. At RM 2.5, Kellog passes through a large fish pa passage culvert (installed 2008) running un under the Mainline 2 Road within the Kapowsin tree farm currently owned and managed by Hancock (Hancock Timber Resource Group). Kellog Creek flows entir entirely within the privately owned Kapowsin tree farm where roads and past timber harvests have negas tively impacted several portions of the stream. Kellog provides spawning and rearing habitat for nd adult; as well as juvenile steelhead and coho. Wild steelhead have managed to maintain a small fo n foothold in Kellog Creek over the past several decades due to the fact that the mouth of the c creek is located downstream of the Electron diversion dam Flows dam. over the past century have often been sufficient durtury ing late winter and spring; thereby allowing stee steelhead access to tributaries located downstream of the diversion dam at RM 41.7. Naturally returning c coho were observed in Kellog Creek in 2004. These were the first natural spawners seen since adult and juvenile coho plants began in the upp Puyalupper

lup basin in 1997. Coho activity has been observed tivity as high as RM 1.4, whereas steelhead activity is ofo ten observed as high as RM 2.1. Bull trout utilization is unknown; however, it is suspected that they likely use the creek for foraging purposes. purposes Upstream of the culvert, the creek assumes a moderate to high gradient step-pool composition unstep suitable for larger adult spawners such as coho or steelhead. Steelhead surveys are conducted from the culvert, downstream to the mouth. From the culvert at RM 2.5, downstream to RM 1.6, the creek flows through a moderate gradient step-pool/cascade step channel containing patchy gravel. Several sections of the surrounding banks are comprised of exposed compacted glacial debris; contributing both fine and an small course materials to the stream. Due to timber harvesting, the riparian zone throughout this reach he consists of a thin mature 2nd growth conifer buffer coni on both sides. However, there is a significant amount of wind-throw in the channel associated throw with this insufficient buffer. Steelhead spawning activity is occasionally observed in this segment; however, steelhead spawning commonly begins beteelhead low RM 1.6. At this point, substantial flow from a left bank tributary, and the reduction in gradient, gradient create a more conducive spawning environment. environment Below RM 1.5, the gradient relaxes for the next , mile and excellent spawning gravel is consistently available all the way to the confluence with the Puyallup River. The majority of steelhead spawning activity is observed within this lower 1.5 miles. The RMZ is more intact along this lower reach as long well. In addition to a few substantial debris jams, jams there are several interactive pieces of LWD present in the stream channel. The gradient increases near grad RM 0.5 as the creek drops down into the Puyallup River flood plain. A large, structurally complex secse tion of the channel exists just below the PSE flume line. This complex was created by historic amounts of course materials moved during the 1996 flood duri event. Near the mouth of Kellog, the creek initially drops into the Puyallup River channel migration zone and may flow for an additional 0.1-0.5 miles before dumping into the active main river channel. Steelhead spawning activity has frequently been ha documented within this section of the creek.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 73

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1995Kellog Creek Steelhead Redd Counts Seasonal Comparisons (1995-2009)
35 31 30 27 25 25 22
NUMBER OBSERVED

STEELHEAD REDDS

20 17 15 13 12 10 10 6 5 5 3 10 10 10 12

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
SEASON SURVEYED

survey surveys. The 2008 redd data is incomplete due to extremely poor survey conditions which prevented a regular full season of surveys.

Currently, instead of using the AUC method to determine steelhead escapement, the Puyallup Tribal Fisheries Department and WDFW determine steelhead escapement based on redd counts. Since the mid 1980’s, state biologists have derived steelhead escapement from data obtained through WDFW’s (formally Washington Department of Game) Snow Creek Research Project (Freymond and Foley 1985). Researchers placed a weir on Snow Creek, and over several years were able to count the number of steelhead passed above, as well as the number of redds produced by spawners. A final factor of 0.81 females per redd was calculated. Furthermore, a ratio of 1 male to 1 female is used when no sex ratio is known; which is the case throughout the Puyallup/White River system. Therefore, to determine the total escapement for steelhead, each redd is multiplied by a factor of 1.62 (i.e. 42 redds x 1.62 steelhead per redd = total escapement of 68 steelhead).

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 74

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

0.3 miles of anadromous usage. Three significant unnamed tributaries add flow to Klickitat; unfortuKlickitat nately, they do not contribute any beneficial spawning or rearing habitat given they are located well en above anadromous barriers. Lower Klickitat provides exceptional habitat conditions for bull trout (char) and cutthroat rearing and spawning. The first 0.3 miles is low gradient, gradient with excellent spawning gravel and significant amounts of in-channel LWD. Numerous pools and side channels provide excellent habitat for juveniles. habi A series of bedrock falls and cascades at RM 0.3 blocks any further upstream migration. Numerous surveys have been conducted above the falls; howho ever, no fish or redds have been observed. Klickitat Creek has been surveyed for bull trout since 1999; thus far, no salmon or steelhead have been observed teelhead spawning in the creek. Bull trout from the mainsmain tem White River are observed spawning in the creek early in the fall, and juvenile bull trout have been lickitat Creek is a significant right bank observed in the pools and lateral habitat during latera hite headwater tributary to the White River. these surveys. The few dead bull trout observed ead The word Klickitat is a native word mea meanduring surveys, appear to be pre-spawned mortalipre ing “beyond” or “prairie people”. The creek is exclu- ties due to predation. sively surveyed for bull trout from late August Klickitat has been identified as a key index through early October. The creek is not surveyed ber. stream for bull trout spawning. During the 2002 for other species because, with the exception of through 2007 survey seasons, bull trout floy tagged steelhead, the creeks 3300’ elevation is li likely too at the USACE trap in Buckley were observed ap high for most salmon. In 2007, PTF biologist o obspawning in the creek. For three seasons, from or f served pink salmon in Sunrise Creek ( (elev. 2800’) 2005-2007, PTF biologists conducted extensive bull 2007, which is located just inside the National Park bou boun- trout migration telemetry studies; as well as redd stu dary, approximately 5 mile downstream of Klickitat surveys along the upper White River and West Fork , Klickitat. This is the highest point on the White River that hest White River. The study focused heavily on the adult salmon have been documented by the Puya Puyalheadwater tributaries located within Mt. Rainier lup Tribe since surveys have been conducted. National Park. Study results showed that the cold Klickitat Creek is a phenomenal nonglacial high mountain streams located within the park proms p stream, originating from Ghost Lake ( (elev. 4396’) vide the majority of the critical bull trout spawning near Cayuse Pass. Klickitat is a north facing habitat within the basin. Two of the bull trout obo stream flowing entirely within Mt. Rainier National served spawning in 2007were were Park, and is the source of drinking water for the part of the migration telemeeNPS White River compound. Klickitat enters the try study. Both fish had been White River north of Sunrise road at approximately implanted with radio tags RM 67.9. The creek is surrounded by old growth and released near Greenwaand the water temperature is tempered by cold clear ter (RM 45) in late June, and pered water year round (three year average summer te tem- were observed spawning toperature from 2006-2008 was 6.56 oC [range 3.8-8.5 gether in September just beBull Trout low the falls. oC]). The only drawback being, there is only about he

KLICKITAT CREEK 10.0357

K

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 75

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Klickitat Creek Bull Trout Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
16 LIVE DEAD 14 REDDS

12

NUMBER OBSERVED

10

8

6

4

2

0 8/29/08 9/9/08 9/19/08
DATE SURVEYED

9/26/08

10/7/08

Raw spawning data for Klickitat Creek can be found in Appendix D. Klickitat Creek Bull Trout Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (2000-2008) (200030 LIVE DEAD 25 REDDS

21 20
NUMBER OBSERVED

18 17 16 15 14 12 11 10 10 7 6 5 5 4 3 2 1 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
SEASON SURVEYED

9 7

5 4 4

2005

2006

2007

2008

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 76

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(2001Klickitat Creek Bull Trout Run Timing (2001-2008)
16

2008 2007

14

2006 2005

12
NUMBER OF BULL TROUT OBSERVED

2004 2003

10

2002 2001

8

6

4

2

0 Sept 1-5 Sept 6-10 Sept 11-15
DATE

Sept 16-20

Sept 21-25

Sept 26-31

10) 2008 Klickitat Creek Water Temperature (August 29 – October 10)

Average: 6.56 Max: 8.5 Min: 3.8

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 77

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

cobble; yet, good quality patches of spawning gravels are available (lower left). The channel habitat t) consists mostly of low gradient pools and riffles. ly rif The creek contains a substantial proportion of small tains and medium size woody debris, and the surrounding riparian zone consists mostly of alder and Douglas Doug fir. Logging activities occurred along the lower reach of Le Dout in the past; however, there is curcu rently a good RMZ along the majority of the lower spawning reach of the creek. A split in the channel at RM 0.45 often prevents adult fish from migrating further upstream due an increase in the gradient along with a reduction in flow (top right). The upper reach of the creek is steep with impassable casca cades. The 62 Rd. crosses Le Dout Creek approxe Dout Creek is a small tributary to the U Upimately 0.45 miles from its confluence with the per Puyallup River, entering the main yallup mainstem Puyallup River. river channel at RM 39.2. This small order right The mouth of Le Dout (lower right) is located stream drains a wetland area at just over 1,800 feet, dam and flows northwest for approximately 2.5 miles b be- about 2.6 miles below the Electron diversion dam. fore meeting the Puyallup. Unfortunately, low flows Given that the creek is downstream of the diversion dam, and river flows over the past century have ofo (major factor) often prevent adult salmon from a ascending past the first 0.45 miles. Le Dout is located ten been high enough during late winter and spring to prevent the mainstem channel of the Puyallup o within the Kapowsin tree farm owned by Hancock River from being drawn dry, wild steelhead have (Hancock Timber Resource Group), who purchased the property in 2005. Several areas along the upper managed to maintain a minute foothold in Le Dout Creek. Despite generally low escapement numbers, reach have undergone several timber harv er harvests in steelhead surveys in Le Dout are conducted annualthe past. Le Dout Creek supports an exceptionally ly by the Puyallup Tribe. Winter steelhead stocks inter limited number of coho and steelhead spawners. The creek is often too shallow in late summer to a al- in the Puyallup basin have experienced a dramatic decline since 1990 (ESA listed in 2007). The precilow Chinook access to spawn and bull trout utiliz utilizapitous decline within just tion is unknown unknown. the past few years has Le Dout is a stream with moderate complex complexi- created serious concern among fisheries managty, and habitat that is ers. Factor(s) responsible well suited for coho and for the decline in steelsteelhead adult ers, as well as juveniles juveniles. head survival are unknown, especially when To a large extent the other salmon species are substrate present throughout Le Dout con- experiencing relatively out good success. sists of small and large

LE DOUT CREEK 10.0620

L

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 78

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

LeDout Creek Steelhead Redd Counts Seasonal Comparisons (1995-2009) (199512 STEELHEAD REDDS

10 10

8 8
NUMBER OBSERVED

8

6

4 4 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 2

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 79

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

gists conducted extensive bull trout migration telemetry studies and redd surveys along the upper White River and West Fork White River; focusing River heavily on the headwaters located within Mt. RainiRain er National Park. The study results showed that the cold high mountain streams located within the National Park, including Lodi, provide the majority , This photo was taken from Berkeley Park of the critical bull trout spawning habitat in the barout b left near 6,000’ looking north. The peak to the left is Skyscraper Mountain, and to the right is sin. In addition, bull trout spawning was less conull Ridge. the Mt. Freemont Ridge. sistent and frequent in this tributary compared to that observed in several significant headwater trisigni butaries located along the White River. River During the 2007 season, several bull trout redds were documented in Lodi from mid-to-late Septemmid ber. During the 2008 season, no bull trout spawning activity was observed. The only bull trout obhe served spawning during 2006 was part of the migration telemetry study. This bull trout had been imi planted with radio a tag and released near GreenGree water (RM 45) in early June, and was observed th headwa- spawning in the creek on September 8 . odi Creek is a significant right bank headw Characteristic of many headwater tributaries, tributaries ter tributary to the West Fork White River. the lower reach of the creek is a low gradient chanThe name Lodi apparently originated from nel flowing within the open channel migration zone early mineral prospectors in the region. This high of the West Fork White River floodplain, and is remountain stream flows northwest through a steep peatedly manipulated by glacial valley, bordered by Skyscraper Mountain to alley, the west and the Mount Fremont ridge idgeline running mainstem river incursions. There is little significant along the east (top left). Lodi flows entirely within tion Mt. Rainier National Park (NPS stream designation LWD present in this portion of the channel and the high #f09-00a), the creek is non-glacial in origin rather, glacial origin; solar exposure results in siggits sources are derived from snowpack accumu accumulations within Berkeley Park, located at 6,400+ feet of nificant algae mats accumut lating over the substrate elevation (top left); as well as other surrounding surface and groundwater sources. Berkeley Park is (right). Although spawning does occur within this small n nestled into the northern slopes of the Burroughs stretch, it can be limited due the lack of quality Mountain Range. Lodi Creek flows for just over 4 miles from its headwaters before entering the White spawning substrate created by the alluvial deposits (fine sand and silt) from the West Fork White River. River at approximately RM 13.7; situating it about Beyond the open floodplain, the creek enters the foa mile upstream of Van Horn Creek (RM 12.65 . 12.65) rested lower slope of the valley floor as it parallels The lower reach of Lodi provides excellent habithe West Fork White River channel. From this channel tat conditions for bull trout rearing and spawning spawning. point, the creek assumes a pool-riffle configuration pool Various surveys have verified both resident and for approximately the next 0.8 miles before climbing fluvial bull trout utilization within this stream. its way up the steep valley wall; an impassable falls However, the creeks 3400’ elevation is likely too 00’ prevent any further upstream migration. The fostream migration high for Chinook, coho and pink salmon. PTF sur, rested reach provides quality spawning and rearing veys the creek for bull trout spawning during the opportunities. month of September. From 2005-2007, PTF biol 2007, biolo-

LODI 10.0227 CREEK 10.0227

L

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 80

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

along with stable log jams have created remarkable stream complexity throughout the lower reach of the creek. Meadow Creek is unspoiled in many ways and has incredible potential to be a highly productive salmon and steelhead stream. Unfortunately, anadromous salmon were unable to access the creek for nearly a century due to the streams location above the Electron diversion dam on the Puyallup River. River With the completion of the Electron fish ladder (@ RM 41.7) in the fall of 2000, anadromous fish paspa sage was restored for the first time since 1904. Resestored 1904 toring anadromous access to the upper Puyallup River has made approximately 26+ miles of spawning and rearing habitat above the diversion available for several species including Chinook, coho, pink, steelhead, and bull trout. The creek does; trout however, have a resident population of cutthroat trout. It is also suspected that bull trout may be present in the creek, since they are known to popuknow eadow Creek is a tributary to the Mowich late the Mowich River; however, bull trout utilizaer; River, entering the Mowich at RM 3.9 tion has not been documented to date. (lower left). The creek was named by Ba BaiDue to the lengthy absence of anadromous fish ley Willis (1857-1949) in 1883. Willis was a geologi- usage and the poor rate of natural fish reestablishis reestablis cal engineer who played an essential role in esta estabment, Meadow Creek is only occasionally surveyed lishing Mt. Rainier as a national park. Meadow ori- to determine if salmon or steelhead are utilizing the mon ginates from Eunice Lake (elev. 5353’), deep within stream. Disappointingly, many of the fish enMt. Rainier National Park. With exception of the hancement techniques employed by the Puyallup Mountain Meadows habitat area below Euni Eunice Tribe such as adult, juvenile, or fry plants; as well , Lake, the creek flows through a high gradient, fr he freas the use of acclimation ponds, are not possible due ponds quently confined channel for most of its 4.6 mile to the creeks remote location and lack of vehicle length. Meadow Creek has one significant tribut tributaaccess. Therefore, one of the Puyallup Tribe’s short Puy ry, Hayden Creek, at RM 2.5. Pristine spawning den term goals continues to be the reintroduction of and rearing habitat exists within the lower one-mile Chinook and possibly coho via remote site incubaincub reach of the creek. This anadromous reach consists tors (RSI). The obvious need for RSI’s is due to the . of a low to moderate gradient channel, with a pool, limited accessibility to the creek. Upwards of Up riffle character, abundant spawning gravel, LWD; ing 40,000 Chinook and coho could be incubated and as well as released into the creek annually; however, this has howev an intact not been accomplished as of the printing of this rer mature port. Currently, no proposals exist for the reestabriparian lishing steelhead into Meadow Creek or the Upper zone along Puyallup system. Yet, the need for action is parapar the entire mount due to the steeply declining stock of wild creek. steelhead in the Puyallup Watershed. Current efWa Several forts have yet to document any steelhead usage in pieces of the Mowich River or Meadow Creek. C LWD

MEADOW 10.0630 CREEK 10.0630

M

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 81

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Several pieces of LWD along with stable log jams have created remarkable stream complexity co throughout the lower reach of the creek. Rushingwater Creek originates from the Golden Lakes in Mt. Rainier National Park. Rushingwater flows over 5 miles to its confluence with the Mowich River at RM 0.6. Most of Rushingwater flows within the Rainier Timber-Kapowsin tree farm (Hancock Kapowsin Forest Management) where roads and timber harha vesting have impacted several portions of the stream. The upper survey reach of the creek is mostly comprised of pools and glides, with fine and medium sized substrate. Abundant in-stream wooin dy debris and a moderate to dense canopy cover extend throughout most of this reach. The North and South Mowich forks flow though Mt. Rainier National Park and reach their convergence at RM 7.5 to form the main stem Mowich RivM er. The upper 4-5 miles of the Mowich River consist 5 of steep and moderate gradients, with a largely cobco ble and boulder substrate. There is little spawning habitat available, yet some suitable spawning condicond tions exists in the outlying side channels below RM ch 7.5. The channel migration zone of the North and South Mowich are bordered by mature dense conifer uth and mixed deciduous forests. . From RM 6.5 to 3.1, the Mowich flows through the Snoqualmie National Forest where the river is The u upper Mowich comprised of more complex habitat. The gradient River (#1 (#1) decreases along this reach, resulting in a more poolpool he Mowich River converges with the Puyallup riffle character where smaller spawning substrate is River at RM 42.3, this is approximately 0.6 deposited and resting pools are available for upeposited u miles above the Electron diversion dam The stream migrants. The lower three mile of the river dam. glacial headwaters of the Mowich River originate flows within the Kapowsin tree farm owned by Hanfrom the Edmunds, and the North and South M Mocock (HanThe upper Mowich wich glaciers on the west slope of Mt. Rainier. Si Sigcock Timber River (#2) nificant tributaries to the Mowich include; Crater, Resource Spray, Meadow, and Rushingwater creeks. Meadow Group). reeks. originates from Eunice Lake, deep within Mt. ice Most of the Rainier National Park and enters the Mowich at lower three RM 3.9. The creek flows through a high gradient, miles of the frequently confined channel for most of its 4.6 mile channel belength. Meadow Creek has one significant tributary, comes conHayden Creek, at RM 2.5. However, the lower mile fined and wever, of the creek has a low to moderate gradient, with a narrowed by the steepening valley walls. Forturowed pool-riffle character, abundant spawning gravel, nately, much of the channel retains its complexity , LWD, and riparian cover along the entire channel. and spawning opportunities are abundant for both

MOWICH RIVER 10.0624

T

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 82

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

salmon and steelhead. Juvenile coho have been o observed as high as RM 5.0, whereas adult and juv juvenile bull trout have been documented as high as RM 7.5. Of special note is the first documented spaw spawning of naturally returning Chinook in the Mowich River in 97 years. Two females on separate redds were observed spawning in the lower reach (RM 1.0) on September 7, 2001. With the completion of the Electron fish ladder (RM 41.7) in the fall of 2000, anadromous fish pa passage was restored for the first time since 1904. Surplus Chinook and coho salmon from Voights Creek Hatchery were planted in the Mowich River, e and Rushingwater Creek for several years in efforts to jump start the Upper Puyallup. One of two a acclimation ponds used for reestablishing coho (up to 2008) into a 26+ mile reach of the Upper Puyallup River is located just off the main channel of R Rushingwater Creek at RM 0.6. The pond holds 14,000 cu. ft. of water with a flow rate of 1-3 cfs, in the past, 40,000 to 100,000+ coho yearlings were imprinted and released from Rushingwater annua annually. Coho yearlings originated from Voights Creek Hatchery where they were ek adipose clipped and coded wire tagged. Fish were released at 20 fish per pound, for a total biomass of 10,000 pounds. There is also a natural acclimation pond on the Mowich used for rearing Fall Ch Chinook, located at RM 0.1 (bottom photo). om The Puyallup Tribe’s restoration goal is to rebuild depressed Chinook stocks and remove them from ESA listing. Hi Historically, Fall Chinook have been reared since 1980 with a variety of stocks, goals, and objectives. Using acclimation ponds, limiting harvest, and making substantial gains in habitat restoration, the tribe will be able to acccomplish this task. Levee setPhoto #3 backs,

oxbow reconnections both inter tidal and upland, ons Commencement Bay cleanup, and harvest cutbacks have already been initiated. Only the jump-starting of Chinook in Lower Mowich River (#4) habitat areas devoid of fish is left. Acclimation id ponds are a proven method in increasing fish numnu bers on the spawning grounds. Hatchery rearing e rea 200,000 Fall Chinook for acclimation ponds in the upper Puyallup River is a key component to restoration goals.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 83

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

character. The creek contains excellent and frequent spawning gravel, as well as significant LWD and de, bris jams throughout the 2.2 mile anadromous reach. Niesson Creek is surveyed consistently for wild steelhead and spot checked for coho. Steelhead have coho been observed spawning as high as RM 2.2 near the abandoned 22 Rd. Naturally returning coho were w observed for the first time in 2002. The natural rer turns are a result of live adult plantings and juvenile acclimation projects conducted by the Puyallup Tribal Fisheries Department. Since 1998, the Puyallup Tribe has been transporting live surplus adult coho a from the WDFW’s Voights Creek Hatchery in OrtHat ing; however, no fish were planted in 2004 or 2007. Instead, naturally retuning adult coho were allowed to spawn without intrusion from hatchery planted coho. Adult surplus Fall Chinook have been planted in the past, when fish were available and creek flows allowed; unfortunately, the creek flow is often too , iesson Creek is a tributary to the Upper low to allow naturally returning Chinook access to Puyallup River. Originating from snowpack the creek in late summer and early fall. run-off and ground water, the creek runs , Like Kellog and Le Dout creeks, the mouth of c northerly for approximately 5.3 miles before mee meetNiesson Creek is located downstream of the Electron ing the Puyallup at RM 41.1. Anadromous usage diversion dam. Flows over the past century have . extents throughout the first 2.2 miles of the c creek; often been high enough during late winter and supporting Chinook (planted), coho, and steelhead. , spring to prevent the mainstem channel of the Beyond RM 2.2, creek climbs steeply along the r rePuyallup River from being drawn dry. The higher maining 3.1 miles to its origin at just over 4,000 winter/spring flows have allowed wild steelhead to g feet. Niesson Creek is located within the Kapowsin maintain a tree farm, owned and managed by Hancock (Hanfoothold in cock Timber Resource Group), who purchased the Niesson property in 2005. Creek. UnThe overstory riparian zone consists of mixed co con- fortunately, ifers and deciduous trees. Continuing timber ha harescapement vesting activities have in Niesson reduced the riparian has decreased zone to the state r resignificantly quired minimu along minimum over the past several extended se segseveral years. The winter steelhead stocks in the ments of the lower Puyallup basin have been declining since 1990. The creek. precipitous decline within the past several years has ecline Niesson is a comcreated serious concern among fisheries managers. plex, moderate sized Factor(s) responsible for the decline in steelhead stream, which varies escapement are unknown, especially when other esp between a pool-riffle salmon species are experiencing relatively good sucsu and forced pool pool-riffle cess.

NIESSON CREEK 10.0622

N

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 84

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1998Niesson Creek Surplus Adult Coho Plants (1998-2008)
900 ADULT COHO

800

754

700

NUMBER OF COHO PLANTED

600 497 500

500 376

300 205

200

150

335

400

100

0 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
YEAR PLANTED

(1995Niesson Creek Steelhead Redd Counts Seasonal Comparisons (1995-2009)
60 STEELHEAD REDDS 50 49 45 49

40
NUMBER OBSERVED

37

30

29 27 22 22

20

17 14

100

16

15

10

9

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
YEAR SURVEYED

extremely The 2008 redd data is incomplete due to extremely poor survey conditions which prevented a regular full season of surveys. PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 85

656 14

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

ducive to spawning due to a primarily sandy subpri strate; however, pools and side channels provide exever, cellent habitat for juvenile bull trout (lower left) tat which are often observed in the pools and lateral habitat during adult spawning surveys. In addition, this reach of the creek is highly subjected to the su possibility of redd scouring or heavy silt deposition due to the influence of the mainstem White River. fluence The next 0.12 miles flows through the edge of the .12 forested area along the White River channel. At ong this point the channel gradient increases slightly, as do the adult spawning opportunities. Although the substrate throughout this section is somewhat sandy, several pockets of suitable spawning gravel , exist. Stream complexity increases due to some small debris jams and limited LWD (top left). The surrounding riparian consists of primarily alder o with some small to moderate sized Douglas fir and cedar; even so, solar exposure is still high through , this portion of the creek. The final quarter mile of anadromous usage conco O Name is not the officially designated tains the best habitat. The channel contains several name for this stream, but it’s commonly res pieces of LWD and spawning gravels, in addition to ferred to as No Name Creek by PTF staff a heavy riparian zone consisting of fir and cedar. At (NPS designation W14-00a). No Name is a small approximately RM 0.71 the creek turns sharply and .71 south facing left bank headwater tributary of the rapidly climbs up the valley wall. At this point the wall White River; at nearly 3.5 miles in length only the ; length, stream quickly develops into a series of impassable first 0.7 miles offers exceptional habitat conditions xceptional cascades preventing any further upstream migramigr for bull trout (char) rearing and spawning No spawning. tion. Bull trout have been observed spawning in the spaw Name is surveyed for bull trout from late August creek from late August through September. September through early October; unfortunately, the creeks nfortunately, In 2006 and 2007, PTF biologist conducted exbiolo 3300’ elevation is likely too high for Chinook coho Chinook, tensive bull trout radio telemetry and redd surveys and pink salmon. No Name Creek, like Klickitat along the upper White River; focusing heavily on Creek, is pristine in many ways. Originating along ys. the slopes of the Sourdough Mountains near Sunrise the headwaters located within Mt. Rainier National Park. During Park, the creek flows entirely within Mt. Rainier Spawning bull trout the 2007 seaNational Park. No Name Creek enters the White River north of Sunrise Park Road at approximately son, several bull trout were RM 68.1. observed The first 0.34 miles of the creek is lo gradient low spawning in No and flows within the channel migration zone of the Name Creek White from early to River. The habi- late September. served tat within One of the bull trout observed spawning in the creek was part of the migration telemetry study. This tion this secbull trout had been implanted with radio a tag and planted tion is the least con- released near Greenwater (RM 45) in late June, and Juvenile bull trout was observed spawning in late September (right).

NO NAME CREEK 10.0364

N

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 86

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 No Name Creek Bull Trout Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
10 LIVE DEAD 9 REDDS

8

7
NUMBER OBSERVED

6

5

4

3

2

1

0 8/29/08 9/9/08 9/19/08
DATE SURVEYED

9/26/08

10/7/08

Raw spawning data for No Name Creek can be found in Appendix D. No Name Creek Bull Trout Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (2005-2008) (200520 LIVE 18 DEAD REDDS 16

14
NUMBER OBSERVED

13 12

12

11

10

9 8

8

6

5 4

4

2

1

1

0 2005 2006 2007
SEASON SURVEYED

2008

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 87

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 No Name Creek Water Temperature (August 28 – October 14)

Average: 6.36 Max: 9.2 Min: 2.7

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 88

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

debris (bottom left). The channel meanders through a forest of cedar, fir, alder and maple that is fairly dense along much of the lower reach (RM 6.5 to 8). Several side channels branch off along this reach, offering additional spawning and rearing habitat. High water events often reestablish some significantly long complex side chancha nels located above RM 0.4. These side channels are often utilized by coho. Cattle occasionally have access to the creek, but they have had minor impact. The upper reaches of Ohop Creek extend well ex into the Kapowsin tree farm owned by Hancock (Hancock Timber Resource Group), who purchased the property in 2005. Logging roads and timber ogging hop Creek is the main feeder st stream to Lake harvesting have impacted several portions of the Kapowsin; not to be mistaken for the Oh ot Ohop stream including; sedimentary inputs, windthrow, cluding; Creek which is a tributary to the Nis Nisqually. increased solar exposure, as well as confinement Ohop Creek is considered a continuation of Kapow- and constriction of the stream channel. channel sin Creek; therefore, it shares the same WRIA d deCoho are the only species surveyed for on a conco signation (10.0600). Continuing for nearly 8.5 miles sistent basis. Adult coho escapement has dropped oho beyond Lake Kapowsin, the creek currently su supprecipitously in Ohop Creek; as well as Kapowsin ports primarily coho (top left photo). In addition to Creek over the last several years despite the 5 year coho, the creek likely continues to support a limited coho net-pen project employed in Lake Kapowsin by pen number of steelhead as well. the Puyallup Tribe during the 90’s, in addition to allup The lower 0.2 miles of Ohop Creek flows through the surplus adult plants from Voights Creek. Steela narrow and incised wetland boundary at the south head surveys have been reduced to periodic spot educed end of Lake Kapowsin. This initial stretch is nonchecks during the spring since none have been obo conductive to spawning and is heavily vegetated served for several years. However, it’s likely that a (mostly reed canary grass [Phalaris arundinacea , ris arundinacea]) small number of steelhead may continue to spawn and is commonly the site of recurrent beaver (Casin the creek above the survey area since they are tor canadensis) activity. From RM 6.5 to RM 7.0, observed consistently in Kapowsin Creek. Kapows the creek assumes a low gradient pool pool-riffle strucThe winter steelhead stocks in the Puyallup bab ture containture; sin have been declining since 1990. The precipitous ing excellent decline within just the past few years has created spawning gr gra- serious concern among fisheries managers. FacFa vel, as well as tor(s) responsible for the decline in steelhead esseveral deep capement are unknown, especially when other salsa pools and mon species are experiencing relatively good sucsu moderate cess. Although documented in Kapowsin Creek, amounts of in Chinook, chum and pink salmon have not been obino stream woody served in Ohop.

OHOP CREEK 10.0600

O

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 89

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1995Ohop Creek Coho Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1995-2008)
600 537 LIVE DEAD

500

400
NUMBER OBSERVED

488

300

200 141 71 100 76 100

295

314

54

39

34

39

61

25

27 32

31

13

4

6

4

4

15

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
YEAR SURVEYED

An additional 492 adult surplus coho from Voights Creek hatchery were planted in the North Fork of Ohop (approximately 3 miles

upstream of survey area) in 2002 and 399 surplus adults were planted in 2008.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

2

18 24 Page 90

19

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

downtown Auburn. The blockage forced the river to avulse and find a new channel. This newly created diversion sent nearly the entire White River flow down through the Stuck River channel into the Puyallup; more than doubling the size of the PuyalPuya lup River drainage. In 1915, a concrete structure was constructed, thereby permanently diverting the White River into the Puyallup. yallup. The Puyallup River continues to flow west from its confluence with the White until it reaches ComCo mencement Bay in Tacoma. An extensive system of levees, approximately 90 miles, was constructed along the Puyallup, White and Carbon rivers beginning in the early through mid 20th century. There are a significant number of large tributaries that feed these mainstem rivers including the ClearwaClearw ter River, Greenwater River, Mowich River, as well as Huckleberry and South Prairie creeks. c In addition to the White River, the Carbon River is Wahe Puyallup Watershed is identified as W also key tributary of the Puyallup River, entering ter Resource Inventory Area 10 (WRIA 10) the Puyallup at RM 17.9; just north of the city of by the Washington State Department of partment Orting. The Carbon River and its associated tributrib Ecology. The Puyallup River Watershed provides taries provide excellent spawning and rearing opo over 1,300 linear river miles (RM) of drainage over portunities for salmon, steelhead, and bull trout. In an area greater than 1,000 square miles. The three the past, steelhead have been documented as high major river drainages include the Puyallup, White, he as the Mt. Rainier National Park boundary. HowHo and Carbon rivers which flow almost entirely within ever, the majority of spawning for all species within ivers Pierce County and part of South King County. All this drainage, with the exception of bull trout, oco three river systems originate from glaciers along the curs in South Prairie Creek and the lower 11 miles om airie north and west slopes of Mt. Rainier, located entir entire- of the mainstem Carbon. ly within Mt. Rainier National Park. The Carbon The mean annual flow of the Puyallup River over and White rivers converge with the Puyallup River the first 86 year gauged history was 2,922 cfs. The at RM 17.8 and RM 10.4 respectively. largest flood of record was 57,000 cfs and occurred The White River is a significant tributa tributary, with in December 1933. The majority of the large flood he a drainage area nearly twice that of the Puyallup events have occurred in the months of November River. However, the White and Puyallup drainages and December in response to heavy rains on a subsu are often viewed and managed as two distinct and stantial snow pack. The minimum low flow defined separate entities. This management approach is as the 90%-exceedance level for the Puyallup was exceedance due in part because prior to 1906, the White River 1,156 cfs. Over the past two decades there has been did not flow into the Puyallup. Salo and Jagielo a trend of decreasing low flows (Sumioka 2004). (1983) described that prior to 1906; the majority of The Puyallup River at Puyallup flow gage the White River flowed north towards Elliot Bay. (#12101500) was activated in 1915 and is located at Yet, some of the water from the White often flowed RM 6.6. south to the Puyallup through the Stuck River The systems glacial origin is responsible for the channel. In November of 1906, a flood event mob el. mobiturbid conditions that are most noticeable during duri lized a tremendous amount of wood debris that warmer weather in late spring and summer. The blocked the north flowing channel in what is now White, Carbon, and Puyallup rivers carry a trer

PUYALLUP 10.0021 RIVER 10.0021

T

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 91

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

mendous volume of bed load material which contr contributes to the dynamic nature of the system. The high sediment loads are responsible for the braided channel morphology characteristic of broad valley hology segments. This condition is most prevalent in the upper reaches within and immediately outside the National Park boundaries. Outside the Park boundaries, the rivers course through industrial forestlands including national forest but primarily private timber company owne ownership. Much of these forestlands have been ha harvested at least once and in many cases twice. Lands in timber production are densely roaded with some sections approaching six lineal miles p square per mile. Roads have contributed to many of their trademark problems such as landslides, slope fai failures, altered hydrology, culvert and bridge projects that can effect upstream migration, and of course high levels if sedimentation within effected dr drainages. The lowest section of the Puyallup River, from the confluence with the White River at RM 10.4 to Commencement Bay is confined by levees and the habitat lacks complexity (lower left). The small amount of suitable gravel present is often co compacted and offers little spawning opportunity. Steelhead have been observed spawning just u upstream from the White River confluence; the lowest documented spawning of any spe species in the river. In the fall of 2008, the Puyallup Tribe completed construction of one of its most pr prevalent w watershed re restoration projects to The lower Puyallup River (@ I-5) date. The Sha Dadx (Frank Albert Road) wetland restoration project, located on the lower Puyallup River, crea wer created an accessible 12-acre off-channel wetland habitat for channel salmonids and other freshwater resident fish. The project was instrumental in reestablishing an old strumental disconnected oxbow and low lying wetland to the

mainstem river. The reclaimed habitat was lost during the construction of the lower river levee system in the early 1900’s. In response to the loss of nearly an entire estuarine ecosystem that once existed, the creation of this critical and necessary lower river environment will provide overwintering, as well as foraging opportuniopportun ties for young juvenile salmon. In addition, this haadd bitat will offer the benefits that the estuaries once es provided to out migrating (smolting) salmon during the transition from fresh water to salt water. The Puyallup continues to be tightly confined by inues levees on both sides with the expected lack of chancha nel complexity (top right). These levee constraints continue from the White River confluence to approxrom imately RM 25, just south of the town of Orting. This reach is similar to the lower Puyallup, but does Puyallup support sporadic spawning by chum, Chinook and steelhead during their respective seasons. Along heir Orville Rd., upstream of Orting, a levee setback project was completed in the summer of 1999. ApA proximately 2 miles of new levee was built back from the original levee adding over a hundred acres to the floodplain in this reach. Several high water events later, many side channels have formed and spawning gravel has been retained but only adult chum use has been documented. In late 2006, a documented 6000 foot levee set-back (below) was completed
City of Orting

Levee set-back

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 92

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

up upstream of the Ca Calistoga Brid in the ridge town of Or Orting. This new set setback added over 55 acres to the floodplain within this reach. From RM 25.5 to 30.8 the channel is only partia partially contained by levees and there are several access accessible side channels. There is little spawning activity within this reach due to the higher gradient and r resulting increase in average substrate size. Upstream from Puget Sound Energy’s Electron powe powerhouse at RM 30.8 (top left) the river flows through a deep, narrow canyon

Diversion Dam, headworks, and fish ladder on the Upper Puyallup River.

ing in the Puyallup River occur within this reach. lup With the completion of the Electron fish ladder (RM 41.7-top right) in the fall of 2000, anadromous fish passage was restored for the first time since 1904. There are approximately 26+ miles of usable habitat above the diversion and surveys are conducted occaocc sionally in response to the Puyallup Tribes live sursu plus hauls each fall. he The Mowich River converges with the Puyallup River at RM 42.3; this is approximately 0.5 miles dam (center left pho- above the Electron diversion dam. The glacial center headwaters of the Mowich River originate from the to). There are glac many small ve ver- Edmunds, and the North and South Mowich glaciers on the west slope of Mt. Rainier. Significant tritr tical drops and butaries to the Mowich include; Crater, Spray, bedrock ca casMeadow and Rushingwater creeks. Species docuc cades within mented utilizing this basin include Chinook, coho, this 6 mile ca can, trout yon, all of which steelhead/rainbow trout, cutthroat trout, and bull trout. are passable to salmon and Puyallup River Gorge steelhead. There are frequent spawning opportunities in the tail-outs of the many deep pools located within this outs upper river reach. From the top of the canyon to canyon, the diversion dam at RM 41.7, the river is moderat moderately confined and provides several high quality spawning oppo opportunities (lower left). The highest densities of steelhead spaw spawnPUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 93

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(2004North Fork Puyallup River Surplus Adult Chinook and Coho Plants (2004-2008)
1,400 CHINOOK 1,200 1,112 COHO

1,000
NUMBER OF FISH PLANTED

800 618 502 600 529 200 0 2004 2005 2006
YEAR PLANTED

12

240

2007

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

310 2008

400

382

930

Page 94

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP RIVER JUVENILE
SALMONID PRODUCTION ASSESSMENT PROJECT 2007
Written by:

Andrew Berger & Justin Paul

T

he Puyallup River Juvenile Salmonid Production Assessment Project began in 2000. The Puyallup Tribal Fisheries Department he started the project to estimate juvenile production of native salmonids, with an emphasis on natural Fall Chinook salmon production and survival of hatchery and acclimation pond Chinook. Since 2000, an E. G. . Solutions’ 5-ft diameter rotary screw trap located on ft the lower Puyallup at RM 10.6, just upstream of the confluence with the White River, has been used to estimate juvenile production. As more data becomes available, juvenile produ production estimates may provide baseline information a allowing managers to meet escapement objectives in the watershed create a production potential potential-based management strategy and accurately forecast future returns of hatchery and naturally produce adults. produced In addition, a basin spawner/recruit analysis will indicate stock productivity, helping to determine the overall health of the watershed and evaluate the contribution of enhancement projects. Trapping Gear and Operations

The rotary screw-trap used in this study consists of sed a rotary cone suspended within a steel structure on top of twin, 30-foot pontoons. The opening of the foot rotary cone is 5 feet in diameter, allowing for a sampling depth of 2.5 feet. The cone and livebox asa sembly are attached to a steel frame and may be raised or lowered by hand winches located at the front and rear of the assembly. Two five-ton bow-mounted anchor winches with mounted 3/8’’ steel cables were used to secure and adjust the direction of the trap and keep it in the thalweg. The th cables were secured to trees on opposite banks. An additional rear cable was secured to a tree on the right bank along with an aluminum “stiff-arm” to “stiff further stabilize the trap. Four 55-gallon containers 55 filled with water were secured on the deck at the rear of the trap to compensate for the generation of force at the front of the trap during operation. The 5-ft diameter rotary screw trap was installed ft in the lower Puyallup River (RM 10.6) just above ( the confluence with the White River. Trap operaoper th and continued 24 hours tion began on February 24 a day, seven days a week until August 8th. The trap was checked for fish twice a day at dawn and dusk. In some instances, the trap was checked plus or mich nus two hours of dusk or dawn due to the availabiliavailabil ty of personnel. During hatchery releases and high flow events, personnel remained onsite through the night to clear the trap of debris and to keep fish from overcrowding. Revolutions per minute (rpm), water temperaons temper ture, secchi depth (cm), turbidity (NTU), weather cm), conditions, and stream flow (cfs) were described for each completed trap check. A cross sectional area of the river at the smolt trap was taken to monitor channel morphology at the site. gy Goals and Objectives The goal of this project is to report production estiest mates, characterize juvenile migration timing, ded scribe length distribution for all wild salmonid, outout migrants and fulfill the objectives of the Puyallup River Fall Chinook recovery plan. To reach these goals, this study will produce populapopul tion estimates of out-migrating smolts, estimate migrating species specific migration timing, compare natural versus hatchery production and run timing, analyze
Page 95

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

mean fork length of wild smolts and detail species Puyallup Tribal Fisheries Department, or download composition of the sample population. The objectives it at www.scribd.com. of this project are to: Summary of 2008 Results 1. Estimate juvenile production for salmonids * For the 2008 migration season production estiin the Puyallup River and determine freshmates were completed for Chinook, coho, and chum water survival for unmarked juvenile Chimigrants. nook. 2. Estimate in-river mortality of hatchery and acclimation pond Chinook. Investigate physical factors such as, light (day vs. night), flow and turbidity and their importance to trap efficiency.

* Natural Chinook production was estimated at
89,536 unmarked migrants. Out-migrates were captured between January 31st and August 9th.

3.

* Chum production was estimated at 593,973 migrants passing the trap in 2008 from a catch of 13,305 chum fry.

In this report for the 2008 smolt out-migration season all stated objectives will be met for Chinook * A total of 1,321 unmarked coho smolts were capsalmon. Non-target species such as coho, pink, chum tured in the screw trap between January 31st and and steelhead will be addressed to a lesser extent. June 20th. The production estimate for wild unmarked coho for the 2008 smolt trap season was Sampling Procedures 83,608. Smolts were anesthetized with MS-222 (tricaine methanesulfonate) for handling purposes and sub* A total of 251,373 pink smolts were captured in sequently placed in a recovery bin of river water bethe screw trap between January 31st and May29th. fore release back to the river. Juveniles were identi- The production estimate for pink migrants for the fied as natural or hatchery origin as unmarked or 2008 smolt trap season was 14,936,007. marked respectively. Fork length (mm) was measured and recorded for unmarked fish. When possible, 50 chum, 50 pinks, 50 age1+ coho, 25 age 0+ co- * A total of 189 unmarked steelhead were caught in the smolt trap in 2008. No production estimates ho, 25 age 0+ Chinook, and 25 steelhead were measured per day. Scale samples were additionally were completed for steelhead migrants. taken on all wild steelhead smolts. Species were separated by size/age class. Coho were identified as fry, age 0+ (<70mm) or smolts, age 1+ (>70mm). Chinook smolts were separated by age 0+ (<150mm) or age 1+ (>150mm). All chum and pinks were identified as age 0+. Trout fry age 0+ (<60mm) were not differentiated to species. Hatchery origin fish were identified in three ways: 1) by visual inspection for adipose fin clips, 2) with a Northwest Marine Technology “wand” detector used for coded wire tag detection, and 3) with a Destron Fearing Portable Transceiver system for Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish. To request a full copy of the 2008 report, contact the
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 96

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

RODY CREEK 10.0028

R

Creek Creek, ody Creek, a tributary to Clarks Creek is part of the lower Puyallup River drainage system. Rody is approximately 1.6 miles in length; however, only the lower 0.6 miles is access accessible to adult spawners. Rody Creek can be located just northeast of downtown Puyallup where the creek passes under Pioneer Way E. through a unan dersized, yet generally fish passable culvert at RM 0.5. Rody has numerous deficits including but not including, limited to; a confined and straightened channel, intermittent or complete fish barriers, no off off-channel habitat, flooding and channel erosion, absent or d deficient riparian cover, and the infestation of reed , canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea). Rody Creek does however offer some suitable habitat for coho and chum spawners, as well as overwintering juvenile coho. Adult fluvial bull trout a are known to forage in the smaller tributaries of the lower Puyallup; yet bull trout utilization in Rody is currently u unknown Insuffiknown. cient flows prevent Chinook from acnook cessing the creek in late summer. Approximately 300-400 feet of 400

anadromous usage is available above the culvert under Pioneer Way; however, a 3 foot high stone hig barrier prevents fish passage above this point (botsh tom left). Above the stone barrier, additional habihab tat is available and could be utilized if the blockage were removed. During the 2006 spawning season, ing significant numbers of chum were observed spawning in the reach upstream of Pioneer Way E. In stream sharp contrast to the reach below Pioneer Way E., E the upper reach of the creek has the only intact riparian zone which consists largely of alder. Downstream, from Pioneer Way E. to the mouth, Rody flows through a channel that is best described as an incised and straightened drainage ditch (top d left & right). The habitat throughout most of the lower half mile reach of Rody Creek is remarkably poor; much of the accessible channel has no suitable spawning gravel, and the riparian consist more or less entirely of blackberry, turf grass, and reed cac nary grass. The reed canary grass, as well as wa. grass tercress, can be overwhelming during some seasons; often choking extended lengths of the channel and trapping or preventing fish from migrating through. rapping In addition, the grass traps and holds large amounts of fine materials, consequently covering the spawning substrate. The channel generally becomes surveyable after the first freshet of the season. However, chum salmon are regularly observed spawning in the stream when the channel clears. Several chum spawn each season in a section of available habitat just below Pioneer. An extremely high water event in the January of 2006 redistributed a large quantiredistr ty of gravel throughout the channel for approxy appro imately 300 feet below Pioneer Way. A half mile Way downstream of culver passage under Pioneer, Rody u th and dumps into Clarks Creek passes under 66 Creek, a tributary of the Puyallup River. A future Puya restoration project is currently being engineered (Pierce County) for the section of creek running from just above, to just below Pioneer. Construction Pi is scheduled to begin in 2010.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 97

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Rody Creek Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
10 LIVE DEAD

9

8

7
NUMBER OBSERVED

6

5

4

3

2

1

0 11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08
DATE SURVEYED

12/22/08

12/31/08

1/15/09

Rody Creek Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1999-2008) (1999500 450 400 350
NUMBER OBSERVED

441

LIVE DEAD

326

300 250 200 155 150 100 50 4 0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

73

81

94

39 8

31 32

43 20 19 27 1 14

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 98

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1999-2007), 40,000 to 100,000+ coho yearlings were yearl imprinted and released from Rushingwater annualm annua ly. Coho yearlings originated from Voights Creek d Hatchery where coho were adipose clipped and e clippe coded wire tagged. Fish were released at 20 fish per re pound, for a total biomass of 10,000 pounds. In ada dition to the acclimation of juvenile coho and Chinook, adult surplus coho and Chinook from Voights , Creek Hatchery have been planted in Rushingwater tchery Ru (1997-2008). However, no adult fish were planted in 2004. Instead, the first naturally retuning adult . coho were allowed to spawn without intrusion from hatchery planted coho. Future live plants may be reduced or eliminated based on the number of natunat rally returning spawners. Dividing this stream into four reaches, the lowest reach covers the first mile of the creek. This initial creek reach consists of a complex riffle-pool system (top rif left) with considerably large substrate; consisting of large gravel, cobble and boulders. Several ushingwater Creek originates from the Upwindblown trees, the result of poor RMZ manage, manag per and Lower Golden Lakes located in Mt. ment, span the channel the length of this stretch. stretch Rainier National Park. Rushingwater flows Abundant in-stream woody debris and a moderate stream over 5 miles from the lower lake to its confluence to dense canopy cover extend through most of this with the Mowich River at RM 0.6. Approx Approximately reach. Beaver (Castor canadensis) activity is frethe first 2 miles of the creek are anadromous. quent throughout the upper portion. Beyond this, Downstream of the NPS boundary the creek flows 1 through the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest in reach 2, the creek climbs nearly 1,000 feet over the next 2 miles. An impassable cascade is located . before reaching private timber property The lower property. within this reach preventing any further upstream ting reach of Rushingwater flows within the Kapowsin migration. tree farm owned and managed by Hancock (HanThe 3rd cock Timber Resource Group), who purchased the reach harbors property in 2005. Logging roads and timber harogging vesting have impacted sections of the stream specif- significantly stream, ically windthrow located along the lower reach. R Ru- different habitat. For shingwater supports adult and juvenile Chinook r roughly the (planted) and coho (planted and NOR). Steelhead next mile the and bull trout utilization is unknown. However, creek asbull trout utilization is assumed, to some degree, , sumes a plasince they are well documented in the Mowich. Surveys for steelhead conducted in 2009 did not r re- cid flow and contains excellent spawning habitat, as well as considerable amounts of beaver activity and s veal any spawning activity. LWD structures (lower right). This reach is one of One of two acclimation ponds used for reestabthe sites where adult surplus coho were planted tes lishing coho, and occasionally Chinook (spring & (1997-2008). The final reach of Rushingwater once fall), into a 30-mile reach of the Upper Puyallup mile again climbs swiftly (2,000 feet) over the next 1.6 River is located just off the main channel of R Rushingwater at RM 0.6. The pond holds 14,000 cu. ft. miles to the outlet of Golden Lake at 4,500 feet. of water with a flow rate of 1-3 cfs; in past years

RUSHINGWATER CREEK 10.0625

R

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 99

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1997Rushingwater Creek Surplus Adult Coho Plants (1997-2008)
800 745 700 ADULT COHO

549

NUMBER OF FISH PLANTED

500

339

400

548

600

251

200 100

100

0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
YEAR PLANTED

Rushingwater Creek Juvenile Coho and Chinook Acclimation Pond Plants (1998-2009) (1998180,000 149,970 COHO FALL CHINOOK SPRING CHINOOK 140,000 104,500 133,486 2009 Page 100

160,000

225

NUMBER OF CHINOOK PLANTED

101,400

120,000

100,350

100,450

100,000

40,000

20,000

0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
YEAR PLANTED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

38,093

39,935

60,000

55,053

60,100

80,000

84,000

230

250

300

265

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

adequate sized spawning gravel, principally throughout the lower section of the creek, are available. Most of the spawning habitat within the creek, although quite limited, exists in the lower 0.5 miles of the creek. It’s likely that a great deal of the gravel present throughout the lower reach is recruited from Salmon Tributary. Fish do ascend a above the first half mile despite the fact that spawnpite ing opportunities are few and the habitat is considerably poorer in quality. In response to the limited spawning habitat available, several of the salmon , observed in Salmon Creek are likely to be ascending to the spring fed tributary, Salmon Tributary, which ry, enters Salmon Creek at RM 0.5 on the right bank. The consistent flow into Salmon Creek from this perennial tributary contributes greatly to the accessibility of Chinook during the late summer and early fall when instream flows in many streams are too low for Chinook to enter. Salmon Creek supports adult Chinook, pink, coCreek, almon Creek, also known as Strawberry ho, and chum spawners; with chum being the most Creek, flows just north of downtown Sumner. abundant species present. Coho are observed ies The creek channel is narrow and incised (top spawning; however, their numbers continue to be photo), especially along the lower 0.5 miles. Most of low. Steelhead and bull trout utilization is unu the creek flows through moderately developed pr priknown. Prior to 2005, Salmon Creek was not reguvate and commercial properties before entering the larly surveyed for Chinook since they were seldom White River at RM 2.1. In 2004, the City of Sumner observed. However, throughout the previous 10 completed a large wetland restoration project adj adjayears, a few chinook carcasses were observed within cent to the lower reach of Salmon Creek (RM 0.4). the lower 300 feet of the creek while conducting coThe 11 acre site was the result of a mitigation se setho surveys. Chinook surveys conducted since 2005 tlement with Davis Properties and Fred Myers. have documented spawning throughout the lower lowe Several of the limiting factors impacting fish imiting 0.5 miles of the production in Salmon Creek include; a con tion confined and creek. straightened stream channel, disconnected floo floodA new culplain, channel erosion, absent or deficient riparian vert was incover, as well as low summer and fall seasonal stalled near the flows. High sediment inputs, industrial discharge igh discharge, mouth of Saland lack of channel habitat are additional limiting mon Creek durfactors. ing the summer The riparian along portions of the creek consist ortions of 2007 (lower of sparse stands of alder, fir and maple. Unforturight photo). The culvert was installed to facilitate nately, large sections of the stream riparian consist the construction of an access road across the of nothing other than blackberry, turf grass, and stream channel in order to reach a future indusindu reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) which Phalaris trial warehouse development on the north side of provide little or nothing in the way of shade or LWD the creek. During the fall of 2008, the two lower inputs. The substrate is largely fine sediment, clay, undersized cement culverts that had long been rer and undersized gravel; however, limited patches o of sponsible for fish passage issues were removed.

SALMON CREEK 10.0035

S

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 101

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Salmon Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
LIVE 14 DEAD REDDS 12

10
NUMBER OBSERVED

8

6

4

2

0 9/11/08 9/19/08 9/29/08
DATE SURVEYED

10/8/08

10/17/08

Salmon Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (2005-2008) (200535 LIVE DEAD 30 REDDS

25
NUMBER OBSERVED

21 20 20 20

15 11

13 10

13

13

10 7 5 5 4 3

0 2005 2006
SEASON SURVEYED

2007

2008

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 102

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1998Salmon Creek Coho Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1998-2008)
30 27 LIVE DEAD

25

20
NUMBER OBSERVED

15

11 10 9

6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2 2 2 2 4

6

2007

2008

SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 103

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Salmon Creek Chum Salmon Spawning Cround Counts and Run Timing
20 LIVE DEAD

18

16

14
NUMBER OBSERVED

12

10

8

6

4

2

0 11/5/08 11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08 12/22/08 1/6/09 1/13/09 1/22/09 2/2/09
DATE SURVEYED

(1991Salmon Creek Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1991-2008)
160 138 LIVE 129 DEAD

140

NUMBER OBSERVED

93

100

70

80

78

82

109

120

61

51

60

49

57

68 47 48

44

31

40 20

44

29

45 20 2007 10 2008 Page 104 29

25

27

28

23

18

17

12

2

0 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

1 2

13

20

14

19

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

culverts located on Salmon Creek have been responsible for periodically preventing adult salmon, 10.0036 primarily chum, from accessing Salmon Tributary. The upper culvert on Salmon Creek often created a sigvert si nificant fish passage problem until late 2007, when bank erosion permitted the creek to breech the culvert. During the fall of 2008, the two lower undersized cement culverts that had long been responsiverts ble for fish passage issues were removed. r Beyond RM 0.13, the gradient increases substansubsta tially and the channel narrows. The increase in gradient and flow is by and large an obstacle to chum, which are the most abundant species to spawn in the creek. Salmon Tributary regularly supports a large run of chum salmon for a stream of ge almon Tributary is a short run, spring spring-fed its size. Unfortunately, the densities of adults dur, o stream entering Salmon Creek (Strawberry ing some seasons has been too high, and redd supesup Creek) at RM 0.5. Salmon Tributary has a aprimposition was recurrent; especially during and proximately 0.13 miles (700 feet) of highly produ producfollowing the peak spawning period. Pre-spawning Pre tive spawning habitat. The lower anadromous predation mortalities of chum is common during ties reach consists of a low to moderate gradient channel most seasons; however, when high spawning densiwith excellent spawning gavel available throughout ties are observed, pre-spawned mortalities due to spawned its length (lower left & upper right photos . Alphotos) predation increases (lower right). Chum fry will though the creek lacks significant structure, it spend some degree of time rearing in the creek. The manages quit well to supports adult chum and coho process of smoltifispawners, as well as providing limited overwintercation occurs ing opportunities for juvenile coho and Chinook. quickly and the Beyond the anadromous reach the creek climbs chum will migrate quickly to a point where impassable cascades pretowards marine vent any further upstream migration. The riparian waters shortly afalong the lower reach of the creek consists largely of ter emerging from alder, as well as a few conifers and holly A few holly. the gravel. pieces of small in-stream woody debris are present; stream Coho are often however, LWD recruitment is limited and underobserved in the fall spawning in the lower 250 feet sized The ripasized. of the creek. Flows in Salmon Tributary are too low . rian zone along to provide Chinook or steelhead access to spawn, yet head the upper non nonChinook have been observed spawning in Salmon served anadromous Creek at the mouth of Salmon Tributary. Small, reach is well i inlow gradient pools at the mouth provide excellent ex tact. act. habitat for young Chinook and coho; newly emerged n In the past, coho fry are regularly observed in late January durserved two perched ing the later part of chum surveys.

SALMON TRIBUTARY

S

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 105

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Salmon Tributary Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
80 LIVE DEAD

70

60

NUMBER OBSERVED

50 Significant numbers of preprespawned mortalities due to predation were observed.

40

30

20

10

0 11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08 12/22/08
DATE SURVEYED

1/6/09

1/13/09

1/22/09

2/2/09

(1993Salmon Tributary Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1993-2008)
600 LIVE 456 500 481 DEAD

363

400
NUMBER OBSERVED

346

255

300

200 142 130

89

242

275

75

50

70

100

0 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

4

48

Page 106

76

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Analogous to many headwater tributaries within the park, the lower 300-400 feet of the creek is comprised of a narrow, low gradient channel flowing fl within the open channel migration zone of the White River floodplain. There is no significant LWD present in this portion of the channel. Altion channel though spawning does occur within this small stretch, it is acutely limited due the lack of quality spawning substrate created by the fine alluvial deed d posits from the White River, and is repeatedly manipulated and affected by mainstem river incurffected mainste sions. Beyond the open floodplain, Shaw Creek enters lain, the heavily forested lower slope of the valley floor as it parallels the White River. From this point, the . thi creek assumes a pool-riffle configuration for approxriffle appro imately the next 1.05 miles (top left). Unfortunately, only about half of this reach provides quality spawning and rearing opportunities. Frequently, ing during periods of lower flows, the creek water goes subsurface approximately 0.5 miles after entering haw Creek is a small right bank headwater the forested area; creating a provisional yet signifiting tributary of the White River. This high cant barrier. Furthermore, if flows are low enough, mountain drainage is a north facing stream additional barriers are created throughout the wetwe flowing through the Shaw Creek Valley, between ted channel by small jumps in channel height due to Tamanos Mountain (native Chinook jargon meaning bedload build-up behind LWD embedded in the up “Spirit”) to the west and Governors Ridge to the channel. Fortunately, this wetted channel section east. Located entirely within Mt. Rainier National irely provides excellent habitat for rearing; as well as Park, the creek is nonglacial in origin; rather, its spawning when flows are sufficient. Spawning grasufficient source comes from the Owyhigh Lakes located at s vel is abundant; as are significant logjams and innearly 5,200’. Shaw Creek flows for approximately channel LWD. In addition, numerous deep pools n 3.5 miles from Owyhigh Lakes plateau before enterand side channels provide excellent habitat for juj ing the White River at approximately RM 68.8; j ximately just venile and adult fish utilizing this creek. creek upstream of Klickitat Creek. The seasonally dry channel reach continues Shaw provides exceptional habitat conditions for itat beyond the Sunrise Road Bridge located at approxridge, bull trout rearing and spawning. PTF surveys the imately RM 1.1. Beyond the bridge crossing, the creek for bull trout from late August through early gradient begins to increase significantly as the significantl October. During the 2008 season, bull t trout were stream channel begins to climb up the valley wall observed spawning during September. Although tember. toward the high lakes. At this point, a series of imbull trout spawning is consistent in this tri ull tributary, it passable cascades marks the permanent upper exe does not experience the spawning frequency similar tent of anadromy. The stream continues to course to that observed in Klickitat or No Name c served creeks. its way through the steep Shaw Creek Valley until With the exception of steelhead, the creeks 3400’+ ith reaching the Owyhigh Lakes plateau. Several small elevation at the mouth is likely too high for most kely unnamed tributaries contribute additional flow to ries salmon. In the fall of 2007, PTF biologists observed Shaw along this upper reach; unfortunately, they do reach pink salmon in Sunrise Creek which is located i innot add any beneficial spawning or rearing habitat side the National Park and approximately 5.8 miles given that they are located well above the anadromanadro downstream of Shaw Creek. ous barriers.

SHAW 10.0365 CREEK 10.0365

S

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 107

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

some low energy pocket areas provide what little gy pr spawning habitat is available along the lower creek. tat Incredibly, the few spawning habitat areas availahab ble are utilized each season by bull trout. In 2007, lized the South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement E Group (SPSSEG), with funding from the USFWS and the USFS, completed the removal of an old diversion dam suspected of causing a barrier to mim grating salmon and bull trout. The removal of this aged structure has enhanced access to available spawning habitat upstream. ing Bull trout, which are often observed spawning in rout, spawn Silver Springs, were not surveyed for in Silver Creek prior to 2006. However, in 2006 and 2007, a o bull trout migration and spawning ground telemetry study was conducted by PTF on the White River. In support of the project, several bull trout captured in the USACE Buckley trap were implanted with radio transmitters. The radio tagged fish were then th tracked over the next 6 months from their release ilver Creek is a right bank headwaters tribusite at RM 45 near the community of Greenwater, to tary of the White River located at RM 60.5, several spawning sites located in the upper White cated just outside of the northern boundary of Mt. orthern River including Silver Creek. A tagged bull trout Rainier National Park. Silver Creek originates during the 2006 study was observed holding in SilSi along the Crystal Mountain Ridge within the W idge Wever Creek prior to spawning at a site approximately natchee National Forest, and flows for over 7 miles chee 200 feet upstream from the mouth (1 redd observed through steep mountainous terrain, dropping nearly in 2006). In addition to 2006, bull trout spawning 3,000 feet from its source until reaching its confluactivity was documented along the lower 200 feet of ence with the White River immediately West of the creek in 2007 (2 redds observed) and 2008. observed Highway 410. Silver Creek has one major tributary; Although entirely feasible, steelhead utilization feasible 4.4 mile Goat Creek (10.0314), which en enters on the is currently unknown since no surveys have been sur right bank of Silver Creek 0.2 miles up from its eek conducted to determine usage. However, coho, Chiusage mouth (lower left photo). Upstream of Goat Creek pstream nook, pink and sockeye are frequently observed in , observe there are numerous smaller unnamed tributaries nearby Silver Springs; yet, with the exception of an , contributing flow to Silver Creek as well. occasional coho, PTF biologist have not observed The surrounding riparian zone consists of some any other salmon species spawning in Silver Creek. old growth conifers, and a mixture of younger co conInterestingly, Silver Creek is also the final restiferous and deciduous trees. The in-stream habitat stream ing place of Henry C. Allen throughout the lower 0.5 miles of Silver Creek co con(lower right), a civil war vetsists of mostly eran, and Purple Heart recimoderate to high pient who fought with the gradient ca cas16th Wisconsin Infantry, cades with sha shalthen relocated to the region low and mo modafter the war. He was found erately deep frozen in the winter of 1898 scour pools. The near his trap lines and was scour pools and buried on site.

SILVER CREEK 10.0313

S

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 108

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Silver Creek Bull Trout Spawning Ground Counts
10 LIVE DEAD 9 REDDS

8

7
NUMBER OBSERVED

6

5

4

3

2

1

0 8/29/08 9/10/08 9/18/08
DATE SURVEYED

9/25/08

10/2/08

Raw spawning data for Silver Creek can be found in Appendix D.

Water 2008 Silver Creek Water Temperature (August29 -October 11)

Average: 7.1 Max: 9.04 Min: 3.67

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 109

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

White during high-water and flood events. In addition, the mouth of Silver Creek has frequently been ver relocated a couple of hundred feet due to mainstem river incursions. Silver Springs is principally a coho stream; however, several species including Spring Chinook, sockeye, pink salmon, and bull trout have been dod cumented spawning in the creek at some period over ing the past several seasons. Although steelhead are present in the upper watershed, their utilization of er Silver Springs is unknown. With the exception of coho, the other species documented in the creek have not been observed spawning on consistent annual basis. A small number of Chinook were observed spawning during the 2001, 2006 and 2007 seasons. Pink salmon were observed spawning in the creek in 2003, 2005, and 2007; as well as a a couple of sockeye in 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2007. 2004 Adult salmon spawning in Silver Springs Creek fed headwater were previously captured at the USACE fish trap in ilver Springs is a short, spring-fed headwa f tributary to the White River (RM 60.5). With Buckley, and transported above Mud Mountain its clear and consistent flow, this cool spring , dam. Since precise escapement numbers are offers excellent spawning and rearing habitat for d known, surveys are conducted to determine fish disdi several species of salmonids. Erupting from a small tribution and spawning success. Silver Springs is bench along the forest floor within the Silver the second highest point at which adult salmon are Springs Campground; this spring creek runs adjaobserved; several dead pink salmon were observed ob cent to Hwy. 410, approximately 0.5 mile north of in Sunrise Creek in 2007. Sunrise is located 2.5 the Mt. Rainier National Park boarder. Silver rder. miles upstream, inside Mt. Rainier National Park, Springs flows for approximately 0.3 miles within a making it the highest salmon migration point dolow gradient pool riffle channel. At a point along cumented by PTF staff. the lower creek, the channel passes through a unan Bull trout spawning in Silver Springs generally dersized, yet fish passable culver under the commences in earcampgrounds one-way road. ly September The creek contains a moderate amount of intererate (right photo) shortactive in-stream LWD, in addition to one significant ly before the coho long-term woody debris jam located in the lower appear. However, channel. The overstory riparian consists largely of in contrast to sevmature conifers, in addition to several hardwoods eral of the other located near the confluence with the White River headwater tributaand Silver Creek. Typical of this type of stream, the ries bull trout are Spawning bull trout pawning substrate is made up primarily of sand and small known to spawn in, bull trout spawning in Silver , Si gravel. However, several pockets of excellent Springs is somewhat inconsistent. It’s conceivable sistent. spawning gravel are present throughout the reach, the creeks proximity to campsites, as well as two campsites although it is frequently obscured by fine sand. The foot bridges plus a road crossing, and the presence scured crossing entire channel of Silver Springs runs within the of campers, is disrupting bull trout spawning. The spawning floodplain of the WhiteRiver, and has on occasion r, campground is open and active through the first tive been inundated by silt and woody debris from the week of October; closing just as coho are arriving. ;

SILVER SPRINGS 10.0332A CREEK 10.0332A

S

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 110

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(2001Silver Springs Bull Trout Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (2001-2008)
10 LIVE 9 DEAD REDDS

8

7

NUMBER OBSERVED

6 5 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 2 4 5

0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

SEASON SURVEYED

Raw spawning data for Silver Springs Creek can be found in Appendix D.

52008 Silver Springs Water Temperature (September 5-October 1)

Average: 6.47 Max: 6.63 Min: 6.31

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 111

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

miles of additional spawning and rearing habitat, as well as flow contributions. From the mouth, upstream to RM 12.6, the stream stream is typically a low to moderate gradient poolriffle channel with many deep pools and a few short low gradient cascades. The lower 8 miles flows within a broad valley floor and spawning opportunis ties for all species is abundant throughout. Land use along this section is mainly agricultural and res r creational. Chinook spawning occurs primarily within the lower 8 miles, while coho show increased ile usage throughout the middle and upper reaches of the 15 mile anadromous section of the creek. South creek Prairie experiences a unique late-run of coho, which late often spawn into late February and early March. Chum regularly utilize the lower 3 miles heavily but are frequently observed well above RM 10. Steel10 head utilize areas along the entire stream below the en barrier falls; however, usage is reduced in the canouth Prairie Creek is a major tributary of the yon reach below the falls. The valley walls narrow Carbon River, entering the Carbon near RM rbon significantly above RM 8; at this point the creek ; 6, just downstream of the Highway 162 and ighway channel becomes more confined and the gradient comes Foothills Trail bridge crossings. With a drainage increases. Spawning and rearing opportunities are area over 90 mi2, South Prairie Creek is considered still prevalent here, as is the increase in LWD and one of the most productive drainages in the Puya PuyalLWD inputs from the surrounding forest. lup/White River Watershed. The headwaters orig origiFrom RM 12.6 to the falls at RM 15.4, the chan15.4 nate along the northwest foothills of Mt. Rainier nel gradient increases substantially and the creek within the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Snoqualmie channel becomes moderately to extremely confined ately The mainstem creek flows for over 21.5 miles coursmiles; within a steep canyon. Spawning and rearing opyon. o ing its way through or near the communities of Wilmunities portunities are severely reduced or non-existent. non keson, Burnett, and South Prairie. The creek offers Spawning gravel is scarce in this upper reach and critical spawning and rearing habitat for adult and many heavily scoured bedrock sections exist. juvenile salmonids including; Chinook pink, coho, Chinook, The riparian zone changes dramatically over the dram chum and steelhead. Bull trout have been doc docu15.4 miles of anadromous stream. The upper canca mented in the creek, but distribution and utilization yon reach flows through a commercial forest and is unknown. Limiting factors associated with streamside vegetation consists of second growth fir South Prairie include; low summer flows, channel and alder. Buffer widths along recent harvest areas confinement and narrowing, bank erosion, disco disconare generally wider than the state regulated minireg nected floodplain, water quality (303 (d) listed for 303 mum due to steep, potentially unstable slopes along slop temperature), areas of deficient riparian cover, and the canyon. From RM 12.6 to RM 6.0 the riparian invasive plant species. zone is relatively intact, consisting of mature hardhar The anadromous range extends roughly the first woods with some fir. Below this point, to the con15 miles of the mainstem; a series of impassable ; fluence, significant portions of the banks are arfalls near RM 15.4 prevents any further upstream mored and streamside residential development is migration. Tributaries including Wilkeson, Spik Spikecommon. Much of the lower 6 miles flows through ton, Beaver, plus several unnamed tributaries, add active agricultural land where alder and cottonwood cultural a are the most common streamside tree species.

SOUTH PRAIRIE CREEK 10.0429

S

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 112

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 South Prairie Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Grounds Counts
180 LIVE DEAD 160 REDDS

140

120
NUMBER OBSERVED

100

80

60

40

20

0 09/04/08 09/12/08 09/22/08 09/23/08 09/29/08
DATE SURVEYED

09/30/08

10/09/08

10/16/08

10/22/08

2008 South Prairie Chinook salmon graph was generated using survey data collected by WDFW biologists.

(1998South Prairie Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1998-2008)
928 1,000 838 900 800 700
NUMBER OBSERVED

LIVE DEAD 770 REDDS

537 503

536

505

527

600 500 377 388

692

478

389

476 109 52 2008 Page 113 163 369

326

312

400 300 200 100 0

360

251

244

289

217

127

117

81

92

211

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

51 27

2006

304

2007

SEASON SURVEYED

2008 South Prairie Chinook salmon graph was generated using survey data collected by WDFW biologists.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1992South Prairie Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1992-2008)
9,000 7,711 LIVE DEAD

8,000

7,000

6,000
NUMBER OBSERVED

4,000 2,986

3,943

4,231

5,000

7,309

2,307

1,032

1,110

2,000 640 363

1,428

2,028

2,149

3,000

785 703

816

996

785

2,267 2007 305 2008 Page 114 647

434

341 63

364

383

331

390

265

1,000

499

88

0 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

44

80

174

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2009 South Prairie Creek Steelhead Spawning Grounds Counts 20 LIVE 18 16 14
NUMBER OBSERVED

DEAD REDDS

12 10 8 6 4 2 0 3/10/09 3/19/09 4/24/09 4/27/09 5/4/09 5/5/09 5/22/09 5/27/09 6/4/09 6/11/09 6/25/09
DATE SURVEYED

South Prairie Creek Steelhead Redd Counts Seasonal Comparisons (1999-2009) (1999250 STEELHEAD REDDS 196 187 168 159
NUMBER OBSERVED

200

150

146 129 119 129

100

93 71

50 32

0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
YEAR SURVEYED

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2009 South Prairie steelhead graphs were generated using survey data collected by WDFW biologists.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 115

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SQUALLY CREEK 10.0024

S

qually Creek is a small tributary located ually within the larger 12.1 mi2 Clear Creek Basin (10.0022). The Clear Creek Basin drains the plateaus and flatlands running along the southern valley of the lower Puyallup River, just west of the city of Puyallup. Encompassing an area of nearly 1 square mile, Squally Creek is the smallest of three main tributaries feeding Clear Creek. Squally originates along the upper valley plateau near 72nd Street East and flows north dropping through a steep narrow canyon along the valley wall Near wall. the foot of the valley the creek passes under Pioneer Way and the BNSF rail line before reaching Clear Creek. .21 Approximately the first 0.21 miles of the creek provides the only suitable habitat for spawning and rearing; beyond this the creek begins to climb the ing; valley wall preventing further upstream migration. Several of the fish and habitat limiting factors involved with Squally i volved including; channel confinement, intermittent or , complete fish barriers, no off-channel habitat, comchannel pacted substrate, flooding and channel erosion, a absent or deficient riparian

cover, and the influx of reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) and blackberry. In addition, there is blackberry some development along the creek; primarily pripr vate residential, as well as storm run-off that is idential, run channeled into the creek. A large detention pond built by Pierce County is located on the western tritr butary of upper Squally. The pond was constructed to address excessive storm run-off and sediment isrun sues. The 0.21 mile anadromous segment has two .21 short distinct reaches, one below and one above PioPi neer Way. Downstream of Pioneer Way, the chancha nel is deeply incised with a substrate consisting of moderately compacted gravel, clay, and abundant gravel fines (top& bottom left photos). This substrate type photo is typical of the entire basin; a result of glacial deposits and compaction. Natural channel cutting through this hardened substrate has created a two foot jump in the channel; prevented chum from asa cending beyond the lower 200 feet for the past sevse eral seasons. The riparian is sparse along the lower s 300 feet, consisting mainly of a few small alders, blackberry, and reed canary grass. The last 80 feet nary grass of the creek runs through a culvert passing under cul the BNSF railroad tracks (lower right), where right Squally finally meets with Clear Creek. Squally is Creek mainly utilized by chum, although, a few coho are altho occasionally observed spawning in the lower stretch low of the creek during December. Chum frequently spawn within the culvert where accumulations of gravel can be several inches deep. No adult Chinook or steelhead usage has been documented. Upstream of where the creek passes under Pioneer Way, the gradient increases and the less confined channel quickly becomes braided. Due to the chanbraided nel braiding in this reach, the stream depth is often shallow. However, there are several pieces of hardever, wood debris present, as well as moderate quantities , of suitable spawning gravel. The riparian along this section consists mostly of alder. Unfortunately, no ald spawning activity has been observed in this reach for several seasons.
Page 116

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

heavily on the headwater tributaries located within Mt. Rainier National Park. The study results showed that the cold high mountain streams located within the National Park, including Sunrise, provide the majority of the critical bull trout spawning habitat in the basin. In addition, bull trout spawning has been less consistent and frequent in this tributary compared to that observed in more significant headwater tributaries located along the White River, such as Klickitat Creek (elev. 3300’) located 5 miles upstream. Other species known to utilize the creek include cutthroat trout, brook trout, and pink trout salmon. The brook trout are likely descendents from fish plants in Hidden and Clover lakes during the early to mid part of the last century. Pink salsa mon were observed in the creek in 2007. Although this creek has not been surveyed for coho; it is reare sonable to assume that coho have or do utilize this creek since it is located a short distance upstream dis from Silver Springs which is consistently exploited unrise Creek is a left bank headwater tribuby adult spawners. Chinook and steelhead use in tary to the White River. This mountain Sunrise is unknown. stream (elev. 2800’) flows northeast through east The lower reach of the creek (RM 0-0.15) is a low the steep Sunrise Creek Valley, between the Sourgradient channel flowing within the White River nel dough Mountains to the northwest and Sunrise floodplain, and is repeatedly influenced and affected af Ridge along the southeast. Located entirely within by mainstem river incursions. There are moderate incursions the boundaries of Mt. Rainier National Park (NPS quantities of LWD present and a beneficial riparian nd stream designation #W06-00a), the creek is nongla- buffer zone of conifers and mixes deciduous trees cial in origin; rather, its sources comes from several exists along the majority of the creek (right). Alsub-alpine lakes including Clover Lake (elev. 5732’) though spawning does occur within this small g and Hidden Lake (elev. 5915’); as well as snowpack stretch (depending on mainstem influence), it can be accumulations within the White River Park region. limited due the lack of quality spawning substrate sp White River Park is nestled into the eastern slopes created by the alluvial deposits (sand & silt) from of the Sourdough Mountain Range located in the the White River. Upstream of the floodplain, the northeastern edge of the park. Sunrise Creek flows creek enters the heavily forested lower slope of the for 4.5 miles from its headwaters before entering valley floor as it begins to climbs up the valley. the White River at approximately RM 63 positionely 63; From this point, the creek ing the mouth of the creek just inside the National assumes a pool-rifflePark boarder. cascade configuration up The lower anadromous reach of Sunrise provides into the steep valley; this suitable habitat conditions for bull trout (char) rear- forested reach provides s ing and spawning. PTF has surveyed the creek for quality rearing habitat, bull trout spawning activity during the month of but no spawning opportunSeptember for the past three years. Bull trout ities. An impassable falls telemetry studies and redd surveys were conducted at approximately RM 0.26 during 2006 and 2007 along the upper White River prevents any further upand West Fork White River; the projects focused ; stream migration.

SUNRISE 10.0337 CREEK 10.0337

S

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 117

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

to address excessive sediment and gravel movement issues. Although Swan Creek has been surveyed for several salmon species including Chinook, coho, chum and steelhead; only chum are observed in relatively abundant numbers (top left). In addition to chum, limited numbers of coho are observed spawning in the creek in December. However, substantial numbers of coho juveniles are often observed in the spring. Unfortunately, summer and early fall flows are too low to allow Chinook access to the creek. Although bull trout utilization is unknown within Swan Creek; adult fluvial bull trout are known to dult a forage in the smaller tributaries of the lower Puyalorage Puya Creek wan Creek is a moderate sized tributary lup. Swan also supports a large population of cutthcutt located within the larger Clear Creek Basin roat trout, which can be observed spawning in the (10.0022). The Clear Creek Basin drains the spring. Two steelhead redds were observed during plateaus and flatlands running along the southern the April 2004 survey season. They were the first valley of the lower Puyallup River, between the c cisteelhead redds seen in Swan Creek in several eelhead ties of Puyallup and Tacoma. The head waters of years. However, no steelhead redds have been obo Swan Creek originate just south of Highway 512 512, served since. Other species present in the creek ini and flow just over 6 miles north to meet up with clude catfish, lamprey, and sculpins. Clear Creek near Pioneer Way E. The Swan Creek From its origins, the creek flows within a narrow basin drains a moderately developed land area of eveloped distinct channel for approximately 3 miles through or nearly 4 mi2. The land use along the creek is larg large- the upland plateau south of 72nd Street East. Near ly rural residential and recreational. The average 72nd, the creek begins to drop into an increasingly water discharge recorded by the USGS flow gauge SGS narrow valley. The creek passes through a large (#12102190) for a five year period (1990 (1990-1991, 1995- concrete box culvert under 64th Street E.; then drops 1997) was 4.78 ft3/second. nearly three Several of the fish and habitat limiting factors feet back into involved with Swan Creek including; channel co conthe creek finement, intermittent or complete fish barriers, u un- channel. This stable substrate, flooding and channel erosion, a abjump in elevasent or deficient riparian cover, invasive non non-native tion is an upplants, and water quality (bacteria). In addition, stream barthere is some development present along the creek; rier to all speprimarily private residential, as well as storm run runcies; with the off that is channeled into the creek. A large dete detenexception of tion pond built by Pierce County is located on the steelhead, which may be able to pass if flows are lower reach of the creek. The pond was constructed high enough. However, spawning opportunities are

SWAN CREEK 10.0003

S

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 118

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

extremely limited and the habitat quality is poor upstream of this point. Downstream of the culvert, the next 0.2 miles of the creek flows though a well defined channel with little spawning habitat or complexity. Beyond this, the creek channel takes on more complexity due to the placement of sill logs which hold back bed load and create pool habitat through this narrow valley section (previous page-lower right). Unfortunately Unfortunately, one of the structures has developed into a likely barrier to upstream migration during low f ing flows. This narrow valley reach continues for approximat approximately the next 1.8 miles until the gradient and the va val. ley walls begin to ease around RM 0.8. The channel dynamics change cons considerable through this reach; from a single well d defined channel to braided sections. There are several pieces of instream LWD; as well as sevces eral smaller pieces of wood and woody debris jams (center left). Several sections of the banks consist of actively eroding compacted glacial debris; contribu contributing fine and small course materials into the stream channel. Spawning habitat is available throughout; ailable yet, the substrate is largely made up of fine sand and undersized gravel. The RMZ is well intact along the valley section; consisting largely of mature ing Doulas fir, alder, cottonwood and maple. A rapid shift in the RMZ occurs around RM 1.5 at this point 1.5; the surrounding forest consists primarily of a much thinner stand of alder, cottonwood and maple. To a wood large extent, the lower part of Swan Creek passes

through the 290-acre Swan Creek Park. The park is acre Cr largely undeveloped with a hiking trail paralleling the creek. str From RM 0.8 to 0.5, the stream is pool-riffle in character and contains good spawning gravel, riparip rian diversity and channel complexity. There is also complexi a noticeable decrease in LWD and woody debris in the channel. Swan Creek is prone to high water events however, and the substrate is only moderatemoderat ly stable. A sediment detention pond is located at tion RM 0.5 (bottom photo) and is dredged annually or biannually by Pierce County. During these events, fisheries staff from the Puyallup Tribe seines the pond before dredging to remove the majority of fish present, and relocates the fish captured downstream down of the work site. A large wooden wing wall is in arge place at the head of the pond to direct the creek tot wards the detention pond. Just downstream of the detention pond, the creek flows through a short narrow channel and under Pioneer Way E. Much of the channel is confined by rip-rap. The RMZ along this short stretch is exrap. tremely poor and heavy erosion is occurring along the left bank. The creek then flows a few hundred feet before reaching the Haire Wetlands (right). Some restoration work has been completed in the past on the lower reach of the creek. In 2001, a 1212 acre site located just downstream of Pioneer Way was utilized to develop a side channel for overwinoverwi tering juveniles and as a means of reconnecting recon Swan Creek to Haire Wetland the Haire Wetlands. In addition, the restoration included the removal of invasive and nonnative plant species, and replanting the area with native trees and shrubs. The City of Tacoma financed the Haire Wetlands restoration site along Clear and Swan creeks through the Natureeks ral Resource Damages Assessment Program source (NRDA).

A gravel and sediment detention pond on Swan Creek is located at RM 0.5. PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 119

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Swan Creek Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
50 LIVE DEAD

45

40

35
NUMBER OBSEREVED

30

25

20

15

10

5

0 11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08
DATE SURVEYED

12/12/08

12/22/08

1/15/09

(1992Swan Creek Chum Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1992-2008)
1,600 LIVE 1,400 1,196 1,200
NUMBER OBSERVED

DEAD

1,000

928

692

800

792

1,492

574

600

400 252 217 222

131

84

77 38

20

47 38

41

7 9

7

0 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

6 6

17

Page 120

105 91

104 100

200

113

553

600

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

enced by mainstem river incursions. Prior to 2006, the first 450 to 600 feet of the stream was a low gradient channel with good spawning gravel. Howspawn ever, the Puyallup River overtook this short reach, lup eliminating nearly all the available spawning habiavailabl tat. There was no salmon utilization in Swift Creek utilizat for nearly a century due to the streams location above the Electron diversion dam. With the compledam tion of the Electron fish ladder (@ RM 41.7) in the fall of 2000, anadromous fish passage was restored for the first time since 1904. Restoring anadromous . access to the upper Puyallup River has made approximately 26+ miles of spawning and rearing habitat above the diversion available for several spesp cies including Chinook, coho, pink, steelhead, and , bull trout. Swift Creek is not regularly surveyed for spawning activity, but rather had been the location of annual surplus adult coho plants (1997-2003) from the WDFW Voights Creek Hatcher located in the city of wift wift Creek is a right bank tributary to the Orting. Adult plants were started in 1997 as a Upper Puyallup River. Swift originates from means to reintroduce coho and jump-start the upper jump the Sunset Park region located along the west reach of the Puyallup. From 1997 to 2003, between slope of Mt. Rainier National Park. Swift flows ap- 116 and 513 adult coho were planted annually in tional proximately 2.8 miles from its origin at 5400’ to its Swift Creek from the 710 rd. bridge which crosses confluence with the Puyallup River (low right) at (lower the creek approximately 0.3 miles upstream from its reek RM 46.8 (elev. 2180’). Downstream of the NPS confluence with the Puyallup. Yet, the majority of ence Yet boundary (RM 2.6) the creek flows through the Mt. the coho planted would fall downstream and spawn Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest before reaching Snoqualmie in the lower spawning reach of the creek when it the Puyallup, approximately .85 miles downstream existed. The loss of this habitat was one of the rea, oss from the confluence of the North and South Fork Forks. sons surplus Swift drops rapidly for the majority of its 2.8 mile plants of corun. The greater component of the creek consists of ho were disa moderate to high gradient channel with a cobble continued in and boulder substrate; as well as moderate amounts Swift. In of small and large instream woody debris. The ripa- response to rian zone, which is comprised of mature conifers this loss, coand mixed deciduous trees, is well intact along the , ho and Chientire creek corridor nook surplus Currently, little spawning habitat exi exists for plants have adult salmon or steelhead to utilize. What habitat since been transported up to the North Fork of the is available is present in the lower 0.2 miles of the er Puyallup and planted from a bridge constructed in creek. Unfortunately, the creek channel climbs he 2004. In addition to coho and cutthroat, steelhead cutthroat steeply approximately 0.2 miles from its confluence utilization within this stream has also been docuwith the Puyallup River; a series of high gradient ; mented; though currently, bull trout utilization is cascades prevents further upstream migration for eam unknown. most species. The lower creek is repeatedly infl influ-

SWIFT CREEK 10.0697

S

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 121

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

VOIGHTS CREEK 10.0414

and habitat limiting factors associated with Voights miting Creek include; erosion, flooding, water quality (temreek perature), channel confinement, loss of off channel nel confinement habitat and a disconnected flood plain on the lower connected reach, an intermittent fish barrier created by a water tent diversion dam (prior to 2009), and water withdrawal (prior to 2009). The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife operates a hatchery located at RM 0.5 (lower left); however, this facility was non-operational for much non of 2009 due to significant damage caused by severe flooding during the January, 2009 flood event. uary, WDFW plans to make repairs and have the hatchery operational again by mid August, 2009. Prior to this 2009 unfortunate shut down, the department had con, ducted a Fall Chinook (entire 2008 brood year lost), coho, and winter steelhead (program terminated in program terminate 2009) program at this location. location The WDFW hatchery on Voights Creek has artificially propagated coho since 1917, having in the past incorporated fry and smolts from other draidra nages, including Big Soos Creek, Minter Creek, Garrison Springs, George Adams Creek; as well as the Skagit and Washougal rivers. Voights Creek ivers. ights oights Creek is a tributary to the lower Car800,000 bon River, entering the Carbon at RM 4.0 just produces approximately 800,000, 100% mass marked (adipose fin clip) coho pre-smolts annually; southeast of the community of Orting Orting. of which, 100,000 to 200,000 are customarily transVoights Creek originates along the northwest fo fooferred to acclimation ponds in the upper Puyallup Puyal thills of Mt. Rainier, just west of Martin Peak a and north of the Mowich River. The creek flows for near- Watershed. In addition, hatchery rearing 200,000+ Fall Chinook for acclimation ponds in the upper ly 20 miles in a northwest direction until it joins the re Carbon River. Encompassing a drainage area of nea . near- Puyallup River is a key component to restoration ly 23 mi2, the mainstem creek offers nearly 4 miles of goals. The Puyallup Tribe operates several accliW anadromous usage; in addition, a little spawning and mation ponds in the Puyallup/White River Warearing habitat is available in Coplar Creek a small tershed. Acclimation ponds are a proven method for r Creek, tributary entering Voights at RM 0.7. However, Cop- increasing fish numbers on the spawning grounds. . Three of the acclimation ponds were used for reestion lar Creek is generally only accessible during the i intablishing Fall Chinook and coho reared at Voights creased flows associated with late fall and winter into a 26+ mile reach of the Upper Puyallup River snows and rainfall. The anadromous habitat availaabove Electron Dam (RM 41.7). The Electron diverble in Voights sion dam had been an anadromous barrier for 97 support Chisupports nook coho and years (1904-2000). nook, In addition to the rearing and acclimation of juj steelhead; as veniles, surplus live adult Fall Chinook and coho well as occ occasion pink and from the WDFW Voights Creek hatchery were sional Puyallu chum spawners. planted in the upper Puyallup River drainage when surplus fish were available. The Puyallup Tribe has A range of fish been hauling surplus adults from Voights Creek and s

V

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 122

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

planting them in the upper Puyallup Watershed since1997. Puyallup River Fall Chinook are endemic throughout the Puyallup River, Carbon River, Lo Lower White River, as well as several of the tributaries associated with these mainstem river systems. A large component of adult fall Chinook spawners are hatchery origin from the WDFW Fall Chinook program operated o ram on Voights Creek. In addition, over the past seve several operational se seasons, the weir de esigned to prevent fish passage above the hatchery had proven to be ineffec ineffective, therefore, allowing ha hatchery fish to access the upper 3.4 miles of the creek to spawn naturally. Voights Creek is currently surveyed for steelhead only. head An impassable falls located at RM 3.9 blocks any further upstream migration (top left). Stee Steelhead are frequently observed spawning throughout the entire ng 3.4 mile stretch above the hatchery. Unfortunately, . steelhead escapement in Voights Creek has fallen considerably over the past decade. Winter steelhead inter populations in the Puyallup basin have been decli declining for nearly the past two decades. The steep de. cline observed in steelhead escapement over the past several years has created serious concern among fisheries managers. Factor(s) responsible for the decline in steelhead escapement are unknown unknown. The stream channel varies a great deal in complexity throughout its length. The lower mile is co . confined by armored banks and levees, with large se segments of significantly deficient riparian cover and negligible instream LWD. Prior to January, 2009; a water diversion dam near RM 1.2 intermitten .2 intermittently blocked upstream migra migrating fish during low flow p periods. For Fortunately, there were sev-

eral spawning opportunities available below the dam. The gradient throughout this lower reach is low; the substrate size is more consistent than the upper reach, although smaller and somewhat compacted. nd The extreme high water event of 2009 caused the 2 creek channel to avulse just upstream of the diverdive sion dam (lower right). The new channel currently runs just north of the old channel; then reconnects with the older established channel just upstream of tablished chan Hyw162. The new channel provides few spawning opportunities. Upstream of the diversion dam, the channel begins to encounter the influences caused by influ increasing elevation as it ascends out of the valley floor. The gradient increases slightly; however, the . channel is no longer confined, allowing the creek to branch out creating several braids and significant side channels over the next 0.8 miles. The riparian throughout this section is well intact and there is a significant increase in LWD and debris jams. deb Near RM 2, the valley walls close in tightly and the channel is naturally restricted to a defined, moderate sized channel and with narrow gorges (upper right). The surrounding riparian is primarily a mix of 2nd growth conifer and deciduous trees. Nearly the entire 2 mile reach, from the diversion to the falls, is a moderate gradient channel containing excellent, although somewhat sporadic patches of gravel. Sevgra eral pieces of LWD and significant log jams are present throughout this reach as well. Several large mass wastings (landslides) are present along the hills and slopes of the upper reach above the gorge; conco tributing substantially to LWD and gravel inputs downstream.

New channel

Old channel

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 123

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1995Voights Creek Steelhead Redd Counts Seasonal Comparisons (1995-2009)
60 STEELHEAD REDDS 50 44 48

40
NUMBER OBSERVED

33 30

20

18 16

10

9 7 4 1

10 8 4 2

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
YEAR SURVEYED

The 2008 redd data is incomplete due to extremely poor survey conditions and access issues which prevented a regular full season of surveys.

(1998Fall Juvenile Coho Salmon Outplants from Voights Creek Hatchery (1998-2009)
149,970

COWSKULL ACCLIMATION POND 10.0680 RUSHINGWATER ACCLIMATION POND 10.0625 LAKE KAPOWSIN

NUMBER OF FISH RELEASED

101,400

96,790 100,350

99,400 100,450

104,500 104,500

93,000 84,000

71,980

39,935

34,850

55,053

60,100

93,000

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003
YEAR PLANTED

2004

2005

2006

20,100

2007

2008

2009

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 124

21,000

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

structed, thereby permanently diverting the White dive River into the Puyallup. Significant tributaries of the White include the West Fork White River, Huckleberry Creek, Boise , Creek, Clearwater River, and the Greenwater River. The White River Watershed provides critical spawnspaw ing and rearing habitat for several salmonids ini cluding several ESA listed species which include; native White River Spring Chinook, winter steelChinook head, and bull trout. Other non-threatened species . non include coho, pink, chum, sockeye, rainbow trout, cutthroat, and whitefish. These tributaries, with the exception of the West Fork, are described in this report. All adult salmon and steelhead that spawn in the Upper White River and its tributaries are initially captured in the USACE fish trap in Buckley; then transported above Mud Mountain dam (RM 29.6). nsported Since precise escapement numbers for the Upper White River drainage are known, surveys are conco he White River (Stuck) is a vast and dynamic ducted to determine fish distribution and spawning glacially driven river system. The headwasuccess. This is especially important regarding ters of the White originate from the Emmons Spring Chinook, since adult production monitoring nce and Fryingpan glaciers on the north face of Mt. is part of the recovery plan. Rainier. Flowing 76.7 miles from its mountain The systems glacial origin is responsible for the source to its eventual confluence with the Puyallup turbid conditions that are most noticeable during not River; the White River Watershed drains an are of warmer weather experienced during late spring and area nearly 494 mi2. The White River has a drainage summer. The White River conveys a tremendous area nearly twice that of the Puyallup River. Ho How- volume of bed load material which contributes to ever, the White and Puyallup drainages are often the dynamic nature of the system. The high sedised viewed and managed as two distinct and separate ment loads are responsible for the braided channel entities. This management approach is due in part morphology characteristic of broad valley segments. because prior to 1906, the White River did not flow se This condition is most prevalent in the upper reachr into the Puyallup. Salo and Jagielo (1983) described es within and immediately outside the National that prior to 1906; the majority of the White River Park boundaries (river mile 56 to 71). Although this flowed north towards Elliot Bay. Yet, some of the upper headwater segment provides little or nothing water from the White often flowed south to the in the way of mainstem spawning opportunities, its Puyallup through the Stuck River channel. In N lup Nopristine and unspoiled tributaries provide a great vember of 1906, a flood event mobilized a tremen tremenddeal of the critical bull trout spawning and rearing ous amount of wood debris that blocked the north habitat in the system. Sunrise Creek (RM 63), loflowing channel in what is now downtown Auburn. cated 2.5 miles inside Mt. Rainier National Park, The blockage forced the river to avulse and find a marks the highest salmon migration point docudoc new channel. This newly created diversion sent his mented by PTF staff. nearly the entire White River flow down through Downstream of the NPS boundary near RM 61, 61 the Stuck River channel into the Puyallup, more the mainstem river, as well as many of its tributaer, tribut than doubling the size of the Puyallup River dra drairies course through industrial forestlands including includ nage. In 1915, a concrete structure was co conNational Forest, but primarily within private tim-

WHITE RIVER 10.0031

T

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 125

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

ber company ownership. Much of these forestlands have been harvested at least once and in many ca cases twice. Lands in timber production area are ofareas ten densely roaded with some sections approaching six lineal miles per square mile. Roads have co contributed to many of their trademark problems such as landslides, slope failures, altered hydrology, cu ydrology, culvert and bridge projects that can effect upstream migration, and of course high levels if sedimentation within effected drainages. In contrast to the headwaters reach, mainstem spawning opportunities are frequently available throughout much o the upper of mainstem from RM 55 downstream to Mud Mou Mountain dam at RM 29.5. Chinook, coho and pink sa , salmon have all been observed spawning in the lower velocity margins of the mainstem within this se section. The West Fork White River entering at RM 49.2 on the left bank is glacially driven as well, and is characterized by generally unconfined, often braided and complex channels. Abundant spawni gravels bundant spawning are present in pool tail, as well as the margins and low velocity areas along the lower river Woody deriver. bris is abundant although much of it has been dep though deposited too high to interact with the regular seasonal flows. To a great extent, the overstory riparian zone is either second growth conifer or hardwoods except hardwoods; for the zone through Mt. National Park wit consist with of mostly old growth. Several tributaries includi including Pinochle, Cripple and Wrong creeks; frequently reeks; support Chinook, coho and pink spawners. In addi, tion, the clear headwater tributaries of the West he Fork; specifically Lodi Creek, provide several key spawning and rearing opportunities for bull trout. There are approximately 5 miles of suitable h habitat between Mud Mountain Dam and the USACE Buc Buckley trap at RM 24.3; unfortunately only unfortunately, modest spawning at best takes place due to lack of fish access between the two sites. Mud Mountain is an earthen dam built for flood control (left), and is a complete blockage to upstream migration. It is for this reason that fish are captured at the diversion

dam in Buckley and transported upstream and rer leased above Mud Mountain. The Corps’ trapping facility is uniquely integrated into a diversion dam and flume intake that was, up until January 2004, used to divert water from the White River to genergene ate power. Since Puget Sound Energy (PSE) ceased power production, instream flows have increased considerably in the lower river. Thus far, some measure of water has continued to be diverted from di the river to maintain the water levels and water iver quality in Lake Tapps. However, the effect on fish passage is the same; a small percentage of fish will fall back downstream below Mud Mountain; utilizutili ing this disenfranchised reach of the river between the two facilities. stream 24.3 Downstream of the diversion dam at RM 24.3; to approximately RM 11, there is frequent and concenconce trated use by Chinook, pink, coho and steelhead. , Some chum spawning activity takes place within this reach as well; however, the majority of chum spawn below RM 15. When power production ended in 2004, this roughly 13 mile reach has abundant e and excellent spawning gravel. There are significant side channels, as well as LWD and log jams , contributing to the complexity of the lower River. This reach provides numerous spawning and rearing opportunities. One side channel complex, apcom proximately a mile long, is located on the left bank lo directly below the Shaker Church access (RM 14.5). This long established chanThe lower White River nel supports Chinook, pink and coho, as well as the highest recent documentation of chum salmon spawning. Another substantial side channel not surveyed due to multiple debris jams blocking access, is located a couple of miles downstream on the left bank. Aerial surveys have documented both Chinook and steelhead spawning in this side spawn channel. Downstream from approximately RM 11, the oximately channel is constrained by levees (right photo). The channel from this point loses complexity and there is a marked decrease in both spawning gravel and spawning activity of all species.
Page 126

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1994White River Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1994-2008)
205 LIVE DEAD REDDS 151

200

150
NUMBER OBSERVED

142

102

117 101 98 99

100 75 79

69

74

80

N O T S U R V E Y E D

44

51

36

36

50

44

94

24

26

23

11

10 10

12

14

16 22 21

17

17

17

3 4

0 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
DATE SURVEYED

Survey efforts since 2004 have been increasingly thwarted by higher flow conditions and poor water visibility. Data collected since 2004 is therefore incomplete.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

1

5 7

10 Page 127

30

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

habitat for Chinook, coho, pink, chum and steel, stee head. However, Chinook use is often limited due to the extremely low flows common in the creek during mon late summer and early fall. Bull trout utilization is tro unknown. From the barrier falls at RM 6.2, down to approxappro imately RM 5, the creek is confined by valley walls; yet the channel width and gradient are conducive to he providing ample spawning opportunities for all species (top left). Coal Mine Creek, entering near RM oal 5.7, is the only significant tributary entering the anadromous segment of Wilkeson Creek. Coal Mine supports coho, chum, and pink spawners. Between RM 5 and 4, Wilkeson Creek meanders through the town of Wilkeson, the channel is often deeply entrenched and the banks generally riprip rapped and confined. Spawning opportunities throughout this section are available, although, somewhat reduced compared to the rest of the creek. At RM 4.2, the Wilkeson Waste Water ent ilkeson Creek is a large tributary to lower Treatment Plant discharges its treated domestic wastewater into the creek. South Prairie Creek (10.0429). Wilkeson Below river mile 4 and the community of WilkeWilk flows for 12.3 miles from its source in the son, the creek travels through generally undeve, Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and then ational Forest, loped forested land until it reaches South Prairie. passes through the community of Wilkeson, before The lower 4 miles of Wilkeson is a pool-riffle stream meeting South Prairie Creek (RM 6.7) just east of with a gravel/cobble substrate. With a few excepexce the town of South Prairie. Unfortunately, only the tions, abundant spawning gravel is present lower half of Wilkeson is accessible to salmon; a sethroughout this reach. The riparian along lower ries of falls at RM 6.2 marks the upper extent of Wilkeson consists of hardwoods and conifers with a f adult salmon and steelhead migration. Several fish and habitat related issues associated diverse understory of nawith Wilkeson Creek include; erosion, water quality tive shrubs and vegetation. (temperature), channel confinement, low flows, w wa- Large swaths of Japanese knot weed are also present ter withdrawal, and aquatic noxious weeds (Japaawal, along numerous sections of nese knotweed-Polygonum cuspidatum). In addiPolygonum the creek. In-stream wootion, pieces of coal still visible in the creek channel ble dy debris is plentiful providing both channel comco continue to bring to light the regions coal mining tinue plexity and cover. The lower 3 miles are very natunat history and its lasting impacts on the creek Curcreek. rently, the primary land use along Wilkeson is rural ral (lower left), with a heavily wooded riparian zone, he exce residential, recreational, light commercial, and for- debris jams and several side channels offering excellent chum spawning opportunities, as well as overest. Despite these l liwintering habitat for juvenile coho, Chinook and nile mitations, the Wilkesteelhead. The lower 1.5 miles of the creek often . son Creek basin is a experiences the heaviest spawning effort by Chiproductive system tive system, nook, pink, and chum. Whereas, coho (right) and providing suitable spawning and rearing steelhead focus more on the middle and upper reaches of the creek.

WILKESON CREEK 10.0432

W

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 128

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Wilkeson Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
10 9 LIVE DEAD REDDS 8 7
NUMBER OBSERVED

6 5 4 3

2 1 0 9/4/08 9/11/08 9/19/08 9/29/08
DATE SURVEYED

10/8/08

10/17/08

Wilkeson Creek Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Seasonal Comparisons (1995-2008) (199570 LIVE 60 60 DEAD REDDS

50
NUMBER OBSERVED

40 35 29 30

38

30

20

19 17 11

20 18 15 14 13 8 12 17 11 8 4 2 2 1 2007 1 2008 8

12 9 6 3 1 1 1 1999 2000

10

10

0 1995 1996 1997 1998 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
SEASON SURVEYED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 129

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Wilkeson Creek Steelhead Spawning Ground Count
10

LIVE
9

DEAD REDDS

8

7
NUMBER OBSERVED

6

5

4

3

2

1

0 3/12/09 3/23/09 4/27/09 4/28/09 5/4/09 5/5/09 5/22/09 6/9/09
DATE SURVEYED

(1999Wilkeson Creek Steelhead Redd Counts Seasonal Comparisons (1999-2009)
60 STEELHEAD REDDS 50 50

40
NUMBER OBSERVED

30 30

30

30

29

23 20 20 13 10 6

22

8

0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
YEAR SURVEYED

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 130

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

WRIGHT 10.0370 CREEK 10.0370

River; focusing heavily on the headwaters located ily within Mt. Rainier National Park. The study reional sults showed that the cold high mountain streams located within the National Park, including Wright, provide the majority of the critical bull trout spawnity spaw ing habitat in the basin. Wright Creek enters Fryingpan at approximately RM 1.5; less than a mile upstream of the Sunrise ; road crossing. Of its 1.7 mile length, Wright Creek provides approximately 0.2 miles of anadromous usage. A series of bedrock cascades and falls (top left photo) blocks any further upstream migration. The creek is almost entirely bordered by an old growth coniferous forest and the water is cooled year round by snow and glacial melt water from Sarvant Glacier, which is located on the northern slopes of the Cowlitz Chimneys (Sarvant Glacier is

named after Henry M. Sarvant, (1869-1940), an en(1869 gineer and early surveyor of the mountain). Addieyor

W

Creek, right Creek, located within Mt. Rainier National Park, is a small right bank trib tributary to Fryingpan Creek. This small . mountain stream is surveyed for bull t trout from late August through the first part of October. The ber. mouth of Wright Creek, which is located at nearly 4000’ elevation, is too high for most Pacific salmon species. Wright Creek does provide excellent rea rearing and spawning habitat for a host of resident and fluvial bull trout. In 2006 and 2007, Puyallup Tr Tribal Fisheries staff radio tagged bull trout (9 fish in 2006/19 fish in 2007) captured in the USACE fish trap near Buckley. Subsequently, a few of these bull trout were tracked from their release site at RM 45 on the White Lower Wright Creek River (near the town of Green Greenwater) to Fryingpan C Creek and Wright Creek. Spawning was o observed in both creeks during September. The telemetry st studies and redd su surveys along the upper White River and West Fork White

tion flow is contributed by a small nonglacial tributary entering on the left bank at RM 1.4. 1.4 The first 0.1 miles of the creek consists of a narrow, moderate gradient channel flowing within the open Fryingpan Creek floodplain (lower left photo). Several patches of excellent spawning gravel are gra available throughout this section of the creek and out the majority of spawning has occurred within this segment of the creek over the past two years. There ver years is no significant LWD or natural cover present in this portion of the channel; however, spawning acnel; a tivity is often observed within close proximity of the in few pieces of small woody debris present. present Beyond the open floodplain channel, the creek enters the forested slope along Fryingpan. The Fryingpan channel assumes a step-pool configuration from this pool point on. Throughout this final reach of fish usage, spawning opportunities are reduced due to the increased gradient, predominately larger substrate, ased and rapid flows encountered. Although the majority . of this short reach provides excellent rearing habihab tat, it doesn’t offer much in the way of spawning opo portunities. Approximately 0.1 miles after entering the forested area, the creek climbs rapidly up a series of bedrock cascades and small falls; marking falls the end of anadromous habitat. Four bull trout redds were observed in the lower 0.12 miles of the creek in 2007.
Page 131

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 Wright Creek Bull Trout Spawning Ground Counts and Run Timing
10 LIVE DEAD 9 REDDS 8

7
NUMBER OBSERVED

6

5

4

3

2

1

0 8/29/08 9/9/08 9/19/08
DATE SURVEYED

9/26/08

10/7/08

Raw spawning data for Wright Creek can be found in Appendix D.

312008 Wright Creek Water Temperature (August 31-October 15)
10

Temperature (*C)
9 8 7 6
*C

Average: 4.78 Max: 9.03 Min: -0.4

5 4 3 2 1 0 -1
9/1/08 9/2/08 9/3/08 9/4/08 9/5/08 9/6/08 9/7/08 9/8/08 8/31/08 9/9/08 9/10/08 9/11/08 9/12/08 9/13/08 9/14/08 9/15/08 9/16/08 9/17/08 9/18/08 9/19/08 9/20/08 9/21/08 9/22/08 9/23/08 9/24/08 9/25/08 9/26/08 9/27/08 9/28/08 9/29/08 9/30/08 10/1/08 10/2/08 10/3/08 10/4/08 10/5/08 10/6/08 10/7/08 10/8/08 10/9/08 10/10/08 10/11/08 10/12/08 10/13/08 10/14/08 10/15/08

DATE

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 132

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Seasonal Comparisons of Spawning Ground and Counts and Buckley USACE Trap Counts for Salmon and Steelhead.
The following charts are separated by species and include both wild and hatchery origin spawning ground escapements. They are a compilation of the yearly survey totals conducted by the Puyallup Tribe Fisheries Department, the Washin Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Army Corps of Engineers’ Buckley trap counts. These data yield an empi empirical representation of total natural/hatchery escapement for the entire WRIA 10: Puyallup/White River Watershed. It’s /hatchery important to note that the number of live fish observed and represented in the graphs is an accumulation of all fish seen throughout the survey season. The total number of live fish observed does not depict the estimated escapement which is derived through statistical analysis (AUC method method-see appendix F). The live and redds totals in the following graphs do x not include the fish or redds observed above RM 24.3 on the White River, since these actual escapement totals are known from the USACE Buckley trap counts.

APPENDIX A
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 133

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1993Chinook Seasonal Spawning Ground Counts and Buckley USACE Trap Counts (1993-2008)
6,000 BUCKLEY COUNTS 4,634 LIVE 5,000 DEAD REDDS 4,000
NUMBER OBSERVED

2,372

3,000 2,002

2,079

4,565

1,292 1,532

1,546

1,465

1,394

1,240

1,060

1,193

1,393

1,433

2,000 1,013

849 531 803 1,141 849 710 1,151 1,526 1,029 411

1,528

409 424 251 105 392

586 321 213

422

241 233 402

466 502

0 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

The live, dead, and redds totals in this graph do not include the Chinook or redds observed above RM 24.3 on the White River; actual escapement totals are known from the USACE Buckley trap counts. The breakdown for the Buckley trap counts are listed in the section covering the Buckley USACE fish trap found at the beginning of this report.
(1993Adult Coho Seasonal Spawning Ground Counts and Buckley USACE Trap Counts (1993-2008)
21,591 25,000 BUCKLEY COUNTS LIVE 16,748 20,000 DEAD 14,341

NUMBER OBSERVED

13,893

15,000

6,503

6,370 6,371

5,005

6,022

2,662 1,013

2,617

927 1,902 355

2,454

5,000 1,379 976 209

2,733 1,693 661

1,782 1,252 297

1,789 522

1,809

2,924

4,046

6,252

1,065 1,283 171

1,325 221

1,745 508 2007

1,475

7,482 2008 Page 134 1,179 247

10,000

7,988

444

0 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
SEASON SURVEYED

The live and dead totals in this graph do not include the coho observed above RM 24.3 on the White River; actual escapement totals are known from the USACE Buckley trap counts.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

414

966

8,420

12,620

160

643

1,000

761 515 284

402 577 702

479 698 605

959 738

753

837 924

856 938

1,057 921

1,965 1,637

1,683

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

(1993Adult Chum Seasonal Spawning Ground Counts and Hatchery Returns (1993-2008)
25,000 20,635 19,506 HATCHERY LIVE DEAD

20,000

17,629 18,508 18,006

NUMBER OBSERVED

12,679 11,209

12,620

14,273

15,000 10,217

10,051

11,393 12,606 7,150 7,196 4,652 4,958

10,000 7,244 6,130 7,049 5,472 6,083 4,441 7,037 7,190

9,686 5,437 4,590 2007 218 165

5,229

5,032 5,116

1,276 2,634 2,286

2,701

5,000

0 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2008
SEASON SURVEYED

(2000Steelhead Seasonal Spawning Ground Counts and Buckley USACE Trap Counts (2000-2009)
600 524 BUCKLEY COUNTS LIVE DEAD 435 REDDS 383 367

500

NUMBER OBSERVED

337

357

400

369

1,632 2,290 1,685

1,645

303

300

265

231

269

162

152 137

163

200

183

207

67

100

81

54

135

43

45

49

28

37

8

8

6

5

3

2

3

5

15 2008 2009 Page 135 1

0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
SEASON SURVEYED

The live, dead, and redds totals in this graph do not include the steelhead or redds observed above RM 24.3 on the White River; actual escapement totals are known from the USACE Buckley trap counts.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

145

3,942 4,555 2,212

4,397 3,619

3,446

3,761

2,314

3,320

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Pink Seasonal Spawning Ground Counts and Buckley USACE Trap Counts (1991-2007) (1991BUCKLEY COUNTS 312,500,000 LIVE DEAD

613,876

261,038

NUMBER OBSERVED

127,541

497,841 2007 Page 136 64,347

6,250,000

29,794

33,346

6,622

11,626

5,824

3,769

3,139

2,987

1,959

2,500 223

50

1 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999
SEASON SURVEYED

208

1,502

2001

3,941

13,190

125,000

18,810

19,935

2003

2005

The live and dead totals in this graph do not include the pink salmon observed above RM 24.3 on the White River; actual escapement totals are known from the USACE Buckley trap counts.

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

21,716

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SALMON AND STEELHEAD SPAWNDISTRIBUTION AND SPAWNING UTILIZATION
The following maps are separated by species; they represent the different distributions and spawning utilization represent areas within the watershed. The following maps were produced by Marilu Koschak, with the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commissions (NWIFC).

APPENDIX B
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 137

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 138

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Insert Chinook map

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 139

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Insert coho map

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 140

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Insert chum map

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 141

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Insert pink map

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 142

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Insert steelhead map

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 143

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

20082008-2009
TROUT, CHINOOK, BULL TROUT, AND STEELHEAD REDD LOCATIONS (GPS)

The following redd location maps were produced by Puyallup Tribal GIS Analyst Paul Arnold.

APPENDIX C
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 144

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 145

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 146

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 147

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 148

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 149

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 150

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 151

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 152

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 153

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 154

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 155

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 156

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 157

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 158

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 159

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 160

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 161

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

20082008-2009
STEELHEAD, SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT SPAWNING DATA

APPENDIX D
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 162

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Spawning Data 2008 Chinook Spawning Ground Data
BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE

CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS

CARBON RIVER

CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS

CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

C H I N O O K

STREAM

WRIA 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057

DATE 8/27/08 9/5/08 9/15/08 9/24/08 10/03/08 10/14/08 10/24/08

LOWER R.M. 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.2 0.0 2.2 0.0 2.2 0.0 2.2 0.0 2.2 BOISE CREEK

UPPER R.M. 2.2 2.2 2.2 4.5 2.2 4.5 2.2 4.5 2.2 4.5 2.2 4.5 Total

LIVE 3 52 40 4 203 211 54 52 11 1 0 2 633 LIVE

DEAD 0 3 33 0 29 13 163 139 26 34 0 0 440 DEAD

REDDS 0 20 48 0 58 90 28 64 2 15 0 0 325 REDDS

10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410

9/4/08 9/11/08 9/19/08 9/29/08 10/8/08 10/17/08

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 CANYONFALLS CR.

0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 Total

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD 0 0 DEAD 0 0 0 15 46 257 77 1 396 DEAD 0 0 3 1 24 6

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 REDDS 1 1 REDDS 0 0 4 30 62 7 0 0 103 REDDS 0 0 11 10 4 0
Page 163

10.0413

9/26/08

8.5 CARBON RIVER

9.5 Total

2 2 LIVE

10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027

8/26/08 9/4/08 9/11/08 9/19/08 9/29/08 10/8/08 10/17/08 10/27/08

3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 CLARKS CREEK

3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 Total

0 0 8 68 246 92 4 0 418 LIVE

10.0022 10.0022 10.0022 10.0022 10.0022 10.0022

8/26/08 9/11/08 9/19/08 9/29/08 10/8/08 10/17/08

1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7

1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8

0 0 10 27 9 0

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

CLEAR

10.0022

10/27/08

1.7 CLEAR CREEK

1.8 Total

0 46 LIVE

0 34 DEAD 1 1 12 7 16 6 0 43 DEAD

0 25 REDDS 7 25 39 57 9 2 0 139 REDDS

CLEARWATER CLEARWATER CLEARWATER CLEARWATER CLEARWATER CLEARWATER CLEARWATER

DEER (Adult Plants) DEER (supplemental survey)

FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL

Data collected by WDFW GREENWATER GREENWATER GREENWATER GREENWATER

HYLEBOS HYLEBOS

HUCKLEBERRY HUCKLEBERRY HUCKLEBERRY HUCKLEBERRY HUCKLEBERRY

C H I N O O K

10.0080 10.0080 10.0080 10.0080 10.0080 10.0080 10.0080

8/28/08 9/8/08 9/17/08 9/25/08 10/2/08 10/10/08 10/23/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 CLEARWATER R.

1.6 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 Total

10 23 48 91 37 10 0 219 LIVE

10.0685 10.0685

10/3/08 10/17/08

0.0 0.0 DEER CREEK

1.0 1.0 Total

252 0 252 LIVE

53 53 DEAD 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 DEAD

14 14 REDDS 0 0 3 10 11 4 0 28 REDDS

10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406

9/4/08 9/11/08 9/19/08 9/29/08 10/8/08 10/17/08 10/27/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 FENNEL CREEK

0.8 0.8 0.8 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 Total

0 0 3 2 1 1 0 7 LIVE

10.0122 10.0122 10.0122 10.0122

9/11/08 9/18/08 10/1/08 10/15/08

0 0 0 0 GREENWATER R.

7.9 7.9 7.9 7.9 Total

116 91 69 1 277 LIVE

8 34 27 12 81 DEAD 0 0 0 DEAD 0 0 3 2 0 5 DEAD 0

68 62 56 4 190 REDDS 0 0 0 REDDS 1 17 26 20 1 65 REDDS 0

10.0006 10.0006

9/19/08 10/23/08

0.1 0.1 HYLEBOS CREEK

0.5 0.5

0 0 0 LIVE

10.0253 10.0253 10.0253 10.0253 10.0253

8/22/08 9/10/08 9/18/08 9/25/08 10/2/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 HUCKLEBERRY CR.

1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 Total

0 10 19 8 0 37 LIVE

KAPOWSIN

10.0600

8/27/08

0.0

0.4

0

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 164

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN

RUSHINGWATER RUSHINGWATER

SALMON SALMON SALMON SALMON SALMON SALMON SALMON

SILVER SPRINGS SILVER SPRINGS SILVER SPRINGS SILVER SPRINGS

Data collected by WDFW SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE

SWAN SWAN SWAN SWAN

C H I N O O K

10.0600 10.0600 10.0600 10.0600 10.0600

9/15/08 9/24/08 10/3/08 10/14/08 10/22/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 KAPOWSIN CREEK

1.6 1.6 1.6 3.2 3.2 Total

0 17 0 2 0 19 LIVE

0 2 2 4 0 8 DEAD

0 18 1 2 0 21 REDDS

10.0625 10.0625

9/30/08 10/27/08

0.0 0.0 RUSHINGWATER

0.2 0.2 Total

5 0 5 LIVE

1 0 1 DEAD 0 0 0 0 4 9 0 13 DEAD 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

5 0 5 REDDS 0 0 0 2 9 2 0 13 REDDS 0 0 0 0 0 REDDS

10.0036 10.0036 10.0036 10.0036 10.0036 10.0036 10.0036

8/26/08 9/4/08 9/11/08 9/19/08 9/29/08 10/8/08 10/17/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 SALMON CREEK

0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 Total

0 0 0 4 13 4 0 21 LIVE

10.0332A 10.0332A 10.0332A 10.0332A

9/10/08 9/18/08 9/25/08 10/2/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 SILVER SPRINGS

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 Total

0 0 0 0 0 LIVE

10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429

9/4/08 9/12/08 9/22/08 9/23/08 9/29/08 9/30/08 10/9/08 10/16/08 10/22/08

0.3 0.3 0.3 8 0.3 8 0.3 0.3 8 SOUTH PRAIRIE

3.8 12.6 8 12.6 8 12.6 12.6 8 10.2 Total

17 154 154 25 100 15 10 1 0 476 LIVE

2 5 41 2 63 2 30 18 0 163 DEAD 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

5 96 111 19 91 17 24 3 3 369 REDDS 0 0 0 0 0 REDDS

10.0003 10.0003 10.0003 10.0003

8/26/08 9/4/08 9/11/08 10/8/08

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 SWAN CREEK

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total

0 0 0 0 0 LIVE

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 165

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

WHITE RIVER

10.0031

10/10/08

7.5 WHITE RIVER

24.3 Total

10 10 LIVE

0 0 DEAD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

30 30 REDDS 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 REDDS

WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON

10.0432 10.0432 10.0432 10.0432 10.0432 10.0432

9/4/08 9/11/08 9/19/08 9/29/08 10/8/08 10/17/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 WILKESON CREEK

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 LIVE

CHINOOK

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 166

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 BULL TROUT SPAWNING DATA (WHITE RIVER)
KLICKITAT KLICKITAT KLICKITAT KLICKITAT KLICKITAT

SILVER CREEK SILVER CREEK SILVER CREEK SILVER CREEK SILVER CREEK

SILVER SPRINGS SILVER SPRINGS SILVER SPRINGS SILVER SPRINGS SILVER SPRINGS

B U L L

STREAM

WRIA 10.0357 10.0357 10.0357 10.0357 10.0357

DATE 8/29/08 9/9/08 9/19/08 9/26/08 10/15/08

LOWER R.M. 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 KLICKITAT CREEK

UPPER R.M. 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Total

LIVE 0 13 3 0 0 16 LIVE 0 1 0 0 0 1 LIVE 0 0 0 0 0 0 LIVE 0 3 1 0 0 4 LIVE

DEAD 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

REDDS 0 6 14 1 0 21 REDDS 0 1 3 0 0 4 REDDS 0 1 2 0 0 3 REDDS 0 0 4 8 0 12 REDDS

10.0313 10.0313 10.0313 10.0313 10.0313

8/29/08 9/10/08 9/18/08 9/25/08 10/2/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 SILVER CREEK

0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 Total

10.0332A 10.0332A 10.0332A 10.0332A 10.0332A

8/29/08 9/10/08 9/18/08 9/25/08 10/2/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 SILVER SPRINGS

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 Total

NO-NAME CREEK NO-NAME CREEK NO-NAME CREEK NO-NAME CREEK NO-NAME CREEK

FRYINGPAN FRYINGPAN FRYINGPAN FRYINGPAN FRYINGPAN

WRIGHT CREEK WRIGHT CREEK WRIGHT CREEK WRIGHT CREEK WRIGHT CREEK

T R O U T

10.0364 10.0364 10.0364 10.0364 10.0364

8/29/08 9/9/08 9/19/08 9/26/08 10/7/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NONO-NAME CREEK

0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 Total

10.0369 10.0369 10.0369 10.0369 10.0369

8/29/08 9/9/08 9/19/08 9/26/08 10/15/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 FRYINGPAN CREEK

1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 Total

0 0 0 0 0 0 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

0 1 2 0 0 3 REDDS

10.0370 10.0370 10.0370 10.0370 10.0370

8/29/08 9/9/08 9/19/08 9/26/08 10/15/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 WRIGHT CREEK

0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 Total

0 0 3 0 0 3 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

0 0 6 1 0 7 REDDS

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 167

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

HIDDEN SPRINGS

ANTLER CREEK ANTLER CREEK ANTLER CREEK ANTLER CREEK

PARALLEL CREEK PARALLEL CREEK PARALLEL CREEK PARALLEL CREEK PARALLEL CREEK

B U L L

UNIDENTIFIED

9/26/08

0.0 HIDDEN SPRINGS

0.7 Total

0 0 LIVE

0 0 DEAD

0 0 REDDS

UNIDENTIFIED UNIDENTIFIED UNIDENTIFIED UNIDENTIFIED

9/9/08 9/19/08 9/26/08 10/15/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 ANTLER CREEK

0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Total

0 0 0 0 0 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

0 0 0 0 0 REDDS

UNIDENTIFIED UNIDENTIFIED UNIDENTIFIED UNIDENTIFIED UNIDENTIFIED

8/29/08 9/9/08 9/19/08 9/26/08 10/15/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 PARALLEL CREEK

0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 Total

0 1 4 1 0 6 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

0 1 1 3 0 5 REDDS

DISCOVERY DISCOVERY DISCOVERY

UNIDENTIFIED UNIDENTIFIED UNIDENTIFIED

9/9/08 9/19/08 9/26/08

LODI CREEK LODI CREEK

W. Fork White River

UNNAMED CREEK W. Fork White River

SUNRISE CREEK SUNRISE CREEK SUNRISE CREEK SUNRISE CREEK SUNRISE CREEK

SHAW CREEK

T R O U T

0.0 0.0 0.0 DISCOVERY CREEK

0.6 0.6 0.6 Total

0 0 0 0 LIVE

0 0 0 0 DEAD

0 2 0 2 REDDS

10.0027 10.0027

9/16/08 10/6/08

0.0 0.0 LODI CREEK

0.5 0.5 Total

0 0 0 LIVE 0 0 LIVE 0 0 0 0 0 0 LIVE 1 1 LIVE

0 0 0 DEAD 0 0 DEAD 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD 0 0 DEAD

0 0 0 REDDS 1 1 REDDS 0 0 0 0 0 0 REDDS 1 1 REDDS

10.0219

10/6/08

0.0 UNNAMED CREEK

0.1 Total

10.0337 10.0337 10.0337 10.0337 10.0337

8/29/08 9/9/08 9/19/08 9/26/08 10/15/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 SUNRISE CREEK

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 Total

10.0365

9/26/08

0.0 SHAW CREEK

1.1 Total

(UNIDENTIFIED): These tributaries are not identified on hydrology and/or officially named.
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 168

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008 COHO SALMON SPAWNING DATA
STREAM BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE WRIA 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 DATE 9/15/08 9/24/08 10/3/08 10/14/08 10/24/08 11/20/08 12/2/08 12/9/08 12/18/08 LOWER R.M. 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 BOISE CREEK UPPER R.M. 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 TOTAL: LIVE 0 1 5 18 224 186 11 6 0 451 LIVE DEAD 0 0 0 3 6 66 29 11 5 120 DEAD

Surveys conducted by WDFW

CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS

CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS

CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR

C O H O

10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410

11/17/08 12/2/08 12/9/08 12/16/08 12/30/08 1/6/09 1/15/09 1/23/09

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 CANYONFALLS CR.

0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 TOTAL:

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027

10/17/08 11/5/08 11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/16/08

3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 CLARKS CREEK

3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 TOTAL:

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

10.0022 10.0022 10.0022 10.0022 10.0022 10.0022

10/17/08 11/5/08 11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08

1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 CLEAR CREEK

1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 TOTAL:

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

CLEARWATER CLEARWATER CLEARWATER

10.0080 10.0080 10.0080

9/25/08 10/2/08 10/10/08

0.0 0.0 0.0

1.1 3.8 3.8

0 7 6

1 0 0

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 169

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

CLEARWATER

10.0080

10/23/08

0.0 CLEARWATER RIVER

3.8 TOTAL:

0 13 LIVE

0 1 DEAD

Surveys conducted by WDFW

COAL MINE COAL MINE COAL MINE COAL MINE COAL MINE COAL MINE COAL MINE COAL MINE COAL MINE COAL MINE

10.0432A 10.0432A 10.0432A 10.0432A 10.0432A 10.0432A 10.0432A 10.0432A 10.0432A 10.0432A

11/5/08 11/14/08 12/2/08 12/9/08 12/16/08 12/30/08 1/6/09 1/15/09 1/23/09 1/28/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 COAL MINE CREEK

0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 TOTAL:

4 6 0 2 1 14 15 18 0 0 60 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 DEAD

DEER (Adult plants)

Surveys conducted by WDFW

FENNEL CREEK FENNEL CREEK FENNEL CREEK FENNEL CREEK FENNEL CREEK FENNEL CREEK FENNEL CREEK

Surveys conducted by WDFW

FISKE FISKE FISKE FISKE FISKE FISKE

C O H O

10.0865

11/5/08

ADULT FISH DEER CREEK

PLANT TOTAL:

697 697 LIVE

DEAD

10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406

11/5/08 11/17/08 12/2/08 12/9/08 12/16/08 1/6/09 1/15/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 FENNEL CREEK

1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.1 1.9 TOTAL:

10 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 LIVE

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 DEAD

10.0596 10.0596 10.0596 10.0596 10.0596 10.0596

10/22/08 11/5/08 11/14/08 12/2/08 12/9/08 12/30/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 FISKE CREEK

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 TOTAL:

0 3 3 0 0 0 6 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

FOX FOX FOX FOX FOX FOX

10.0608 10.0608 10.0608 10.0608 10.0608 10.0608

10/14/08 10/23/08 10/28/08 11/5/08 11/17/08 11/26/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 FOX CREEK

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 TOTAL:

0 0 1 90 20 0 111 LIVE

0 0 0 5 54 13 72 DEAD
Page 170

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN

10.0600 10.0600 10.0600 10.0600 10.0600 10.0600 10.0600

10/3/08 10/14/08 10/23/08 10/28/08 11/5/08 11/24/08 12/3/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 KAPOWSIN CREEK

1.6 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 TOTAL:

0 1 0 2 170 3 0 176 LIVE

0 1 0 0 5 7 3 16 DEAD

LE DOUT

10.0620

10/27/08

0.0 LE DOUT CREEK

0.4 TOTAL:

7 7 LIVE

3 3 DEAD

NIESSON NIESSON

OHOP OHOP OHOP OHOP

PUYALLUP RIVER

RODY RODY RODY RODY RODY

C O H O

10.0622 10.0622

10/28/08 11/4/08

0.0 ADULT FISH NIESSON CREEK

1.0 PLANT TOTAL:

37 656 693 LIVE

11 11 DEAD

10.0600 10.0600 10.0600 10.0600

11/6/08 11/20/08 11/25/08 12/3/08

ADULT FISH 6.5 6.5 6.5 OHOP CREEK

PLANT 7.5 7.1 7.0 TOTAL:

399 16 2 0 417 LIVE

11 10 3 24 DEAD

10.0600

10/30/08

ADULT FISH PLANT PUYALLUP RIVER

N. FORK TOTAL:

618 618 LIVE

0 DEAD

10.0028 10.0028 10.0028 10.0028 10.0028

11/5/08 11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08

0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 RODY CREEK

0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 TOTAL:

0 0 0 0 0 0 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

RUSHINGWATER RUSHINGWATER RUSHINGWATER RUSHINGWATER

10.0625 10.0625 10.0625 10.0625

9/30/08 10/27/08 11/6/08 11/6/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 ADULT FISH RUSHINGWATER CR.

1.0 1.0 1.0 PLANT TOTAL:

0 0 16 265 281 LIVE

0 0 0 0 DEAD

SALMON

10.0035

10/17/08

0.0

0.5

0

0
Page 171

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SALMON SALMON SALMON SALMON SALMON

10.0035 10.0035 10.0035 10.0035 10.0035

11/5/08 11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 SALMON CREEK

0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 TOTAL:

2 1 0 0 0 3 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

SALMON TRIB. SALMON TRIB. SALMON TRIB. SALMON TRIB. SALMON TRIB.

10.0036 10.0036 10.0036 10.0036 10.0036

11/5/08 11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 TRIBUTARY SALMON TRIBUTARY

0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 TOTAL:

SILVER SPRINGS SILVER SPRINGS SILVER SPRINGS

SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE

Surveys conducted by WDFW

SPIKETON CREEK SPIKETON CREEK SPIKETON CREEK SPIKETON CREEK SPIKETON CREEK SPIKETON CREEK SPIKETON CREEK SPIKETON CREEK SPIKETON CREEK

C O H O

0 0 0 0 0 0 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

10.0032A 10.0032A 10.0032A

10/2/08 10/10/08 10/23/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 SILVER SPRINGS CR.

0.3 0.3 0.3 TOTAL:

3 5 32 40 LIVE

0 1 2 3 DEAD

10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429

11/19/08 11/25/08 12/4/08 12/9/08 12/11/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 6.0 0.0 SOUTH PRAIRIE CR.

8.0 8.0 8.0 10.2 6.0 TOTAL:

16 13 148 19 9 205 LIVE

0 0 1 0 0 1 DEAD

10.0453 10.0453 10.0453 10.0453 10.0453 10.0453 10.0453 10.0453 10.0453

11/5/08 11/14/08 12/2/08 12/16/08 12/30/08 1/6/09 1/15/09 1/23/09 1/28/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 SPIKETON CREEK

0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 TOTAL:

6 9 0 0 10 26 29 4 0 84 LIVE

1 0 0 0 0 0 3 10 5 19 DEAD

SPRING CREEK

10.0430

11/18/08

0.0 SPRING CREEK

0.3 TOTAL:

4 4 LIVE

0 0 DEAD

SWAN

10.0003

10/17/08

0.3

1.0

0

0
Page 172

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SWAN SWAN SWAN

10.0003 10.0003 10.0003

11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08

0.3 0.3 0.3 SWAN CREEK

1.0 1.0 1.0 TOTAL:

0 0 0 0 LIVE

0 0 0 0 DEAD

SQUALLY SQUALLY SQUALLY SQUALLY

10.0024 10.0024 10.0024 10.0024

11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 SQUALLY CREEK

0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 TOTAL:

0 0 0 0 0 LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON

10.0432 10.0432 10.0432 10.0432 10.0432

11/5/08 11/17/08 11/24/08 12/3/08 12/9/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 WILKESON CREEK

1.1 5.8 5.8 1.1 1.1 TOTAL:

0 2 6 0 0 8 LIVE

0 2 0 0 0 2 DEAD

COHO

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 173

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

2008/2009 CHUM SPAWNING DATA
STREAM
BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE

WRIA
10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057

DATE
11/20/08 12/1/08 12/9/08 12/18/08

LOWER RM
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 BOISE CREEK

UPPER RM
4.5 4.5 2.2 2.2 TOTAL:

LIVE
0 23 14 4 41 LIVE 0 0 3 6 13 29 5 0 56 LIVE

DEAD
0 5 5 4 14 DEAD 0 0 0 11 46 21 24 9 111 DEAD

CANYON CANYON CANYON CANYON CANYON CANYON CANYON CANYON

10.XXXX 10.XXXX 10.XXXX 10.XXXX 10.XXXX 10.XXXX 10.XXXX 10.XXXX

11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08 12/22/08 12/31/08 1/15/09 1/22/09

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 CANYON CREEK

Surveys conducted by WDFW

CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS

10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410

11/17/08 12/2/08 12/9/08 12/16/08 12/30/08 1/6/09 1/15/09 1/23/09 1/28/09

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.0 CANYONFALLS

CARBON CARBON CARBON

10.0413 10.0413 10.0413

11/25/08 12/4/08 12/11/08

0.0 0.0 0.0 CARBON RIVER

CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS

10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027

11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/16/08 12/22/08 12/31/08 1/15/09 1/22/09 2/2/09

3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 CLARKS CREEK 1.7

C H U M

1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 TOTAL:

0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.4 TOTAL:

0 0 11 7 120 67 5 2 1 213 LIVE

0 0 0 0 9 60 39 0 0 108 DEAD

6.0 6.0 6.0 TOTAL:

70 78 12 160 LIVE 0 0 5 115 100 67 49 21 11 368 LIVE 0

4 21 32 57 DEAD 0 0 8 80 95 48 53 9 3 296 DEAD 0
Page 174

3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 TOTAL: 1.9

CLEAR

10.0022

11/17/08

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR

10.0022 10.0022 10.0022 10.0022 10.0022 10.0022 10.0022 10.0022

11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08 12/22/08 12/31/08 1/15/09 1/22/09 2/2/09

1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 CLEAR CREEK

1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 TOTAL:

2 6 15 22 255 66 16 0 382 LIVE

0 4 8 13 22 73 37 5 162 DEAD

Surveys conducted by WDFW

FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL

10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406

11/5/08 11/17/08 12/2/08 12/9/08 12/16/08 1/6/09 1/15/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 FENNEL CREEK

Surveys conducted by WDFW

TRIB. FENNEL TRIB. TRIB. FENNEL TRIB. TRIB. FENNEL TRIB. TRIB. FENNEL TRIB. TRIB. FENNEL TRIB. TRIB. FENNEL TRIB.

10.0406A 10.0406A 10.0406A 10.0406A 10.0406A 10.0406A

11/17/08 12/2/08 12/9/08 12/16/08 1/6/09 1/15/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 FENNEL CREEK

HYLEBOS HYLEBOS

10.0006 10.0006

11/17/08 11/28/08

0.1 0.1 HYLEBOS CREEK

RODY RODY RODY RODY RODY RODY RODY

10.0028 10.0028 10.0028 10.0028 10.0028 10.0028 10.0028

11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08 12/22/08 12/31/08 1/15/09

0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 RODY CREEK

C H U M
0.0 0.0 0.0

1.1 1.1 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.1 1.9 TOTAL:

41 94 172 164 132 58 0 661 LIVE

1 13 97 101 67 0 22 301 DEAD

0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 TOTAL:

0 1 1 3 11 1 17 LIVE

5 7 4 1 50 69 136 DEAD

0.7 0.7 TOTAL:

1 0 1 LIVE

0 0 0 DEAD

0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 TOTAL:

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 LIVE

0 0 1 3 9 0 0 13 DEAD

SALMON SALMON SALMON

10.0035 10.0035 10.0035

11/5/08 11/17/08 11/25/08

0.5 0.5 0.5

0 3 11

0 1 3

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 175

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SALMON SALMON SALMON SALMON SALMON SALMON SALMON

10.0035 10.0035 10.0035 10.0035 10.0035 10.0035 10.0035

12/3/08 12/12/08 12/22/08 1/6/09 1/13/09 1/22/09 2/2/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 SALMON CREEK

0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 TOTAL:

14 6 5 3 3 0 0 45 LIVE

10 3 8 0 2 2 0 29 DEAD

SALMON TRIB. SALMON TRIB. SALMON TRIB. SALMON TRIB. SALMON TRIB. SALMON TRIB. SALMON TRIB. SALMON TRIB. SALMON TRIB.

10.0036 10.0036 10.0036 10.0036 10.0036 10.0036 10.0036 10.0036 10.0036

11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08 12/22/08 1/6/09 1/13/09 1/22/09 2/2/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 SALMON TRIB.

SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE

10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429

11/19/08 11/25/08 11/26/08 12/4/08 12/9/08 12/11/08

0.0 0.0 6.0 0.0 6.0 0.0 PRAIRI SOUTH PRAIRIE

Surveys conducted by WDFW

SPIKETON SPIKETON SPIKETON SPIKETON SPIKETON

10.0453 10.0453 10.0453 10.0453 10.0453

11/14/08 12/2/08 12/30/08 1/6/09 1/15/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 SPIKETON CREEK

SQUALLY SQUALLY SQUALLY SQUALLY SQUALLY SQUALLY SQUALLY

10.0024 10.0024 10.0024 10.0024 10.0024 10.0024 10.0024

11/17/08 11/25/08 12/3/08 12/12/08 12/22/08 12/31/08 1/15/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 SQUALLY CREEK 0.3 0.3

C H U M

0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 TOTAL:

0 3 10 23 15 12 4 9 0 76 LIVE

0 73 54 32 16 29 13 3 0 220 DEAD

8.0 6.0 10.2 8.0 10.2 6.0 TOTAL:

375 518 431 525 241 177 2267 LIVE

14 27 52 253 232 69 647 DEAD

0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.2 TOTAL:

0 0 0 0 0 0 LIVE 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 LIVE 9 3

0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD 0 7

0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 TOTAL: 1.3 1.3

SWAN SWAN

10.0003 10.0003

11/17/08 11/25/08

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 176

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SWAN SWAN SWAN SWAN

10.0003 10.0003 10.0003 10.0003

12/3/08 12/12/08 12/22/08 1/15/09

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 SWAN CREEK

1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 TOTAL:

34 47 12 0 105 LIVE

24 38 22 0 91 DEAD

WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON

10.0432 10.0432 10.0432 10.0432 10.0432

11/17/08 11/24/08 12/3/08 12/9/08 1/22/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 WILKESON CR.

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 TOTAL:

0 10 90 62 0 162 LIVE

0 2 10 15 0 27 DEAD

CHUM

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 177

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

PTF - 2009 STEELHEAD SURVEY DATA
STREAM BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE BOISE WRIA 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 10.0057 DATE 3/20/09 4/20/09 4/29/09 5/13/09 5/26/09 6/9/09 6/22/09 LOWER R.M. 0.0 2.2 0.0 2.2 0.0 2.2 0.0 2.2 0.0 2.2 0.0 2.2 0.0 2.2 BOISE UPPER R.M. 2.2 4.5 2.2 4.5 2.2 4.5 2.2 4.5 2.2 4.5 2.2 4.5 2.2 4.5 TOTAL LIVE 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 LIVE DEAD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD REDDS 2 1 4 2 2 3 1 3 2 3 1 1 0 0 25 REDDS

CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS CANYONFALLS

10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410 10.0410

3/16/09 3/26/09 4/7/09 4/17/09 4/27/09 5/4/09 5/19/09

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 CANYONFALLS

0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 TOTAL LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 REDDS

CARBON CARBON

10.0413 10.0413

3/30/09 5/1/09

0.0 0.0 CARBON

9.5 23.0 TOTAL LIVE

1 0 1

0 0 0 DEAD

3 0 3 REDDS

CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS CLARKS

10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027

3/16/09 3/26/09 4/7/09 4/17/09 4/27/09 5/4/09 5/19/09

3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 CLARKS

3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 TOTAL LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 REDDS

CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR

10.0022 10.0022 10.0022 10.0022

12/31/08 3/16/09 3/26/09 4/7/09

1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7

1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9

1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0
Page 178

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR CLEAR

10.0022 10.0022 10.0022 10.0022

4/17/09 4/27/09 5/4/09 5/19/09

1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 CLEAR

1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 TOTAL LIVE

0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

0 0 0 0 0 REDDS

Surveys conducted by WDFW

CLEARWATER CLEARWATER

10.0080 10.0080

4/16/09 4/28/09

0.0 0.0 CLEARWATER

3.7 3.7 TOTAL LIVE

0 0 0

0 0 0 DEAD

2 3 5 REDDS

FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL FENNEL

10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406 10.0406

3/16/09 3/26/09 4/7/09 4/17/09 4/27/09 5/4/09 5/19/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 FENNEL

0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 TOTAL LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 REDDS

FOX FOX FOX FOX FOX

10.0608 10.0608 10.0608 10.0608 10.0608

3/16/09 3/24/09 4/24/09 5/4/09 5/19/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 FOX

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 TOTAL LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

0 0 0 0 0 0 REDDS

KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN KAPOWSIN

10.0600 10.0600 10.0600 10.0600 10.0600

3/23/09 4/16/09 4/28/09 5/13/09 6/9/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 KAPOWSIN

3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 TOTAL LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

2 0 0 1 0 3 REDDS

KELLOG KELLOG KELLOG KELLOG KELLOG

10.0621 10.0621 10.0621 10.0621 10.0621

3/19/09 4/6/09 4/16/09 4/28/09 5/28/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 KELLOG

2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 TOTAL LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

0 0 0 0 3 3 REDDS

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 179

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

LEDOUT LEDOUT LEDOUT LEDOUT LEDOUT

10.0620 10.0620 10.0620 10.0620 10.0620

3/19/09 4/6/09 4/16/09 4/28/09 5/28/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 LEDOUT

0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 TOTAL LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

0 0 0 0 1 1 REDDS

MEADOW

10.0630

4/7/09

0.0 MEADOW

0.5 TOTAL LIVE

0 0

0 0 DEAD

0 0 REDDS

MOWICH RIVER

10.0624

4/7/09

0.0 MOWICH RIVER

4.0 TOTAL LIVE

0 0

0 0 DEAD

0 0 REDDS

NIESSON NIESSON NIESSON NIESSON NIESSON

10.0622 10.0622 10.0622 10.0622 10.0622

3/19/09 4/6/09 4/16/09 4/28/09 5/28/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NIESSON

2.0 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 TOTAL LIVE

0 1 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

0 1 2 2 9 14 REDDS

LOWER PUYALLUP

PUYALLUP

10.0021

5/1/09

1 L. PUYALLUP

26.2 TOTAL LIVE

0 0

0 0 DEAD

2 2 REDDS

UPPER PUYALLUP

PUYALLUP PUYALLUP PUYALLUP PUYALLUP PUYALLUP

10.0021 10.0021 10.0021 10.0021 10.0021

3/19/09 4/6/09 4/16/09 4/28/09 5/1/09

36 36 36 36 26.2 U. PUYALLUP

41.7 41.7 41.7 41.7 55 TOTAL LIVE

0 0 0 1 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

1 3 1 1 0 6 REDDS

RUSHINGWATER

10.0265

4/30/09

0.0 RUSHINGWATER

0.5 TOTAL LIVE

0 0

0 0 DEAD

0 0 REDDS

Surveys conducted by WDFW

SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE

10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429

3/10/09 3/19/09 4/24/09 4/27/09 5/4/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 8.0 0.0

8.0 12.6 8.0 12.6 8.0

0 1 4 2 1

0 0 0 0 1

0 6 10 9 14

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 180

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE SOUTH PRAIRIE

10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429 10.0429

5/5/09 5/22/09 5/27/09 6/4/09 6/11/09 6/25/09

8.0 0.3 8 0.3 0.3 10.2 SOUTH PRAIRIE

12.6 8 12.6 12.6 10.2 12.6 TOTAL LIVE

0 0 0 1 0 0 9

0 0 0 0 0 0 1 DEAD 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD

8 8 3 10 2 1 71 REDDS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 REDDS

SWAN SWAN SWAN SWAN SWAN SWAN SWAN

10.0003 10.0003 10.0003 10.0003 10.0003 10.0003 10.0003

3/16/09 3/26/09 4/7/09 4/17/09 4/27/09 5/4/09 5/19/09

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 SWAN

0.7 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.8 1.0 TOTAL LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SWIFT

10.0697

4/30/09

0.0 SWIFT

0.3 TOTAL LIVE

0 0

0 0 DEAD 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD 0 0 DEAD

0 0 REDDS 1 3 4 0 0 8 REDDS 0 0 REDDS

VOIGHTS VOIGHTS VOIGHTS VOIGHTS VOIGHTS

10.0414 10.0414 10.0414 10.0414 10.0414

3/23/09 4/24/09 5/4/09 5/13/09 5/27/09

0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 VOIGHTS

3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 TOTAL LIVE

0 0 0 0 0 0

WHITE RIVER

10.0031

5/1/09

0 WHITE RIVER

24.3 TOTAL LIVE

0 0

Surveys conducted by WDFW

WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON WILKESON

10.0432 10.0432 10.0432 10.0432 10.0432 10.0432 10.0432 10.0432

3/12/09 3/23/09 4/27/09 4/28/09 5/4/09 5/5/09 5/22/09 6/9/09

0.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 WILKESON

6 6.1 6.1 3.0 6.1 3.0 6.1 6.1 TOTAL

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEAD REDDS 145

0 1 1 3 0 2 1 0 8 REDDS

Helicopter Flight LIVE Redd totals do not include redds observed above RM 24.3 (Buckley) on the White River LIVE STEELHEAD SURVEY TOTALS:
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

DEAD 1

15

Page 181

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

20082008-2009
ADULT AND JUVENILE FISH PLANTS AND RELEASES

APPENDIX E
PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT Page 182

WRIA 10: PUYALLUP/WHITE RIVER WATERSHED

Adult Chinook
Date 01-Oct-08 03-Oct-08 Adult Coho Date Oct-30-08 Nov-4-08 Nov-5-08 Nov-6-08 Nov-6-08 Location North Fork Puyallup Niesson Deer Creek Ohop Rushingwater WRIA 10.0699 10.0622 10.0685 10.0600 10.0625 River Mile 0.2 2 0.5 2.5 2 Males 323 Females 277 Jacks 18 TOTAL 618 656 697 399 265 Location North Fork Puyallup Deer Creek WRIA 10.0699 10.0685 River Mile 0.2 0.5 Males 148 117 Females 157 132 Jacks 5 3 TOTAL 310 252

Juveniles
SPECIES DATE (F) 21-Feb-09 18-Mar-09 27-Mar-09 2-Apr-09 3-Apr-09 3-Apr-09 17-Apr-09 17-Apr-09 27-Apr-09 27-Apr-09 27-Apr-09 11-May-09 11-May-09 29-May-09 SPECIES DATE (V) 26-May-09 26-May-09 27-May-09 27-May-09 SPECIES DATE (V) 26-Mar-09 2-Jun-09 23-May-09 1-Jun-09 1-Jun-09 SPECIES DATE (V) Stream Puget Creek Hylebos Creek Diru Creek Diru Creek Diru Creek Diru Creek Diru Creek Diru Creek Diru Creek Diru Creek Diru Creek Diru Creek Diru Creek Diru Creek Chum WRIA 12.0002A 10.0014 10.0029 10.0029 10.0029 10.0029 10.0029 10.0029 10.0029 10.0029 10.0029 10.0029 10.0029 10.0029 Fall Chinook WRIA 10.0027 10.0027 10.0027 10.0006 Spring Chinook WRIA 10.0122 100122 100253 10.0680 10.0625 Coho WRIA 10.0600 Number of Fish 50,000 101,388 100,258 762,592 104,776 109,685 505,000 100,000 108,000 110,500 270,294 200,000 110,107 57,600 Total: 2,690,200 Number of Fish 499,350 499,500 540,127 20,243 Total: 1,559,220 Number of Fish 115,600 830,996 382,300 181,386 133,486 Total: 1,643,768 Number of Fish Total: 21,000

Stream Clarks Creek Clarks Creek Clarks Creek Hylebos Creek

Stream Greenwater River Greenwater A.P. Huck Army A.P. Cowskull Rushingwater

Location Lake Kapowsin

PUYALLUP TRIBAL FISHERIES 2008-2009 ANNUAL SALMON, STEELHEAD, AND BULL TROUT REPORT

Page 183

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful