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After studying this chapter, you should be able to

:

Human Resource
Management

2. Explain the employee’s, manager’s, and employer’s
career development roles.

ELEVENTH EDITION

1

1. Compare employers’ traditional and career planningplanningoriented HR focuses.

GARY DESSLER

3. Describe the issues to consider when making
promotion decisions.
Part 3 | Training and Development

Chapter 10

5. Answer the question: How can career development
foster employee commitment?

Managing Careers
© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc.
All rights reserved.

PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook
The University of West Alabama

© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved.

10–2

TABLE 10–1 Traditional Versus Career Development Focus

The Basics Of Career Management

Career
Management

4. Describe the methods for enhancing diversity through
career management.

Career
Development

Employees’
Careers

HR Activity

Traditional Focus

Career Development Focus

Human
resource
planning

Analyzes jobs, skills, tasks—
present and future. Projects
needs. Uses statistical data.

Adds information about individual
interests, preferences, and the like to
replacement plans.

Recruiting and
placement

Matching organization’s
needs with qualified
individuals.

Matches individual and jobs based on
variables including employees’ career
interests and aptitudes.

Training and
development

Provides opportunities for
learning skills, information,
and attitudes related to job.

Provides career path information.
Adds individual development plans.

Performance
appraisal

Rating and/or rewards.

Adds development plans and individual
goal setting.

Compensation
and benefits

Rewards for time, productivity,
talent, and so on.

Adds tuition reimbursement plans,
compensation for non-job related
activities such as United Way.

Career
Planning

Source: Adapted from Fred L. Otte and Peggy G. Hutcheson, Helping Employees Manage Careers (Upper Saddle River,
NJ: Prentice Hall, 1992), p. 10, and www.ge.com.cn/careers/career_management.html. Accessed May 18, 2008.
© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved.

10–3

FIGURE 10–1
Employee
Career
Development
Plan

© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved.

TABLE 10–2

10–4

Roles in Career Development

Individual

Manager

• Accept responsibility for your own career.

• Provide timely and accurate performance
feedback.

• Assess your interests, skills, and values.
• Seek out career information and resources.
• Establish goals and career plans.
• Utilize development opportunities.
• Talk with your manager about your career.
• Follow through on realistic career plans.

• Provide developmental assignments and
support.
• Participate in career development
discussions with subordinates.
• Support employee development plans.

Employer
• Communicate mission, policies, and procedures.
• Provide training and development opportunities, including workshops.
• Provide career information and career programs.
• Offer a variety of career paths.
• Provide career-oriented performance feedback.
• Provide mentoring opportunities to support growth and self-direction.
• Provide employees with individual development plans.
• Provide academic learning assistance programs.
Source: Reprinted from www.HR.BLR.com
with permission of the publisher Business
and Legal Reports Inc., 141 Mill Rock Road
East, Old Saybrook, CT © 2004.
© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved.

Source: Adapted from Fred L. Otte and Peggy G. Hutcheson, Helping Employees Manage Careers (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1992),
p. 56; www.ge.com.cn/careers/career_management.html; and www_03.ibm.com/employment/us.cd_career_dev.shtml. Accessed May 18, 2007.
10–5

© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. All rights reserved.

10–6

1

com. Accessed May 18.” Challenging First Jobs 5. Hutcheson. Job postings Career booklets/pamphlets Formal education/tuition reimbursement Written individual career plans Career workshops Performance appraisal for career planning • Be sure that the mentor understands what you expect in terms of time and advice. 8. 10–10 10–11 Decision 2: How Should We Measure Competence? © 2008 Prentice Hall. Assessment Center Upward appraisal Counseling by manager Special needs (dual-career couples) Formal mentoring Diversity management Common career paths Expatriation/repatriation Dual ladder career paths Source: Adapted from Fred L.TABLE 10–3 Possible Employer Career Planning and Development Practices Choosing a Mentor • Choose an appropriate potential mentor. Appraisal committees Training programs for managers Counseling by HR • Have an agenda. Encourage role reversal.cd_career_dev. Inc. Horizontal.com/employment/us. Provide each employee with an individual budget. Inc. Networking and Interactions 4. All rights reserved. p. or Other? 10–12 2 . Lateral moves/job rotations Orientation/induction programs Pre-retirement programs Special needs (highfliers) Succession planning • Respect the mentor’s time. All rights reserved. © 2008 Prentice Hall. • Don’t be surprised if you’re turned down. Inc. Inc.html. Helping Employees Manage Careers (Upper Saddle River.and offline career development programs. Provide career coaches. Inc. 2007. 3. All rights reserved. 1992). Job Rotation © 2008 Prentice Hall. Establish a “corporate campus. 10–8 Innovative Corporate Career Development Initiatives 1. All rights reserved. Inc.ibm. Realistic Job Previews 2. Decision 3: Is the Process Formal or Informal? Decision 4: Vertical. Career-Oriented Appraisals Mentoring 7. www. All rights reserved.cn/careers/career_management. Otte and Peggy G. Utilize computerized onon. 10–7 The Employer’s Role in Career Development © 2008 Prentice Hall.” Employer’s Role 6. Provide career planning workshops.ge.shtml. Help organize “career success teams. Offer onon-site or online career centers. All rights reserved. Managing Promotions and Transfers Making Promotion Decisions Decision 1: Is Seniority or Competence the Rule? © 2008 Prentice Hall. 56. NJ: Prentice Hall. and www_03. 10–9 FIGURE 10–2 Sample Agenda— Two-Day Career Planning Workshop © 2008 Prentice Hall.

All rights reserved. All rights reserved. Inc. Inc. All rights reserved.” Improve Networking and Mentoring © 2008 Prentice Hall. 10–14 Taking Steps to Enhance Diversity: Women’s and Minorities’ Prospects Career Management and Employee Commitment Take Their Career Interests Seriously Comparing Yesterday’s and Today’s Employee-Employer Contract Institute Flexible Schedules and Career Tracks Eliminate Institutional Barriers Eliminate the Glass Ceiling 10–15 Career Management and Employee Commitment (cont’d) © 2008 Prentice Hall. Inc.  A lack of women mentors 10–13 © 2008 Prentice Hall. location)  The “old“old-boy network” of informal friendships  Greater advancement possibilities • Employers’ reasons for transferring employees  To vacate a position where an employee is no longer needed. New Contract: “Do your best for us and be loyal to us for as long as you’re here.  A lack of highhigh-visibility assignments and developmental experiences (glass ceiling)  A lack of company role models for members of  To fill a position where an employee is needed.Handling Transfers Enhancing Diversity Through Career Management • Employees’ reasons for desiring transfers • Sources of bias and discrimination  Personal enrichment and growth  More interesting jobs  Too few people of color employed in the hiring department  Greater convenience (better hours. All rights reserved. All rights reserved. the same racial or ethnic group  To find a better fit for an employee within the firm. Inc. All rights reserved. Inc. and we’ll provide you with the developmental opportunities you’ll need to move on and have a successful career. Career Development Programs Old Contract: “Do your best and be loyal to us. 10–16 Career Management and Employee Commitment (cont’d) Commitmentoriented career development efforts © 2008 Prentice Hall. © 2008 Prentice Hall. Inc.” Career Development Programs CareerOriented Appraisals 10–17 © 2008 Prentice Hall. and we’ll take care of your career.  Inflexible organizations and career tracks  To boost productivity by consolidating positions. CommitmentOriented Career Development Efforts CareerOriented Appraisals 10–18 3 .

Old Saybrook. CT © 2004. 141 Mill Rock Road East. All rights reserved. Inc. 10–20 10–21 preretirement counseling career cycle growth stage exploration stage establishment stage trial substage stabilization substage midcareer crisis substage maintenance stage decline stage career anchors © 2008 Prentice Hall. Inc.com with permission of the publisher Business and Legal Reports. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.FIGURE 10–3 Sample Performance Review Development Plan Retirement • Preretirement Counseling Practices  Explanation of Social Security benefits  Leisure time counseling  Financial and investment counseling  Health counseling  Psychological counseling  Counseling for second careers  Counseling for second careers inside the company Source: Reprinted from www. 10–19 © 2008 Prentice Hall. All rights reserved. Inc. All rights reserved. Inc. All rights reserved. Inc. © 2008 Prentice Hall.BLR. Attracting and Retaining Older Workers KEY TERMS career career management career development career planning career planning and development reality shock job rotation mentoring promotions transfers retirement Create a Culture that Honors Experience HR Practices for Older Workers Offer Flexible Work Offer Part-Time Work © 2008 Prentice Hall. Inc. PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook The University of West Alabama © 2008 Prentice Hall.. 10–22 Identify Your Career Stage Human Resource Management 1 ELEVENTH EDITION GARY DESSLER • Growth Stage • Exploration Stage • Establishment Stage  Trial substage  Stabilization substage  Midcareer crisis substage Part 3 | Training and Development Chapter 10 Appendix • Maintenance Stage • Decline Stage Managing Careers © 2008 Prentice Hall. 10–24 4 .HR. Inc.

1998. Inc. 212. All rights reserved. 10–26 FIGURE 10–A3 Finding the Job You Should Want (Part 2) Source: James Waldroop and Timothy Butler. “Finding the Job You Should Want. All rights reserved. 214. Reprinted by permission. p.” Fortune. Copyright © 1998 Time Inc. All rights reserved. 1998.” Fortune. 211. Inc. Copyright © 1998 Time Inc. 10–30 5 . Inc. including: Accountants Carpenters Advertising Executives Research and Development Managers Military Officers Bankers Credit Managers Chamber of Commerce Executives Investment Managers Lawyers © 2008 Prentice Hall. 10–27 © 2008 Prentice Hall. Reprinted by permission. “Finding the Job You Should Want. Inc. March 2. All rights reserved. 10–25 FIGURE 10–A2 Finding the Job You Should Want (Part 1) © 2008 Prentice Hall. Inc. All rights reserved. All rights reserved. All rights reserved. Copyright © 1998 Time Inc. © 2008 Prentice Hall. 10–28 FIGURE 10–A4 Finding the Job You Should Want (Part 3) Identify Your Career Anchors Technical/ Functional Competence Security Autonomy and Independence Managerial Competence Creativity Source: James Waldroop and Timothy Butler. March 2. March 2. Inc. p. “Finding the Job You Should Want. p.” Fortune.FIGURE 10–A1 Choosing an Occupational Orientation TABLE 10–A1 Examples of Occupations that Typify Each Occupational Theme Realistic Investigative Artistic Social Enterprising Conventional Engineers Physicians Psychologists Auto Sales Dealers Public Relations Executives School Administrators A Wide Range of Managerial Occupations. All rights reserved. 1998. © 2008 Prentice Hall. All rights reserved. Source: James Waldroop and Timothy Butler. 10–29 © 2008 Prentice Hall. Reprinted by permission.

Inc. college. 2007.gov//oco/.com. and financial literacy information and services to students. All rights reserved. All rights reserved. Reproduced with permission of Dow Jones & Co.com • SalaryExpert • Construct My Future (information about construction careers) • Simply Hired • Cool Works • ERI's Career Salary and Cost of Living Calculators • Futures in Nursing • hotjobs. 10–35 © 2008 Prentice Hall. financial aid.com • Jammin Jobs! • Snag a Job • Streaming Futures (career advice from industry leaders through online streaming video) • Think Big (information on technical careers) • Translation Industry Career Guide • True Careers • Job Bank USA • Try Tools (information about careers in construction) • Job Web • You Apply Here (hourly and part-time employment) • JobProfiles. All rights reserved. All rights reserved. © 2008 Prentice Hall. Inc. via Copyright Clearance Center © 2004. Inc. Inc. and schools (http:/ /mapping-our-future. Inc. a public service Web site providing career. © 2008 Prentice Hall. 10–36 6 . All rights reserved. 10–31 Source: Printed with permission from Mapping Your Future. All rights reserved.com Source: http://www. 10–34 FIGURE 10–A8 Example of a Good Résumé Writing Your Résumé • Introductory Information • Job Objective • Job Scope • Your Accomplishments • Length • Personal Data • Make Your Résumé Scannable © 2008 Prentice Hall. Accessed August 9.bls. 10–32 FIGURE 10–A7 CareerJournal. Inc.FIGURE 10–A5 Occupational Outlook Handbook Online FIGURE 10–A6 Some Online Sources of Occupational Information Career Guidance / Job Search • All Star Jobs • JobSniper • America's Career InfoNet • NationJob • Campus Career Center • O*Net Career Center (includes career assessment) • Career Magazine • Occupational Outlook Handbook • CareerExplorer • Personality Questionnaires Online • College Central Network • Quintessential Careers • CollegeGrad. © 2008 Prentice Hall.org). 10–33 Source: Wall Street Journal by CareerJournal.com Finding the Right Job • Do Your Own Local Research • Online Job Boards • Personal Contacts • Answering Advertisements • Employment Agencies • Executive Recruiters • Career Counselors • Executive Marketing Consultants • Employers’ Web Sites © 2008 Prentice Hall. Inc. families.

Inc. 10–38 7 . Prepare. Inc. Prepare • Avoid touchy subjects • Uncover the Interviewer’s Needs • Look the part • Relate Yourself to the Person’s Needs • Make it search friendly • Use abbreviations • Think Before Answering • Say it with numbers • Make a Good Appearance and Show Enthusiasm • Carefully proofread © 2008 Prentice Hall.Online Bios Handling the Interview • Fill it with details • Prepare. All rights reserved. 10–37 © 2008 Prentice Hall. All rights reserved.