You are on page 1of 212

jiiiilil

iliililUiLliliiiL

:xr

^^te~!

Cr-

ARCHITECTURE AND APPLIED ARTS


IN OLD SPAIN

OLD SPAIN
By

AUGUST

L,

MAyER,

PH. D

PROFESSOR AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MUNICH


CORRESPONDING MEMBER OF THE REAL ACADEMIA
DE BELLAS ARTES DE S. FERNANDO IN MADRID
OF THE REAL ACADEMIA DE BUENAS LETRAS IN SEVILLA
AND OF THE HISPANIC SOCIETY OF AMERICA
IN

NEW YORK

WITH 3Jo ILLUSTRATIONS

44602

NEW yORK

BRENTANO'S

MCMXXI

c c

c c c

e '

PRINTED By

E.

HABERLAND, LEIPZIG (GERMANY)

The

richntss

of Spain

characteristic old townsites, as well as

is

^1

today

still

overwhelming

in spite

in

characterful and

conspicuous products of the applied

arts,

of the considerable vandalisms of the Napoleonic

wars and

in spite

To make

a choice that will illustrate the various types

applied arts

monuments,

significant architectural

in

of the modernization craze of the nineteenth century.

and architecture

exceedingly

is

difficult.

in

On

every branch of the wide

the one

hand

is

the simply

fields

of

immea=

surable plethora of materials, on the other the lack of good photographic e.xamples of important
,^

'"

objects scarcely
It

to

is

difficult.

known

outside of the narrowest professional circles.

be noted that the procuring of materials during these present troubled times

The Association of Friends of Art

as well as the Institut d'Estudis Catalans


activity in

getic

in

in

Madrid <Sociedad de

los

Amigos

Barcelona deserve great thanks for

making important materials available, not only by

was

del

Arte)

their

ener=

instituting exhibitions,

but also by the turning out of numerous photographs and model catalogues.
C

Of all

this the editor

has made most bountiful use, and

is

under the greatest obligations to these

associations, as well as to the Director of the Repertorio Iconografico de Espafia,

Photographer Mas,
stitution

tors

).

Roig, formerly of Lacoste,

Hauser y Menet, and

last

who have

in

assisted him

but not

Moreno, and

the In=

least, to the collec=

a large measure through

and often special reproduction,

the loan,

of photographic copies.

MADRID, OCTOBER

27,

1920*

AUGUST

L.

MAyER

CONTENTS
V

Preface

Page

Moorish Art

Page IX

City Sites and Castles

Page

Churches

Plates

1-14

Plates

15-32

Page XI

Plates

33-61

Buildings

Page XII

Plates

62-106

Furniture

Page

XIV

Plates

107-

Page

XIV

Plates

126-141

Page

XVI

Plates

162-164

Leather

Page

XVI

Plates

155-158

Carpets

Page

XVI

Plates

166-168

Stuffs

Page

XVI

Plates

168-174

Ceramic Art

Page XVII

Plates

141-154

Ivory

Page XVIII Plates 159-161

Glass

Page

XIX

Bibliography

Page

XX

Page

XXI

Wrought

Iron

Work

Precious Metals

List of Illustrations

;.:

Plates

125

175-176

Madrid,

Don

Jose Weissberger. Leather Work. XVII. century

charm znipecufiarity ofofdSpa=


uisfj art lies in the wedding of the western,
European or Christian art with the eastern,

The

special

Asiatic^^African or Moorish, and this


true of

its

architecture and applied

is

especially

in

which, as a

rule, the

this

Moorish element
in the Gothic

proved the stronger, not only produced


period the so=called

Mudcjar

style*), but the in=

Moorish style showed


periods in which Spanish

fluence and effect of the


itself

art

into

far

those

had impressed a special national stamp upon

European

style.

For

early Renaissance

<first

there developed the

manner.

It

was so

instance, in the period of the


half of the

l^""

Plateresque or

called because

it

century)

silversmith

strongly sug^

gested the applied art style and because the simila=


*)

Mudejar

is

derived from the Arabic "mudefalat"

suB-

mitted, and the Mudejar style means the style of the politically but spiritually

unconquered Moor.

work, with

its

use of small

decorative forms instead of great monumental ones,


is

very close. In this period there came also the Spanish

late

the

art.

This unique interpcnetration and amalgamation,

wedding,

rity to costly silversmith

and high Baroque <about 1650), which was called


Churriguera style after its originator, Chur=

riguera of Salamanca. After these

two

styles, with

their lu.xuriantly flourishing decorations, there soon

followed, as a reaction and in sharp characteristic

which were simple

cally Spanish contrast, styles


in

highest degree.

the

16'''

century came the estilo

that

is,

and

in

desornamentado,

the severe ornamentless style of Herrera,


the

Foreign

and

second half of the

In the

18'''

artists

in all

century, classicism.

have worked

in

Spain

at all times

branches, but most of them have sub--

mitted themselves to the

charm of

the country

and

adapted their style not only to the peculiar climatic


conditions (particularly to the relation of light and
shade), but indeed to the whole atmosphere which

they found there.

This was the easier for

men from

VIII

which

the northern countries, as certain elements

are met

are today generally indicated as Gothic

While we

of the Spanish building and decorative arts,

to the northern art, sudi relations are not lacking as

place of regularity

in

We

with the constructive.

e.,

i.

a play

find the demateriali=

zation of everything useful into the transcendental

in the

Alhambra

tastic
i-f

Pf- -to

Baroque sacristy

as well as in the

The

of Cartuja of Granada.

Pf-

ration.

again in Moorish art and belong to the essentials

freedom and breadth

pi.i-'i.

ceived a specially striking construction and deco=

extraordinarily fan=

conception of quantity meets us

of columns

in

the

Mosque

in the forest

of Cordoba, as well as

in

the building of the Escorial, in the ornamentation of

Alhambra

the

halls,

buildings of the

in the

Everywhere

rigueresque style.

churches

the Plateresque

in

and palace facades and

there

Chur=

a rhyth^

is

mical sweep of space to which Charles Scheffler's

comment
Gothic

is

that

The only

when he says of

appropiate
it

"glitters

difference

is

like

million

that, in the south,

Such

Italian

buildings as the Certosa of Pavia can also

The

be designated as Plateresque.

Venice produces by

which

effect

on the water (the


self evidence of the manner in which oriental
ideas could be taken up there) is shown throughout
all

situation

its

Spain because of the peculiar conditions of

and

which produce an

light

impossible in other parts of Europe.

air

quite

optical illusion

This tendency

went so far that the single


ornamental element was finally formed in quite a
toward the

flat

flat

manner and

style

was

the final result

laminated style of Alonso

Cano and

the fret=saw

the School of

The ^ror (decoration) had characteristically attain^

be found, but

everything

is

rhythmically related. But of prime im=

portance

the fact that the wall, in contrast to walls

is

Upper

regards the Italian, and especially the


art.

Santiago.

to the

light

to

inner and outer relations

up

splendour of

is

many

facettes".

no unsteady

time of the Churrigueresque style,

and shade

northern

find here

ed

its

completion after the discovery of America,

and during the

setting in of the strong decline of the

Spanish world=power. Perhaps the most favourable


place for the study of Spanish decoration

is

Sala=

of the northern style, remains always recognizable

manca, although Burgos, Toledo, Granada, Sevilla

as a closed surface even though

and, last but not least, Zaragoza, offer plenty of im=

vity

trary,

its

always doing

ness of a tent wall.

utmost to give

his

The

this

it

the lights

rich decoration has an ex=

ceedingly delicate appearance and

on

material gra=

not accentuated,- the architect, on the con=

is

is

always

set

up

background, while the plastic form has the

general effect of being pressed


ings of the

Churrigueresque

Even

flat.

the build=

which had been

style,

developed to a degree before unknown, have,

in spite

portant material.

the

In

decorative motives

Spanish strong sense of reality


has not been used here

The

is

the

What

revealed.

pilgrim's flask, the

cord of the monks' capoch, ship=cables, crowns, but

above

all,

the coats-of=arms which have

nowhere

enjoyed greater triumph nor been so generally em=


ployed as

in

Spain.

Two things emphatically give


and colour.

Spanish decoration

The geometrical

its

of the severity of the facette work, something of the

real life;

tapestry^carpet effect possessed by the Moorish as

ornamentation of the Mudejar, the blind arcades

light

brick

Mudejar and Plateresque wall decorations.

and tower decorations, the plateresque stringpieces

This complete covering of the surfaces with pure

of the stairway, and the repeated clear linear or-

ornamental or figured plastic, or else with plastic

naments of the

well as the

consisting of these

two elements,

is

exceedingly

from the

light

flat style

plastic

receive their real clearness

form.

The heavy Baroque

springs from the

forms are relieved of their oppressiveness, not only

late in the Pla=

indirectly through their flatness, but directly through

teresque period, very popular for facades, chapel

themanncrof their expression.And then the colours!


All Moorish constructions and the entire Moorish
scheme of inner decoration are built up on the harmo=

characteristic of Spanish

Moorish

art=principle,

art.

It

and was,

till

walls and the construction of high altars.

In the

Churrigueresque period a large carpet was hung


up, as it were, only on a certain part of the wall
or facade.
P^-i9 trated

itself

The

richness of decoration

upon the

portal

section,-

concen=

the

facade up to the gable was included and,

mony

whole
in

har=

with the Retablo, or carved altar work, re=

ny of blue, red and

gold.

(Of these, of course, only

miserable remains can be recognized today.)


colourfulness, which

To

this

was even more heightened by

the variegated walUtilings, the artists of the

Mu^

dcjar style and even those of the Plateresque held

p/.

oi

IX

.<;^

y;
Barcelona, Museo.

After the colourlessness of the Herrera

fast.

greatest

the
in

Embroidery

luxuriance of gold and

That

again.

the colouring

style,

colour set

and the carpet^Iike

character of the decor "vnxz vigorously emphasized


until well into the 18'^

from the early periods

cen=

in

Gold and

generally

XV. century

more massive than

strong, are of consider^

able thickness, the fortresses and


often built of quarried stone

popular, however,

mosques being very

and

brick.

Still

was loam and unburnt

more

p'-ioi

brick, a

material which has proved unexpectedly durable.

tury goes without saying.

Silver.

thick, clay^like earth, to

which lime and small

stones were added in greater or smaller quantities,


PI.

oorish

I-

7,loo-foJ,

contrast of sim=

i7/v delights in the

M'

pie exterior construction with the greats

est richness in the interior.

elusion, great seriousness

Without, se^

and the utmost

simplicity,-

within, luxury and a delicate brightness.


pi.i-io

H 11.12.14,

hambra of Granada and

in

the

Mosque

final

art are

still

conserved.

architectonic idea of the

Of

'.

i'i.4,o.r

in the

In

ing

astonish^

Wood

was an important constituent of the Arabian build=


ing.
The rafters of the interior arches of galleries

first

carvings,

AU

time for building

opposed

to flatness, great

flatly

roofed, the

ed, so that they

may

little

halls, the

ornamented wall surfaces. This covering of the


was fastened to the wall by iron

actual construction
nails

and hooks, or by cane and

larly strong grass.

The

fine

tufts

of a particu=

ornamental work of the

Alhambra, like that of the Mudcjar buildings in Sevilla

provided which was

and Toledo, consists of a kind of superfine stucco


of unheard of firmness and durability, the composition

and a rhythm of

light is

Alhambra, as in the
manner, quite in the spirit

In the

light

wooden frame

the

be compared to hanging lace

not outdone later on.

building,

is

to be perceived.

of the Moorish and Mudcjar buildings.

pf.ioo.ioi

and chambers, the edges of baths, the panelling and

Court of

(Court of Lions). The spaces are treated

The wails

were mixed

the

halls vaulted with cupolas, the walls often perforata

market

trees

vaulted ceilings, groined roofs ornamented with

whole building of the

used for the

very individually,- the corridors are

of the

and twigs of

it

"Outlines

ness<CourtofMyrtles>incontrastto lurking, graceful

veils,

splinters

was by these means that such


durability was attained <Caveda>.

and

To make

spongy bullrushes,

in his

are constructed

liveliness

wood

also employed.

durable,

shoe and pointed arches, as well as their archi volts and

is

other. Elevation as
I.

in,

was

more

calm=

hambra water

PI

small

still

Courtyards and towers, passages and


in striking contrast to each

Myrtles as well as

halls

mixture

this

beams and the interior parts were all inlaid


with wood. The third important material was gyp=
sum, which served as a binding material for the
masonry, but was principally used for decorative
purposes. From this material were formed the horse=

of the Development of Style".

purposes.

the style and

Alhambra, Charles

Osthaus has given a classical estimate


2

AU

splendid examples of secular as well as ecclesiastical

Moorish

/'/./,

In the

of Cordoba

according as a greater or smaller strength and con=


sistency were desired,

of which has remained a secret among the Moors.


Through their predilection for the light and dainty
style, we find early in Moorish art that small deco

Pi.3.7.9

X
rative forms are chosen

in

The

resque style.

gratings

later in the Plate=

become reed work, the


by small ones,

plates are replaced

and

large frames

mon=

preference tolarge

umental ones, as was also done

while later on, instead of the column, the balustrade

The door

tites.

we

Instead of water-spouts

chosen.

Pi.g.io is

find stalac=

panels are cut and divided into

smaller squares, just as the mosaic predominates


Pt.4,iox\\z

complicated tiling=work which

out of small pieces.


Pi.ioo.ioi

tury

tiling is

dow
Pf- 4, 6. 7,

But,

the perforated ceilings.

in

is

displayed

in

ermg.

Almost

<

contusmg

as

the

cov=

rich arabesque ornamentation of the stucco wall

S,lo,l2

Pf.i3

cen=
The ridi handwork of the
woodwork of the win=
14'''

a flourishing vitality

all,

put together

is

again seen in the

gratings and

above

in

Hilly land

charmmg

as this

ara-

have been preserved

sites

its

more or

originally

was remodelled

16'''

The main square

century into a splendid

town

of the Spanish

The townhall, which was

tjiiisition.

square, has also, therefore, a public hall in

upper story.

This

the so-called Miradero,

is

audience=room, for those

and

who

Thesurroimd-

main square frequently open on

to

Moorish and Jewish


up to the pre=
e.xcept that the

be found

even

in

limits fixed in

accordance with the

and trades have been preserved


to the present day.

were very narrow, not only

also frequently in the north.

they were rendered

still

As

in

in

The

the south, but

other countries,

narrower by the

fact that

the wooden houses were constructed in stories


which extended over the street and had wide gables.
Today, on the other hand, a general tendency to

enlarge the streets, as

observed not only


in the

south,

in

in

European

cities,

is

to be

the north of Spain, but also

where the narrow

streets (over

which, as

a protection from the heat, cloths are stretdied) are


really in the highest degree natural.

The main

streets

of Barcelona and some other large towns already

had drainage

in the

middle ages.

quently cover an area out of


cessity. This

comes from

all

Town

sites fre^

proportion to ne=

even

Castile

in

is

many

given to

A highly

a provincial

the individual character of the stately

its

citizens.

of Spain justly deserves

its

the south as in the west, a great

have also been preserved.

We

reputation. But

number of

also

know

castles

of large

monasteries and convents after the style of Poblet,

which bear on the outside a strong


acter,- for

these monasteries also contained a king's

palace and the tombs of rhe monarchs, as did the Escorial later.

Arcos de

In hilly

la

towns

like

Toledo, Segovia or pt.n

Frontera, the castle

on the highest point of the town

The

principal church, the

on the

site

of course, built

cathedra f,

rises generally pi.33-i(

mosque and, some


a Roman temple stood. The plan of the

where the

time earlier,

is,

site.

principal

mosque can frequently be recognized through that of

small

the cathedral,especially inSeville, where, for instance,

mosque courtyard as well as the "Pardon


Gate" leading to it have been left almost untouched.
The style of the Moorish minarets has also influenced the shape of the church towers. TheSevillian

in

siderable space, but also because the one^family

house has always been highly esteemed

in

Spain.

pi.20.

fortress-like char-

towns, numerous churches, chapels, cloisters and


orphanages, old hospitals, etc., not only take up con=

the fact that,

especially blessed with castles and thus pi.n-^o

is

this part

,-;

remotest parts. Madrid and Salamanca

possess perhaps the finest constructions.

mansions of

pr.2s.

the neighbouring streets of this square,

in their

town through

streets
Pi.31

a promen-

bad weather. These arcade walks are also often

be noticed. The

most Spanish towns up

is

the interior again a di=

characteristic aspect

in

or

preside at certain

for their especialguests.

enclosure of single quarters by walls can no longer

different businesses

its

in

Toledo and Segovia,

in

in-

ade where one can go about conveniently even

vision into Christian,

pr.os.j,.

often contained Pt.3o.o^>'

cities

quarters, can be easily recognized even

day

nol

and a court of

ally for tournaments, bullfights

the ground floor into arcades, and there

sent

is

only, as in Italy, " the best room", but served origin=

ing houses in the

in

gate, with

gate=way always richly adorned and inclosed by


two round towers.

festivities

and suburbs, and

"

passage = way,

less defective

the

in

Pf.2o-j^

completeness,

their

in

The Moorish double

especially in Castile.

gantic arabesque

The

skilful Pt.i5,i6

ramparts and gates have been, for the


most part, done away with. Nevertheless, numerous

in this

medieval divisionofthe towns into

most

old

besque style is the Moorish town, which, with its nu=


merous ramifications of broad and narrow streets, its
lanes and blind alleys, seems indeed to be but a gi=
itself.

in the

the cave dwellings

is

frequently seen today.

still

The

everywhere

utilized

is

manner. The logical issue of this

the great

42,43-4

XI

Toledo, S. Juan de

la Penitentia.

Giralda has been copied by

The tower

towers.
with

all its

doubt that
Pf.33.43 ret.

The

Early Plateresque

many Andalusian church

of St. Catalina

in

Valencia,

Baroque forms, intentionally leaves no


it

was erected on

the site of an old mina=

cimborio, or central tower,

is

characteristic

of quite a number of Spanish cathedrals.

northern part o^ Spain


mittin^
In

more

Andalusia

it

on

this object

and church

twilight

tection

is,

is,

has the function of ad=

of course,

their

in

emphasis

abeyance,
in

cathe=

Greece, rather

atmosphere of pro-

and mysticism.
cathedrals betrays a

strong French influence, above


(old

and new

countries, cathedrals

find a transition of the northern

all

Castile and

in

Castile). In these

mountainous

and churches were

built

which,

without the influence of the great masters of the "He

de France", would have been impossible.

We have

Gothic style

cent of the Italian Gothic.


It is

very characteristic of the conservative character

when the Renaissance


was penetratingevery where, cathedrals in the Gothic

of the Spaniard that, at a time

style, like those

of Segovia and the


built.

ments joined those of the Gothic. This gave


transition style, whidi

may

the early Plateresque, a special charm.


called after

it

He

This epoch

was Hnrique Hgas,

ciple of a Brussels artist,

triumph.

tried, at first

who

the dis=

carried this style to

which were reminiscent

of the Gothic. Later, however, he constructed

which were suited

from the Mudcjara decorative

resembles the cathedrals of Rheims and Amiens), to

ed

r>i.4'i,49

the mighty cathedral of Toledo, and to the Gothic

naissance.
the

in

obtaining

full

Pf-io.-i?

with small success, to con=

struct Renaissance buildings,

thic buildings

Pi.35

to the

originator. Cardinal Cisneros, the

its

Cisneros style, and

son=in''law,AntonioCovarrubias,

not seldom

could,

be designated as that of

only to turn our attention to the elegant Cathedral

we

it

of course, not be avoided that the Renaissance ele=

of Leon, <the "Pulchra Leonina" which strongly

In the east,

new one atSala=

However,

r'f.26

parts of that of Avila.

into a

width and spaciousness, which are strongly reminis=

is

many Gothic

Beginning of XVi.ceniur). Detail

Iron.

manca, were founded and

as in ancient

and gloom with

/"/.voThe design of

Leon

the

light to the interior.

for in this sunflooded region the

dral

In

Wrought

Trellis.

full

Go=

to his style issuing

ait.

But

it

was

his

who first succeed'

recognition for the Italian Re^

He became

the greatest rei)resentative of

Plateres(|ue style

(also called the style o^ 43.50

'

XII

Carlos V.

His
works pos=

ediy conservative character of the Spaniard,

aU

later

ready mentioned, shows

the

scss,

onthewho=

declining

middle

the genuine

of tombs.

That the

le,

the petty

all

of

the

Churrigucra

=i3,

many churches
a

number of

little

me=

of Egas,

thusiasm

felt

for

^'""^ ^^^'' i"

IS'**

century,

and erected
this

his

was of

the interior details

is

is

the

true that sometimes the

ported by columns.

the

new

fields

Manifold
pi.6s.78. tion

in

the

highest degree

the construe^

P(. 71

splendid

facades

of Administration, Diet and the Provincial Parlia=

The great Spanish cemeteries are gruesome and


gloomy spots. That of Barcelona, illustrated here,
shows that they are real burial places, where
no living creature has anything to seek. The mark=

62

Pf.69

The

ers are

to

found
IS't-

in

be
the

cen=

tury, for in=

on

stance,
the

gay and

delightful

Rococo

ments.
Pf.74

/>/:

crowns, and from them developed

traditional

of the large hospitals and colleges, with their

and courts, the Gothic Ex=


PI. 61-63 change in Valencia, Palma and Zaragoza, the Law
PI.63-90 Courts like those of Barcelona, and the Palaces

64,34.85.92

like

corner tow*

still
is

battlements were decora=

"Cres-

ed

teria".

of activity are given to the architect as

well as to the sculptor.

The

like

the so-calU

gained and

The boarded

hU

agree

and, although

is

style.

exchanges and colleges were

pop*

still

roof crown,

the other hand, a special atmosphere

in

shaped/ those of the Valencian Exchange

whole impression of

shows

Like the

replaced for decorative purposes by open halls sup^

were formed

interior

and more stately

passages of defence

and

seems complicated thereby and the


worshipper pushed back from the high altar, still on
the

and clear

and crowned battlements.

built in a finer

pupils,

forming of

free

still

Very

towngate, the facades of these houses were later

tively

the choir built in the centre,

church within a church, so to speak,


it

roof

flat

en=

works were

altar

towered house stands

the

mad

the

to

in

an interior fortification girdle

and, built on a quadrangular ground plan,

ular

peculiarity

were,

66-71.

86-89

method of construc=

often

Churriguera and

special Spanish

it

pr.

towered houses of the nobility

ed unexampled.

sacrificed.

In Avila, the

tion.

the nobleman's

more, against rebellions from within the town.

But

which innumerable Gothic

to

served, but a dark and defiant

all,

serves tobecalU

^^ '^

altars.

Cathedral of Burgos.

in the

form, as

de=

the latter part of

comparison

vealed to

against not only attacks from without, but,

into classical temples

in

long the

were conserved is especially re=


us by the tomb of Archdeacon Villegas

forms

cess which

XVI. century the

classicistic

Gothic

and with a suc=

Jose Lazaro

importance

How

of objects projecting from the wall.

P'-So.si.

that

all

mansion, originally generally showed not only a re=

contrary to Churriguera's will, converted

guzz,

astonishing, after

sociated himself

Ventura Rodri=
Pf-37

not

Tfie Spanisfi fioiise, and above

thods

Iron. Beginning of

is

had, later on, as=

with the art

Wrought

arrangement

has been mentioned about the flattened character

54

Don

the

had a special preference

for wall

free

Plateresque style.

Late Gothic Castillian Door Knoder

through

artists

in

character,

from

Madrid,

pronouncedly

highRenaissance

features

Pf. 47,

tombs

ages

itself

PI.

Palaceofthe

Marquis
de
^,

in

Valencia.

n
barcelona, \t
Museo
r

Late Gothic Door Knocker


XV. century

70

XIII

Madrid,

Don

Jose Lazaro. Late Roman Bronze Censor <XII1. centur\


Zamora (XIV. century)

The dwelling house

preserves to the present

still

time a very closed, reserved and repellant exterior/


not revealing
often

have two

ground
its

floor

is

real character.

floors

for

occupied

in

while

greater coolness,

moves
66, 67.

its

to the ujjper floor, the

damp and

cold.

On

the

The houses very


reason

that

the

summer, because of
in

winter the family

lower one being too

the upper floors,

narrow baU

and Gotliic Bronze Candlestick from

found the closed walls, while

Toledo was

in

Andalusia and

to

be noted the sort of peristyle^Iike

building of the

open courts, surrounded by ar=

cades, and frequently having a linlc fountain in the


middle.

The ceilings

of churches,

ficent

those of palaces, pi.ioi-io6

like

have always been constructed

in

a specially magni=

manner. The Moorish model can be recogni=^

?,i6,S7

conies are never lacking, nor, on the ground floor,

zed up to the

windows through which at night lovers


and betrothed converse. The peasant's house on

panelled ceiling, with

the grated

the east coast


PI.

72

is

very

lightly built,

mild, equable climate,- tliose

Aragon

in

because of the

harsh Castile and

are massive and firm while

in

the

pro-

vince of Galicia, which has been justly called for


ages Spanish Switzerland, they naturally

show

great similarity to the Swiss peasant houses.

90-9J Splendid staircases are not often seem

in Spain,-

in the stately mansions of the no=


always display a sombre reserve and never
exceed a somewhat subdued brightness.

the

of

or

stone.

Gothic, the star design

Mudejar
was

ceiling. The
was preserved in

At
was

the

time

of the

built
late

frequently so enriched

that there arose (juite a striking resemblance to lace

The Mudejar wood

patterns.
fold inlaid

ceilings

show mani^

ornamentations of ivory and other ma-

The Renaissance

terials.

north were

the

cell-like wainscoting,

most various ways, whether they were

wood

richly gilded.

In the

its

geometrical pattern of the ceiling

however, those

be remarked at an early period.

when

century,

succeeded by the Renaissance coffered

bility

94-99 In the court buildings two different types are to

16'''

ceilings

The dividing of the

are

frequently

doors and door=

wings into small panels remained

in

use

in

Spain

until late into the 16"'' centurv.


The development
and variation of the geometrical motives used are

P1.107.109.
12012/t

XIV
easily to be traced
/>/.

75-

92

by the examples here shown.

(Observe in this connection the door in the back=


ground of the Cathedral of the Way of the Cross
Burgos, and on the staircase of the University

in

of Salamanca.)

rich iron garnishments

mounted on velvet and, above

adorned with a gigantic

all,

The

lock.

inside facade

of these writing-tables was very often covered with

wrought silver work, and to sudi an extent, that the


manufacture of sudi silver secretaries was repeat=
edly forbidden because of their exaggerated luxury.

However, ebony work with wrought^silver remained

The

inner rooms of the mansions of the nobiI=

and of the citizens have no tendency


any great lu.xury, not even to real com^
fort or convenience. The masculine and, at times,
slightly ascetic manner of the Spaniard is expressed
in

ity

not astonishing that the inlaid

to

terial,

such a renunciation. The furniture corresponds

Great attention

to the character of the rooms.


to

bearing and,

in

comes

in addition to this, there

a certain childlike trait,

which reveals

at times

a naive

itself in

playful things, such as complicated furniture.

The wealth
PI.108.

paid

is

behaviour and dignity, as well as to an aristocratic

joy

of Spain

cdXftirniture,

considerable

is

in

old ecclesiastic

such as the numerous choirstalls, often

by artists of Germany, the Nether=


lands or France, and the sacristy wardrobes, which
were magnificently wrought in the 17''' and IS'""

richly carved
PI.

122

As

Pi.imto centuries.

regards

120. 122-124

secular furniture,
L

chests,

TL
Ihe

chairs and secretaries play the principal part.


Pi.ii3,ii4

chair, the so=called "Sillones fraileros", greatly


resembles the Italian chair

in its

main form, except

that the pattern of the carved or inlaid


tion, especially

115- IIS

On

the

carved=wood chests,

as well as on those covered with leather or velvet,

and locks play

the ornamental iron garnishments

an important
piim

/'/://5,//9,

ornamenta^

of the nail work, betrays the national

Spanish character.
PI.

part.

Of

the greatest

interest

is

which is painted
inside and which shows the Mudejar style through^
out. The panels were divided in a manner similar
to the large Moorish and Mudejar doors. The sec =
retaries and cabinets (contador or bufete) were
IS'*"

century buffet

in

three parts,

frequently introduced from Germany in the

would appear
such furniture was made
tury and

that

it

in

the

IS'*'

16'''

cen=

century

there in large quantities

with special consideration

for the

Spanish

taste.

These importations were forbidden in 1603 and the


foreign models were then copied and varied by the
Spanish.

Pi.120

especially popular until into the late periods.

The

secretaries

made

in

Vargas,

in

the

It

is

work of costly ma=

with the application of tortoise

shell,

ivory

and mother-of-pearl, was especially esteemed

at

The Spanish
recognizable by their

the time of the Churrigueresque style.

tables are very often easily


wrought=iron supports.
with

Naturally,

in

connection

the satisfaction in detailed

this furniture,

all

forms, already expressed in the main architecture,


is

particuarly noticable.

in

the form of the beds.

This can be observed also


PI 125

no other country has the art oj ivroiight'iron

In

been so ardently fostered as

Spain.

in

many and England can compete


is

also true in connection with

Only Ger=

with her, and

works

this

bronze.

in

The Moors added no new motives to this art, neither


Wrought = iron work pro=
did they excel in it.
duced

skilful

masters throughout

the Catalanians Blay and Sunol

all

Spain. In 1250

were summoned

gratework for Notre Dame.

to Paris to construct the

The principal features of the Spanish wrought^iron


work are the numerous chapel gratings <the
monumental ones which
enclose the altar house and choir. Besides these
achieved great
the Spanish wrought = iron
art
triumphs with candelabra, braziers <Braseros> and
door garnishments, as well as locks and chest=bind=
above

Rejas)

ings.

all,

the

The conservative

Roman

element was preserved

Gothic

period.

The same

fact

is

until

late into the

17'''

and

perforated

of

many

18'''

PI

XJ

1 i^

to be noted in connection

with the ornamentation of mortars and weights


the

Pll3o-li

page

character of the Spaniard

reveals itself here again in the fact that the

centuries.

garnishments

Just as the

in

PIIS7

artistic,

are the chief decoration

a simple or velvet=covered

wooden

chest

and of the outside of many a secretary, thus the


large nails with

of chairs

is

which the leather or

stuff

covering PI 11 5- 1

fastened are of considerable decorative PI

Of

province of Toledo, were especially popular and

importance.

were known under the name of Varguenos. These


were case^Iike writing tables upon a carved stand, the

that large nails, manifoldly varied in their form, are

folding board

wooden house doors

on the outside being ornamented with

PI 124

the greatest importance

is

1<

129

the fact

used as the sole decorative motive on the heavy PI 126,

n
comparet

in

Castile and

Arragon and, PIK4

XV

Phct Ar\/nM,u

Barcelona, Catedral.

Gothic decorative Finish

wooden doors of cliurciies


buildings. The mussel motive, like

naturally, also on the

and great public

that of tiie insignia of different, knights' orders,

quently employed
stone.
39.I40

the decoration of

fre=

wood and

That the locksmith's profession produced

eminently fine work

without saying.
Pf.n.i

in

is

in locks,

Among

bolts and keys, goes

the large seven^branched

church candelabra, those in the cathedrals of Burgos


and Sevilla are justly the most celebrated because

for vaulted Ceiling.

XIV'. ceiiturv

of their beautiful proportions and the fineness of


their

As

in

Finally, our attention

execution.

turned to

lie

nutnerous

pul[)its

other branches, so also

in

works

did

Custodia

and

field.

Be-

'Pax'^tablets,

developed a

s\>\cx\= ri.i62

and remarkably individual manner of constriic=

tion.

The most

/y./jo

\n />/vcioiis

mctafs the church vessels cover a broad


sides chalices, crosses, reliquaries

the tabernacle or

must be

made of base metal.

beautiful specimens of these

always

XVI
and costly

individual, architectonically articulated

structures which, considering their materials,

little

16''^

uncommon

an

rise to

were produced

height,

in

the

century by members of the Arphe family, orig=

inally

We

from Germany.

is

it

owing

entirely

of the present time

On

the other

to the unfavourableness
is

given of the

V^eneras, which, often formed in a triangular shape

or, as

Secular ornament
especial peculiarity.
to the

and

In

harmony

PI.

163.164

pt.113.

155158
PagcVii

not distinguished by any


the period of the transition
style,

however, the change


distinctly noted.

the stones are,

"a jour" <Holland>.

part, set

In the

jyih

century the most extreme luxury reigned

and

silver table furnishings,

many examples

The

in

are naturally

finest

in

gold

although at the present

time there are not very

upper

Dei.

is

new Gothicism,

the

x^'ith

Christ,

Agnus

were, as

decor must be very

in

most

for the

Mary or

At

Churrigueresque

in taste

it

to be seen.

the houses of the Spanish

patterns

find,

especially

Leather was used

in

Spain

applied arts with

in the

a special partiality. Besides holders for

nevertheless strongly remind us of Coptic patterns.

further peculiarity of the Spanish carpet

coat = of=arms

motive.

shown

from the second half of the

and

tury,
18'''

for this

was manifoldly varied

it

century.

In

show

as are usually found


carpets, the

This

Spain.

is

struck

wall coverings. Besides floor

development of the actual

In the

the Arabian, with

from the Guadames

all

possible

and upholstery

in

This

which derive

is

seen

their

in

name

Africa, where they were

first

produced extensively. They were made with great

Cordoba and

later

often imitated in

France.

Carpets were produced

at

a very early period,


in

Cuenca. The oldest examples known to us extend


back to the beginning of the 12''' century. Excellent
work was also done in Alcaraz, near Murcia, chiefly

The Spanish carpets or rugs of


the Middle Ages frecpjently show an especial knotting
century.

which

allo\"('s

metrical patterns.

sharp contours and small geo=

Through

this tedinic

a decorative

principle can be carried out like that of the Azulcjos.

the

whole Moorish

style

\ii'hich

late

can be understood. Later,

Gothic epoch, the


is

the factories of Sevilla, Toledo,

and Valencia give evidence. The


ences

in his

At

the

in

velvet,

fabrication

Italian,

to be remarked,

Granada

interesting differ=

of Spanish

and

Italian

have been explained by Pedro de Arntiano

"Ex=

excellent introduction to the catalogue

of Spanish Materials

in

Madrid" <1917>.

the time of the Baroque, but chiefly in the

century, the French influence,

from Lyons, was very strong

in

18'''

issuing principally

the cfecor.

Since

the days of the Celtiberians, the activities of the

Spanish were uncommonly extensive

branch of

art.

Two

in

the

ceramic

large groups are to be disting*

uished.

The one comprises

dishes,

plates

principally vessels,

of different sizes^ vases, jugs,

i.

e.,

etc.,

and represents a "brush" decor, mostly in gold or


gold colour and in blue or green (Teruel). The sec=

A strike

importance as a placeof manufacture. In the

not infrequently divided into

stands out from a sort of plaited back ground. Natur=

in

pi.io.-.-.;-,

Coptic is strongly to be perceived and, through these,

Cufic inscriptions were ornamentally used

is

small mosaic^like parts, and sometimes the pattern

here

o^

First,

ond group comprises the tiles, the so=called "Azu=


lejeria". In the Hispano=Moresque Ceramic of about
the middle of the 12''' century, Calatayud played a
leading part, and in the 16''' century it gained renewed

The middle ground

ally,

e.,

i.

conventionalized patterns of animals, that of the

its

hibition

especially in Chinchilla (province Alicante), and

tedinic

in

Almeria as the principal manu=

of

on a gold ground.

the so-called Guadameciles,

16'''

textile art,

the stuffs, three periods can be distinguished.

which often

the

known

festive occasions.

or rather the Venetian influence,

in

is

used to hang over the balconies on

decorated wall hangings, the variegated decor of

in

South
by the numerous

as main motive sudi patterns


in

from the time of the

elegance

cen=

IS'*^

until into the

so-called "Reposteros"
is

was

the rich collection of the

Kensington Museum, one


carpets which

the

is

great predilection

materials for settles, there \^'ere also produced, richly

lies

which

the intention of the designer of the carpet, but

facturing place. Besides the Sassanian influence, with

nobility,

sorts of utensils, covers for caskets

Pi.166-168

Besides geometrical

mals, the grotesque forms of which were perhaps not

and bearing the name of the Virgin

were worn as medals

we

and often described

no example

if

part being thus very narrow.

from giving a

West Gothic consecrated crowns.


hand,

that the border decoration frequently

is

covers two thirds of the whole carpet, the middle

on the borders of the


narrow sides, conventionalized figures of men and ani=

refrain

description of the celebrated

ing feature

the borders, as in stucco decoration.

pt.i4i-i'

XVll
century Malaga was a principal manufacturing

H'*"

centre, and the ceramic

end of the

H'*"

century,

15'''

art attained there, at the

century and

century the factory

In the

15''^

lencia)

was on

beginning of the

tlie

highest point, as also at Granada.

its

Manises <Va=

at

the "Reflexo metalico",

The particular
which was already

found on the

of the castle of Medina^

Azzahra
later

level

floor tiles

end of the

at the

on the

same

the

tiles

of the

and

to

be

century, and also

10'''

15'''

gloss,

16''^

centuries,

was

obtained by mixing red ochre, sulphur, very old

copper and

This Ceramic

silver.

is

known

to

have

been very often adulterated, but the adulteration

were

by the colour.

detected

easily

fired

three times,-

first

These

fabrication

the

after

is

articles

These wall

serve as a covering for socles

tiles

and rooms,

courts

table

particularly as they were

tiles,

the provinces of Valencia up to a late period.

in

Mensa

the

century, also

a covering for the

as

surface

Aragon. Not so much attention


pattern in the tiling

more

whole

to the

is

paid to the single


single tiles, but

to the

harmony of

whole architecture.
there

to

is

As

far

back as the

wine or

as cruets for

which served

oil,

were often covered with

and

to

produce colour contrasts

patterns.

rical

coloured

tiles

with metal

In the

14'''

century

where, since the beginning of the

In the

certainly

older ceramic industry can be traced.

still

(White, unglazed earthern vessels are

day

to the present

pottery

at the

beginning

of

in

Andujar).

end of the

the

15'''

14'''

still

In the

century and

century,

large

made

decor of
at the

ornament

constrasts with a small one principally consisting

15'''

the

too, an

as an ornamental motive, finds here,

Above

is

is

then replaced

all,

the

word

used. This word, written

by a Latin one

in

Gothic

and becomes an important element of the


Besides the Spiral motive,

motive gains extraordinary importance,

although chiefly on armorial plates. But the favorite

J5ih

motive

is

the vine leaf.

century the

vine

leaf

course of the

In the
is

made

times, tiling

work was

Artistic star patterns

treated like mosaic.

and other geometrical orna=

ments were made out of small parts and of splinters

The

(Aliceres).

pattern

became ever

with time, more complicated, but

in

smaller and

grew from
tation.

there,

tendrils

The play

and

flat

all,

developed

i/tro/"

which

geometrical ornamen-

of the white bands darting here and

and of the coloured parts of the

incessantly varied.

From

the original

flat

pattern,

is

pattern, as

out of one formed according to tone values and col-

ours often doubly rhythmized, there developed


the

14'''

century a coherent network, and

in

finally a

upon a white ground.


This is, asOsthaus has shown, the strange change of
the Moorish decor in the Alhambra from that of the
variation of plaited ribbons

Court of Myrtles

to that of the

Court of Lions. The

followed by the Azulejo,

mosaic^like combination

the coloured roof tiles, especially the blue glazed

well as the formation of the pattern,

ones (hence the name Azulejos) are to be disting=

mined by the technical process.

the garlands of vine leaves placed

richer

a certain degree

The band work, above

oppo=
site each other become more and more numerous
and everything becomes more delicate and dainty.
Finally the plates are divided into single compartments by plastic radii, which are connected on the
border by bows. In connection with tile work,
smaller,

pt.s3jefi

tiling three dif-

and there followed theLaceria, a

border ornamentation.
the rowel

development of the wall

in

good

ferent divisions are to be distinguished. In the earliest

itself,

"Alafia"<pardon or mercy)

letters

in Sevilla offer

century the backs of the plates began to

important place.

on ribbons,

white and blue),

orderly.

Moors

glazed

work, different towers

this

more

be ornamented. Text, which was used everywhere

by

Of

geomet-

tiling,

the beginning

of spiral ground ornamentation.


of the

At

(especially green,

reflex.

in

Aragon and

in

for the decoration of

Teruel and the Alcazar facade


examples.

century, a

century

with colour the floor and walls, or at least the wall


socle,

a green and white glaze, principally made in Talavera


13'''

10'''

be recognized the inclination to enliven

towers and facades as well as for floor

had been put on.

the

socle tiling with the other decoration and with the

Andalusia there were used

)ugs, called Tinajas,

15''"

Catalonia and

in

to the

work,
effect

in

altar

and, chiefly since the

as floor

of the raw shape, the second time after the pro=

Large terra cotta

/5:i-/5-/

used

duction of the white or blue glaze, and then after


the layer of the gloss decoration

'.

uished from the wall

containing only a

i)art

is

of the |)attern and forming

with three other parts the whole design, or


patterns

dence

in

small

which give the model a constant correspon-

to a piece of stuff.

The

character of the sur-

face of the late Gothic and Renaissance Azulejo, as


is

chiefly deter-

First the colours

Pf.153

XVIII

by plas=

of the pattern are separated from each other

which

stripes

tic

before being

are,

This technic

red with a layer of grease.

"Cuerda seca". Later


Pf.i54

parts of the pattern are


stripe

P(.t54

is

is

called

Cuerda technic

the

in

cove=

fired,

the

deepened and a separating

no longer necessary. Besides the

strictly

16'*"

16'''

later.

the neighbouring Puente del Arzobispo.

in

century the

18'''

In the

Alcora porcelain competed

finer

strongly with the ceramic of Palavera, but the imi=

Alcora decor could not prevent

geometrical motive, that of the coat=of=arms appears

tation of the

on the Sevillian and Zaragozan IS'*^ century tiles,


and in the 15''' century the animal motive is much

decline.

employed. Plates were also made

basins and holy water basins, inkstands etc.,

many

technic,

tile

decoration with the mate=

be recognized

once, as well as

in the

brated Fortuny Azulejo

more than

in the pattern

whole
in

effect,-

thus the cele=

Osma

the

Collection

pictures in the
tion in the

tiling,

form of

else has a stronger

to the Spanish armorial carpets.

enjoyed

in the \5^^

century an

lours blue

Spain and

in

principally

in

and these soon found applica=


ornamen=

in

and other walls. The decor

polychromic harmony of the co=

and yellow. The colour became very de=

At the end of that cen=


Niculoso Pisano of Sevilla=Triana, an import^
ant manufacturing centre, where fonts were also

licate

frequently rude shapes and too free drawings.

constructed

porcelain were

method of decoration by
introducing Renaissance motives and Italian tedinic.
Whole altars were then built in the Azulejo style,
a significant change in the

much
manu=

but the national character of the art suffered so

by

it

that a decline

in

and Palavera replaced Sevilla

facture,
extent.

soon took place

he lalavera ceramic

pottery, that style

which may

is,

the

and harmonious with time and thus

The porcefaht

cora, founded
first

in

Spain, as

in

The

century.

finished

other

in

factory of

Al=

1727 by Count Bonaventura de

The

produced a kind of fayence.

mind the production of superior


goods, and therefore, based the whole manufacture
founder had

to a certain

upon as

chierly as regards

possible.

rightly be designated

made arose
18'''

offset the

where crude and

factories

countries, in the

Aranda,

is

blue on a milk=white ground, or

international popularity.

rich glazed ceramic, brought about

the

produced whole

tury,

in

the

altar pictures, friezes,

tations of sacristies

work, but, above

all,

enjoyed

it

Here were

colonies.

generally painted

tiling

is

ceramic of Talavera, notwithstanding the

tile

reveals the closest relation, not only to the Persian

The Spanish

its

Less interesting than the jugs and plates, shaving

greater popularity

Italian influence.

Tiie blending of the


rials is to

Cuerda seca

in this

with male and female heads showing

no trace of the

/5o, /?/

century plates, was given up


The
century productions, by the way,
were not made in Palavera de la Reyna itself, but

on the rims of the

in

large an export of serviceable articles as

The chief workman of the first period was


Frenchman Ollery, from Moustiers, who

the

as the national Spanish style.

brought the taste of the French factories into Spain.

individual,

Pyramids with children's

It is characteristic and
always masculine, and sometimes a little
rough, but always of a strongly decorative effect.

In
it

connection with the dishes of the


is

16'''

century

true that one can distinguish at times resem=

vases after Chin=

figures,

ese and Delft designs as well as tea things

prosperity, three

Saxon

blance to the Mudejar style and distant reminis=

in

cences of Persian models, and there are undoubtedly

been manufactured since the 60's of the

vases of

this

and the following centuries which be=

tray the acquaintance of the decorator with the Italian

models.

These things are only interesting from the


view and arc, on the whole, un=

art=history point of

important.

In this

connection, however,

noted that the Spanish ceramic

differs

it

is

to be

from the

Ita^

same manner that the two languages differ.


The animals, which form the chief motive of the
lian in the

16'''

century plates, are drawn,

rectly, with

uncommon

the designer.

The

if

not always cor=

sureness and effectiveness by

butterfly motive,

which

is

found

were

At the height of its


thousand workmen were employed

principal productions.

the

this

when
first

Porcelain

factory.

the

the

in

style

18'''

century,

German Johann Knipfer worked

decorator

in

Alcora.

had

as the

After 1780 there were,

besides the factory of Aranda, four rival institutions


in

the neighbourhood.

facture, under

After Knipfer, the rnanu^

Cloostermans from Paris, experienced

a revival, <1787 to 1798), but in the


the

went

decline

took

into other

place.

In

1858

19'''

century

the

factory

hands and the new owners carried

the business on in a throughly factory=like manner,

with English methods and English workmen.

1759 the Buenretiro Manufactury

in

In

Madrid was

pt. Mi-t}^

page XX

XIX
founded as a branch business of
\%'itli

Italian

made only

workmen, and

Capo
first

Monte,

di

thirty

years

decorative pieces for the royal family

after Cliinese patterns.

lions of this factory are

The most

Madrid and

brilliant

produc=

two rooms wainscoted, so

to speak, with porcelain.


castle of

for the

One

of these

is

the other in that of the

in

the

Aran=

juez< 1763 -1765).


"(.175.176

Gfass was made


the

Roman

in large quantities in

periods.

The

Spain during

chief places of

manufac=

ture
to

were Castril de

IS'"^

in

predominated. Pilgrim's

Roman Mosaic

flasks, oil

and jugs often show bold and


desire for ornamentation

and vinegar cruets,

fantastic shapes.

made

itself felt

The

everywhere,

as did the other favorite decorative forms.

The

whole character of the Spanish glass^art is thor=


oughly masculine, like the character of the whole
Spanish applied

art.

After

Ripoll, Sa, Maria.

Pena, where work similar

la

Murano was carried on and, in tlie


century. La Granja, where the French taste

that

for Apsis.

End

I'litg tin

of Xi. century

Caiiijaich

ERATURE

LIT
C. Justi:

Introduction to Baedeker's "Spanien

M. Dieulafoy:

Gesdiidite der Kunst

in

"

(Leipzig 1912)

Spanien und Portugal

<in

the series

"Ars Una".

Stuttgart 1913)

Caved a:

I.

Gesdiidite der Baukunst

Heyse.

Gesdiidite des Barod<

Braun:
K. E. Osthaus:

Spaniens

C.

(German by Paul

Spanien <EssIingen 1908)


(Freiburg 1913)

<Hagen 1918)

in Spanien und Portugal (Berlin 188992)


Die Baukunst Spaniens, mit Text von C. Gurlitt (Dresden 1889-92)
Von Spaniens alter Baukunst (Munidi 1913)
Arquitectura romanica en Cataluna (Barcelona)

Uhde:

Baudenkmaler

H. Wurz:
PuigyCadafalch:

LamperezyRomea: Historia
Lamperez y Romea:Las

de

la

Arquitectura

ciudades espafioles y su arqin'tectura municipal

media (Anuario de
I.

in

alte Jesuitenkirdien

Grundziige der Stilentwicklung

M. Junghaendel:

V.
V.

Spanien, published by F. Kugler

Stuttgart 1858)

0. Schubert:
1.

in

Quadrado, M. Murguia,

R.

Amador

la

Asoziacion de arquitectos de

de los Rios,

et al.

EspaiTa, sus

al

finalizar la

la

Cataluna

edad
1919)

monumentos y

artes

(Barcelona 1884-1903)

Beriihmte Kunststatten

(Verlag E.

A. Seemann,

Leipzig):

Sevilla.

Granada

und Cordoba.

Toledo. Avila, Segovia und der Escorial

El arte en Espana

Thomas, Barcelona): La Catedral de Burgos. Guadalajara = Alca!a de


Real Paiacio de Madrid. La Casa del Greco. Sevilla.
El
Escorial. Monasterio de Guadalupe. Poblet. Aranjuez. Ciudad Rodrigo
Monumentos arquitectonicos de Espana (Madrid 1859 76) (New Edition 1908 fF.)
The Industrial Arts in Spain (London 1890)
Juan F. Riafio:
Hispano=Moresque ware of the XV. century (London 1890)
A. van de Put:
F. Sarre * F. R. Martin Die Ausstellung von Meisterwerken Muhammedanisdier Kunst in Miindien
(edit.

Henares.

1910 (Munidi 1912).

Containing a

list

of further special literature

Bertaux:
L'exposition retrospective d'Art de Saragosse 1908 (Saragosse-Paris 1910)
Pedro M. de Artinaiio: Catalogo de la exposicion de tejidos esparioles anteriores a la introduccion
E.

del Jacquard

Pedro M. de Ar tin a rio: Catalogo

de

(Madrid 1917)
le

exposicion de Hierros antiguos espafioles (Madrid 1919)

Catalogo de Mobiliario Espanol de


(Madrid,
J.

Font y

D, Platon

Gum a:

Numerous

los siglos

XV.=primera mitad

edicion, 1918)

Rajolas valencianes y catalanas (Villanueva y Geltru 1905)


La ceramica antigua de Talavera (Madrid 1919)

Paramo:

El conde de Casal:

2.

...La ceramica de Alcora (Madrid 1919)


articles and illustrations in periodicals:
Arte Espaiiol (Madrid)
.

Museum

(Barcelona)

La Esfera (Madrid)
Historia

y Arte

(Madrid,- will not appear further)

Boletin de la Sociedad Espanola de Excurciones (Madrid)


Boletin de la Sociedad Castellana de Excurciones (Valladolid)

del

XVII.

XXI

Barcelona,

Don

Carlos Vallin. Alcora

Porcelain, Coffee Pot and

Cup, End of XVIII. century

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Afcafd de Guadaira, Castillo 18
Afcafd de Hen a res. Cloister of S.

Magdalen,

Door Lock 139


Courtyard

97

Barcefotia, La Aiidiencia 63
Audience Court, Staircase 9o
Casa Dalmases Calle de Moncada, Staircase 91
Casanovas, Dona de Torrus, Lace 165

Magistral, Chapel Grating 131

Catedral, Decorative Finish for vauitedCeiling_\'^'

133
Oratorio de S. I-'elipe, Door Lod< 139
Palacio Arzobispal, Staircase 9/

Catedrai, Grating 131

Magistral, Grating

Universidad

64

Universidad, Portal

Avifa, Convento de
Pews lo8
Garnishment

for

Tomas, Choir

Door 127

Grating 133
Patio del

Town

Convento de

Fortification

2o

Cementerio viejo 7-1


Coleccion Giiell, Dish 142
Maria, Sa. del Mar, Portal

85
S.

Catedral, Grating 132

S.

Tomas 9^

Museo,
Museo,
Museo,
Museo,
Museo,
Museo,

8o

Chest 155
Churdi Vestments 17o

Door Knodter Xll


Embroidery JX
Silk Material ///
Stuff 168

XXII
Museo, Woolen Material 172
Don Patricio, Lace 165

Pasco,

Plaza del Rey, Palace of Charles

V 27

Alhambra, Sisters' Chamber 9


Alhambra, The Red Towers //
Alhambra, The Two Sisters' Chamber lo
Alhambra, Vaulted Ceiling lol
Alhambra, Windows loo

M. Paul, Chemist's Pots 144


Vallin, Don Carlos, Candlestid< and Candaia^
brum 138
Vallin, Don Carlos, Coffee Pot and Cup XXI
Valiin, Don Carlos, Eagle 137
Vallin, Don Carlos, Jug 163
Vallin, Don Carlos, Mortar 137

Gratis, Plaza Mayor 73

Vallin,DonCarlos,Porcelain Dishes and Plates/-/^

(j//<7(^/i:7/^/V7/'<7,

Tadiard,

Burgos, Casa

del

Cordon, Portal 86

Catedral, Central

Tower 43

Catedral, Chapel

JO
51

35

Leon,

Museo, Altar Front 161

Mayor 28
Town Gate 23

Cadiz, Plaza de Isabel with Townhall 3o


Cafatayiid, Sa. Maria, Portal 79
Can Terrat, Brazier 138
CordoBa, Catedral, Gate 126
Mezquita, Ceiling lo3
Mezquita, Court of Oranges

97

Mezquita, Mihrab Cupola lo2

Mezquita, Stucco Decoration 12

44

Ciienca, Town Buildings and Grounds 16

Escoriaf 4o
Granada, Alhambra, Ambassadors' Chamber
(Detail)

Alhambra, Court of Justice 6


Alhambra, Court of Lions 3
Alhambra, Court of Lions, Capitals 7
Alhambra, Court of Lions, Hall 5
Alhambra, Court of Myrtles /
Alhambra,Courtof Myrtles and ComaresTower2
Alhambra, Court of Myrtles, Stucco Deco=
ration

26

77

Alhambra, Courtyard with Facade


Alhambra, Mosaic Tiling 153

lo7

Convento de S. Marcos, Ceiling lo4


Convento de S. Marcos, Choir Stalls ///
L ogrono, Palacio de Duque de laVictoria, Portal 87
London, formerly Art Shop, Crevecoeur Plate /-^5
formerly Art Shop, Crevecoeur Plate, Reverse /-i^6
South Kensington Museum, Dishes 146
South Kensington Museum, Glass Jug 175
South Kensington Museum, Glass Lamp 176
South Kensington Museum, Pilgrim's Flask I76
South Kensington Museum, Vinegar and Oil
Spanish Art Galleries,

Mezquita, Sanctuary //

Nicolas

66

Azulejo and Floor

Cruets 175

Mosque 14

St.

Catedral

Catedral, Choir Stalls

Plaza

Torre de

Infantado palace, Court of Lions99

Duqiies del Infantado

Catedral, Antehall

Hospital de S. Juan, Portal 81

Mezquita,

los

96

154
Folkwang Museum, Floor Tiling 153
Huesca, Capilla de Sa. Ana, Chapel Grating 132
Catedral, Chest 122

75
Tomb 6o
Towers 34

Catedral,

Court of an Arabian House


Moorish Market Hal! 13

Tiling

Catedral, Portal

Catedral,

Ceiling lol

Hagen, Folkwang Museum,

Catedral, Entrance to Chapel

Catedral, Furrier's Gate

Cartuja

Palaciode

Candelabrum 138

Catedral,

Wooden
54

Alhambra,

89
Don Domingo

Asilo, Portal

Barcenas,
Barcent,

Duquesa

de.

Vargueno 12o
Damask 174
de

las,

Belda, S., Secretary 115

Borondo,
Bois,
Bois,

Woolen Carpet 166

Spanish Art Galleries, Woolen Carpet 167


Madrid, Almenas, Condede las, Alcora Ceramic
Chemist's Pot 142
Almenas, Conde de las, Alcora Dishes 143
Almenas, Conde de las. Chair 113
Almenas, Conde de las. Chest 118
Almenas, Conde de las. Secretary 119
Almenas, Conde de las. Silk Material 174

Bois,

Don
Don
Don

Sr., Buffet
Feli.v,

118

Alcora Busts, Vases,

etc.

143

Alcora Plaques and Saucers 141


Felix, Alcora Porcelain 142

Felix,

Capilla del Obispo,

Door lo9

XXIII

Convento de
Hospital de

la

las

Descalzas Reaies, Staircase

93

Latina, Portal 8/

Paufar,

Lafora, Beatriz Srta., Chest 116

Don Juan, Chest ///


Lafora, Don Juan, Choir Stall 112
Lazaro, Don Jose, Box and Chest 129
Lazaro, Don Jose, Brazier 138
Lazaro, Don Jose, Bronze Censer and Bronze
Lafora,

XIII
Don Jose, Custodia <Monstrance> 162
Lazaro, Don Jose, Door KnoAer J>CII
Lazaro, Don Jose, Heads of Nails 129
Lazaro, Don Jose, Pastoral Staff 162
Lazaro, Don Jose, Secretary 122
Lazaro, Don Jose, Two Secretaries 123
Laiglesia, Don Eduardo de, Velvet IJJ
Candiestid\

Lazaro,

Medinaceli,

Duke

Ministerio de

Montal,

Don

la

of,

^X^ooden Bendi 121

Guerra JI

Pedro, Secretary 1/9

Don Platon, Bowls 147


Don Platon, Holy Water
Don Pedro, Chest 116

Marques
Marques

147

de.

Choir

de. Field

Stall

Escuelas Menores, Portal 82


Esteban, S.
S.,

de

112

Jose,

120

Armorial Carpet 168

Four Chairs 158


Jose, Holy Family, Leather

Jose,

Work 156

LIniversidad

Don Jose, Hope, Leather Work 156


Don Jose, Leather Wings of a Look=
ing Glass 157
Weissberger, Don Jose, Leather Work PII
Weissberger, Don Jose, Silk Material 169
Weissberger, Don Jose, Table 124
Weissberger, Don Jose, Talavera Plate and Ba=

the

150
Jose,

Talavera Plate and Ba=

151

Aiaiizaiiares ef Reaf, Castillo 19


cfe Gafdacaiio, Village Churdi 41
Munidj, formerly: Dr. von Buerkel, Carpet 166
Pampfoiia, Catedral, Ivory Chest 159

5a. Alaria

126

84

95

Composteffa,

Catedral,

Way

of

47
37

Clara, Sa.

Hospital Real

68

Hospital Real, Courtyard

99

Hospital Real, Facade


Martin, S. Pinario,

Martin, S. Pinario,
Plaza de Platerias

78
Facade 39
Madonna 55

29

Santiffaiia, Colegiata,
Segovia, Alcazar 19
Clemente,

Don

52

Cross

Aquaducto

sin

Sacristy

of the Cross

Weissberger,

sin

36

S, Justo, Portal

Weissberger,

Weissberger,

Tombs 5S

Escuelas Menores, Courtyard 82

Saiitiajjo de

Table 115

Viana, Marques de. Small Chest

Weissberger,

Catedral Vieja,

Way

Don R., Snuffers 14o


Sinobas, Don R., Two Weights 137
Torrepalma, Conde de. Brazier 138

Weissberger,

48

Catedral Vieja, Stuff //O

LIniversidad, Staircase 9-2

Sinobas,

Don
Don
Don

Catedral Vieja, Basilica

Monterey Palace 69
Pots

Salamanca, Marques de. Bed 125


Santillana, Marques de. Chair 114

Weissberger,

Catedral, Facade 38
PoBfet, Monasterio 2o
Ripoff, Sa. Maria, Roman Mosaic
Safamattca, Casa de las Condias 67
Casa de las Condias, Detail 67
Casa de Doiia Maria la Brava, Portal 86

Key Tower 25

Paramo,

Santillana,

JJ

Gate 13o

Portal 80
P/asencia,

Iglesia

Paramo,

Santillana,

Altars

ef.

Cartuja, Iron

Esteban,

Palacio Real //

Ruiz,

Paris, Louvre, Dish 145


Past rait a. Ducal Castle, Coffered Ceiling I05

Way

of the Cross

94

XXIV

S.,

Suburb 32

Lower Town 32
Seviffa, Alcazar, Facade 83
Millan, S.,

Alcazar, Patio de
Alcazar, Portal

las

Doncellas, Wall Tiling

83

Casa del Ayuntamiento 68


Casa de Pilatos, Courtyards 9^
Casa de Pilatos, Grating 135
Palacio de las Duenas, Door lo7
Palacio de S. Elmo, Portal

8Q

Nueva Jo
Sevres, Musce Ccramique, Dish 146
Tafavera. Ceramic 149
Plaza

152

XXIV
Pa fen cia, Audiencia, Salon de Cortes, Ceiling/06
Catedral, Central Tower 33

Tarragona, Catedral 36
Catedral, Door 12/
Wall 57
164
Rey, Gate Ardi 25

Catedral, High Altar

Lonja de Seda 61

Teriief, Catedral, Basin

Lonja de Seda

Tofedo, Alcazar del


Castillo de S. Servando I8

Miguelete

Catedral, Choir

62

44
Marques de dos Aguas, Facade To
Houses 72

Palacio del

Round 49

Peasants'

Coro 56
136
Catedral, West Facade 45
Chapel Apse 27
Catedral,

Torres de Cuarte 22

Catedral, Pulpit

Torres de Cuarte

Convento de
Cupola lo2

Sa. Isabel, Brid\

Hospital de S.

Cruz 88

Juan, S. de

Maria, Sa.,

la

Puerta

Nueva

Sham Arcades 24

Blanca

Grating

XI

59

de Bisagra

22

Town

Iglesia

de

Lonja

63

Pablo,

S.,

la

de Zaporta, Portal

37

Magdalena

Tankard 163

Box 159
lo3
Seo, Tower 33
Seo, Ivory

Seo, Cupola

Puerta del Sol 21


Street

Zaragoza, Casa
Engracia, Sa.

la Penitentia,

24

Zaiitora, Casa de los Momos 68


Catedral, South Portal 76

31
View 15

Torre nueva

Segovia, AquaductO.

Late

Roman

46

Building

45

87

Granada, Alhambra
Myrtle Courtyard (South View), Renaissance Palace of Charles V.

in

Background

o
o

3
N

<

u
o

Granada, Alhambra
Courtyard with Mosque Facade. Second half of XIV. century.
Socle, and Stone Floor

Coloured Stucco, Glazed Tile

/iv P-'niiiishii

Granada, Alhambia
I

lall

near Lions' Court.

Last quarter of

XIV. century

of f.Jiior TclHwanff,

Hagcn

Granada, Alhambra
Court of

^-

Justice,

and Lions' Court.

Second

half of

XIV.

centur\'

MM

**

^^

'

^%t TO' ilf i%


'

>r

Aik

.-*

'-'4'

J\/

*5 A

5J

t-vTH
/Vv-/.

M;.7J.v >

Granada, Alhambra
Stucco Ornamentation of Ambassador's Chamber.

Last quarter of

XIV. century

.l.V

Phol. Hiiii.wi

Granada, Alhambra
Capitals and Stucco Decoration

in

1, ions'

Court.

Last nuancr ol \l\'. ici\tury

y Mciwt

Granada, Alhambra
Stucco Decoration of the

I'ortai

of the Myrtle Court.

XIV, century

I'I'Ct.

Granada, Alhambra
Sisters'

Chamber.

Stalactites

and

Gypsum

Decoration.

XIV. century

Htiiis.TX Mcih-l

10

ir

>

r-^-rTV

Granada, Alhambra
The Two

Sisters' Cliamber. Second half of XIV. century.

Walls of coloured Stucco,


Glazed Tile Socle. Marble Floor

Stalactite Ceiling

11

L
Cordoba, La Mezqiiira
Sanctuary <961 76)

12

Cordoba, La Mezquita
Capilla Vidaviciosa.

Mudejare Stucco Decoration. Glazed Tile Socle.

XIV. century

13

Granada
Remains of the Moorish Market

Hall.

Burnt

down

in

1843

14

15

o
>
3

o
t/3

16

'

a.

o.

jO

5
S

>^

2
o

u
'S.

17

o
o
o

o
1-

18

r/\-t.

Alcala de Gnadaira <Province


Hevi n Stone.

Principally built

Sevilla),

XIV.

XV.

H.nivr y.\hnet

El Castillo

century

Toledo, Castillo de S. Servando


Citadel on the

left

Bank of

the Tajo.

Built for

Defence of the Town lying on the


in Xlll. century

Restored

right

Bank, about

100

19

Hausery Menet

Manzanares
iuilt

el

Real, Castillo

by Juan Guas. Second

half of

XV.

century

I 'hot.

Segovia, Alcazar
XI. century.

Almost

entirely restored In 1352

58

IWr,

KLiijinj'uit

20

Pfiot. Beer, Ktagenfiirl

Avila
Town

Fortification.

Granite.

End

of

XVI. century

^^:^?(m

WW:'

^%
Poblet (Province Tarragona), EI Monasterio
Gothic Fortification Gate

<1

367 82). The Cloister was

fortified for the

Defence of the Kings' Tombs

21

\rr.-i

Toledo,
About 1100

(?>.

La Puerta

Mudejarc

Style.

del Sol
BriA Decoration

ur.u-

22

Valencia, Torre de Cuarte


Town Gate (1444-90)

Toledo, Puerta Nueva de Bisagra


Double Town Gate. Exterior Side, built 1550, restored

1575

23

.'i^u

fKl

Burgos
Town Gate (1536-52)

24

c/3

c/5
5-1

CJ

^^

o 2

ra

25

26

c
O
u

.2

o
o
c
&
o
1-

>

27

>
X

ro

>

2Q

?;

CQ

o
u

28

re

,'5

re

t/2

29

t/l

30

/Vvv. H.:ns,r y

.l/.v;,/

Cadiz, Plaza de Isabel U


Classicistic

Townhall

ft
^4

s-^^^^'-

/>/>/.

Sevilla,

On

La Plaza Nueva

the Right

<S.

Fernando)

Townhall <1527-64, restored 1891)

H.iiLwi

\hn,-r

31

I'hci. Liiccsi,'

Toledo
Alley.

Tower of

Calheclr.il in Bad<grountl

32

Segovia
Lower

Part of the

Town

near

St,

Millan,

Walls of Fortification on Iberian Fundament (XL

XII.

centuiy)

Pfiot. B,\T, Klaneiifuri

Segovia
St.

Clement's Suburb,

Typical Castilian Houses

33

re

-5

C03

3-<

>

*c

.y

O
re

-J
re

So ^c3
re

N
6
1-

34

Burgos, Catedral
1221 - 1567.

Towers by Hans of Cologne <1442 and following years)

35

Burgos, Catedral
Part of the Furrier's

Gate

<Built in

1516 by Francis of Cologne. Renaissance Style)

36

41

CO

"i

37

UJ

xn
3_

(/I

tJ

_:

>

oa

41G0;i

38

/'/vv,

Plasencia, Catedral
Plateresque North Facade.

First half of

XVI. century

L^ucste

39

/Vvv.

Late Plateresque

Santiago de Compostela, S. Martin Pinario


ith ChurA Alteration
Church Facade (completed 1652. Outside Staircase

.uwitf

completed 1740)

40

"

r-;
ttJ

OS

41

O
o ^

^o
c
ra =
u >

TO

06
ra

42

Sevilla,

On

the Site of the

Main Mo5que 1402 -

Zaragozd,
Begun by Francis Herrera,

Jr., in

Catedral

1506. Additional Building 1530

Igltsia

1681,- altered

de

la

Virgfn

75.

Belfr> <Giralda> originally

Minaret

del Pilar

and continued 1753. Coloured <AzuIejos> Cupolas

43

Burgos, Catedral
Late Gothic Central Tower

vt itli

Plateresque Ornamentation

<1540 67>

44

U.

Pq

:i>^

1/3

^ro

.=

o
<U

>

o ^
u oa
o

45

-a

46

tT3

47

-Ss

H
ra

>

^i^^__ /

'

09

48

Phot. Lacosts

Salamanca, Catedral
Late

Roman Column

Basilica.

V ieja

Xll. century

49

I'lol.

Moreno

Toledo, Catedral
Choir Round with double Passage. The Cathedral of
<

five

Naves

1227 -1493)

in the early

Gothic

Isle

de France Style

50

Burgos, Catedral, Capilla del Condestable


Late Gothic Chapel erected 1482 (Plateresque

High Ahar)

51

Entrance to the

late

Gothic Chapel of

St.

Burgos, Catedrai
Ann (1477 88). Tomb of Archdeacon

.-.

.l/.';.v^

Diaz <died 1492) on the Right

52

Salamanca,

S.

Esteban

Baroque Sacristy of the Dominican Churdi. XVII. century

53

n-

- \\^

PhCI

Paular
Cliurrlsucrcsque Altars <carved

Wood,

gilded

.iiid

painted) of the Cloister

CluirA

54

Phot.

Garzon

Granada, Cartuja
Sacristy in Churrigueresque Style (Marble and Stucco, 1727-64).
The Cases are of
inlaid with Ivory, Mother-of-pearl and Silver (1730
64)

Cedar

Wood

55

Santiago de Compostela, S. Martin Piiiario


Gothic Madonna

in late

Baroque polyclironiic Altar Worl</

Wood

Carvings

l^icostc

56

57

ra

>.i

ct

58

ro

59

r3

O 1

!-

60

Late Gothic

Burgos, Catedral
Tomb of Archdeacon Villegas

(died 1536)

61

Valencia,

La Lonja

de Seda

Gothic Bourse with Passage for Defence

62

U
ii

o.

H
."3

'5

>

D
O
CQ

63

64

65

>
X
u

CO

o
(g-

66

67

u^1
r3

s5

-6

,o

(J

o
3 i

-J

;t"^W|5^

's^

-11

1-

68

Santiago de Compostela, Hospital Real


Early Renaissance Building with Churrigueresque Additions

.A//,'/-

Sevilla, Casci <kl .Xyuntaniifiiro

Ufiife

Townhall. F^lateresque Style (1527 64)

'^

JJIJl*initlTifl

:^--

f^jl

Hi^^nr'''^*'*^

^amoia. La Casa de
Nobleman's House,-

los

late

Memos

Gothic

Plioi.

Lacostf

69

Salamanca
Corner Tower of

tlie

Plateresque Monterey Ralace

70

Pfot.

Valencia, Palacio del Marqiies de dos


Begun 1740. Originally painted

a! fresco,

after>sards ornamented in coloured

Hauwr y Moh'T

Aguas
Marble Stucco. Portal of Alabaster

71

Madrid, Palacio Real


Classicistic

Baroque Building <1738-64>

Granite and Limestone

Madrid, Ministerio de

la

Guerra

Classicistic Palace Building <1782>

72

>

>

73

re

-=

:s

SI

x
i>

=
>
I

Q.

t/j

o Ico
o

74

1. ji;-^;-_.'i"2a'X2!iL

Barcelona, Cementerio viejo


Cemetery. Classicistic Style

.-

--'^iW;^;

75

i
.ji^

Burgos, Catedral
Gothic

I'ortal to the

Way

of the Cross. Doors of carved

Wood

76

Or-.

TJ

> S
^
^yj

O
E

c^

V
N

77

o
o

O
o

>

s
Z]

S O

J^^

o
a.

<
o

78

Pf70t.

Santiago de Compostela, Hospital Real


Plateresque

Facade by Enrique de Egas

<1

501

10)

Lacoste

79

Pfiot,

Cakitayud, Sa. Maria


Plateresque Portal <1528), Pillar to

tlie

Left with late

Mudejarc BriA Decoration

Lacoste

80

81

c/2

82

'J\

83

ro

-B

^ _o
''

CO 2
o

2 w

<
CO

.E

a
rf.

r2

1
11.

84

C^2S65i^>..i2^J?fe.aSaF-

Salamanca, Universidad
in Plateresque Style.
Originally simple Gothic Building (1415-33). Alteration

West Facade

85

Alcala de Henares, LInivcrsidad


Plateresque

Main

Portal <1538)

86

c
o

-o

O w

I.

u
o S
CQ
te-

>

87

O
u

>

at
o

i"

du
o
h4

11

Toledo, Hospital de

S.

Cruz

Early Plateresque Portal (Hospital erected 14Q4 1514)

89

90

ro

t:

<

I
<
^
(^
'

fj

-a

1-

4;

,2

91

-a

92

Salamanca, Universidad
Plateresque Staircase.

<Among

other Decorations Representation of a Bull Fight)

93

'S-^

Pi'vi.

"Madrid,

Convento de

las

Descalzas Reales

Baroque Staircase with Painting <about 1660)

Mcn'/io

94

'5c

U
o

U
o

5^
^ 5

00

95

96

>

^
s-

o S

^1
>

'^

<l

n3

re

o
o

97

J-

<

"6

"5,

l>

98

o
in

3<"

U
TO

>

^04
ro

C/2

2
n

-^

99

Guadalajara, Intantado Palace


Late Gothic Lions' Court w

ith

Mudejare and Renaissance Elements

Ajttr

Uhde

Santiago de Compostela, Hospital Real


Late Baroque Court. Plate Style

"

with classicistic Addition.

Begun before 1769. Completed 1798

100

#^^'3k -^XsV.o

v^:x
<

o
o

iKW^.t:

it

.i

."

**-

,:--i~ *:i.

>

^5^
3

101

>
X
tu

_5
^

<u

-o

TO

'J

o
o

<

-SI
c

On
.0

102

^
N

u
'

-^

o
o

103

oa

CO

TO

3 O

o S
u-

>.

>

si
^
Co

o c
<y

^O ox
i

104

PBot.

Leon, Convento de
Coffered Renaissance

S.

Marcos, Sala Capitular

wooden Ceiling with Mudejare Reminiscences.

First half of

XVI. century

Moreno

105

"ivK,i
P/Jot.

Pastrana, Castle of the


Coffered Renaissance Ceiling.

Dukes

XVI. century

Phct.

Pastrana, Castle of the


Coffered Ceiling.

Hauser y Mcm'l

Dukes

XVI. century

Hauscr y Menu

106

E
o

O
o

CO

-75

<

it:

>

107

B
n
c
ra

5:

ra

'5

P
"u

a.

Oh

w Q

CO w

mm^

-^S

^
ro

U
c
O

U
M
o

108

0\f

Avila, Convento de S. Tomas


End of XV. century

Late Gothic Choir Pews.

109

Madrid, Capilla

del

Obispo

Renaissance Door, probably after a Design of Giralte <about 1550-60)

110

"3

ss

Ill

t/3

ro

-6

O =
u ^
a.

c
O

>

.t:

>

&

112

Madrid,

Don

Juan Lafora

Renaissance Choir
XVI. century

Pew

"Madrid, Marqiies de Santillana


Early Plateresque Choir Pew
Beginning of XVI. century

113

Madrid, Conde de
Cliair.

las

Almenas

XVI. century

Madrid, B. Pcryoiiton
Chair.

XVI.

century.

<Velvet Seat and Bad(>

Madrid, Private Collection


Renaissance Secretary. About 1600

Madrid, Conde de Sclafani


Chair. Leather Covering.

End

of

XVI. century

114

Madrid, Conde de

las

Alineuds

Chair. VelvetCovering.RenaissanceEnibroidery

Madrid, Conde de
Chair.

las

Almenas

Beginning of XVI. century

Madrid, Marqiies de Santiliana


Chair.

XVI. century

Madrid, B. Per)'onton
Chair, inlaid \sith Mudeiarc Decoration.

XVI. century

115

Pfiot.

Haliscr

y Sknct

Madrid, Marques de Santillana


Field Table.

Madrid,

XVII. century.

Inlaid

B, Pcryontoii

Renaissance Double Chest,- upon it, Gothic Case


covered with Leather and wrought Iron Garnishments

Work

with engraved and gilded Bronze

Madrid,
Secretary.
Silver Reliefs.

S.

Belda

XVi. century
Covered with Velvet

16

Madrid,
Gothic Chest covered

Nsith Leather,

Don

Pedro Ruiz

ornamented

>xith

wrought

Iron.

XV.

century

phot. Hatist'r

Madrid, formerly

Srta. Beatriz

Gothic carved Chest, partly

gilded.

XV.

Lafora
century

Mcrtcr

117

Madrid,

Don Bernardo

Gothic carved

Clicst.

Peryonton

XV. century

I'fiot.

Madrid,
Gothic Chest covered

>x

ith

Don

HausiT y Mcnci

Juan Lafora

Garnishments. Cn.l of
Velvet and w'rought Iron

XV.

i:ntur\'

118

-Ti

119

120

5j

"5b

t/5

;-

P
"3

>,

m-'

'^
-O

i-

CQ

CO

c
(J5

03

ra

O
.E

>

c
o

!>

C -

-5

c
Oi

121

ra

"o

-6

u S
n -a

-a

122

*^K3

/*

!MJ|

-:

:9

Madrid,
Plateresque

wooden

Don

Secretary,

Jose Lazaro

made

for Charles

V. XVI. century

P/vr. Olrra

Huesca, Catedral
Plateresque Chest for Sacristy

<Wood. 1556)

123

Madrid,

Don

Jose Lazaro

Renaissance Secretary. XVI. century

Madrid,

Don

Jose Lazaro

Small Baroque Secretary. XVII. century

124

Madrid,
Early Plateresque Secretary with

late

Don

Jose Lazaro

Gothic, Mudejare and Renaissance Elements.

V r

m HI 41

ffi

*i

'

::

.:

,!

;;

,;

Beginning of XVI. century

'
'

W tf m t\*m* mi^-*^ # i st !*i w^


.1

/'/?(?/.

Madrid,
Carved

Wood

Don

Jose Weissberger

Renaissance Table with armorial Motive. XVI. century

Mot^no

125

Phot. Roig

Formerly Madrid, Marques de Salamanca


Front Part of a Bed. Wood and Bronic. XVII. century

126

TJ

=
o '

^10;;

_:

-6

o
c

re

ra

t.

,-

03

-T3

u
O

-a
"O

Ji

2
o

127

<
a

^^
aj
03

!*

o
o

-^

5 J

128

Phot.

Toledo, Catedral
Renaissance Door with Knockers (Bronze)

Moreno

129

Heads

ot Nails (wrought Iron; tor

Door Garnishments,'

late

XV. and XVI. century

^^Y*T^^*^r- ^1

'-^"

(Left) Late Gotliic enamelled copper^gilded Bo.x. Alioiit

Madrid,

Don

1500

i^r-

(Right)

Roman

]osi Lazaro

enamelled Chest. XIII. eentury

130

03
I
(C

o
J:

[1}

131

to

132

ra

133

o
o

13

<
a

t.

bo

c
a;

134

Phot. Lacostc

Sevilla,

Catedral

Plateresque wrought Iron Altar Grating

135

I'tot. .\tcr,-iio

Sevilla,
Plateresque wrought Iron

Casa

Window

de Pilatos

Grating. First half of

XVI. century

136

PHoi, Moii'no

Toledo, Catedral
Renaissance

Pulpit.

Iron and Bronre <1543

52)

137

Barcelona,

Don

Carlos Vallin

Gothic Eagle, wrought

Iron.

XV.

century

Barcelona,

Don

Carlos Vallin

Bronze Mortar (1790)

Phol. H<uis,-r

Phot. Uaiiscr .v Mfttct

Madrid,

Don

R. Sinobas

Late Gothic Bronze Weight <1492>

Madrid,

Don

Bronze Weight <1609>,

Mrin't

R. Sinobas
after

Gothic Model

138

139

r3

00

o ^

<

1/

140

/^l^#
^^'^'

^>- -*

>vA

ffj

A'

**

-!f*W

..

Pfior.

Madrid, Collection of
Snuffers

Don

<1800 30)

R. Sinobas

Hatiscr

j'

Mend

141

I'hci.

Phot. Roig

Alcora Porcelain. Polydiromic Washing Set


XVIII. century

Alcora Porcelain. PolyAromic Plaquettc and Saucer


XVIII. century

Madrid,

Don

Felix Bois

Poig

142

/i?*- -^-

ir^^^^,..!rTsjc->.^

Pt:ot.

Pfvi. Koi]

Alcora Porcelain. Pyramid

Alcora Flower Vase with

as Table Decoration

Madrid,

Don

Felix Bois

Pf<ot. Poiji

Phot. Roin

Madrid, Conde de
Alcora Ceramic. Chemist's

las
Pot.

Almenas
Blue Decoration

Roig

Silver Reflex

Barcelona, Coleccion

Gi^iell

Alcora Dish with coloured Decoration

143

Pi'ot. koii]

Madrid, Conde de
Alcora Porcelain. Group

in

las

Almenas

White,- polydiromic Dishes

PI'ot.

Madrid,

Don

Koig

Felix Bois

Alcora Porcelain. Busts and polydiromic Vases

I'I'OI. Rciji

Madrid,

Don

Alcora Porcelain.

Feli.x

Bois

Basins and Flovccr Pots

144

>
X

a.

u.

4:

145

4J

<

2
o o
w >

.o

'd.

a-

"H
.c

TO

w o

15

>
03

ft-

.2

tr

146

AJr.-r

ran

Jt'

After van dc Put

I'm

Formerly London, Art Trade


Back of the Creveca'ur Plate (see Page 145)

London, South Kensington


Hispano^Moresqiie

Plate.

Museum

Beginning of XVI. century

^^^^^iBUgs,

After van de Put

After van dc Put

Sevres,

Musee Ceramique

Hispano-Moresque Plate. Decorations of Spirals and Lines of Writing

London, South Kensington


Hispano^Moresque

Plate.

Museum

Small Leaf Decoration.

XV.

century

147

Talavera Ceramic.

aLiver.i

Ceramic.

XVIII. century.

XVIII. century.

Holy Water

Madrid,

Don

Polydiromic Shaving Basins

I'ots witii

Arms

ol diltcrcnt ecclesiastical

Pbroii PcUcimo

Orders

148

03

>
O

c
u
03

OB

[/

149

c
o

-2 ^
aa o-Sf

>
X

u &
o

o
--'
CO

<

Ul.

=
js

4J

> W
5

(rt

jQ-H

O
3 U

(u

^
^1,03

- o

ra

150

End

Talavera Ceramic. Small Dish.

Talavera Ceramic.

Plate.

Madrid, Collection

J.

of XV'II. century

W'U.

ceiitur)

Weissberger

151

Talavera Ceramic.

Talavera Ceramic.

About 1700

Bowl.

Plate.

Madrid, Collection

XV'll. century

J.

Weissberger

152

P/'Ci/.

Sevilla,

Alcazar, Patio de
Wall

Tiling.

las

Doncellas

Moorish Star Pattern

Lacosft.'

153

//iof.

Phot. G. OstHaus

llauicr \ MciKl

Hagen, Folkwang

Granada, Alhambra
Moorish Floor Tiling

Work

XIV.

with white Band ^X^ork

centur\-

.^'

^T'-^iLiaa^
^L-^l

Granada, Alhambra
Moorish

'loor Tiling.

Star Pattern.

XIV.

centur>-

Museum

Pomegranate Pattern
XVI. century

Seviliian Floor Tiling.

'

154

?fti-^

Gothic Azulejo with Animal Motive


Third cpiarter of

XV.

Floor Tiling with the Family Coat of

Arms

Last quarter of

century

of Fernandez de

XV.

Cordoba and

Ziiiiiga

century

^^?l

Mm
P/Jor,

Madrid, Coleccion

Osma

Star Pattern, Azulejo

Cuerdaseca Tedinic.

XV.

Hagen, Folkwang
Sevillian Renaissance

in

^.WM

Pfmt. G. Osthaus

G. Ost/iaiis

Museum

Armorial Stone

Hagen, Folkwang
XV.

centurv

Sevilla,
Sevillian Renaissance

Museo

Provincial

Floor Tiling Altar

F*ront,

Museum

Azulejo with Cock's Foot Pattern

XVI, century

century

155

Phcu Ai

Barcelona,

Museo

Gothic Chest covered with Leather.

XV.

century

\nt Mils

156

O
oa

(55

.22

to

O
c
o

>

IS

157

>
D

vftj

tn

^^

:2-=

OQS

o
"6

158

Chair.

Baroque Chair covered with Leather

Leather Covering

XVIL

XVI. century

Chair covered with Leather. XVI. century

Madrid,

Don

century

Chair covered with Leather. XVI. century

Jose Weissberger

159

Aflfr

Bcrtiiii v

Zaragoza,
Moorish Ivory Box

\x

ith

gilded Silver

Aficr

H.-riiiii V

.\Jt,-t

Iklt.lUX

La Seo

Mountings ornamented with

Filigree.

XiV. century

Pamplona, Catedral
Name

of Abdelmelics, Son of Almansor (1005), with secular Scenes


Cordovan Work under Sassanian iiitluence

Moorish Ivory Chest with the

160

lb

.t:

i*

'X
tJttJ

u
o
o

a,

o
u
.52

"S-

o
o

-6

>
o

'SjX

<P.

161

B
o

9.

^ ^

= o =
"Si!"

J--

CQ

>^
"c

1W

162
bO

163

.tz

164

AJtir Bcrtjiix

Teruel, Catedral
Basin,

wrought

in Silver.

Plateresque Style with Mudejare Reminiscences. First half of

XVI. century

165

Barcelona, Collection

Don

Patricio

Pasco

Patricio

Pasco

Guipure Lace

Barcelona, Collection
Catalan Lace

Barcelona,

Don

after

Russian Style

Dona M. Casanovas

de Torrus

Catalan Altar Cover with Guipure Lace

166

*i***(S3EJtln a* .*.

London, Spanish Art Galleries


Carpet, With geometrical Pattern and white
ornamental Letters. XV, XVI. century

Woolen

Formerly Munich, Dr.

v.

Buerkel

Carpet, Knotting similar to Linen Lattice Work


Geometrical Pattern on interlaced Ground, XV, century

Woolen

167

London, Spanish Art Galleries


Woolen Carpet

with Armorial SliicMs

Middle of

XV.

century

London, Spanish Art Galleries


Woolen

Carpet.

Last quarter of

XV.

century.

With

Bearings and figural Scenes along the Edges

arniori.il

168

Madrid,

Don

Carpet

Coat of Arms. XVII. century

viith

Jose Weissberger

Phot.

Barcelona,
Hispano- Arabic

Stuff.

Museo

Sassanian Influence.

X.- XI.

century.

Green on Red

Maliu

169

Vlwi. M,i/,ii

Madrid,
Silk Stuff.

(Reil

Ground. Animals

Don
ycilovs

Jose Weissberger
Ornamentation blaA.) Granada.

XVI. century

170

1-

U
re

ro

-2

f^

CO
o

O g
on

o.

-5
m

S
1

2.6
3

it

>

c
u

<

(13

o
o

<
II

o
c

o.

172

Pliot.

Mju-ii

Matiti

Pl-ot.

Maicii

Barcelona,
Catalan-Aragonian woolen

i ror

Museo

Stuffs.

XV'I.

XVII.

century

Mau-it

173

Madrid,
Coloured printed Velvet

Don Eduardo
witli the

Virgin

<le las

do Laiglcsia
Atigustias.

(Valencia.

1740)

174

2o
O
t/5

TO

c
b

CO

175

>

2
-a

H
i

E
s

c
o
do
_C

c
y,

3
O
C/0

-o

>

176

>
Q.

c
o
.c
'55

3
O
C/3

O
C
o

>
o
o

J2

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY


Los Angeles

University of California

SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY FACII,ITY


405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1388
Return this material to the library
from which It was borrowed.

3 1158 00618 3445

*'<

D 000 754

61

iiii
11
Pliili

ill