Discovering Mesa Prieta

:

The Petroglyphs of Northern New Mexico
and the People Who Made Them

 

Teachers Curriculum – 2014 Edition
Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project, Velarde, NM
Judith A. Chaddick, MS; Esta Gutierrez, MS Ed., lead writers
Katherine Wells, BA, lead illustrator
Janet MacKenzie, MA, editor

 

Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project
PO Box 407
Velarde, NM 87582

Discovering Mesa Prieta

Discovering Mesa Prieta:
The Petroglyphs of Northern New Mexico
and the People Who Made Them
Teachers Curriculum appropriate for all levels, from 4th grade to Adult Education
Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project, Velarde, NM

Published by:
Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project, 2014
Lead writers: Judith A. Chaddick, MS; Esta Gutierrez, MS Ed.
Lead illustrator: Katherine Wells, BA
Editor: Janet MacKenzie, MA
Funders and financial contributors:
Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation
Historic Preservation Division, New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs
Santa Fe Community Foundation
New Mexico Children’s Foundation
Family Foundations and Individual Donors
For additional information, please contact:
Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project
PO Box 407
Velarde, NM 87582
mesaprieta@cybermesa.com
(505) 852-1351

Special note:
Curriculum also available online via link on the MPPP website at mesaprietapetroglyphs.org
Please credit Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project and referenced authors.
No fees may be charged for any further distribution of this curriculum.
Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project is a 501(c)(3) non-profit community
organization located in Velarde, NM.
MPPP documents, protects and sustains endangered archaeological treasures
in the northern Rio Grande Valley.

©

2014 Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project

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Discovering Mesa Prieta

PROTECTING PETROGLYPHS
by Herman Agoyo
To us these petroglyphs are not the remnants of some long lost civilization that has been dead for many
years… They are part of our living culture. What is stored in the petroglyphs is not written in any book
or to be found in any library. We need to return to them to remind us of who we are and where we came
from, and to teach our own sons and daughters of it.
The petroglyphs are under a severe threat from vandalism and land development activities. For this
reason, there is a need to protect the petroglyphs in a way that will allow us to continue to use them for
religious purposes, as well as to save them for the benefit of both Indians and non-Indian visitors who
come to appreciate our culture.

Herman Agoyo, San Juan Pueblo (the people of San Juan Pueblo now use its Tewa name, Ohkay Owingeh)
All Indian Pueblo Council Chairman (1987-1990).
Statement before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Interior and Insular
Affairs. Albuquerque, New Mexico, October 11, 1986.

 

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©

2014 Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project

Discovering Mesa Prieta

CONTEXTUAL STATEMENT

The landscapes, including Tsikw’aye or Mesa Prieta, in which petroglyphs are found are spiritual places
to many peoples of northern New Mexico. We do not understand the meaning of these images, but we
know that some are sacred to the Pueblos and Hispano people. In development of this curriculum, we
sought guidance from Tewa Pueblos regarding cultural concerns and from Hispano heritage experts and
historians.
In presenting this curriculum, we wish to celebrate the existence of these images as well as the cultures
and histories they embody. It is our intention to be respectful to those who made the petroglyphs and all
who hold them sacred.
The terms we use to classify the petroglyphs are descriptive only and are not intended to assign meaning
or interpret the images. It is our hope that all of us may approach this curriculum and the petroglyphs
with respect and wonder. We believe that Discovering Mesa Prieta will also help students connect with
their cultural heritage.
We encourage educators from other geographic areas to adapt the curriculum for their own use. If you
need guidance in the pronunciation of Tewa or Hispano words used in this curriculum, please consult
with a Tewa-speaking or Spanish-speaking person, or you may contact the Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project
office.

©

2014 Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project

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