GO FOR

NATIONAL DEBATE GATORS
THE OPEN TITLE

‘WILD’ABOUT
THE JOURNEY

CASES CONVERGE TO STIR CONVERSATION ABOUT RACIAL
JUSTICE AND POLICE USE OF FORCE

WEEKEND PAGE 17

NATION PAGE 6

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
www.smdailyjournal.com

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014 • Vol XV, Edition 95

San Bruno wraps up centennial festivities
Gala one of city’s final events to commemorate 100 years
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

After a year of celebration, San
Bruno will be wrapping up its 100th
birthday year with one of its last
events: a semi-formal gala on
Saturday.
Grown out of the San Francisco
earthquake and fire in 1906, San Bruno
Park Addition was developed into
housing. San Bruno officially became
a municipality in 1914 after several

new neighborhoods sprung up. At the
time, the city had about 1,400 residents, compared to its about 42,000
now. Prior to its establishment as a
city, the ranch land supplied San
Francisco with horses, milk and meat,
according to the San Bruno Centennial
website.
“It’s
really
special, ”
said
Councilman Ken Ibarra. “I’ve lived
almost half my life here and I think it’s
really special I’m a part of it. I hope
everyone else thinks that way too; it’s
unusual.”

At the party that will be held at
Skyline College, Ibarra is excited to
see San Bruno residents he hasn’t seen
in a while.
“As small of a town as we are, you
still don’t see a lot of people,” he said.
“It will be interesting to celebrate with
them.”
One-hundred years is very significant, said Mayor Jim Ruane.
“It should be a lot of fun,” Ruane
said. “We’ve tried to plan it so it’s a
PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE SAN BRUNO LIBRARY

See 100 YEARS, Page 23

Green’s Hall on San Mateo Avenue around 1910-1914.

Average ACA
premiums to
rise in 2015
Most customers can find coverage comparable
to what they have now if they shop around
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL

Jesse Flora shows mixed media works by Wendy Golden at his Neologian Art Gallery in San Mateo. Flora’s gallery
and six other venues will be open to the public for this month’s First Friday.

Expanding the arts
San Mateo’s First Friday offers new venues
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

San Mateo is quickly becoming
a First Friday destination with
seven galleries now participating
in the monthly event with an
upcoming holiday twist.
Despite the city not having a
centralized art district, a grassroots effort by local artists and
gallery owners has more than doubled the size of the event in just

five months.
“It’s pretty cool because it’s all
growing pretty organically, just
through the local artists and business owners,” said Lorna Watt, a
local artist best known for her
yarn-bomb creations downtown.
“We really want it to be a resource
for the community.”
Everyone is welcomed to the free
events taking place at a variety of
venues.
Food, drink and live music will

be enlivening several studios and
galleries; some will be offering
live artist demonstrations and
there is even a kid-friendly crafting location.
While nearing the holidays,
Watt said this Friday’s event
serves as a great opportunity for
attendees to pick up unique gifts
and support local artists.
“It’s a range from fine art to arts

See ART, Page 22

WASHINGTON — Many people
covered under President Barack
Obama’s health care law will face
higher premiums next year, the
administration
acknowledged
Thursday. While the average
increases are modest, it’s more
fodder for the nation’s political
battles over health care.
Officials stressed that millions
of current HealthCare. gov customers can mitigate the financial
hit if they’re willing to shop
around for another plan in a more

competitive online marketplace.
Subsidies will also help cushion
the impact.
It’s currently taking an average
of 30 minutes for returning customers to update their coverage.
Premiums for the most popular
type of plan are going up an average of 5 percent in the 35 states
where the federal government is
running the health insurance
exchanges, said a report from the
Health and Human Services
Department.
Monthly premiums are one of

See HEALTH, Page 23

Coastside Fire wins bid for 2.5-acre lot
Harbor District approves sale of El Granada property
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The San Mateo County Harbor
District’s debated sale of a 2.5-acre
long-vacant lot was awarded to the
Coastside Fire Protection District
Wednesday, despite some members
of the public hoping for a community center.

The El Granada post office lot,
which has never been built upon
and has no sewer or water systems,
was sold to the fire district for
$845,000 just below the Harbor
District’s asking price.
Several people spoke out at the
meeting in favor of awarding the

See SALE, Page 23

2

FOR THE RECORD

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“I’ve never been poor, only broke.
Being poor is a frame of mind. Being
broke is only a temporary situation.”
— Mike Todd, American movie producer (1907-1958)

This Day in History
Nelson Mandela, the anti-apartheid
leader who became South Africa’s first
black president and was a global symbol of sacrifice and reconciliation,
died at age 95.
In 1 7 7 6 , the first scholastic fraternity in America, Phi
Beta Kappa, was organized at the College of William and
Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia.
In 1 7 8 2 , the eighth president of the United States, Martin
Van Buren, was born in Kinderhook, New York; he was the
first chief executive to be born after American independence.
In 1 7 9 1 , composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart died in
Vienna, Austria, at age 35.
In 1 8 3 1 , former President John Quincy Adams took his
seat as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives.
In 1 8 4 8 , President James K. Polk triggered the Gold Rush
of ’49 by confirming that gold had been discovered in
California.
In 1 9 3 2 , German physicist Albert Einstein was granted a
visa, making it possible for him to travel to the United
States.
In 1 9 3 3 , national Prohibition came to an end as Utah
became the 36th state to ratify the 21st Amendment to the
Constitution, repealing the 18th Amendment.
In 1 9 5 5 , the American Federation of Labor and the
Congress of Industrial Organizations merged to form the
AFL-CIO under its first president, George Meany.
In 1 9 6 2 , the United States and the Soviet Union announced
a bilateral space agreement on exchanging weather data
from satellites, mapping Earth’s geomagnetic field and
cooperating in the experimental relay of communications.
In 1 9 7 4 , the final episode of “Monty Python’s Flying
Circus” aired on BBC Television.
In 1 9 8 4 , the action comedy “Beverly Hills Cop,” starring
Eddie Murphy, was released by Paramount Pictures.

2013

Birthdays

Singer Little
Richard is 82.

Comedian-actress
Margaret Cho is 46.

Actor Frankie
Muniz is 29.

Author Joan Didion is 80. Author Calvin Trillin is 79. Actor
Jeroen Krabbe is 70. Opera singer Jose Carreras is 68. Pop
singer Jim Messina is 67. College Football Hall of Famer and
former NFL quarterback Jim Plunkett is 67. World Golf Hall of
Famer Lanny Wadkins is 65. Actress Morgan Brittany is 63.
Actor Brian Backer is 58. Pro and College Football Hall of
Famer Art Monk is 57. Country singer Ty England is 51. Rock
singer-musician John Rzeznik (The Goo Goo Dolls) is 49.
Country singer Gary Allan is 47. Writer-director Morgan J.
Freeman is 45. Actress Alex Kapp Horner is 45. Rock musician Regina Zernay (Cowboy Mouth) is 42.

REUTERS

A general view of the Yosemite Falls flowing in Yosemite National Park. Two days of heavy rains have reinvigorated the
landmark falls, as a major storm brought more rain on Wednesday.

In other news ...
5,000-pound bridge
stolen in Michigan
FARMINGTON HILLS, Mich. — A
Michigan man says his family’s
5,000-pound footbridge has been
stolen from his property in suburban
Detroit.
WXYZ-TV reports that Robert Cortis
filed a police report Wednesday saying
the 40-foot bridge is made of steel and
wood, and that it was stolen from his
property in Farmington Hills.
Cortis says he discovered the bridge
was missing when he stopped by his
property near 8 Mile Road with plans
to move the bridge this week. He
planned to set it up at his catering business as a place to take wedding photos.
Cortis says the bridge has sentimental value because his father built it
decades ago. He says whoever has it
can return it with no questions asked.

Poisoned Los Angeles
mountain lion recovers
LOS ANGELES — A mountain lion
living in Los Angeles’ Griffith Park
appears to have recovered from mange
and exposure to rat poison.
Santa Monica Mountains National
Recreation Area biologist Jeff Sikich
says the lion dubbed P-22 looks
healthy and has a full belly in recent
photos.
The National Park Service on
Thursday released photos taken last

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Dec. 3 Powerball

©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

LGIRL

LEANHI

25

30

32

54

46

26

Dec. 2 Mega Millions
13

18

22

62

49

11
Mega number

Dec. 3 Super Lotto Plus
9

19

23

37

1

18

26

35

39

0

0

1

Daily Four
6

Daily three midday
5

47

23

0

9

Daily three evening
2

0

3

The Daily Derby race winners are Winning Spirit,
No. 9, in first place; Eureka, No. 7, in second place;
and California Classic, No. 5, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:44.66.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A:
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: TINGE
VOICE
APPEAR
SHADOW
Answer: He poked his skeptical buddy with the new
spear to — PROVE HIS POINT

The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee
Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com
jon@smdailyjournal.com
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that at its peak housed as many as 350
people living in squalor just a short
drive from tech giants Google, Apple,
Yahoo and eBay.
Ortega shuddered and clutched her
fleece blanket while watching tractors
cram couches, tents, blankets, rotten
food and pails of excrement into roaring garbage trucks.
“It’s just junk to everyone else but to
us, that’s home. That’s our stuff,” she
said.
On a nearby sidewalk, Al Palaces, a
former truck driver who settled into the
encampment about eight months ago,
said he was trying to think of a plan.
“I just grabbed whatever I could
because I don’t want to go to jail,” he
said, standing next to an overloaded
shopping cart stuffed with dirty plastic
bags.
For months, social workers have
been trying to house camp residents.
And four days earlier, they were warned
they had until dawn Thursday to leave
or face arrest for trespassing. Still,
city officials estimated about 60 people remained at the filthy site when
cleanout day came.
After a rainy night, skies cleared
Thursday, and one person after another
in varying states of mental clarity and
sobriety dragged their belongings in
suitcases, shopping carts and on bicycles out of the camp through ankledeep sludge. By midmorning, dozens
had reached the sidewalk, abandoning
most of their possessions.

Local Weather Forecast

Mega number

TOSUMT

Yesterday’s

SAN JOSE — About 50 muddy souls
dragged their meager belongings out of
a trash-strewn California creek bed
Thursday as police and social-service
workers began clearing away one of
the nation’s largest homeless encampments, a collection of flimsy tents and
plywood shelters in the heart of
Silicon Valley.
The people forced out of the camp
known as the Jungle ended up alongside a busy San Jose road, startling
passers-by who slowed down to watch.
“People drive by and look at us like
we’re circus animals,” said a sobbing
Nancy Ortega.
More than 30 police officers and
dozens of construction workers in
white hazmat suits joined about 15
social-service workers in the effort to
take apart the treacherous community

Fantasy Five
Powerball

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

BAROH

Crews break up homeless
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Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

month by a remotely triggered camera
set up at the site of a freshly killed
mule deer. More than 1,500 photos
were taken as P-22 returned to feed over
four nights.
P-22 was robustly pictured by
National Geographic last year with the
Hollywood sign in the background.
But early this year he was markedly
deteriorated when he was captured for a
collar battery change. Biologists
treated him for mange and poisoning,
and then released him.

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Fri day : Rain and a slight chance of
thunderstorms. Highs in the lower 60s.
South winds 10 to 20 mph.
Fri day ni g ht: Showers. Lows in the
mid 50s. South winds 10 to 20 mph.
Saturday : Mostly cloudy. A chance of
showers in the morning. Highs in the
lower 60s. South winds 5 to 10 mph.
Chance of showers 30 percent.
Saturday ni g ht: Partly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s.
South winds 5 to 10 mph...Becoming east after midnight.
Sunday : Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower 60s.
Sunday ni g ht and Mo nday : Mostly cloudy. A chance of
rain. Lows in the lower 50s. Highs in the lower 60s.
Mo nday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of rain.
Lows in the lower 50s.
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 200 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

LOCAL/STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

Fire chief pleads not guilty to grand theft
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The Central County fire chief accused,
along with his wife who has fled the country, of an elaborate credit card scheme is
allowed to post $80,000 bail after his sister provided a judge proof the money was
not ill-gotten.
Mark Steven Ladas, 50, was not allowed
to post any bond until after he could show
the funds weren’t from any alleged criminal
activity. At his first court appearance
Thursday afternoon, Ladas’ sister submitted
an affidavit substantiating the source.
Ladas also surrendered his passport to the
court and was admonished not to leave the
state without permission.
He pleaded not guilty to six counts of
grand theft and two counts each of tax evasion and filing false tax returns. A preliminary hearing is scheduled for Feb. 26.
Defense attorney Eric Hove did not return
a call for comment.
Ladas is on paid administrative leave
from the Central County Fire Department
which serves Burlingame and Hillsborough
and contracts with Millbrae and San Bruno

Mark Ladas

for administrative services. He faces up to seven
years in prison if convicted, Chief Deputy
District Attorney Karen
Guidotti said.
His wife, Peta Ladas,
49, faces the same
charges plus several more
but she is currently at
large with an outstanding

arrest warrant.
Prosecutors claim Peta Ladas stole money
using fake credit cards and fake businesses
between January 2011 and June 2013, funneling nearly $35,000 of the illicit funds
into three of her husband’s bank accounts.
She was arrested in December 2012 but
Mark Ladas posted her $10,000 bail and
she fled the country. Her charges include on
felony count of failing to appear.
Peta Ladas’ alleged scheme included her
opening fraudulent credit cards using fake
names and using them for purchases at fake
businesses. Using a point of sale machine,
she reportedly drew money from the businesses and deposited it in Mark Ladas’
accounts.

The Hillsborough couple individually filed
taxes in 2011 and 2012
that did not claim the
money, according to
prosecutors.
The year-long investigation into Peta Ladas
was sparked by her leaving a wallet in a
Peta Ladas
Burlingame hotel room
and having a maid return it to police.
Inside, authorities reportedly discovered
her identification along with several credit
cards in false names.
On Wednesday, the fire department
announced Ladas’ being placed on leave
with Deputy Fire Chief John Kammeyer
stepping in as acting chief. Ladas was
named chief in April 2013. His base salary
is $196,420 annually and he gets an extra
10 percent for serving as chief to Millbrae
and San Bruno, for a total of $216,062.

michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102

California court strikes down DNA collection law
By Sudhin Thanwala
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — A California
appeals court struck down a state law that
requires the collection of DNA from anyone
arrested on suspicion of committing a
felony.
The 1st District Court of Appeal said
Wednesday that the state Constitution’s ban
on unreasonable search and seizure prohibited the DNA collection using a cheek swab.
The law was approved by voters in 2004.
“We conclude that the DNA Act ... unreasonably intrudes on such arrestees’ expec-

tation of privacy,” Presiding Justice J.
Anthony Kline said in a 3-0 ruling.
There was no immediate order stopping
police in California from continuing to
collect DNA, and the appellate court’s ruling could be appealed. Still, the ruling is
important, said Julia Harumi Mass, a senior
staff attorney at the American Civil
Liberties Union of Northern California,
which filed a brief in the case.
“It’s one of the first opinions to recognize that DNA analysis is fundamentally
different from a fingerprint,” Mass said.
“Arrestee DNA collection raises serious privacy concerns.”

Supporters of the law say law enforcement’s interest in solving cold cases, identifying crime suspects and even exonerating the wrongly accused outweigh privacy
concerns raised by the forced DNA collections.
The state Attorney General’s office is
reviewing the decision, spokesman David
Beltran said.
The appeals court in Wednesday’s ruling
was reviewing an earlier decision it issued
on the law in light of a 2013 U.S. Supreme
Court ruling that upheld a similar Maryland
law. The earlier ruling also found the
California law unconstitutional.

3

Police reports
The high cost of eating out
A group of customers were unhappy
with their food and wanted a refund at
Beijing Buffet on South Airport
Boulevard in South San Francisco
before 6:47 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 8.

REDWOOD CITY
Burg l ary . A home was broken into and multiple items were stolen on Alameda de las
Pulgas before 10:29 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 2.
Acci dent. A vehicle hit an elderly pedestrian who sustained a minor head injury on
Maple Street and Veterans Boulevard before
11:50 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 2.
Burg l ary . The sound of breaking glass was
heard and a motion detector sounded an alarm
of a commercial building on Second Avenue
before 3:36 a.m. Monday, Dec. 1.
Sus pi ci o us pers o n. Teenagers were seen
riding their bicycles and shining a light
onto driveways on Clinton Street before
6:15 p.m. Monday, Dec. 1.
Sus pi ci o us pers o n. A man with a beard
was seen hiding in the bushes and tampering
with the circuit breaker of a store on
Jefferson Avenue before 4:56 p.m. Monday,
Dec.1.
Vandal i s m. A woman had her passenger
side mirror damaged on Middlefield Road
before 12:27 p.m. Monday, Dec. 1.

HALF MOON BAY
Drunk i n publ i c. A man was found lying
next to the highway too drunk to care for
himself on Highway 1 and Filbert Street
before 4:05 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 3.
Hi t-and-run. A vehicle collided with a
bicyclist and fled the scene on Highway 1
and Terrace Avenue before 3:13 p. m.
Tuesday, Nov. 25.
Po s s es s i o n o f drug s . A man was cited and
released when he was found with a pill bottle
of ecstacy and two small bags of cocaine on
Highway 1 before 3:02 a.m. Tuesday, Nov.
25.

4

LOCAL/STATE

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

CITY GOVERNMENT
• Burl i ng ame will host a community meeting 6:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Dec. 9 at the B url i n g ame
Recreati o n Center’s social hall,
850 Burlingame Ave. , about the
Caro l an Av e n ue “Co mp l e t e
Streets ” Pro ject. A brief presentation at this meeting will cover the reason for the project, detailed information about project elements, the proposed schedule, recommended construction methods and
potential impacts.
The city and its project team have developed and
assessed a variety of improvements to improve vehicle
traffic and bicycle safety along Carolan Avenue between
Broadway and Oak Grove Avenue. The project would convert the road from its four-lane configuration to a twolane road with designated bike lanes and a center turn
lane. As part of this project, bulbouts, landscaping and
stormwater treatment facilities will be added in certain
locations.
There will be an interactive question-and-answer period
with the project team immediately following the presentation.
Contact Aug us ti ne Cho u, engineering program manager for the city’s Publ i c Wo rks Department, at 5587230 or achou@burlingame.org.

Around the state
Senate layoffs resulted
from $4 million budget gap
SACRAMENTO — The state Senate faces a budget shortfall of up to $4 million this fiscal year, helping explain
why it laid off 39 of its roughly 1,000 staff members last
month.
Senate officers had previously said that fiscal problems
were to blame for the cutbacks.
Dan Reeves, chief of staff in the Senate president pro
tem’s office, tells The Sacramento Bee that the deficit resulted from slow budget growth during the recession, higher
health care costs and having too many employees.

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DA: No death penalty in
home invasion murder
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Two men charged with the murder of
their friend during a botched 2013 San
Mateo home invasion robbery will
not face the death penalty, prosecutors
announced Thursday.
Instead, Bunn Vo, 24, of San Jose,
and Edwin Lee, 23, of Daly City, face
life in prison without the possibility
of parole if convicted in the Sept. 4,
2013, robbery that left accomplice
Bryant Ma mortally wounded.
The prosecution announced its decision in court Thursday morning not to
seek death and the pair were ordered
back to court Dec. 18 to set a trial
date.
The decision to take the death penalty off the table was based on the defendants’ lack of criminal record and the
fact that the victim, Ma, was a participant in the home invasion robbery

Alleged arsonist
charged with felonies
A young man was arrested on four
felonies after causing three separate
fires over the course of a few hours in
South San Francisco last Friday morning.
Juan Jose Tapia Garcia, an 18-yearold South San Francisco resident, was
arrested for three counts of arson and
burglarizing a car around 3 a.m. Nov.
28, said Sgt. Tom Neary.
Garcia’s crimes, all within walking
distance of his home, occurred on the
600 blocks of Miller and Grand
avenues, Neary said.
Garcia started on Miller Avenue by
lighting on fire a couch sitting on a
resident’s porch. At another home,
Garcia lit a doormat and umbrella on
fire that caused damage to the door,
Neary said.
Garcia was picked up soon after
while in the midst of burglarizing a car
in an apartment parking lot on Grand
Avenue. Police found a smoldering
newspaper in the parking lot and evidence on Garcia connecting him to the
arsons, Neary said.
Garcia was booked into county jail
and was released Nov. 28 on $100,000
bail.

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during which an
occupant shot him,
Chief
Deputy
District Attorney
Karen
Guidotti
said.
Although Vo and
Lee did not shoot
Ma,
under
California
law,
Bunn Vo
they are responsible because they were allegedly participating in a felonious crime that led to
the 23-year-old man’s death.
Vo and Lee are charged with first
degree murder with special circumstances, robbery, burglary and kidnapping to commit robbery. Vo is also
held on one count of attempted murder.
They’ve pleaded not guilty.
The defendants and Ma allegedly
entered a home on Lodi Avenue around
11:30 p.m. Sept. 4, 2013, and got
into a gun fight with four others inside

the residence. When
one
defendant
demanded one victim open the safe,
prosecutors say the
man instead shot at
them.
Vo and Lee fled
with Ma in a dark
SUV to Regional
Edwin Lee
Medical Center of
San Jose where Lee was treated for a
gunshot that was not life threatening
and Ma was declared dead on arrival.
Hospital personnel alerted police who
connected them to the San Mateo
shooting. A dark blue SUV was located
in the hospital parking lot and the
men arrested.
Vo and Lee remain in custody without bail.
Neither Lee’s attorney Michael
Devoy or Vo’s attorney Connie
O’Brien returned call for comment.

Local briefs

number of peak-hour five-car trains.
Whether any of the cars will be converted to hold bicyclists will be determined in January, according to
Caltrain.

Caltrain to buy 16 used
cars, extend crowded trains
The Caltrain Board of Directors
approved the purchase of 16 used
Bombardier rail cars to add more
capacity to standing-room-only peakhour trains.
During the board’s Thursday meeting, it approved the agreement to purchase the cars from the Southern
California Regional Rail Authority.
The purchase price was $5.6 million, but that doesn’t include the additional $9.4 million to rehabilitate the
used cars, according to Caltrain.
The total project cost is $15 million, which will be paid through surplus revenue as a result of the regional
rail’s record-breaking ridership and a
2015 farebox revenue bond, according
to Caltrain.
The cars will be stored by the
Southern California Regional Rail
Authority’s Metrolink for two months
as Caltrain works out the logistics of
transporting them to the Bay Area.
Some cars could take up to a year to
rehabilitate while others may go into
service quicker, according to Caltrain.
The new cars will be used to extend a

Man walks into police station,
arrested for drugs
Believing to be on God’s path, an
intoxicated man walked into the
Burlingame
Police
Department
Wednesday and caught two misdemeanor drug charges.
Anthony Marion, a 43-year-old
transient from San Francisco, entered
the police station on Trousdale Drive
around 9:18 a. m. and made an
announcement, Sgt. Don Shepley
said.
“He just walked into our lobby saying he was brought there by the path
of God,” Shepley said.
Marion went into the restroom for
about 10 minutes until an officer went
in to check on him. Marion was
exhibiting signs of being under the
influence and officers found methamphetamine in his backpack, Shepley
said.
Marion was charged with two misdemeanors, being under the influence
and in possession of a controlled substance, Shepley said.

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

5

House rebukes Obama on immigration
By Erica Werner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Emboldened House
Republicans issued a stern but symbolic
rebuke to President Barack Obama over
immigration Thursday, passing a bill
declaring his executive actions to curb
deportations “null and void and without
legal effect.”
Outraged Democrats, immigrant advocates and the White House said the GOP was
voting to tear families apart and eject parents.
“Rather than deport students and separate
families and make it harder for law enforcement to do its job, I just want the Congress
to work with us to pass a commonsense law
to fix that broken immigration system,”
Obama said ahead of the vote.
Even supporters acknowledged that the
bill by Rep. Ted Yoho, R-Fla., which says
Obama was acting “without any constitutional or statutory basis, ” was mostly
meant to send a message. It stands no
chance in the Senate, which remains under
Democratic control until January, and faces
the veto threat from Obama.
The real fight may lie ahead as conservatives push to use must-pass spending legislation to block Obama.

Republican “no” votes. Three Republicans
voted “present.”
Obama’s executive actions last month
will extend deportation relief and work permits to some 4 million immigrants here
illegally, mostly those who have been in
the country more than five years and have
children who are U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents. He also reordered law
enforcement priorities and expanded an
existing deportation deferral program for
immigrants brought illegally as kids.
Compounding the GOP’s anger, Obama’s
executive action came barely two weeks
after Republicans trounced Democrats in the
midterm elections, winning control of the
Senate and increasing their majorities in
the House.
Democratic lawmakers rallied behind the
president Thursday, and immigrant advocates warned Republicans would be alienating Latinos heading into 2016 presidential
REUTERS elections in which the Hispanic vote is
expected to be significant.
House Speaker John Boehner addresses reporters at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.
“They should remember that this is not a
For now, Republicans insisted they must That’s not the way our system of governfight between Republicans and the presigo on record denouncing what they ment works,” said Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La.
dent,” said Clarissa Martinez de Castro, of
described on the House floor as an outra- “This legislation says you can’t do that,
the National Council of La Raza. “They will
Mr. President. There is a rule of law.”
geous power grab by Obama.
be picking a fight with the millions of
The vote was 219 to 197, with three
“The president thinks he can just sit in
American families who will finally find
the Oval Office and make up his own laws. Democratic “yes” votes and seven
some relief.”

House OKs military campaign against extremists
By Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Republican-controlled House approved a $585 billion
defense policy bill that grants President
Barack Obama the authority to expand the
U.S. military campaign against Islamic militants in Iraq and Syria despite misgivings
about a new American combat role after more
than a decade of war.
The vote on Thursday was 300-119, a
reflection of the popularity of the sweeping,
bipartisan measure that authorizes funds for
American troops as well as ships, planes and
other war-fighting equipment built in congressional districts nationwide.
The measure heads to the Senate where pas-

sage is expected next week, although some
GOP senators are angry over the bill’s unrelated provisions to expand wilderness areas.
The legislation endorses Obama’s latest
request to Congress in the 4-month-old war
against extremists who brutally rule large
sections of Iraq and Syria. The bill provides
$5 billion for the stepped-up operation of air
strikes and the dispatch of up to 1,500 more
American troops.
It also reauthorizes the Pentagon plan to
train and equip moderate Syrian rebels battling the forces of President Bashar Assad,
with that mandate expiring Dec. 11. The legislation would extend that authority for two
years.
Still, war-weary lawmakers expressed considerable unease about a slippery slope for
the American military after years of conflicts

in Afghanistan and Iraq.
“We’re getting more deeply involved in the
war in Iraq and Syria,” complained Rep. Jim
McGovern, D-Mass.
The top Democrat on the House Armed
Services Committee, Rep. Adam Smith of
Washington, insisted that U.S. involvement
was limited.
“The train and equip mission is just that,”
Smith said. “I don’t want U.S. combat troops
fighting this ground war .... By training and
equipping the Syrians and Iraqis, we can
empower them to fight their
own ground war with our support from the air.”
Unity on a new legal justification for U.S. military operations against the extremists
remains elusive in Congress,

EXAMINATIONS
and
TREATMENT
of
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of the Eye

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and
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E ve n i n g a n d S a t u rd ay a p p t s
a l s o ava i l a b l e

underscored by the divisions displayed across
the Capitol.
Democrats on the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee sought to push through a measure
defining how Obama can use military force in
Iraq and Syria. But Republicans, who are generally supportive of the war, rebelled. They
objected to a lack of debate and legislative
maneuvering.
House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, reiterated his call for Obama to submit a proposal to Congress for a new authorization.

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6

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

STATE/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Police cases converge
to stir national debate
By Tom Hays and Colleen Long
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — From the White
House to the streets of some of
America’s biggest cities, the New
York chokehold case converged with
the Ferguson shooting and investigations out of South Carolina and
Cleveland to stir a national conversation Thursday about racial justice and
police use of force.
A day after a grand jury cleared a
white New York City officer in the
death of a black man, civil rights leaders pinned their hopes on a promised
federal investigation. Demonstrators
protested for a second night in New
York, carrying replicas of coffins
across the Brooklyn Bridge, and
turned out in such cities as Denver,
Detroit and Minneapolis. And politicians and others talked about the need
for better police training, body cameras and changes in the grand jury
process to restore faith in the legal
system.
“A whole generation of officers will
be trained in a new way,” New York
Mayor Bill de Blasio vowed as he and
his police commissioner outlined pre-

REUTERS

David Scott, of Oakland, kneels with his hands raised during a demonstration
against the New York City grand jury decision to not indict in the death of Eric
Garner in Oakland.
viously announced plans to teach officers how to communicate better with
people on the street.
President Barack Obama weighed in,
saying one of the chief issues at stake
is “making sure that people have confidence that police and law enforcement and prosecutors are serving

everybody equally.”
Even before the decision in the Eric
Garner case came down, racial tensions were running high because of
last week’s grand jury decision not to
charge a white officer in the shooting
death of black 18-year-old Michael
Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.

White ex-cop charged in killing of black man in South Carolina
By Meg Kinnard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ORANGEBURG, S.C. — A white former police chief here was indicted on
murder charges in the 2011 shooting
death of an unarmed black man after an
argument, a case that instantly drew
comparisons to the Ferguson shooting
and the chokehold death in New York.
The indictment of Richard Combs,
the former chief and sole officer in the
small town of Eutawville, was released
Thursday. He faces 30 years to life in
prison if convicted in the death of
Bernard Bailey.
Combs’ lawyer accused prosecutors
of taking advantage of national outrage toward police and the justice system to get the indictment.

“He’s trying to make it racial
because his timing is perfect,” attorney John O’Leary said. “He’s got all
the national issues going on, so they
want to drag him in and say, look what
a great community we are here, because
we’re going to put a police officer who
was doing his job in jail for 30 years.
That’s wrong. That’s completely
wrong.”
Prosecutor David Pascoe said he had
always planned to seek a murder charge
if a judge threw out the former chief’s
“stand your ground” self-defense
claim, which happened last month.
Combs, 38, had previously been
charged with misconduct in office for
the shooting. He had faced up to 10
years in prison.
The indictment is one of three this

year for white officers in the shootings of unarmed black men in South
Carolina, which has a dark and painful
past of civil rights violence.
The shooting happened in May
2011. Bailey’s daughter received a traffic ticket from the chief for a broken
taillight and called her father to the
scene. Bailey and Combs argued, but
eventually went their separate ways.
The police chief got an arrest warrant
for Bailey for obstruction. A few days
later, Bailey went to Town Hall to
argue about his daughter’s ticket.
When he showed up, the chief tried to
arrest Bailey, a 6-foot-6 former prison
guard.
Prosecutors said Bailey marched
back to his truck, and Combs tried to
get inside to turn off the ignition.

Around the state
Flu vaccine may be less effective this winter
NEW YORK — The flu vaccine may not be very effective
this winter, according to U.S. health officials who worry
this may lead to more serious illnesses and deaths.
Flu season has begun to ramp up, and officials say the
vaccine does not protect well against the dominant strain
seen most commonly so far this year. That strain tends to
cause more deaths and hospitalizations, especially in the
elderly.
“Though we cannot predict what will happen the rest of
this flu season, it’s possible we may have a season that’s
more severe than most,” said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at a news
conference Thursday.
CDC officials think the vaccine should provide some protection and still are urging people to get vaccinated. But it
probably won’t be as good as if the vaccine strain was a
match.
Flu vaccine effectiveness tends to vary from year to year.
Last winter, flu vaccine was 50 to 55 percent effective overall, which experts consider relatively good.
The CDC issued an advisory to doctors about the situation
Wednesday evening.
CDC officials said doctors should be on the look-out for
patients who may be at higher risk for flu complications,
including children younger than 2, adults 65 and older, and
people with asthma, heart disease, weakened immune systems or certain other chronic conditions.
Such patients should be seen promptly, and perhaps treated immediately with antiviral medications, the CDC
advised. If a patient is very sick or at high risk, a doctor
shouldn’t wait for a positive flu test result to prescribe the
drugs — especially this year, CDC officials said.

Flash flooding strands drivers in California
LOS ANGELES — Heavy downpours took a parting shot
Thursday at California, triggering flash floods that temporarily stranded more than three dozen people in their cars
in inland Riverside County as the state took stock of the
effects of days of steady downpours.
The stranded drivers and city employees in San Jacinto
Valley spent the day digging their cars out of mud and cleaning up after the deluge. No one was injured.
The Pacific Coast Highway in Ventura County, closed
since an earlier weekend storm sent mud and rocks into the
roadway, was open again by late afternoon.
The dwindling storm brought some relief to the parched
state, but a new analysis showed how much more rain and
snow is needed to pull it from its historic drought.
More than 99 percent of California remained in moderate
or worse drought despite rains received through the end of
November, national drought experts said.
The data cutoff for the update was Tuesday, meaning most
rain and snow from the latest storm was not included.
However, experts said they don’t expect the needle will
move much when the latest precipitation is tallied.
“One event isn’t going to take away three years of
drought,” said climatologist Brian Fuchs of the National
Drought Mitigation Center in Nebraska.
The update shows the California’s drought status was
unchanged from the previous week, meaning 55 percent of
the state still is considered in the most extreme category of
drought while 99.7 percent remains in moderate drought or
worse.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WORLD

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

7

Yemen’s al-Qaida threatens U.S. hostage in video
By Ahmed Al-Haj and Maggie Michael
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANAA, Yemen — Al-Qaida’s branch in
Yemen threatened an American hostage
who was the target of a rescue attempt by
U.S. special forces last month, warning
Washington in a video released Thursday
not to try again, and giving it three days to
meet unspecified demands.
“My life is in danger,” Luke Somers says
in the footage, which appeared to mimic
hostage videos released by al-Qaida’s rival,
the Islamic State group.
It was the first word from the 33-year-old
photojournalist since he was snatched
from the streets of Sanaa more than a year
ago. He had been working for nearly three
years in the impoverished Arab nation,
“living as a normal Yemeni,” friends and
colleagues told the Associated Press.
In a video post of their own, Somers’
mother and brother said Somers was “only
trying to do good things for the Yemeni
population” and pleaded with his captors to
spare him. “Luke is only a photojournalist
and is not responsible for any actions the
U. S. government has taken, ” Somers’
brother, Jordan, said in the footage posted
on YouTube.
Noting that her son “appears healthy” in
his captors’ video, Paula Somers said: “We
thank you for that. Please show mercy and
give us an opportunity to see our Luke
again.”
In a statement earlier Thursday, Pentagon
press secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby
acknowledged for the first time that a raid
last month had sought to rescue Somers but
that he turned out not to be at the site.
White House spokeswoman Bernadette
Meehan also said President Barack Obama
had authorized a rescue operation to free
Somers and other hostages but “regrettably, Luke was not present.”
In the three-minute video, Somers

appears somber and
gives a brief statement
in English, asking for
help.
“It’s now been well
over a year since I’ve
been
kidnapped
in
Sanaa,” Somers says in
the footage posted on
Luke Somers the al-Qaida offshoot’s
Twitter
account.
“Basically, I’m looking for any help that
can get me out of this situation. I’m certain
that my life is in danger. So as I sit here
now, I ask, if anything can be done, please
let it be done. Thank you very much.”
Also speaking in the video, a local alQaida commander, Nasser bin Ali al-Ansi,
denounced American “crimes” against the
Muslim world,
including
U. S. -led
airstrikes against the Islamic State group
in Iraq and Syria.
He condemned the rescue attempt, calling
it a “foolish action” and warned against
any more such “stupidities.” He acknowledged that an “elite group of mujahedeen,”
or holy warriors, were killed in the operation.
Al-Ansi gave the U.S. three days to meet
al-Qaida’s demands or “otherwise, the
American hostage held by us will meet his
inevitable fate.” He did not elaborate or
explicitly say Somers would be killed.
Al-Ansi did not specify the group’s
demands but said Washington is “aware” of
them.
Kirby did not elaborate on the joint U.SYemeni operation to free Somers, saying
details remained classified. However, officials said at the time the raid targeted a
remote al-Qaida safe haven in a desert
region near the Saudi border. Eight captives — including Yemenis, a Saudi and an
Ethiopian — were freed. Somers, a Briton
and four others had been moved days earlier.

Philippines bracing for
powerful, erratic typhoon
By Jim Gomez and Oliver Teves
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MANILA, Philippines — A wide swathe
of the Philippines, including the bustling
capital Manila, braced Friday as a dangerously erratic and powerful typhoon
approached from the Pacific, officials said.
Typhoon Hagupit — Filipino for
“smash” — strengthened overnight with
its sustained winds intensifying to 215
kilometers (134 miles) per hour with gusts
of 250 kph (155 mph) over the Pacific,
450 kilometers (280 miles) from the country’s eastern coast.
The local weather agency PAGASA’s
forecasts show it may hit Eastern Samar
province late Saturday or early Sunday
then barrel inland along the same route
where Typhoon Haiyan leveled villages
and left more than 7,300 dead and missing
in November last year.
But a forecast by the Joint Typhoon

Warning Center in Hawaii said Hagupit
may veer northward after making landfall
and possibly threaten Manila, which has
population of more than 12 million people.
Hagupit’s erratic behavior prompted the
government to call an emergency meeting
of mayors of metropolitan Manila to warn
them to prepare, although local forecasters
predict the typhoon will slice across the
central Philippines like Haiyan did.
“We have alerted the people of Manila
and we’re ready,” Mayor Joseph Estrada
said, while acknowledging “these
typhoons change direction all the time.”
Central Philippine regions, which were
hammered by Haiyan, were busy evacuating thousands of people to safer areas,
including Tacloban city, where the new
typhoon has triggered panic-buying in
g ro cery s t o res an d g as s t at i o n s an d
brought back nightmares of last year’s
deadly onslaught.

REUTERS

A man, who purportedly is a member of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, speaks in this
image taken from video published by AQAP.

Pentagon confirms failed
effort to rescue Somers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon says a
hostage rescue mission last month in Yemen
failed to liberate American Luke Somers
because he was not present at the targeted
location.
The Pentagon press secretary, Rear Adm.
John Kirby, said in a brief written statement
Thursday that the U.S. government was
acknowledging the attempted rescue of the
33-year-old Somers, the only American
among the roughly dozen hostages held by
Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, a Yemenbased al-Qaida offshoot.
Kirby said the Pentagon wanted to “pro-

vide accurate information” in light of the
fact that the rescue attempt has been widely
reported. Eight hostages were rescued, as
has been reported previously.
A Yemeni official said an American journalist and a Briton were moved before the
raid.
Kirby said details about the mission
remain classified.
White House spokeswoman Bernadette
Meehan said the U.S. is aware of a video
showing Somers. She said President Barack
Obama authorized a rescue operation last
month to free Somers and other hostages but
“regrettably, Luke was not present.”

8

LOCAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

T

he Ro tary Cl ub o f Fo s ter Ci ty
will be holding its One Warm
Co at Dri v e this Saturday and
Sunday. This is an ideal time to clean out
your closets and recycle your no-longerused coats, sweaters and blankets that are
simply taking up too much room.
Samari tan Ho us e would also appreciate
sheets and towels. 
The drive is Saturday, Dec. 6 and Sunday,
Dec. 7.
Collection
points will be
located at
Safeway,
Ranch 9 9 and
Lucky stores
in Foster City
from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. each
day. The coats,
jackets,
sweaters and
blankets will be
given to the
Samaritan House for distribution to the
needy during the upcoming cold weather
season.
***
Café de Ko hl , benefiting the restoration and enhancement of Ko hl Mans i o n
at Mercy Hi g h Scho o l Burl i ng ame,
will run 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Monday, Dec. 8 at
the Kohl Mansion, 2750 Adeline Drive in
Burlingame. Visit the Kohl Mansion
dressed up for the holidays in an evening
of light supper, espresso bar, specialty
cocktail, silent auction, boutique shopping, dessert bar and more. Purchase tickets at kohlmansion.com.
***
The So uth San Franci s co Fi re
Department is accepting toy donations at
all five of its fire stations, its Fi re
Admi ni s trati o n office, the Ci ty
Cl erk’s office and local businesses. On
Dec. 15, firefighters will collect toys from
these locations. On Dec. 17 from 3 p.m.-5
p.m., firefighters, staff and community volunteers will sort and bag the toys at Fi re
Stati o n 6 1 located at 480 North Canal St.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Reporters’ notebook

H

al f Mo o n B ay Ci t y Hal l is
hosting an open housing during
the city’s B ay ’s Ni g h t o f
Li g h t s Friday evening.
City Hall will be open for residents to
meet staff and learn more about ongoing
projects such as the Ge n e ral Pl an
update, a new community library and
skate park and the redesign of Mac
Dut ra Pl az a. A time capsule is also
being created for people to leave a note
for the city’s 100th anniversary in
2059.
The open house is 6 p. m. to 9 p. m. at
City Hall, 501 Main St.
***
The city of Half Moon Bay was
acknowledged with the Me t ro p o l i t an
Tran s p o rt at i o n Co mmi s s i o n ’s
2 0 1 3 Mo s t Imp ro v e d Ro ads award.
The achievement was due to the city’s
ability gain a 12-point increase in its
year-over-year Pav e me n t Co n di t i o n
In de x score and a four-point increase on
its three-year moving average from 56
to 60.
Financial constraints due to the economic downturn caused a significant
backlog in street maintenance in 2010.
The city opted to use the MTC S t re e t
S av e r strategy, which focuses on preserving streets in fair condition before
streets in lesser conditions are rehabilitated. This allows cities to manage
deferred street maintenance in a cost
effective manner while improving their
average PCI.
Approximately 60 percent of streets
were initially preserved with lower cost
methods by 2013, funds within the currently 2014-15 budget will help preserve
another 20 percent of city roads and the
remaining 10 percent of streets will be
resurfaced with a more expensive

process, according to the city.
***
The Co as t s i de Lan d Trus t is holding a series of public work days on its
newest Co as t al Trai l segment at
Wav e c re s t starting Saturday, Dec. 13
from 10 a. m. to noon.
The CLT is looking for help to restore
disturbed habitat, reinforce signs and
conduct minor trail maintenance.
Volunteers should meet at the S mi t h
Fi e l d B al l Park and wear sturdy shoes,
layers and sun protection.
For more information visit
www. CoastsideLandTrust. org.
***
San Mateo’s Curi Ody s s e y is thrilled
to announce it received a $100, 000
grant from We l l s Farg o , its largest
corporate gift in the nonprofit’s 60-year
history.
The generous gift will be used toward a
major renovation of the longstanding
wildlife and science center located at
Co y o t e Po i n t .
Wells Fargo will be presenting the
$100, 000 check 12:30 p. m. Friday, Dec.
5 at CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. For more information
visit www. CuriOdyssey. org.
***
Word is Dun k i n ’ Do n ut s is coming
to the Bay Area and is eyeing San Mateo
County along with San Francisco and
Alameda counties as a possible location.
Published reports say the company is
planning to develop 26 locations in the
Bay Area over the next few years.
***
The B url i n g ame Li b rary
Fo un dat i o n presented a check for
$500, 000 to the B url i n g ame Ci t y
Co un c i l Monday, Dec. 1 for the library
renovation project. The City Council

agreed to pledge $2. 5 million, while the
library foundation is charged with raising the remaining $1 million through
donations and public fundraising.
***
Don’t miss the annual B url i n g ame
Tre e Li g h t i n g Ce re mo n y and parade
at City Hall 5 p. m. -8:30 p. m. Friday,
Dec. 5. There will be parade down
Burlingame Avenue following the lighting, along with entertainment such as
visits with S an t a Cl aus and live performances. City Hall is located at 501
Primrose Road in Burlingame.
***
Di v c o We s t has completed the purchase of Ce n t ury Pl az a, an approximately 115, 600-square-foot, four-story
Class A office building at 1065 E.
Hillsdale Blvd. in Foster City.
***
The Re dwo o d Ci t y S an Mat e o
Co un t y Ch amb e r o f Co mme rc e
recently gifted $32, 3000 to Kai n o s
Ho me an d Trai n i n g Ce n t e r for
De v e l o p me n t al l y Di s ab l e d Adul t s .
The funds came from its 25th annual
Kai n o B e n e f i t Go l f To urn ame n . The
2015 tournament is scheduled for May
11 at S t an f o rd Un i v e rs i t y Go l f
Co urs e .
***
Who doesn’t like free food? To celebrate the grand opening of its seventh
location, Italian restaurant To mat i n a at
401 S. B St. in San Mateo will be giving
away free meals to the first 100 guests
between 5 p. m. and 7 p. m. Tuesday, Dec.
16. The restaurant will be open to the
public for regular business Dec. 17.
The Reporters’ Notebook is a weekly collection
of facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.

OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

9

Calorie counts on menus have been due for years OPEC and low gas prices
Other voices

The Sacramento Bee

C

alifornians should cheer the
new federal rules requiring
calorie counts on menus, and
not just because more than 60 percent
of us are overweight.
The regulations posted last week by
the U.S. Food and Drug
Administration finally will make
good on a state mandate that
California passed five years ago, but
that no one has been enforcing.
Given that the federal requirements
actually were inspired by that pioneering state law, we welcome the
action. Still, consumers here shouldn’t have had to wait.
The FDA rules come out of the 2010
Affordable Care Act. They are smart,
sweeping and long overdue.
Beginning next fall, any food vendor with 20 or more outlets — fastfood chains, movie theaters, supermarkets and pizza parlors — will have
to post calorie information on menus.
They can’t just do it in fine print,
either. The postings must be the same
size as the name or price of the item.

Rules apply to alcohol as well as
food.
The information will be a boon to
health-conscious consumers. Huge
restaurant portions and fast food
loaded with fat, salt, sugar and carbohydrates have been obstacles in the
fight to reduce obesity and Type 2 diabetes; Americans consume about a
third of their calories outside the
home.
The calorie counts should not only
help diners make more informed decisions, but also encourage less caloric
menus. Though research has been
mixed, at least one broad study has
shown that consumers do make
healthier choices when they see how
many calories are in their food.
The unfortunate irony is that the
new rules could have been old hat by
now in California, which mandated
calorie counts on chain restaurant
menus in 2009.
In the aftermath of that state law,
some chain restaurants here did, and

still do, include calories on their
menus. But after the Affordable Care
Act passed with menu provisions that
were tougher, in some cases, than
California’s, the state law’s author,
then-Sen. Alex Padilla, D-Pacoima,
wrote a new law to reconcile the state
mandate with pending federal regulations.
The fix effectively stalled the original law while federal rules were written — a process that unfortunately
dragged on for more than three years
while the FDA battled fierce opposition from pizza chains and movie theaters. Meanwhile, calorie counts disappeared from many California
menus, or simply failed to materialize.
It’s frustrating to imagine how
much could have been learned had
California been a true laboratory for
menu labeling. But food vendors here
should have no excuses now. If this
state isn’t among the first to roll out
the new rules, consumers will deserve
an explanation. Californians have
waited long enough for our information to be served.

Letters to the editor
Bicyclists seek space
in Caltrain changes

Not enough bike
capacity on Caltrain

Editor,
Kudos to Samantha Weigel for illuminating the bicycle commuter bumping problem on Caltrain in the article
“Bicyclists seek space in Caltrain
changes: Transit agency to buy used
cars, electrify system” in the Dec. 1
edition of the Daily Journal.
However, “older Gallery trains able to
host up to 48 bicyclists and the newer
Bombardier trains providing room for
up to 80” is inaccurate. Gallerys host
80 cyclists; Bombardiers host 48.
What is at issue is whether the
Caltrain board will vote to retrofit
some of its newly purchased 16
Bombardier cars to add a third bike car
to all Bombardier trains, bringing the
complement to 72 bike spaces and
providing long needed equipment
consistency to overall ridership. 
Kudos to Caltrain for considering
bicycle carriage in its electrification
project. That may be a solution five
to six years down the road, but it does
not address nor relieve today’s transportation crisis. Since 2009, 8,502
ticket-holding cyclists have reported
their bumps to Caltrain. By simple
averaging, 144 paid passengers are
left behind on the platform monthly,
while no other ticketed customer is
denied boarding.

Editor,
When Caltrain’s seats are full, people get to their destinations standing
up. When bike cars are full, cyclists
can’t ride. People are fired, charged
overtime for day care, miss meetings,
miss dates and otherwise lose time
they’ll never get back.
People bring bicycles on-board
Caltrain because their origins or destinations are too far from the stations
to walk. It’s doubtful that bicyclists
would use Bikeshare because bicycles
are only free of daily fees if there are
docks at the passenger’s workplace
and home and the distance can be covered in less than 30 minutes. There
are no docks in my neighborhood,
Bayview, and there never will be.
Bikeshare will never be able to adequately cover the entire bicycle commute-shed of every single Caltrain
station. The last mile problem
remains. I will never leave my bicycle locked to a rack at the station
because it will be used as a urinal and
then stolen. Caltrain will never be
able to supply enough bicycle lockers at its stations to accommodate all
bicyclists. The bicycle locker waiting
list is eternal.
Hopefully, the trains will be
lengthened to accommodate more
bicyclist and pedestrian passengers.

Pat Giorni
Burlingame

Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Angela Swartz, Samantha Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen
Kathleen Magana
Kevin Smith

Charles Gould
Paul Moisio

INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Mari Andreatta
Robert Armstrong
Arianna Bayangos
Sanne Bergh
Kerry Chan
Caroline Denney
Darold Fredricks
Mayeesha Galiba
Dominic Gialdini
Tom Jung
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Jeff Palter
Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner
Emily Shen
Samson So

Ricci Lam, Production Assistant
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
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Should be no longer than 600 words.
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will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone
number where we can reach you.

The locomotive doesn’t need to be in
the platform.

Steven Rosen
San Francisco

Google needs
to check prospective
employees’ backgrounds
Editor,
Having read that a Google courier
was charged with alleged theft and
despite a previous record of three
felony convictions, five misdemeanor
convictions and also his 16 months
in prison for violating probation on
drug and theft charges, why was this
person hired? (“Google courier
charged with theft has charges
reduced” in the Dec. 2 edition of the
Daily Journal).
Wasn’t information on the application checked? And why is everyone
surprised that goods were allegedly
taken from a store earlier this year? It
doesn’t appear to me that HR did any
checking in the hiring of this individual. Maybe the HR people need classes in hiring practices by calling and
verifying employment information.
Considering the fact that I had three
references checked when I adopted a
cat, Google Express just let the door
open to anyone that wanted to come
in from the cold.

Lee G. Correy
Foster City

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Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.

O

ne of the more interesting facts that came out
before the recent OPEC meetings is that the
Middle East-based cartel was keeping prices
lower because prices are dropping.
It might seem like a “Huh?” moment but the rationale
behind it is that increased oil production in the United
States because of shale fracking is creating an increased
supply and, in turn, a reduction in cost.
All eyes (well at least a few eyes) were on the
Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries last
week to see if production levels would be lowered to
accommodate requests from some countries suffering
from the lower price. Lower production means higher
prices.
But OPEC’s decision to keep production at 30 million
barrels a day means that prices will remain low for the
time being. And while that
is good news for those
motorists who are enjoying
prices at the pump and for
businesses like airlines and
parcel services that rely on
fuel, it is not good news for
American companies who
have benefited from new
exploration and extraction
techniques. While many
have cheered the United
States’ new exploration of
petroleum energy sources
because it diminishes our
reliance on foreign-produced oil from often unstable areas (read: Middle East)
others have been concerned about fracking’s potential
effect on the environment here.
Another impact of lower oil prices means that further
exploration may be set aside for now and perhaps oil
companies can use the revenue often invested in such
activities into other alternative energy sources.
Still, it’s a gamble by OPEC in that there is no guarantee that its tactic will work. U.S. companies are
known to be resilient and some say wily when it comes
to finding ways to make a profit in emerging areas of
the economy. Besides, the money has already been
invested into the areas that are producing now so don’t
look for a dramatic pullback — at least right away. It’s
investment into future production that might take a hit.
And that may please environmentalists concerned about
fracking’s impact. Still, fracking was a fairly innovative process and there may be now more exploration
into making it work even more efficiently.
In the meantime, enjoy those low gas prices that are
both a direct and indirect result of the U.S. production of
oil through hydraulic fracturing.
***
The lowering of gas prices couldn’t have come at a
better time than now as the state cap-and-trade rules for
fuel distributors go into effect as part of compliance
with Assembly Bill 32. That legislation is the one
aimed to reduce California emissions to 1990 levels by
2020 — an approximate 16 percent reduction. In July,
when gas prices in San Mateo were about $4.24 a gallon, there was some movement toward new legislation
that would delay implementation for fuel distributors
until 2018. That legislation, proposed by Assemblyman
Henry T. Perea, D-Fresno, didn’t receive needed support
in the Legislature and would have likely been vetoed by
the governor anyway. However, now that gas prices are
largely under $3 a gallon, it appears that the impact of
anywhere between 10 to 15 cents a gallon for the capand-trade legislation could definitely be absorbed
though people tend to get greedy when it comes to low
gas prices. If it’s under $3 a gallon, people want it to be
under $2.80. It means more money in the pocket and in
the bank. And that’s where people like their money,
rather than at the pump.
The combination of the economic pickup with lower
prices means consumption is on the rise. The state
Board of Equalization reported this week an increase this
year of nearly 1 percent, the first increase in eight fiscal
years. And that consumption means more emissions,
another factor in the state trying to meet its reduction
goals by 2020. How that is addressed, no one can know
right now.
Jon May s is the editor in chief of the Daily Journal. He
can be reached at jon@smdaily journal.com. Follow Jon
on Twitter @jonmay s.

10

BUSINESS

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks slip on ECB stimulus speculation
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dow
17,900.10
Nasdaq 4,769.44
S&P 500 2,071.92

-12.52
-5.04
-2.41

10-Yr Bond 2.26 -0.03
Oil (per barrel) 66.78
Gold
1,205.50

Big movers
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Hawaiian Electric Industries Inc., up $4.03 to $32.22
The electrical utility is being bought by NextEra Energy Inc. for $4.6 billion,
including the assumption of debt.
Rite Aid Corp., up 12 cents to $5.58
The drugstore operator’s sales at stores open at least a year, a key measure
of financial health, rose 5.1 percent in November and beat forecasts.
Enbridge Inc., up $4.92 to $52.80
The energy distribution company will increase its next quarterly dividend
by 33 percent and it issued an upbeat outlook.
Barnes & Noble Inc., down $1.21 to $21.03
The bookseller is ending its deal with Microsoft for its Nook e-book reader
and reported worse-than-expected quarterly profit.
Aeropostale Inc., down 71 to $2.48
The teen retailer’s loss widened in its most recent quarter and its forecast
for the holiday shopping season mostly fell short of analysts’ forecasts.
Nasdaq
Plug Power Inc., up 20 cents to $3.70
The fuel cell systems maker signed a multiyear, $20 million contract with
a “major North American telecommunications provider.”
Array BioPharma Inc., up 56 cents to $4.47
The biotechnology company will regain rights to a potential cancer
treatment and receive up to $85 million from Novartis in a closing
payment.
Taser International Inc., up $1.29 to $24.15
The stun gun company said several police departments have put in large
orders for its Axon body-worn cameras.
Avago Technologies Ltd., up $7.94 to $103.07
The chipmaker reported better-than-expected fiscal fourth-quarter profit
and revenue results and gave a positive fiscal outlook.

NEW YORK — The stock market
posted slight losses Thursday after
European Central Bank officials decided to delay any stimulus for the struggling continent until next year.
Investors also braced for the release of
Friday’s closely watched U.S. jobs
report.
Stocks had been solidly lower much
of the day, but did recover some of their
losses after news outlets reported that
the European Central Bank would consider a large stimulus package for next
month.
Earlier comments from ECB President
Mario Draghi were initially interpreted
to mean the bank wouldn’t act until next
year, but by late Thursday consensus
was building that stimulus was imminent.
“The ECB and Draghi basically said,
‘we don’t know what we are doing yet,
but when we do it next month, it’s going
to be big,”’ said Ian Winer, head of equity trading at Wedbush Securities.
The Dow Jones industrial average fell
12.52 points, or 0.1 percent, to
17,900.10. It was down nearly 100
points earlier in the day.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell
2.41 points, or 0.1 percent, to
2,071.92 and the Nasdaq composite fell
5.04 points, or 0.1 percent, to
4,769.44.
Energy stocks were among the hardest

hit. The S&P 500’s energy sector lost
nearly 1 percent as the price of oil sank
yet again. Benchmark U.S. crude fell 57
cents to close at $66.81 a barrel on the
New York Mercantile Exchange on news
that Saudi Arabia reduced its January
prices to U.S. and Asian customers.
Brent crude, a benchmark for international oils used by many U.S. refineries,
fell 28 cents to close at $69.64 on the
ICE Futures exchange in London.
Bloomberg News reported that ECB
officials are considering a large bondpurchasing program that will include
European government debt, citing
unnamed central bank figures. The
report followed the ECB’s decision
Thursday to keep its main interest rate
unchanged at a record low of 0.05 percent.
Draghi hinted at a news conference
that the bank could act early next year.
He said the ECB will reassess the success of its existing stimulus programs
and the impact of low oil prices on
Europe’s economy. If needed, the ECB
could do more, he said.
Draghi’s
comments
and the
Bloomberg News report indicate that
the ECB is getting ready to make its
own large-scale purchases of government bonds. The policy, known as
quantitative easing, or “QE,” has been
used by the U.S. Federal Reserve, the
Bank of England and the Bank of
Japan.
Europe has been a point of worry for
investors all year. The economic sanc-

tions that Europe imposed on Russia,
one of its biggest trading partners, following Russia’s annexation of Crimea
has taken a toll on the entire continent. Europe has teetered on the brink
of recession as Germany, Europe’s
largest economy, has stagnated. If
Europe slipped into recession, it would
be its third recession since 2008.
Jonathan Loynes, chief European
economist at Capital Economics, also
expects a program of government bond
purchases to be launched in January.
“But whether it will be big and effective
enough to revive the eurozone economy is another matter,” he added.
In the U.S., the main focus will be
the November jobs report, which
comes out Friday. Following some
solid hiring data on Wednesday from
private payrolls firm ADP, economists
expect that employers added 225,000
jobs last month and that the unemployment rate slipped to 5.7 percent from
5.8 percent.
Traders got another piece of jobrelated news Thursday. The number of
people who filed for unemployment
benefits fell by 17,000 to 297,000,
the Labor Department said. A reading
below 300,000 has been a signal that
hiring continues to pick up in the U.S.
“At current levels, (the jobless
claims numbers) are consistent with a
very low layoff rate and solid employment growth,” Guy Berger and
Michelle Girard, economists at RBS,
wrote in a note to clients.

Beacons pop up in stores ahead of holidays
By Mae Anderson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — From American Eagle to
Apple Stores, beacons are popping up
everywhere. Are they a shopper’s best
friend or another pesky Big Brother monitoring our every move?
The square or rectangular devices, smaller
than a smartphone, can hang on a wall or
be placed on a machine and communicate
with your phone via Bluetooth signals.
Accessed through apps you download to
your smartphone, beacon technology can
do everything from guide you to the correct
airport terminal to turn on your coffee
maker as you sleepily enter the kitchen. In
retail, beacons aim to entice you to spend
money. As you enter a store, your smartphone might light up with a sale alert.
Stand in the dress section for a while and a
coupon may pop up for something on a
nearby hanger.
“The most important thing a shopper
might need to get access to when they go
into a store are ratings and reviews,
coupons and promotions, ” said Erik
McMillan, CEO of Shelfbucks, which is
working with video game retailer GameStop
and others on its beacon marketing.
Beacons give customers that research right

there in the store — when they have their
wallets and are looking to buy.
Macy’s Inc. has installed beacons in all
of its 840 department stores; other chains
such as Kohl’s are testing them in some
locations. McMillan likens beacons to the
early days of retail websites in the 1990s
when “all of a sudden it got to the point that
‘you can’t not have a website’.” He predicts
the technology will skyrocket from the
50,000 beacons in use now to between 5
million and 10 million next year.
The vast majority of shopping is still
done in stores. E-commerce is fast-growing
but accounts for only about 9 percent of
total retail sales, according to Forrester
Research. Beacons merge in-store shopping with mobile access to information —
and data shows they work.
Between July and September, 30 percent
of shoppers who received a “push-ad”
from an in-store beacon used that offer to
buy something, according to a survey by
Swirl, a marketing technology company
that has worked with retailers such as Lord
& Taylor, Hudson’s Bay, Alex and Ani,
Kenneth Cole and Timberland to deploy
beacons. Sixty percent of shoppers
opened beacon-sent messages, and over
half of those surveyed said they would do
more holiday shopping at the stores as a

result of their beacon experience.
Graham Uffelman, a 45-year-old New
Yorker, said he bought Bluetooth headphones at Best Buy because of a deal he got
via the Shopkick beacon marketing app.
“The app knew I was in the store and actually suggested a product I wanted,” he said.
“The experience was great but also a little
unnerving in the sense that the store knew
who I was and that I was present in their
location. It felt a little Big Brother-like.”
And that’s the challenge. Not everyone is
thrilled that a beacon app is monitoring
them when they walk around with their cellphone. Outdoor advertising firm Titan drew
such outcry last month when it installed
beacons in phone booths in New York the
city had to take them out.
Eamon Bauman, 24, an IT systems administrator in Wisconsin, said he wouldn’t let a
store’s app have access to his location even
if it meant coupons or deals.
“It’s providing retailers too much information about ourselves,” he said. “If a
retailer really wants to draw me into their
store, showing me deals before I get to the
mall is a better way.”
Chloe Joslin, 22, a student in Jonesboro,
Arkansas, was taken aback when she drove
by a Walgreens and a notification on her
phone from the Walgreens app popped up.

Uber raises $1.2 billion, valued at $40 billion
By Barbara Ortutay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Uber raised $1.2 billion in
its latest round of funding from venture capitalists, a sign investors were little fazed by
the ride-hailing app’s recent spate of bad
publicity over privacy violations and its
corporate culture.
The latest investment put a value on Uber
at $40 billion.
That’s bigger than the stock market values of companies such as American Airlines
and Twitter, or the combined value of carrental veterans Hertz and Avis Budget
Group. At the same time, it is not a guarantee that Uber would receive the same valuation as a publicly traded company that it

does as a venture-backed business.
San Francisco-based Uber triggered a
wave of online criticism recently after a top
executive suggested spending $1 million to
dig up dirt on a journalist critical of the driver-on-demand company.
It was not the first time Uber has been
called out for actions by its drivers or its
corporate culture. It is investigating one of
its employees for tracking another journalist’s ride, which has raised fears that Uber is
misusing customers’ private location information.
In a blog post Thursday, CEO Travis
Kalanick acknowledged the company’s
“significant growing pains.”
“The events of the recent weeks have
shown us that we also need to invest in
internal growth and change,” he wrote.

“Acknowledging mistakes and learning
from them are the first steps.”
He said the latest financing round will
help the company make “substantial investments,” particularly in Asia.
Uber’s previous funding round also raised
$1.2 billion. The company operates in
more than 250 cities in 50 countries,
although it faces regulatory hurdles and
pushback from traditional taxis in many
cities.
Also on Thursday, smaller rival Lyft,
which has a decidedly more friendly corporate image — complete with pink moustaches on its cars — announced that it has hired
a chief financial officer, Brian Roberts, and
a chief marketing officer, Kira Wampler.
Roberts, who joined the company in
October, was previously at Walmart.

“The app never asked for permission to
use location services and to my knowledge I
had disabled them from almost every app to
avoid such a situation,” she said.
Because location settings can be different
for individual apps, though, it can sometimes be difficult to disable all services. The
pop-up likely resulted from the phone’s
location setting for nearby store notifications, said Walgreen Co. spokesman Phil
Caruso in an email. He said customers can
turn off notifications if they prefer not to
receive them. Currently, the drugstore
retailer is using beacon technology on a
pilot basis in only a very small number of
its Duane Reade stores.
Transparency is key, says Rob Murphy,
Swirl’s vice president of marketing.
“Now it’s pretty standard if anybody is
doing this type of marketing to specifically
ask for permission,” he said. “You have to
request an opt-in for location services and
in-store push notifications.”
“You can’t be interruptive or intrusive,
you have to be positive and helpful,” said
Alexis Rask, chief revenue officer of
Shopkick, whose app is also used by teen
retailer American Eagle to provide welcome
messages, merchandise tips and styling
guidance throughout its nearly 1,000 U.S.
stores.

Business brief
Apple says plaintiffs’
iPods not covered by suit
SAN FRANCISCO — For want of an iPod,
a billion-dollar lawsuit may be in jeopardy.
Apple attorneys are raising a last-minute
challenge to a class-action lawsuit over the
company’s use of restrictive software that
kept iPods from playing music sold by competitors. Apple says new evidence shows the
two women named as plaintiffs in the case
may not have purchased iPod models covered
by the lawsuit. Opposing lawyers disagree.
U.S. District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez
Rogers said she isn’t ready to decide, but told
both sides to file legal briefs as soon as possible.
Apple stopped using the software in 2009
and the case only covers certain iPod models
purchased between September 2006 and
March 2009.

BATTLE FOR BRAGGING RIGHTS: 49ERS’ ROMAN PUTS CRITICISM BEHIND HIM; RAIDERS’ BROWN ANXIOUS TO FACE FORMER TEAM > PAGE 13

<<< Page 12, San Jose scores
seven times in win over Bruins
Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

Warriors tie club mark with 11th straight win
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Stephen Curry had 19 points
and a season-high 11 assists, Klay Thompson
scored 23 points, and the Golden State
Warriors beat the New Orleans Pelicans 11285 on Thursday night for their 11th consecutive win.
Harrison Barnes added 17 points and 10
rebounds while Draymond Green had 14
points and 14 rebounds for Golden State,
which improved to an NBA-best 16-2.
The winning streak matches the longest in
Warriors history. The 1971-72 team also won

Warriors 112, Pelicans 85
11 straight.
Golden State needed a late burst to hold off
Orlando and keep the streak going earlier this
week. The Warriors also got off a slow start
against New Orleans before pulling away
behind a 20-4 run in the second quarter for
their eighth consecutive win over the
Pelicans.
Anthony Davis had his 12th double-double
for New Orleans with 30 points and 15
rebounds.
The Pelicans were coming off a 112-104

win against Oklahoma City on Tuesday and
coach Monty Williams joked before the game
against Golden State about holding Curry and
Thompson scoreless.
Wishful thinking.
Curry helped keep the Warriors close in the
first quarter until Thompson — who missed
seven of his first eight shots — got going.
The duo combined for 12 of Golden State’s
final 16 points in the second quarter then
teamed up for 10 more in the third when the
Warriors led by as many as 22.
New Orleans, which signed embattled forward Dante Cunningham before the game,

SHP on biggest stage
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

couldn’t keep up.
The Pelicans shot 41.6 percent from the
floor but went only 3 of 15 from 3-point range
and were outrebounded 56-47.
Golden State started off sluggishly and
trailed the entire first quarter while shooting
35.7 percent. They were down by eight early
in the second before going on a 20-4 run to
take the lead for good.

Tip-ins
Warri o rs : Center Andrew Bogut has 14
blocked shots in his last three games. ...
Green’s 14 rebounds matched his career high.

Oklahoma judge
halts semifinal
pending protest
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sacred Heart Prep football coach Pete
Lavorato realizes he and his Gators have experienced a tremendous amount of success on the
football field over the last five seasons.
Friday night, the Gators go for their third
Central Coast Section title in three years and
the fourth in five.
Those previous CCS championships came
in the Division IV bracket — comprised of the
smallest schools in CCS. Friday, SHP faces
one of the most decorated teams in CCS history, Bellarmine, in the finals on the biggest
stage CCS offers — the Open Division 7 p.m.
Friday at San Jose City College.
The question facing the Gators, which are
the defending Northern California Division III
champion, was: could they compete in the
Open Division?
The Gators’ players have answered that with
a resounding “yes.” As the No. 1 seed, SHP
cruised past Oak Grove 37-13 in the first round
before knocking off another CCS Open
Division heavyweight in Los Gatos, 28-21.
Lavorato, however, doesn’t get caught up in
the semantics.
“I don’t think Division I or Division IV or
whatever. Whoever we have to play, we play,”
Lavorato said. “It’s just do what we do. We’re
going to play Gator football.”
“Gator football” means to execute, play disciplined football and not beat themselves with
penalties and turnovers.
Ironic thing is, that described Bellarmine’s
style of play as well.
“(Bellarmine is) fundamentally sound. Very
athletic. Good team speed,” Lavorato said.
“Not real complicated. Kind of have a similar
philosophy as we do.
“They’re tough, physical and fundamentally
sound. They’re not going to beat themselves.”
The Bells have won three of the 10 Open
Division titles since the division was started
in 2004 and have an overall CCS record of 4526 with six titles.
Bellarmine is 10-2 this season with a 5-2
mark in the West Catholic Athletic League

See FOOTBALL, Page 16

DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE

While a lot of the focus has been on the return of Ben Burr-Kirven, it was the likes of Ryan
Tinsley, above, and Lapitu Mahoni who paced the Gators’ ground attack through the first half
of the season. Tinsley and Mahoni have combined for 1,366 yards and nine touchdowns.

OKLAHOMA CITY — There’s still hope for
Douglass High School.
An Oklahoma judge says a high school football semifinal will not be played Friday so he
can consider whether Douglass, which lost to
Locust Grove in controversial fashion in the
quarterfinals, is entitled to a replay. Locust
Grove’s Class 3A semifinal against Heritage
Hall was postponed until next week at the earliest.
The state board that oversees high school athletics rejected a Douglass protest Wednesday, so
the school district went to court on Douglass’
behalf Thursday. Judge Bernard M. Jones said he
wouldn’t rule on Douglass’ complaint until next
Thursday.
“We’ve jumped one hurdle,” Brandon Carey,
general counsel for Oklahoma City Public
Schools, said. “We’ve got an even bigger hurdle
coming up.”
The other 3A semifinal between Cushing and
Kingfisher will be played this Friday as scheduled.
Locust Grove, a small school in northeastern
Oklahoma, beat Oklahoma City’s Douglass
High last week after game officials misapplied a
penalty with about a minute to go. The crew
mistakenly erased a touchdown that had given
Douglass a 25-20 lead.
Douglass wants to replay the entire game or
the final 64 seconds, from the point of the
touchdown.
Earlier in the day, Locust Grove football
coach Matt Hennesy was confident the ruling
would go his way.
“Football is football,” he said. “You fight all
kinds of conditions. You fight the weather, you
fight injuries, you fight turnovers, you fight the
officials and, at the end of the game, when the
clock goes off, whatever the score is, is the
score. And we did everything we were supposed
to do, we followed the rules and now we’re moving on the next round.”
Jones said during Thursday’s proceedings that
he was skeptical of being involved and he doesn’t “know if this is the role for courts to play.”

See PROTEST, Page 16

Senators to NFL: drop ‘blackout rule or we might
By Matthew Daly
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Senators from both parties warned the National Football League on
Thursday to get rid of a four-decade-old TV
“blackout” rule or risk congressional action
to restrict the league’s lucrative antitrust
exemption, which allows NFL teams to
negotiate radio and television broadcast
rights together.
The blackout rule, which bars home games

from being televised in a local market if they
have not sold out, is unfair to fans who have
helped the league reap billions of dollars in
revenue from broadcast rights to games that
are among the most-watched programs on
TV, lawmakers said.
In return for their loyalty, “fans in the public are often treated like a fumbled football,”
said Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn.
“When places like Buffalo, New York, fail to
sell out its 74,000-person stadium, the Bills
game is blacked out for local fans.”

The Federal Communications Commission
voted this fall to stop enforcing the NFL’s
blackout policy, but the action did not end
blackouts, which are written into the NFL’s
private contracts with broadcast and cable
companies.
Blumenthal and other lawmakers at a
Senate Judiciary Committee hearing said
Thursday the blackout rule has long outlived
its usefulness. The rule was adopted in the
1970s to encourage ticket sales at NFL
games, which now routinely sell out at stadi-

ums across the country.
“The simple fact is that these rules only
serve to benefit sports leagues and their
member teams at the expense of the hardworking fans who support them so loyally
through their money, time and passion,” said
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.
During last year’s NFL playoffs, fans of the
Cincinnati Bengals, Indianapolis Colts and
Green Bay Packers came close to experiencing blackouts when those games had not sold

See NFL, Page 16

12

SPORTS

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Sharks erupt for seven goals in win over Boston
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN JOSE — Tyler Kennedy, fresh off the
injured list, scored two goals — including
the winner — and the San Jose Sharks beat
the Boston Bruins 7-4 on Thursday night
for their third straight victory.
Tommy Wingels and Joe Pavelski also
scored twice for the Sharks, who snapped a
three-game losing streak to the Bruins.
Tomas Hertl added a late goal.
The Sharks scored twice on the power
play, giving them seven man-advantage
goals in seven games after being shut out in
their previous four.

Sharks 7, Bruins 4
Reilly Smith scored twice for the Bruins,
who ended a scoring drought but extended
their losing streak to three. Gregory
Campbell and Torey Krug also scored.
Antti Niemi made 20 saves in winning his
third straight. Tuukka Rask stopped 37
shots in losing to the Sharks for the first
time in four games.
The Bruins hadn’t scored more than two
goals in a game since a 4-3 win over
Columbus on Nov. 21. They scored twice in
the first three minutes against the Sharks.

Local roundup
THURSDAY
Girls’ tennis
Menlo School captures Nor Cal title
The Knights beat St. Francis 5-2 to win their first Nor Cal
girls’ team tennis title since winning four in a row from
1998 to 2001.
It was the third meeting of the season between the two
teams. The Lancers beat the Knights in an early-season
matchup, but Menlo got the ultimate revenge, beating St.
Francis 5-2 in the Central Coast Section championship
match and again Thursday.

Girls’ basketball
King’s Academy 44, Carlmont 42

San Jose scored four goals in the second
period to erase a 2-0 deficit. The Bruins also
scored twice in the period, and the game was
tied 4-4 entering the third.
Kennedy redirected a shot from Matt Irwin
that clanked off the crossbar and into the net
just over three minutes into the final frame.
Wingels deflected a shot from MarcEdouard Vlasic 27 seconds into the period,
and then steered in another shot by Irwin.
Kennedy scored his first goal with a redirection over Rask’s shoulder. Pavelski
scored on a power play, punching the puck
in off Rask’s pads.
Smith scored his second goal by finding a

six minutes from time.

College
Men’s basketball
Cañada 86, West Valley 53
The Colts improved to 7-1 on the season with a win over
the Vikings Thursday evening in the first round of the
Monterey Peninsula tournament.
Cañada had five players score in double figures, led by
Israel Hakim’s 16. Deion Ellis added 13 while Crisshawn
Clark and Rohndell Goodwin each chipped in with 11.
Rodrigo Puliceno rounded out the quintet with 10 points.

WEDNESDAY
Girls’ basketball
Carlmont 44, Fremont-Sunnyvale 22

The Knights knocked off the Scots at the Fremont tournament Thursday, rallying from a 39-34 deficit after three
quarters to outscore Carlmont 10-3 over the final eight minutes of the game.
Alexa Bayangos led the Scots for the second game in a
row, finishing with 16 points. Lis Hayes added 13 for
Carlmont, which fell to 1-2 on the season.

The Scots picked up their first win of the season with an
easy victory over the host Firebirds at the Fremont tournament Wednesday night.
Carlmont put the game away by outscoring Fremont 32-4
during the second and third quarters.
Alexa Bayangos paced Carlmont (1-1) with 14 points. Lis
Hayes added 11, while Sabrina Miller and Hannah Wright
each scored six points apiece.

Girls’ soccer
King’s Academy 3, Notre Dame-Belmont 2

Notre Dame-Belmont 63, Sequoia 19

The Tigers rallied from a 2-0 deficit, only to see the
Knights pull out the win with a goal late in the second half.
King’s Academy scored goals in the 29th and 35th minutes for a 2-0 lead, but Notre Dame (0-1) got a goal back
when Jessica Parque scored off a pass from Natalie Murillo
in the 39th minute.
The Tigers scored the equalizer when Parque scored in the
53rd minute, but the Knights pulled out the win with a goal

The Tigers opened the Kelly Shea Gallo Memorial
Tournament hosted by Mills with a blowout win over
Sequoia.
Notre Dame-Belmont opened the game with a 21-1 run in
the first quarter to end the suspense early. The Tigers followed that with scores of 18 and 16 points in the second and
third quarters, respectively.
Eight of nine players on the Notre Dame roster got in the
scoring column, led by senior Limu Vanisi’s 14 points.
Sophomore Cam McNabb added 13 and senior Emma
Pastorino finished with 10 points.
Freshman Olga Faasolo had a strong performance, scoring six points and pulling down 11 rebounds, including four
offensive boards.

Mills 43, Homestead 42
The Vikings squeezed out a one-point win over the
Mustangs in the first round of the Kelly Shea Gallo

space between Niemi and a defenseman after
Carl Soderberg set him up with a nice pass.
Torey Krug scored after taking a pass from
Brad Marchand.
Smith scored less than 30 seconds into
the game with a wide-open shot into the net
off a feed from Patrice Bergeron.
Campbell scored after a back-handed pass
from Daniel Paille.
NOTES: Bruins D Dennis Seidenberg
ended a five-game point drought with an
assist on Campbell’s goal. . Sharks C
Logan Couture passed concussion tests
before game and was cleared to play.

Memorial Tournament.
Mills’ front court of Junior Julia Gibbs and sophomore
Aubrie Businger each scored 13 points to lead the Vikings
to the win. Bussinger also pulled down eight boards to lead
the team in rebounding.

Boys’ basketball
Hillsdale 41, Del Mar 36
The Knights opened their 2014-15 campaign with a win
over the Dons in the first round of the Westmont tournament.
Hillsdale (1-0) trailed 20-17 at halftime but outscored Del
Mar 24-16 in the second half.
Hillsdale’s Adam Cook scored a game-high 11 points and
was the only Knight to score in double digits. David Badet
added nine points in the win.

Boys’ soccer
Menlo School 1, Palo Alto 1
The Knights picked up their first point of the season with
a stoppage-time goal in a draw with the Vikings.
After a scoreless first half, Palo Alto got on the scoreboard first, converting on a corner kick minutes into the
second half.
Menlo (0-1-1) finally struck pay dirt, also scoring off a
corner kick. Palo Alto failed to clear away the cross into the
box and the ball found the foot of Matt Joss at the top of the
Vikings’ penalty box. He rifled a shot on goal that clanged
off the post — and dropped right into the path of Dylan
Williams, who taken down as he prepared to shoot it.
Awarded a penalty kick, Menlo’s Will Chisolm stepped up
and netted the equalizer.

College
Women’s basketball
Skyline 71, Gavilan 48
The Lady Trojans stayed undefeated on the season with a
convincing win over Gavilan.
Skyline (5-0) jumped out a 41-21 lead at halftime and were
never threatened the rest of the way.
Tianna Mitchell paced the Trojans offense with 12 points
and 10 rebounds, while Alyssa Dela Cruz was right behind
with 11 points. Jazel Talauta dished out eight assists while
Sahara Clay recorded 10 rebounds.

Exp. 12/24/14

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

13

49ers’ Greg Roman moves on from criticism
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA CLARA — Offensive coordinator
Greg Roman has moved on from a critical
Twitter post last week by the daughter of his
boss, 49ers general manager Trent Baalke.
After a 19-3 loss to the Seahawks last
Thursday night, Cassie Baalke called for
Roman to be gone before quickly deleting
her tweet and later shutting down her
account altogether.
“Greg Roman can take a hike..the 49ers
don’t want you no more,” the tweet read.
After her words were icons of hands clapping.
Trent Baalke said last Friday that both he
and his daughter had apologized to Roman,
who noted Thursday he had moved on and
was prepared to get the offense back on
track Sunday at Oakland after one of its
worst performances.
“It was very concise, very clear,” Roman
said of the interaction with the Baalkes. “I
have children, I understand. We talked about

it briefly and it’s over.
Period. Really not an
issue. ... I didn’t really
react in an emotional
manner, just kind of a
matter-of-fact matter. I
understand these kind of
things do happen, and we
talked about it, cleared it
Greg Roman up and it’s over.”
“Certainly didn’t play
the way we wanted to play the last game.
Guys came in and took a hard look at it and
rolled up their sleeves and got back to work.
We’ve got to go get this win. It’s that time
of year, and it’s that kind of game.”
Roman has coach Jim Harbaugh’s support
and the coach said Roman will still be calling the plays Sunday as the 49ers (7-5) look
to win their four remaining games and return
to the playoffs for the fourth consecutive
year following three straight trips to the
NFC championship game.
Quarterback Colin Kaepernick went 16
for 29 for 121 yards with two interceptions

and four sacks in one of his worst outings as
a pro and the 49ers were outgained 379-164.
Kaepernick’s 36.7 passer rating was the
second lowest of his career behind a Week 2
defeat at Seattle in September 2013.
“We’ve got a resilient group and we’ve
got a group with a lot of pride. We’ve got a
lot of high-quality, high-character individuals,” Roman said. “Take out the football
part of it. We’ve got guys that I want to be
in a trench with. And, when you go out and
you have that kind of performance you’ve
got to evaluate it, look at it and we’ve got
guys that are their own harshest critics as
well. So, I think we’re dealing from the
high ground there.”
Fullback Bruce Miller said this week that
defenses might be catching on to San
Francisco’s shifts on an offense that is
“maybe even being a little bit repetitive,
giving the same looks.”
“I don’t think new things need to be
introduced. We’ve done a lot of things well
this year,” Miller said. “I definitely think
being more consistent, week in and week

Brown anxious to face former team
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALAMEDA — Oakland Raiders cornerback
Tarell Brown has a fairly good idea what to
expect this week from San Francisco
receivers Anquan Boldin and Michael
Crabtree.
He should.
Brown spent his first seven NFL seasons
with the 49ers and regularly squared off
against the two wide receivers during practices when hitting was kept to a minimum
and the competition light.
This time there won’t be any restrictions,
and Brown is looking forward to it.
“I’ll have the opposite jersey so it won’t
be practice, that’s the biggest thing,” Brown
said. “It’ll be exciting. They’ll be hyped up
to play against me, I’ll be hyped up to play
against them. It’s always great competition
when you go against guys you’re familiar
with.”
Brown has already exchanged a few friendly phone calls with some of his former teammates across the bay, but the love almost
assuredly wasn’t shared with San Francisco’s
front office.
A fifth-round pick in 2007 who started 42
games over his final three seasons with the
49ers, Brown didn’t exactly part on amicable
terms. He was offered a three-year contract to

stay in San Francisco —
which Brown termed a
“slap in the face” — and
eventually signed a $3.5
million, one-year deal
with Oakland.
He hasn’t looked back
since, even as the losses
pile up for his current
Tarell Brown team.
The Raiders limp into
the game at 1-11 and steaming toward the
No. 1 overall pick in next year’s draft. The
49ers (7-5) have also had their share of stumbles this season but still cling to playoff
hopes.
“I wouldn’t change it,” Brown said. “Once
you sign up for something, man, you gotta
finish it. I’m that type of guy where when I
sign up for something I’m going to give you
everything I have until the end. I’m still
jacked up about signing here. I love the
guys, I love the locker room, I love the
organization. We just don’t have the wins
that we feel like we should have.”
Brown signed with the Raiders along with
former San Francisco teammate Carlos
Rogers to help improve Oakland’s secondary. It hasn’t worked out as hoped.
Oakland is ranked ninth in pass defense but
the Raiders have only forced eight turnovers

— tied with the New York Jets for fewest in
the NFL — and have only five interceptions.
Rogers started the first seven games before
being placed on injured reserve last week
with a knee injury.
Brown, who has been limited this week in
practice with a minor foot injury, has been
one of Oakland’s few consistent players. He
has 52 tackles and is only seven shy of his
career high. Along with safety Charles
Woodson, Brown has also served as mentor
and tutor to some of the team’s younger
defensive backs.
“The guy goes out there and he gives you a
solid day’s work every single day out there in
practice, and that’s important,” interim
Oakland coach Tony Sparano said. “He really
is a good pro, a good guy to sit and visit with
when you’re just talking about your football
team a little bit and you want to pick somebody’s brain.”
The Raiders undoubtedly sought out Brown
to get some insight on Boldin, Crabtree and
the rest of the 49ers offense.
“When you think of the Bay Area, you
think of both teams,” Brown said. “It’s
going to be a physical matchup. It’s going
to be electric out there. The atmosphere will
be great. But besides all of that, you just
have to go out and play football and let the
chips fall where they’ll fall.”

out, no matter what the look is, no matter
what the play is. I definitely think that
there’s been some breakdowns, whether it’s
been blocking, protections. When you
have 11 guys counting on each other and
you have a breakdown, whether it’s just one
guy each play, it causes negative plays.
That’s what we’ve had a lot of lately. So
we’ve got to get 11 guys on the same page,
pulling on the same strings, doing the same
things, counting on each other.”
NOTES : Rookie LB Chris Borland
received NFL Defensive Rookie of the
Month honors for November, when he had
57 tackles in five games with two interceptions and three passes defensed. “It doesn’t
mean a whole lot,” Borland said. “We’re in
the middle of a playoff push.” ... Defensive
coordinator Vic Fangio said he will do his
best to convince DL Justin Smith to play a
15th season next year. “If I have to go to
Missouri and drink a beer with him, I’ll do
that,” said Fangio, noting he doesn’t drink
beer. Cracked Borland: “I’ll be on the same
flight.”

Sports briefs
Florida hires Colorado State’s
McElwain as football coach
GAINESVILLE, Fla. — After working though
a buyout issue, Jim McElwain is leaving
Colorado State to become Florida’s next head
coach.
The Gators announced the hiring Thursday at
the same time McElwain started a team meeting
with players and assistants.
The Denver Post reported that Florida will pay
$5 million and schedule the Rams for a future
game in Gainesville. Colorado State will get $2
million for that game.
The person said Florida will spread the $5
million out with payments, which will ease the
immediate financial impact of the coaching
change.

Oregon State’s Mike Riley
is Nebraska’s new coach
LINCOLN, Neb. — Nebraska has hired
Oregon State’s Mike Riley as its new football coach, replacing the fired Bo Pelini.
Athletic director Shawn Eichorst
announced Riley’s hiring on Thursday.
Riley has spent 14 seasons over two tenures
at Oregon State, leading the Beavers to 93
wins and a 6-2 record in bowl games.
Oregon State finished this season 5-7
overall, 2-7 in the Pac-12.

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14

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tim Howard named U.S. Bowe, Mancini head to Boxing Hall of Fame
Soccer Player of the Year
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Goalkeeper Tim Howard has won
the 2014 Player of the Year award for his work with the
U.S. national team.
It is the first time Howard has won the prestigious honor
given to a U.S. team member by Futbol de Primera.
Howard received 101 first-place votes from a panel of
journalists nationwide for a total of
363 points. He beat out Jermaine
Jones, who had 160 points, and Clint
Dempsey (147).
Howard, 35, made eight appearances
for the national team, including some
spectacular performances at the World
Cup.
He made 16 saves in the
Americans’ 2-1 loss in extra time to
Belgium in the second round in Brazil.
Tim Howard
Howard has stepped away from playing for the national team for this season. He is Everton’s keeper in the English Premier League
and has been with the club since 2006.
The second keeper to win the award — Kasey Keller got
it twice — Howard has made 104 appearances for the
national team. This was the sixth time he was a finalist for
the honor.
Midfielder Jones, who was born in Germany, has 10
caps this year with the U.S squad and 48 caps overall. He
was one of the standouts for the Americans at the World
Cup, scoring against Portugal in a 2-2 draw and using his
physical style to help the United States emerge from a difficult first-round group.
He currently is with the New England Revolution and
has helped them make the MLS Cup against the Los
Angeles Galaxy.
Dempsey has nine caps this year with the U.S. team and
scored three goals. He has 39 goals in 110 games since
joining the national squad in 2004. Dempsey currently is
with the Seattle Sounders of MLS.

CANASTOTA, N.Y. — Riddick Bowe, who beat undisputed
champion Evander Holyfield to win the heavyweight boxing title in 1992, and popular lightweight champion Ray
“Boom Boom” Mancini have been selected for induction
into the International Boxing Hall of Fame.
Also selected were featherweight champion “Prince”
Naseem Hamed of England, light flyweight champion Yoko
Gushiken of Japan, manager Rafael Mendoza of Mexico,
referee Steve Smoger of Norfolk, Virginia, journalist Nigel
Collins of England, and broadcaster Jim Lampley of
Asheville, North Carolina.
Posthumous honorees include Japanese flyweight Masao
Ohba, middleweight Ken Overlin of Decatur, Illinois, and
publicist John F.X. Condon of New York City.
Inductees were selected by the Boxing Writers
Association and a panel of international boxing historians.
The induction ceremony will be held June 14 at the Hall of
Fame in upstate New York.
Bowe became the undisputed champ after beating
Holyfield for the three major crowns. One of 13 siblings
who grew up poverty in Brooklyn, Bowe somehow made his
way to the pinnacle of the sport.
A 6-foot-5, 235-pounder, Bowe won his first 31 fights to
get a shot at the title, knocking out all but two of them. He
fought only 10 times after beating Holyfield in the first of
their three memorable bouts and won nine of them. But it
was evident his career was declining when he had to get up
off the canvas to stop Holyfield in their final meeting.
Bowe retired in December 1996 with a 43-1 (33 KOs) pro
record after taking a second straight beating from Andrew
Golota, although he won both fights because Golota hit him
with low blows.
Mancini, the pride of Youngstown, Ohio, followed his
father, Lenny, into boxing and turned pro in 1979. He captured the NABF lightweight title in 1981 from Jorge
Morales and in 1982 scored a first-round knockout of Arturo
Frias to win the WBA lightweight title.
Though his career was brief, the popular Mancini had a
profound impact. In November 1982, he defended his title
against 23-year-challenger Duk Koo Kim of South Korea at
Caesars Palace in Las Vegas in an outdoor bout televised live
by CBS. Mancini scored a knockout in the 14th round, but
Kim suffered brain injuries that led to his death four days
later.
The WBA immediately shortened its title fights to 12
rounds and by 1990 all sanctioning organizations had fol-

Anytime
Anywhere!

lowed suit. But Kim’s death had a negative impact on the
sport’s popularity.
Mancini also made successful defenses against Ernesto
Espana, Orlando Romero and Hall of Famer Bobby Chacon
before losing the title to Livingstone Bramble in 1984 and
in the rematch the next year. He officially retired in 1992
with a pro record of 29-5 (23 KOs).
Hamed learned to box at 7 and turned pro in 1992. In the
ensuing decade, he captured bantamweight, super bantamweight and featherweight titles and had an impressive
string of 15 successful title defenses before retiring in 2002
with a pro record of 36-1 (31 KOs).
The Tokyo-born Ohba turned pro in 1966 and compiled a
25-2-1 record before winning the WBA flyweight championship in 1970. He successfully defended the title five times
over the next three years and in his lone bout outside his
native country stopped Rocky Garcia in the ninth round in
the United States. His last fight was a successful title defense
over Thailand’s Chartchai Chionoi in January 1973. Three
weeks later, he died at 23 from injuries suffered in an automobile accident, finishing with a pro record of 35-2-1 (16
KOs).
Overlin learned to box in the Navy and turned pro in
1931. Perhaps his finest moment was a 10-round victory
over future heavyweight king Ezzard Charles. He retired in
1944 with a record of 135-19-9-2NC (23 KOs) and died in
1969 in Reno, Nevada.
Condon served as vice president and president of MSG
Boxing in 1981 and was matchmaker and commentator for
fights on the MSG Network. He died in 1989.
Mendoza was one of boxing’s most respected managers
and booking agents. He advised 22 world champions,
including Hall of Famers Alexis Arguello and Pipino
Cuevas.
Smoger started in boxing in the early 1970s as a timekeeper, judge and referee for the Police Athletic League and
began his career as a professional referee in 1984 in New
Jersey. Over three decades in the sport, he has refereed nearly 200 title bouts.
Collins immigrated to the United States, boxed in the
U.S. Army, and eventually managed fighters before turning
his attention to writing. He began his professional career in
1973 as a correspondent for The Ring and also served as editor of Boxing Illustrated and managing editor and editor-inchief of The Ring.
Lampley served as announcer for over 40 boxing matches
on ABC’s Wide World of Sports and has been calling boxing
for HBO since March 1988.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

15

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

Murray, Romo lead Cowboys over Bears 41-28
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — The Dallas Cowboys look
like a team that’s ready for another firstplace showdown.
DeMarco Murray ran for a season-high
179 yards and a touchdown, Tony Romo
threw for three scores and the Cowboys beat
the Chicago Bears 41-28 on Thursday night.
The Cowboys (9-4) made it look easy for
most of the night against a struggling team
that lost star receiver Brandon Marshall to a

TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL — Named Bob Bowman president of business and media, Pat Courtney
chief communications officer, Dan Halem chief legal
officer, Jonathan Mariner chief investment officer,
Tony Petitti chief operating officer, Bob Starkey chief
financial officer and senior adviser and Joe Torre
chief baseball officer.
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with
RHP Luke Hochevar on a two-year contract.
SEATTLE MARINERS — Agreed to terms with OF
Nelson Cruz on a four-year contract.
TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with RHP
Colby Lewis on a one-year contract and LIHP
Michael Kirkman on a minor league contract.
Named Jason Wood manager of Round Rock (PCL);
Joe Mikulik manager of Frisco (TL); Spike Owen
manager and Bobby Rose hitting coach of High
Desert (Cal); Jose Perez hitting coach of Hickory
(SAL); Dustin Vissering trainer of Spokane (NWL);
and Salomon Manriquez hitting coach and Alex
Rodriguez trainer of the AZL Rangers.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms with OF
Ezequiel Carrera on a minor league contract.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with RHP
Michael Kohn on a minor league contract.
CHICAGO CUBS — Named Dave Martinez bench
coach, Brandon Hyde first base coach and Henry
Blanco major league quality assurance coach. Reassigned first base coach Doug Dascenzo to
outfield and baserunning coordinator.
NEW YORK METS — Named Pat Roessler assistant
hitting coach.
NBA
NBA — Fined Orlando F Kyle O’Quinn $15,000 for
making excessive contact above the shoulders with
L.A. Clippers F Blake Griffin during Wednesday’s
game.
NFL
NFL — Suspended Baltimore DT Haloti Ngata four
games for violating the league’s policy on performance enhancing substances.
BALTIMORE RAVENS — Released TE Allen Reisner from the practice squad. Signed TE Phillip
Supernaw to the practice squad.
CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed LB Chris Carter.
DALLAS COWBOYS — Released TE Jordan Najvar
with an injury settlement.
HOUSTON TEXANS — Placed LB Max Bullough
on injured reserve. Signed TE Anthony Denham
from the practice squad and WR Jace Davis to the
practice squad.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Signed OT Andrew McDonald.
MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed WR L’Damian Washington to the practice squad.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Placed WR Aaron
Dobson on injured reserve.
NEW YORK GIANTS — Signed G Rishaw Johnson
to the practice squad.
NEW YORK JETS — Placed WR Greg Salas on injured reserve. Signed WR Chris Owusu from the
practice squad.

rib injury. Dallas clinched its first winning
season since 2009, but is looking for more,
with an NFC East title and first playoff
appearance in five years in sight.
Led by Romo and Murray, Dallas rebounded from a blowout loss to the Eagles on
Thanksgiving and pulled within a half-game
of them with another meeting in
Philadelphia next week.
The Cowboys took a 14-7 halftime lead
and scored 21 unanswered in the third quarter
before the Bears (5-8) rallied in the fourth.

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Bear Valley — Thu Reopen 12/6 5 new MG machine groomed 16-16 base sm Mon-Fri: 9a-4p
Sat/Sun: 9a-4p
Boreal — Wed 7:37 am MG machine groomed 826 base 4 of 33 trails, 13% open 2 of 8 lifts, Mon-Fri:
9p-9p Sat/Sun: 9a-9p
China Peak — Plan to Open 12/6
Dodge Ridge — Plan to Open 12/19
Donner Ski Ranch — Plan to Open 12/18
Heavenly — Thu 7:56 am 3 new packed powder
machine groomed 24-24 base 4 of 97 trails 5%
open, 43 acres, 6 of 29 lifts, sm Mon-Fri: 9a-4p
Sat/Sun: 8:30a-4p
Homewood — Plan to Open 12/12
June — Plan to Open 12/13
Mammoth — Thu 6:44 am 2-3 new MG machine
groomed 18-22 base 18 of 150 trails 12% open, 7 of
28 lifts, sm Mon-Fri: 8:30a-4p Sat/Sun: 8:30a-4p
Mountain High — Reopen 12/12 Mon-Fri: 8:30a-4p
Sat/Sun: 8:30a-4p
Mt Shasta — Plan to Open 12/10
Northstar —Thu 5:57 am 6 new powder machine
groomed 18-18 base 20 of 97 trails 21% open, 121
acres, 7 of 20 lifts, Mon-Fri: 8a-4p Sat/Sun: 8a-4p
Snow Summit — Wed 6:53 am MG machine
groomed 18-20 base 2 of 31 trails 7% open, 2 of 14
lifts, sm Mon-Fri: 9a-4p Sat/Sun: 8:30a-4p
Squaw Valley —Thu 7:37 am 10 new powder machine groomed 18-24 base 2 of 170 trails, 2% open,
8 of 30 lifts, sm Mon-Fri: 9a-4p Sat/Sun: 9a-4p
Sugar Bowl —Thu 11:31 am-2 new wet snow 5-11
base Mon-Fri: 9a-4p Sat/Sun: 9a-4p
Tahoe Donner — Plan to Open 12/12
Bear Valley XC — Thu Plan to Open 12/6 2 new
wet snow machine groomed 4-6 base Mon-Fri: 9a4:30p Sat/Sun: 9a-4:30p

Nevada
Diamond Peak — Plan to Open 12/11 California
Mt Rose — Thu 7:35 am 1-2 new MG machine
groomed 15-27 base 21 of 60 trails 35% open, 3 of
7 lifts, sm Mon-Fri: 9a-4p Sat/Sun: 9a-4p

With that, the Cowboys improved to a
league-best 6-0 on the road, where they have
won seven straight since a blowout loss at
Soldier Field on a bone-chilling night last
December.
Romo, who has been bothered by a bad
back, kept checking down and completed 21
of 26 passes for 205 after struggling against
the Eagles.
Murray, the league’s leading rusher, carried 32 times. He also had 49 yards receiving. Dez Bryant had six receptions for 82

NHL GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT
Tampa Bay 27 18 6 3
Montreal 27 17 8 2
Detroit
26 15 6 5
Toronto
25 13 9 3
Boston
27 14 12 1
Florida
24 10 7 7
Ottawa
25 10 10 5
Buffalo
26 9 15 2

Pts
39
36
35
29
29
27
25
20

GF
97
70
82
84
67
53
64
45

GA
69
68
67
77
70
62
68
82

Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT
N.Y. Islanders26 19 7 0
Pittsburgh 25 17 6 2
N.Y. Rangers 24 11 9 4
Washington 25 11 10 4
New Jersey 26 10 12 4
Philadelphia 25 8 13 4
Carolina
25 8 14 3
Columbus 25 8 15 2

Pts
38
36
26
26
24
20
19
18

GF
82
82
71
70
63
66
57
58

GA
68
58
70
70
75
81
71
87

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT
Nashville
25 17 6 2
St. Louis
26 16 8 2
Chicago
25 16 8 1
Winnipeg 26 13 9 4
Minnesota 24 14 9 1
Colorado 26 9 11 6
Dallas
26 9 12 5

Pts
36
34
33
30
29
24
23

GF
69
70
78
55
67
70
75

GA
51
59
49
58
56
83
94

Pacific Division
GP W L OT
Vancouver 26 18 7 1
Anaheim 27 16 6 5
Calgary
27 17 8 2
Los Angeles 26 14 7 5
Sharks
27 13 10 4
Arizona
27 10 14 3
Edmonton 26 6 15 5

Pts
37
37
36
33
30
23
17

GF
82
76
87
71
77
64
58

GA
69
72
69
57
75
85
90

Thursday’s Games
Columbus 4, Florida 3, SO
Vancouver 3, Pittsburgh 0
Washington 2, Carolina 1
New Jersey 5, Toronto 3
N.Y. Islanders 2, Ottawa 1
Detroit 5, Dallas 2
Tampa Bay 5, Buffalo 0
Nashville 4, St. Louis 3
Calgary 4, Colorado 3, OT
Los Angeles 4, Arizona 0
San Jose 7, Boston 4
Friday’s Games
Anaheim at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Colorado at Winnipeg, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at N.Y. Islanders, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Los Angeles, 1 p.m.
Vancouver at Toronto, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Detroit, 4 p.m.
Columbus at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m.
Buffalo at Florida, 4 p.m.
Washington at New Jersey, 4 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 4 p.m.
Montreal at Dallas, 4 p.m.

yards and Cole Beasley caught two touchdowns.
For the Bears, Marshall’s injury was
another low in a disappointing season that
will likely end with them missing the playoffs for the seventh time in eight years.
He was hurt taking a knee to the right side
from the Cowboys’ Barry Church following
a reception in the second quarter. That happened moments after he made a spectacular
42-yard catch, juggling the ball with his
right hand, to help set up a touchdown.

NBA GLANCE

NFL GLANCE
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T
New England
9 3 0
Miami
7 5 0
Buffalo
7 5 0
N.Y. Jets
2 10 0

Pct
.750
.583
.583
.167

PF
378
301
264
190

PA
253
232
217
319

South
Indianapolis
Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville

W
8
6
2
2

L T
4 0
6 0
10 0
10 0

Pct
.667
.500
.167
.167

PF
382
287
213
186

PA
283
247
338
329

North
Cincinnati
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland

W
8
7
7
7

L
3
5
5
5

T
1
0
0
0

Pct
.708
.583
.583
.583

PF
260
328
320
252

PA
247
242
298
245

West
Denver
San Diego
Kansas City
Raiders

W
9
8
7
1

L T
3 0
4 0
5 0
11 0

Pct
.750
.667
.583
.083

PF
361
279
277
176

PA
276
249
224
337

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T
Philadelphia
9 3 0
Dallas
9 4 0
N.Y. Giants
3 9 0
Washington
3 9 0

Pct
.750
.692
.250
.250

PF PA
375 285
343 301
257 319
244 322

South
Atlanta
New Orleans
Carolina
Tampa Bay

W
5
5
3
2

L T
7 0
7 0
8 1
10 0

Pct
.417
.417
.292
.167

PF
291
323
228
220

PA
299
318
331
314

North
Green Bay
Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago

W
9
8
5
5

L
3
4
7
8

T
0
0
0
0

Pct
.750
.667
.417
.385

PF
380
231
233
281

PA
267
207
257
378

Arizona
Seattle
49ers
St. Louis

9
8
7
5

3
4
5
7

0
0
0
0

.750 258 224
.667 298 221
.583 231 244
.417 261 285

Thursday’s Game
Dallas 41, Chicago 28
Sunday’s Games
N.Y. Giants at Tennessee, 10 a.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, 10 a.m.
N.Y. Jets at Minnesota, 10 a.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at Washington, 10 a.m.
Baltimore at Miami, 10 a.m.
Indianapolis at Cleveland, 10 a.m.
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 10 a.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Denver, 1:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Arizona, 1:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Oakland, 1:25 p.m.
Seattle at Philadelphia, 1:25 p.m.
New England at San Diego, 5:30 p.m.
Monday’s Game
Atlanta at Green Bay, 5:30 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
Toronto
15
Brooklyn
8
Boston
5
New York
4
Philadelphia
1
Southeast Division
Washington
12
Atlanta
11
Miami
9
Orlando
7
Charlotte
4
Central Division
Chicago
12
Cleveland
10
Milwaukee
10
Indiana
7
Detroit
3

4
9
11
16
17

.789
.471
.313
.200
.056


6
8 1/2
11 1/2
13 1/2

5
6
9
14
15

.706
.647
.500
.333
.211


1
3 1/2
7
9

7
7
10
12
16

.632
.588
.500
.368
.158


1
2 1/2
5
9

.833
.778
.750
.722
.471


1
1
2
6 1/2

.789
.500
.278
.263
.235


5 1/2
9 1/2
10
10

.889
.722
.579
.500
.263


3
5 1/2
7
11 1/2

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
Memphis
15
3
Houston
14
4
Dallas
15
5
San Antonio
13
5
New Orleans
8
9
Northwest Division
Portland
15
4
Denver
9
9
Oklahoma City
5
13
Utah
5
14
Minnesota
4
13
Pacific Division
Warriors
16
2
L.A. Clippers
13
5
Phoenix
11
8
Sacramento
9
9
L.A. Lakers
5
14

Thursday’s Games
Cleveland 90, New York 87
Portland 88, Indiana 82
Golden State 112, New Orleans 85
Friday’s Games
Oklahoma City at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Denver at Washington, 4 p.m.
New York at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
Cleveland at Toronto, 4:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Boston, 4:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Miami at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m.
Orlando at Utah, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Sacramento, 7 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Philadelphia at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Golden State at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at Houston, 5 p.m.
Minnesota at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
Orlando at Sacramento, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.

16

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

FOOTBALL
Continued from page 1
play, one game behind co-champions Serra
and Valley Christian. The Bells advanced to
the finals with a pair of dramatic wins in the
first two rounds. The seventh-seeded Bells
needed overtime to get past Milpitas 9-6 in
the first round. In the semifinals, they got a
58-yard touchdown run from quarterback Troy
Martig in the waning minutes to give
Bellarmine a 21-18 win over Valley Christian
— a team that had beaten the Bells 42-17 back
on Oct. 11.
“You better stop the run,” Lavorato said of
the Bells.
The Bellarmine defense will have its hands
full as well with the Gators’ rushing attack.
Averaging 246 yards per game on the ground,
Ryan Tinsley (714 yards, 4 TDs), Lapitu
Mahoni (652, 5 TDs) carried the load early, but
the offense has been greatly aided by the
return of running back/linebacker Ben BurrKirven, who has rushed for 759 yards and 16
touchdowns on just 79 carries over seven
games. In two CCS games, Burr-Kirven has
rushed for 284 yards — including 200 against
Oak Grove — and four scores.
Burr-Kirven was not needed as a savior,
however, because, well, the Gators were doing
just fine without him.

NFL
Continued from page 11
out just days before kick-off, McCain said.
The blackouts were averted when local businesses bought tickets to bring the total
above the NFL’s required threshold.
A bill co-sponsored by Blumenthal and
McCain would revoked the league’s antitrust
exemption unless it removes the blackout
rule.
The senators made it clear at Thursday’s
hearing that they would prefer not to enact a
bill. Blumenthal and other lawmakers urged
the NFL to act on its own.
“I think they’d become heroes rather than
the opposite, which they are now,”
Blumenthal said.
Gerard Waldron, a lawyer who represents
the NFL, said the proposed bill would harm

SPORTS
“With Ben not there, we went undefeated and
beat a really good Salinas team (which is in
the Division I championship game),”
Lavorato said. “What [Burr-Kirven’s absence]
did was cause our guys to say, ‘OK, we’re OK
without him.”
SHP pulled out a last-second win over
Salinas Sept. 19, one in which quarterback
Mason Randall drove the offense 99 yards for
the game-winning touchdown and a 27-21
win, completing 9 of 10 passes on the drive
for 95 yards.
Lavorato would not go as far as to say that
was a turning point in the season, “bottom
line is, if we lost to Salinas, I think we would
have been OK,” but it helped forge the team’s
identity.
Now with Burr-Kirven back, the Gators have
taken their play to the next level.
“We were a good team. We’re a better team
with [Burr-Kirven],” Lavorato said. “ Because
he’s the best player in CCS, at least that’s how
I feel.”
So don’t look for Lavorato or the Gators to
be in awe of playing on CCS’s biggest stage
or expect them to make a statement. They will
prepare for Bellarmine the way they prepared
for Los Gatos last week and Leland in Week 1
and then let the chips fall where they may.
“The Open is great. I have a ton of respect
fort the Open teams. … At the same time,
we’ve done pretty good (over the last several
years),” Lavorato said. “The kids don’t have
anything to prove to me or to anybody. We’re
the people it intends to help — the fans —
by undermining “the complex business and
legal structure that allows the NFL to be the
only professional sports league that offers
all of its regular-season game to viewers at
no charge” through over-the-air broadcasts.
Without the certainty of paid attendance
provided by a blackout rule, NFL games are
likely to migrate from free broadcast TV to
pay TV such as cable and satellite, Waldron
said.
The bill also aims fix a problem that largely does not exist, Waldron said, noting that
no NFL games have been blacked out this
season and only two games were blacked out
in 2013. Without threats of a blackout,
advertisers may not be willing to spend as
much money to sponsor NFL games, he said.
“The key factor that distinguishes the NFL
from other types of programming is its ability consistently to deliver a mass audience at
a fixed time,” he said.
But David Goodfriend, chairman of the

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Sports brief

not the biggest, most physically scary looking team. But here is who we are: we are smart,
we work our asses off and we’re disciplined and
we have good athletic talent. Whenever you Woods stumbles to a 77 in his return
have all that, you’re going to compete and
WINDERMERE, Fla. — Tiger Woods returned
these (SHP) kids are going to compete.
to golf Thursday and it was as if he never left —
“Whether that’s good enough to beat except that he looked healthy.
Woods flubbed four chips, had only four birdie
Bellarmine, we’ll find out [Friday] night.”
chances inside 20 feet and stumbled to a 5-over
77 in the opening round of the Hero World
Consolation final
Challenge. He was in last place among the 18
No. 4 Serra vs. No. 2 Milpitas,
players.
7 p.m. Milpitas High School
It was his second return this year from an ailSHP and Bellarmine aren’t the only Open ing back. He missed the cut at Congressional in
Division teams to be facing off Friday. Fourth- his first start after back surgery. His lone birdie
seeded Serra will face No. 2 Milpitas in the Open came on No. 12 when he spun a wedge back to
Division consolation final 7 p.m. at Milpitas tap-in range.
High School.
The Open Division expanded the tournament
to include a consolation side of the bracket with
an eye toward an expanded state playoff pool
beginning next season.
Continued from page 11
Serra (8-4) won a share of the WCAL title,
along with Valley Christian, and drew No. 5 Los
He said making such a decision to replay all
Gatos in the first round. The Wildcats handed the
Padres one of their most lopsided losses in or part of the game would be “extraordinary.”
“I know of no other court that has been
years, 28-0. The Padres bounced back, however,
with a 28-14 win over No. 3 Palma last week to asked to do what has been asked here,” Jones
said.
move into the game against Milpitas.
The Trojans (11-1), arguably one top teams in
Jones said the burden of proof was with
Northern California this season, were stunned Oklahoma City Public Schools to prove there
9-6 in overtime by Bellarmine in the first round. had been “irreparable harm” to Douglass’ playThey came back to wallop No. 4 Oak Grove 33- ers.
15 to set up the match up with Serra.
Mark Grossman, attorney for the Oklahoma
School Activities Association, said he is conSports Fans Coalition, an advocacy group, cerned about the ripple effects of replaying the
said the government should not support game in any form — on time, money, conven“anti-fan activities” by professional sports ience and the start of other seasons. He said he
leagues such as the NFL.
felt for the kids at Locust Grove, who have
“When a sports league receives a public been practicing all week to play Heritage Hall.
benefit” such as the antitrust exemption and
“I’m the father of three kids,” he said. “They
other subsidies, “the fans should get a fair have a lot invested in certain activities, and
return or the subsidy should go away,” they’re very disappointed when they have to
Goodfriend said.
be delayed for whatever reason, whether it’s
Lawmakers at the Thursday’s hearing weather, whether it’s a situation like this. I
appeared generally
sympathetic to would not want to be in that situation.”
Goodfriend’s argument, but two Minnesota
Oklahoma City school district athletic
senators told him should have done a better director Keith Sinor said in a statement that he
job researching his audience. A Green Bay understands others will be affected.
Packers fan, Goodfriend wore a Packers tie to
“Everyone can relate to the heartache that
the hearing — fact noted by Democratic
occurs when you try your best and it’s rewarded
Sens. Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken of
with unfairness,” he said. “Today’s decision
Minnesota.
gives us another chance to make it right for
“It might not have been your smartest students athletes and hopefully spark a broadmove, given that half of the senators here are er conversation that will help to prevent simfrom
Minnesota,”
Klobuchar
told ilar situations from affecting student athletes
Goodfriend.
in Oklahoma in the future.”

PROTEST

650-354-1100

‘Wild’ finds salvation
in the forest
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cheryl Strayed, as played by
Reese Witherspoon in JeanMarc Vallee’s “Wild,” is, bless
the Lord, not an easily discernable type.
She’s also not the sort we’ve
often encountered on the welltrod paths of female stereotypes
in movies. Strayed is a bundle
of messy imperfections, as we
gradually learn from flashbacks
that accumulate throughout her
therapeutic journey on the
Pacific Crest Trail in “Wild.”
She’s a serial adulterer but no
villain. (How many times have
we seen that, in a woman, in our
male-dominated movies?) She’s
curious, experimental and
intrepid to the point of selfdestruction. The same traits,
though, may also be her salvation.
“I’m the girl that says ‘yes’

instead of ‘no,’” she explains to
a friend, with all the positive
and negative implications of
that statement abundantly clear.
Heavy with grief from the loss
of her mother (Laura Dern) to
cancer, haunted by remorse for
seven years of unfaithful marriage to her sensitive husband
(Thomas Sadoski) and shaking
off a dark turn into heroin,
Strayed sets out to hike 1,100
miles up the coast, from the
Mojave Desert to Oregon. She’s
forcing self-renewal not by fleeing her life but by confronting
herself in isolation. When she
wrestles to strap on her oversized backpack, she’s literally
weighed down with baggage.
Her background isn’t neatly
laid out before her hike begins
(with scant preparation) in
California. But the film —
adapted by Nick Hornby from
Strayed’s 2012 best-selling
See WILD, Page 18

Witherspoon goes on a soul-baring ride
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Once she’d decided
to take on her gritty new role in “Wild,”
there were a few things Reese
Witherspoon knew she DIDN’T want to
hear from movie studio executives:
“We want her to be more likable.”
“We don’t want her to use drugs.”
“We don’t want her to be profane.”
And so, Witherspoon says, she didn’t
give them the chance.
She developed the film, which follows
a hard-living woman’s path to solace

and redemption via a long trek in the
wilderness, outside the studio system
under the auspices of her own production company, with private financing.
“And then I took it to the studios and
said, ‘I’m not changing a word,”’
Witherspoon recounts in an interview.
“And I had three bids on it that day.”
“And I think it’s important, you
know?” the actress adds. “You grow up,
you change — I’m a 38-year old woman
now, I have three kids, and I’ve lived a
lot of life experience. It’s really imporSee SOUL Page 18

18

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

SOUL
Continued from page 17
tant to me that the things I put out into the
world are meaningful and thought-provoking. Otherwise, what am I doing?”
“Wild,” based on the best-selling memoir by Cheryl Strayed, is a story of personal catharsis, and listening to Witherspoon,
one gets the sense she was seeking a sort
of professional catharsis by choosing it.
The role, which has garnered significant
Oscar buzz, includes difficult scenes depicting rough sex and heroin use. Witherspoon
wore no makeup and spent days lugging a
heavy backpack up and down hills.
“By far, it’s the hardest thing I’ve done
in my life, ” she says. “The physical
aspects were really challenging — the elements, the heat, the cold, the water, the
rain, 55 locations in 35 days, and carrying
that backpack. And there was nothing else

WILD
Continued from page 17
memoir — fills her journey with montages
of memories. The scenes range from
drugged-out heroin highs to tender
moments with her mom, whose advice to
“put yourself in the way of beauty” spurs
Strayed’s trip. Dern, ever a force of
warmth, glows.
On the trail, every encounter holds the
threat of danger for a woman alone in the
woods, though almost everyone turns out
quite chummy.

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

to cut to — just me.”
Emotionally, it was even harder, she
says: “One day I’d be getting divorced.
Another, my mother would be dying. The
next day I’d be using heroin. It was just
nonstop — not even a roller coaster, just a
continual descent downward! There are
always scenes that I dread, that I say, ‘That
day’s going to be miserable.’ And here, it
was three weeks of that.”
Witherspoon’s director, Jean-Marc
Vallee, calls the actress “a trouper.” As
well he should: He noticed that the backpack looked too light and forced her to
carry a much heavier one. “And then he
just walked away, and I was like, OK,”
Witherspoon laughs. “You can see it digging into my skin. Because it really WAS
digging into my skin!”
Vallee says Witherspoon “went out there
with no makeup, looking like nothing, on
the trail for 65 percent of the film, looking
like a hiker, with a heavy backpack on her
back. I removed the mirrors in the makeup
trailer and she didn’t look at herself. “

Witherspoon, who already has one Oscar
on the mantelpiece for 2005’s “Walk the
Line,” says it was no accident that she
chose such a film at this point in her
career, a time that finds her veering away
from trademark sunny, bright roles and
romantic comedies. (Her 2012 supporting
role in the Mississippi River coming-ofage tale “Mud” is another example of her
new direction.)
“It’s something I consciously did for
myself,” she says. Her production company, Pacific Standard, is specifically geared
toward projects with complex roles for
women — like the role played by
Rosamund Pike in “Gone Girl, ” which
came out in October.
“I was seeing sort of a deficit in leading
roles for women,” she says. “It was just
sort of the lack of complex characters, of
interesting, dynamic women onscreen. I
have a 15-year old daughter and it’s very
important to me what she sees, in movies
and television.”
“Wild,” which opens in select theaters

Dec. 3, was an easy choice.
“I read the manuscript in 24 hours,” she
says, after receiving it from Strayed. “And
I immediately called my agent and said, ‘I
don’t know who this woman is, but I need
to talk to her. I need to hug this person,
and get to know her.’ It is absolutely one
of the most important books I’ve ever read
in my life.”
It’s important to note, Witherspoon
adds, that “Wild,” which has a screenplay
by Nick Hornby, isn’t a “chick movie” —
something she hopes audiences will realize.
“It’s written by a man and it’s directed by
a man,” she says. “If it was a man’s story,
I don’t think we’d be remarking that it’s a
man’s movie.”
“It’s a movie about humanity,” she says.
“About love and loss and sex and drugs,
and how to find your way out of the woods.
I think we all have this moment in our
lives when we realize, no one’s coming
along to save us. We have to save ourselves.”

Much has already been made of
Witherspoon’s unadorned transformation
in “Wild.” Yes, she’s without makeup here
and, as she did in her brief role in “Mud,”
feels closer, more intimate with the audience. Yet she still possesses an always-incontrol fortitude that perhaps makes her a
less than ideal fit for the looser Strayed.
Of Witherspoon’s many fine attributes,
the stuff of the film’s title is not one of
them.
The revelation on “Wild” is less
Witherspoon than Vallee. The FrenchCanadian director somehow stayed below
the radar even after shepherding his stars
in his last film “Dallas Buyers Club” to
Oscars. Just as he did in that film, Vallee

proves particularly adept at shooting in
lived-in environs where he and his actors
find a live naturalism.
“Wild” may be a part of the recent trend
of trek films (like the recent “Tracks” or
“127 Hours”), but its flow between past
and present is uniquely smooth thanks to
Vallee (who shares an editing credit with
Martin Pensa under a pseudonym, John
Mac McMurphy). The flashbacks come in
chunks or just a flash of imagery without
sound, triggered by a smell or a song.
The hardest thing to get past in “Wild”
— and this is a problem some have had
since Thoreau — is that a much-documented solitude can’t help but seem artificially
conceived. (Strayed isn’t seen writing in

the film, but she does briefly express her
literary hopes of being published in
Harper’s, and she leaves cheesy quotes
along the trail.) Such tales come with a
prerequisite arc of salvation, the journeys
seeming as much for the sake of a book or
a movie as genuine reflection.
“Wild” is ultimately unique for its twist,
even if it comes by an unfortunately intrusive narration. Strayed’s rocky past doesn’t need an apology if it gets her where
she’s going.
“Wild,” a Fox Searchlight release, is
rated R by the Motion Picture Association
of America for “sexual content, nudity,
drug use and language.” Running time: 115
minutes. Two and a half stars out of four.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

19

MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

IRON HORS ES IN B LACK AND
WHITE: A TREASURY OF STEAM
LOCOMOTIVE PHOTOGRAPHS AT
THE O. WINSTON LINK MUSEUM IN
ROANOKE, VIRGINIA. In 1955, New
York-based commercial photographer Ogle
Winston Link (1914-2001) happened to be
in Virginia just as the Norfolk and Western
Railway announced that it would change
from steam to diesel engines. The Railway,
headquartered since the 1800s in Roanoke
was the last major American railroad to
operate exclusively under steam power, so
its decision to convert effectively meant the
end of the steam locomotive in the United
States. But it also meant the beginning of a
five-year, self-financed labor of love for
photographer Link, who traveled through
the mountains of Virginia, West Virginia,
Maryland and North Carolina, documenting
this technological shift. By 1960, when the
transition from steam to diesel was complete, Link had captured 2400 images.
Today, 250 of these dramatic photographs
are displayed at the O. Winston Link
Museum in the former passenger station of
the Norfolk and Western Railway in downtown Roanoke. These stunning large-scale
works, most taken at night, convey Link’s
strong emotional connection with his subject. He said, “The train is as close to a
human being as you can get. It talks, it
moves, it grunts and groans. And each
engine has its own characteristics-its own
sound and smell and sights.” In Link’s spectacular photographs, the great machines
live again.
HOTS HOT EAS TB OUND. One of

Link’s best-known photographs is Hotshot
Eastbound, which shows a steam train at
night speeding past a small-town drive-in
movie theater. Link posed the photograph
by arranging for a young couple to sit and
watch the movie in Link’s own car. To photograph the speeding train, Link used a
large format 4x5 Graphic View camera with
black and white film, from which he could
later produce silver gelatin prints. He set up
42 flashbulbs in a series and arranged
another light to highlight the car and the
couple. The photo was taken in the instant
that the train passed. Link added the airplane image on the movie screen later from
a negative he’d made separately of the film,
since his own lights had washed out the
actual movie.
STEAM GIANTS ON FILM. Mr. Jeff
Sanders, President of the Roanoke Chapter
of the National Railway Historical Society,
said, “The Norfolk and Western Railway
(N&W Ry), headquartered in Roanoke,
Virginia, was the last major railroad in the
country to maintain steam motive power.
The railroad designed and built its own locomotives at the company’s shops in
Roanoke. They were known throughout the
world as the most powerful and efficient
steam power ever built. The N&W’s principal task was hauling high quality coal from
southern West Virginia and southwest
Virginia to the port at Norfolk, Virginia.
For that reason, the management of the
Railway stayed with coal-powered steam as
long as they possibly could. In fact the City
of Roanoke’s very existence and growth for
nearly 100 years was due to the N&W Ry,
and ultimately, to coal. Mr. Link, a profes-

COURTESY OF THE O. WINSTON LINK MUSEUM

Hotshot Eastbound (Aug. 2, 1956. Iaeger, W.Va.) is one of the best-known photographs by O.
Winston Link, who documented the end of the steam rail era in the United States.This carefully
posed shot (the young couple in the foreground sits in Link’s own 1952 Buick convertible) is
among his work on display at the O. Winston Link Museum in Roanoke, Va.

See MUSEUM, Page 20

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20

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

Miley Cyrus dazzles at Art
Basel Miami Beach show
By Kelli Kennedy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — In a bizarre
and emotionally transparent performance, Miley Cyrus mocked her own
music, opened up about her dark year
and belted out some Led Zeppelin. Oh
yeah, and she smoked pot onstage.
Wearing a silver metallic Cleopatra
wig and bright turquoise eye shadow,
Cyrus kicked off a private, poolside
show at the Raleigh Hotel in South
Beach singing a duet of “Super Freak”
with a topless woman. Cyrus was
among the top-billed acts during the
star-studded week of the prestigious
Art Basel Miami Beach.
The 22-year-old singer performed
mostly covers, including Led

Miley Cyrus

Zeppelin,
the
Beatles’ “Lucy in
the
Sky
With
Diamonds”
and
Johnny
Cash,
telling the audience
she understood they
were serious about
real art and probably weren’t fans of
her
pop-music

style.
“You thought (Art Basel) was a
respected place where you could
escape me,” said Cyrus, who talked
about her difficult year after her twerking performance at the 2013 MTV
Video Music Awards and the death of
her dog.
The former Disney star said it took
her to a dark place and made her realize

many things she was doing seemed
meaningless.
“This year has constantly challenged me, and that’s why I started
doing art,” she said before launching
into a song she wrote after her friend’s
cat spoke to her in a dream. She also
played the macabre song on the piano,
abruptly banging on the keys at the
end, saying she was sick of talking
about death and wanted to move on to
something fun.
Later in the show, she donned a massive rainbow with a cutout for her
head, while two other performers wore
mushroom costumes. At one point,
two costumed sharks and a penis ran
across the stage. Despite distractions
of bubbles floating through the air and
falling confetti, one thing stood out
— her vocal chops.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

People in the news
Another rerun for ‘Tonight’ while Fallon babysits
NEW YORK — Jimmy Fallon plans to take a third day of
paternity leave from his “Tonight Show” duties.
NBC says it will air a repeat “Tonight
Show” episode Friday so Fallon can spend
another day with his new daughter,
Frances Cole Fallon.
The scheduled Wednesday and Thursday
“Tonight” tapings had already been canceled after her arrival Wednesday morning.
Little Frances joins big sister Winnie
Rose, 1. Both daughters were born to
Jimmy Fallon Fallon and wife, Nancy, via a surrogate.

MUSEUM
Continued from page 19
sional industrial photographer, set out on his own, at his
own expense, to record these last remaining steam giants
on film. In order to be in full control of his photography,
i.e., lighting, exposure and location, he photographed his
subjects at night! After five years and over 2000 images, his
project ended as the N&W completely dieselized. During
those years Mr. Link meticulously captured not only the
steam locomotives, but the very fabric of life of that era and
of the people that lived in those ‘simpler times.’”
THE NORFOLK AND WES TERN RAILWAY’ S
ENGINE 1 2 1 8 . A walkway connects the O. Winston Link
Museum to the Virginia Museum of Transportation, which
holds Norfolk and Western’s massive Class A 1218, a steam
locomotive that at one time was the most powerful operational steam locomotive in the world. Known as the
Mercedes of Steam, the 1218 could easily run at 70 miles per
hour. The engine pictured in Link’s “Hotshot Eastbound”
was of one of 1218’s sister engines at full speed.
MUS EUM PARTICULARS . The O. Winston Link
Museum is located at 101 Shenandoah Ave. N.E., Roanoke.
For more information visit www.linkmuseumorg or call
(540) 982-LINK. The Virginia Museum of Transportation is
located at 303 Norfolk Ave. S.W., Roanoke. For more information visit www.VMT.org or call (540) 342-5670.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com or
www.twitter.com/susancityscene.

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

21

Kathleen Turner stars as columnist Ivins in ‘Red Hot Patriot’
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

The late Molly Ivins was a syndicated newspaper columnist who had
little patience for stupidity, incompetence, pomposity or dishonesty,
especially in politicians.
Instead of vitriol, though, she
skewered them with her homegrown
Texas humor, as seen in “Red Hot
Patriot: The Kick-Ass Wit of Molly
Ivins.”
Kathleen Turner brings her to life
in a one-woman play by twin sisters
Margaret and Allison Engel and presented by Berkeley Repertory
Theatre.
Wearing a blue denim work shirt,
jeans and red cowboy boots, Turner
strides around the newsroom that
houses her utilitarian desk with its
manual typewriter and a preserved
armadillo.
She’s ostensibly trying to write a
column about her father, with whom
she had a love-hate relationship and
whom she called “the General.” He
was a conservative, she a liberal.
She’s occasionally interrupted by
bulletins coming over the Associated
Press wire machine — a staple of
newsrooms before computers — and
delivered to her by a silent copy boy
(Michael Barrett Austin).
Along the way, she talks about her
life, career and the people she’s met.

She started out in journalism when
most newsrooms were all-male and
when most journalists were hard
drinkers, a situation that apparently
led to her own problems with alcohol.
Her anecdotes are peppered with
references to her mentors and famous
people, mostly conservative politicians, most of whom she held in low
regard. She’s the one who dubbed
George W. Bush “Shrub.”
Directed by David Esbjornson,
Turner employs her famously sultry
voice and assured stage presence to
personify Ivins. She easily transitions from astute, often salty humor
to more serious issues.
The latter include the deaths of two
boyfriends, one in a motorcycle accident and one in the Vietnam war,
which Ivins opposed. She says that
both it and the Iraq war were predicated on lies.
The play concludes with her plea
for people to stand up for their rights
and
to
oppose
wrongdoing.
Ironically, this came during opening
night as people across the country
were protesting a grand jury’s decision not to indict a white police officer accused of killing a black teenager in Ferguson, Missouri.
When Ivins died of breast cancer in
2007 at the age of 62, she left a void
that has yet to be filled at newspapers
like the San Francisco Chronicle and

PHOTO COURTESY OF KEVINBERNE.COM

Two-time Tony and Academy Award nominee Kathleen Turner stars in ‘Red Hot Patriot: The Kick-Ass
Wit of Molly Ivins,’ a one-woman show about beloved journalist and satirist Molly Ivins.
hundreds of others across the country.
She was a Texas original.
Running about 80 minutes without
intermission, the play is both
insightful and funny — highly
enjoyable.
“Red Hot Patriot: The Kick-Ass Wit
of Molly Ivins” will continue
through Jan. 4 in Berkeley Repertory
Theatre’s Roda Theatre, 2015
Addison St. , Berkeley. For tickets
and information call (510) 647-2949
or visit www.berkeleyrep.org.

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Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

100 YEARS
Continued from page 1
very, very nice elegant evening that’s heavily subsidized; we’ve budgeted for an event
over the last three to four years. … We’ve
been through a lot (with the 2010 explosion and fire), but we have some very, very
positive things we need to celebrate. … We
have a lot to be thankful for and we’re looking forward to the next 100.”
San Bruno has come a long way. Prior to
1750, the Peninsula was inhabited by the
Ohlone Indians, who were hunter-gatherers.
Then, Spanish Basque explorer Captain
Bruno Heceta came to the western shore of
the San Francisco Bay in 1775 and named
the largest land mass on that side of the
Peninsula Mount San Bruno, after his
patron saint. Saint Bruno the Confessor was
an 11th-century monk and founder of the
Carthusian order of monks. The land was

ART
Continued from page 1
and crafts, to up-and-coming artists,” Watt
said. “There’s more opportunities for everyone to find something they like.”
The Shop at Flywheel Press, which first
started the event about a year and a half ago,
will be lighting up Seventh Avenue and the
alleyway next door by hosting music, free
drinks and a food truck. The Neologian Art
Gallery is planning a live life-drawing exhibition and Scribble Me Happy is having a
free craft station. The Arts Unity Movement
is hosting a holiday-themed show where
attendees can make their own cards and

WEEKEND JOURNAL
taken over by the Mexican government, but
eventually went back to the United States.
In the 1850s, James Thorpe built a lean-to
on what is now El Camino Real and San
Mateo Avenue for changing and watering
horses on the then county road between San
Jose and San Francisco. In 1875, after several changes of ownership and name,
Thorpe’s Place, or the 14 Mile House, was
transformed by August Jenevein into Uncle
Tom’s Cabin, an eating, drinking and gaming establishment. The cabin was open for
nearly 75 years and during prohibition a
speakeasy was run out of the garage behind
the cabin, according to the San Bruno
Centennial website.
Katie O’Connell, a librarian for the city,
has been working as the centennial
archivist, researching the city’s history for
a year and a half. She collected old photos
from San Bruno residents, documents and
has been conducting interviews of residents
about San Bruno.
“It’s been really interesting to see how
the city has changed,” she said. “It’s interworking artists’ space can be visited at the
Claremont Art Studios and Peninsula
Studios. Each location will have art for sale.
“A lot of the artists’ stuff is phenomenal
to say the least, and also reasonably priced
for the community. A lot of the artists are
offering smaller prints or small pieces for
cheaper, so everybody has a chance to get
something,” said Neologian Art Gallery
owner Jesse Flora.
Part of the reason the event has been able
to expand is because each month has
brought more artists out of the woodwork,
Watt said.
“It’s always changing and it’s been really
surprising how many different kinds of
artists have been coming forward and identifying themselves at these different venues
and how many connections artists are mak-

THE DAILY JOURNAL

esting to see how many of the old things are
still around.”
This includes some homes that have been
around for 80 years, she said.
To celebrate San Bruno’s centennial, the
Shops at Tanforan has put together a wall of
photographs from San Bruno’s history.
This display is located in the main lobby of
the shopping center, next to Barnes &
Noble, across from BJ’s Brewhouse.
Additionally, those interested in sharing
their memories of San Bruno can take part
in a 30-minute interview from 4:30 p.m.7:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 11 at the San
Bruno Recreation Center. The city will be
making sound recordings of each interview.
The oral history recordings will be preserved as part of San Bruno history. One
clip from each interview will be added to the
San Bruno Stories Project.
To sign up for a 30-minute oral history
interview slot, email Katie O’Connell at
koconnell@sanbruno. ca. gov or call the
library at 616-7078. Slots will be assigned
on a first-come, first-served basis. Oral his-

tory interviews, some of which were recorded in 1970s, from some of San Bruno’s
founding citizens and first families, sharing
their memories and experiences of San
Bruno going back to the 1800s, are already
online at soundcloud.com/sanbrunopersonalhistories.
The gala takes place 6 p.m.-11 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 6 at Skyline College. The
event is open to everyone over 21 years
old. Tickets are now on sale for $100 at the
Recreation Center located at 251 City Park
Way or by calling 616-7187 by 5 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 5. The ticket price includes
valet parking, beer, wine and soft drinks,
artisan servings, live music, dancing and a
centennial commemorative gift. A no-host
bar will also be available for mixed drinks.
The city will compile a time capsule as
well. Although an exact date hasn’t been
picked, it’s a possibility an event surrounding the capsule will happen on the official
100th anniversary, Dec. 23, Ruane said.
For more information go to sanbruno100.org.

• The Shop at Flywheel Press, 309 Seventh Ave. 6 p.m. to 9
p.m.
www.facebook.com/TheShopFWP
• Claremont Art Studios, 1515 S. Claremont St., 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
claremontartstudios.wordpress.com
• Peninsula Studios, 1022 N. Idaho St., 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
peninsulastudios.wordpress.com
• City Arts of San Mateo Art Gallery at Peninsula Ballet Theater,
1880 S. Grant St., 1 p.m. to 7 p.m.
www.cityartsofsanmateo.org
• Neologian Art Gallery, 1027 S. Claremont St., 7 p.m. to 10
p.m.
www.neologianartgallery.com
• Arts Unity Movement, 149 S. B St., 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
artsunitymovement.com
• Scribble Me Happy, 411 S. B St., 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
www.scribblemehappy.com

Flora recently opened the Neologian Art
Gallery to the public in June where he hosts
life-drawing courses, which are hard to find
outside a university setting, Watt said.
Flora, a photographer whose works will
be on display, said he’s thrilled to now have
a venue where he can help showcase artists
from the area.
“I’ve been participating just because the
whole premise of my art gallery is to actually give artists a chance to expose themselves to the community as well as be more
accessible to the community,” Flora said. “I
can’t think of anything better than First
Friday to actually get that going.”

ing,” Watt said. “It’s really important for
artists to connect for our creativity, and this
has been a really amazing venue for that.”

For a map of San Mateo’s upcoming First
Friday
locations,
v isit
http://goo.gl/hrk aWB.

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WEEKEND JOURNAL

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Calendar
FRIDAY, DEC. 5
Lifetree Cafe Conversations: The
Next Generation. 9:15 a.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Conversation discussing
how the millennial generation —
people born between 1980 and 2000
— will change the world.
Complimentary snacks and beverages will be served. Free. For more
information call 854-5897.
Free First Friday. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. San
Mateo County History Museum, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. At 11 a.m.,
preschool children will be invited to
learn about the horse and its importance to historic transportation. At 2
p.m., museum docents will lead tours
of the museum for adults. Free. For
more information call 299-0104.
Get That Job! — Introduction to
LinkedIn. 11 a.m. South San Francisco
Public Library, 840 W. Orange Ave.,
South San Francisco. This session will
focus on learning how to use
LinkedIn, a popular social media website for job seekers and employments.
20th Annual Celebrity Legends Toy
Drive and Holiday Festival. 11 a.m.
to 7 p.m. Inside Sequoia Station, 1073
El Camino Real, Redwood City. For
more
information
go
to
www.hoskinsblackhistory.org.
Off the Grid. 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Devil’s
Canyon Brewery, 935 Washington St.,
San Carlos. A curated selection of food
trucks. For more information visit
www.OfftheGridSF.com
Friends of the Millbrae Library Big
Book and Media Sale. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Twice yearly sale to benefit
the Millbrae Library. $5 or friends
membership. For more information
call 697-7607.
Holiday party. Claremont Art
Studios, 1515 S. Claremont St., San
Mateo. Open to the public. For more
information email sarah@sarahsoward.com.
New exhibitions at the Pacific Art
League. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Pacific Art
League, 668 Ramona St., Palo Alto. PAL
will be hosting three exhibitions:
Winter Wonder, curated by Lisa
Ellsworth, a small works exhibition
and raffle and a solo exhibition featuring work by Isaias Sandoval. For more
information call 321-3891.
In Bethlehem Inn. 6:15 p.m. First
Presbyterian Church, 1500 Easton
Drive, Burlingame. Family dinner theater with a meal of exotic nuts,
cheeses, roast lamb, fruit, chicken and
other delicacies. $25 adults, $15 children. For more information call 3420875 or visit burlpres.org.
‘The Gift’ Opening Night and Gala.
7 p.m. NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston
Ave., Belmont. Includes a reception
following the opening night performance. $50 donation per adult, $25 per
child. For more information call 5083456.
It’s A Wonderful Life: A Live Radio
Christmas Play. 8 p.m. Crystal Springs
UMC, 2145 Bunker Hill Drive, San
Mateo. $10, but free for children under
11. Watch an entertaining ‘live’ 1940s
radio show version of this holiday
classic. For more information visit
http://www.csumchurch.com/wonderful-life-live-radio-christmas-playdec-571213/.
The Other Place by Sharr White
directed by Kimberly Mohne Hill. 8
p.m. Dragon Productions Theatre,
2120 Broadway, Redwood City. $30.
For tickets call 493-2006 ext. 2.
SATURDAY, DEC. 6
Breakfast with Santa Served Up at
Hillsdale Shopping Center. 8 a.m.
California Pizza Kitchen, 100 Hillsdale
Ave., San Mateo. $10 per person.
Tickets must be purchased in advance
and can be ordered from
www.brownpapertickets.com/event/
866240. For more information call
571-1029.
Practice SAT Test. 8:30 a.m. Aragon
High School, 900 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. Take a full-length
practice SAT test and get your scores
in critical reading, math and writing.
To register call 579-6180 or email
hello@campanile.us.
Rain Barrels Are A Productive Use
of This Week’s Rain. 9 a.m. to noon.
The Lodge, 40 Twin Pines Lane,
Belmont. An information session to
learn about how to install a rain barrel. Free. For more information call
599-1419.
Friends of the Millbrae Library Big
Book and Media Sale. 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Huge variety of books and
media for all ages and in a variety of
languages. Free. For more information
call 697-7607.
Holiday Traditions from Around the
World. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo
County History Museum, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Special free
holiday programs. Free admission. For
more information call 299-0104.

SALE
Continued from page 1

Holiday Traditions from Around the
World. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo
County History Museum, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Special free
holiday programs. Free admission. For
more information call 299-0104.
Winter Open Studio. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
16 Coalmine View, Portola Valley. Lee
Middleman will display recent work
exhibited in three recent national and
two regional competitions. Lee will
feature works influenced by his trips
to Korea and China. For more information go to www.LeeMiddleman.com.
Friends’ Holiday Sale. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Everything is
20-50 percent off. All proceeds benefit
the Belmont Library. For more information call 593-5650.
PENPEX Stamp Show. 10 a.m. to 5:30
p.m. Community Building, 1400
Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City.
Postage stamp show featuring 18
dealers, over 60 exhibits, with USPS on
site. Youth area with free stamps for
beginners. Free admission and parking. For more information call 3652956 or visit penpex.org.
Pescadero Christmas Craft Faire. 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. I.D.E.S. Hall, Stage Road,
Pescadero. Hand crafted items,
engraver, clothes and other things for
sale. For more information call Mary
Logsdon at 879-9018.
Golden Gate Trail Crew Volunteer
Workday. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Park and
Alamo streets, Moss Beach. Workday
to repair tread on the San Vicente
Trail. For more information and RSVP,
visit
parksconservancy.org/getinvolved/volunterr/drop-in-programs/golden-gate-trail-crew.html.
Millbrae
Historical
Society
Children’s Christmas Party. 10:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Millbrae Train
Museum at California and Murchison
Drives. There will be arts and crafts,
games, caroling and refreshments.
Free. For more information call 6971921.
Second Annual Art and Artifacts
Sale. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 1777 California
Drive, Burlingame. Find paintings,
prints, sculptures, art books, vintage
items and collectibles at the
Peninsula Museum’s Second Annual
Art and Artifacts Sale.
20th Annual Celebrity Legends Toy
Drive and Holiday Festival. 11 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Inside Sequoia Station, 1073
El Camino Real, Redwood City. From 2
p.m. to 4 p.m., bring a new
unwrapped toy and have your picture
taken with a celebrity guest. For more
information go to www.hoskinsblackhistory.org.
‘Never Too Late!’ 11 a.m. Menlo Park
City Council Chambers, 701 Laurel St.,
Menlo Park. Stagebridge’s talented
troupe of senior thespians promises
catchy songs, outrageous skits and
unpredictable fun. Free. For more
information call 330-2501.
Visit Santa at his house. Noon to 2
p.m. 760 Laurel St., San Carlos. For
more information call 802-4832.
Victorian Christmas. Noon to 3 p.m.
Lathrop House, 627 Hamilton St.,
Redwood City. Light refreshments
and tour. $3 donation requested. For
more information call 368-7062.
Home four the Holidays Adoption
Fair and Holiday Shop. Noon to 5
p.m. 3016 Rollison Road, Redwood
City. Bring cans of Friskies or Fancy
Feast canned food to donate. For
more information call 368-1365.
An Exhibit by the Peninsula
Chapter of the Women’s Caucus for
Art Reception. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Peninsula Art Institute, 1777 California
Drive, Burlingame. Free. For more
information call 692-2101 or visit
peninsulaartinstitute.org.
‘The Gift.’ 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. NDNU
Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
Free. For more information go to
www.christmascarolthegift.org.
West Bay Model Railroad Assn.
Holiday Show. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. 1090
Merrill St., Menlo Park, near Menlo
Park Train Station. Free. Donations
appreciated. For more information
call 322-0685.
‘The Nutcracker.’ 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.
San Mateo Performing Arts Center,
San Mateo. A ballet performance of
‘The Nutcracker’ by Peninsula Youth
Ballet. For more information and to
purchase tickets go to www.pyb.org.
Peninsula Women’s Chorus presents ‘Portal to the Season.’ 2:30 p.m.
St. Mark’s Episcopal, 600 Colorado
Ave., Palo Alto. Tickets are $30 for
adults and $10 for students and are
available at pwchorus.org or at the
door. For more information contact
Diane
Dragone
at
dianepwc@gmail.com or by calling
(415) 517-7307.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

property to the newly revamped
Granada Community Service District,
which pledged to build a community
center, but the fire district ultimately
offered the Harbor District Board of
Commissioners the best deal.
“[We’re] very excited. We’re moving
forward with the project and the plan is
to build a fire station somewhere on the
2.5 acres,” said Assistant Fire Chief
Paul Cole.
Station 40, which currently occupies
a more than 50-year-old building across
the street, would have a new home and
be able to offer a drive-thru bay at the
post office lot, Cole said. The fire district has the funds budgeted and the new
station is called for in its strategic
plan, Cole said.
Without sewer or water infrastructure,
the Harbor District’s Realtor Jan Gray
previously said no institution would
lend on the property and the buyer
would be paying cash.
Three were bidding for the property
that carries split-zoning requirements
— commercial and the unique El
Granada gateway, which requires a community benefit.
The somewhat mysterious Global
Quality Foods, a Hayward-based
seafood wholesaler that no one seems
to know much about, also sought ownership of the property.
The fire district had shown interest in
purchasing the property for years and
offered a few hundred thousand dollars
more than the Granada district, said
Commissioner Jim Tucker.
“The best deal for us was the fire district. It gave use the money we wanted
plus it was to a public agency that’s
involved in public service,” Tucker
said.

HEALTH
Continued from page 1
the most important and politically sensitive yardsticks for Obama’s health
care law, which offers subsidized private insurance to people who don’t
have access to coverage through their
jobs. Sharper premium hikes were common before it passed.
The modest average increases reported for 2015 mask bigger swings from
state to state, and even within regions
of a state. According to data released by
the administration, some communities
will still see double-digit hikes while
others are seeing decreases. Most are
somewhere in the middle.
“Prior to the Affordable Care Act taking place, we saw double-digit increases in health care costs in this country,”
said White House spokesman Josh

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

23

About 10 people spoke out at the
Harbor District board meeting with
hopes the Granada district would win
the bid and construct the unincorporated town’s first community center, said
Tom Mattusch, who will be sworn on to
the Harbor District board after winning
Commissioner Will Holsinger’s seat in
November.
“I’m just hoping the fire district can
make something that additionally
brings satisfaction to the community,”
Mattusch said. “There’s just been so
much of an outcry and so many people
speaking up for a community center.”
Cole said constructing a new station
is for the public.
“It’s an absolute benefit. There is no
question as to the benefit to the community. That fire station has served that
community well,” Cole said. “Locating
right across the street continues with
that ongoing benefit.”
With incumbents Holsinger and
Tucker leaving their posts, Mattusch
contends the Harbor District board
should have waited until he, newcomer
Nicole
David
and
re-elected
Commissioner Robert Bernardo were
sworn in Jan. 5.
The fire district was awarded the property with approval from Tucker,
Holsinger and Pietro Parravano, president of the Harbor District Board of
Commissioners, while Bernardo and
Commissioner Sabrina Brennan voted
against the sale.
Bernardo said it was a difficult decision and while he respects the fire district, would have preferred the Granada
district’s plans.
“You have two very capable agencies
with two missions that are equally
valid. You have one that’s public safety,
which is the fire district, and one that is
community serving, so I struggled with
this decision. But I personally felt that
sometimes you can’t always just look at
the money, you have to look at the

greatest benefit for the community. And
at the end of the day, that’s what tipped
the scale for me,” Bernardo said.
Mattusch said one might question if
the outcome would have been different
had the sale waited a month.
“The lot was [donated] in 1953 and
what difference would it have made if we
waited a few weeks. The one thing I
would have liked to see from all parties
was how they … were going to work
with the community to bring something that’s directly needed in El
Granada. We’re unincorporated out there
and a lot of people wanted a community
center for people to have classes.
There’s so much going on, there’s just
no place to put on some of these public
activities,” Mattusch said.
All might not be lost for the Granada
district as board President Matthew
Clark previously said there were informal discussions between his district
and fire district representatives about
sharing the large property.
Cole said he wouldn’t comment or
speculate on any possible partnership
and the fire district is focused on building a station.
“We’re very preliminary at this
point. The first thing was to acquire the
land and start working on the zoning,
then we’ll see if there’s something we
can do to allow us to maximize the use
of the property and if that does mean we
can accommodate other entities, that’s
one thing, but the primary purpose was
to put our station there,” Cole said.
Tucker, whose last meeting was
Wednesday after 16 years as a commissioner, said he hopes the property will
be used to its fullest.
“I understand they don’t need all that
land and I understand also, although I’m
not privy to it, that they’ve been talking to Granada,” Tucker said. “I’m hoping that they’ll work with Granada and
let Granada put in some kind of park or
something there.”

Earnest. “Those were routine.”
Many people who go back to the
website “will now find that their costs
are limited to only 5 percent on average,” he said, “a much lower cost
increase than was in place before the
Affordable Care Act.”
Even after Thursday’s report, the bottom line remains blurry.
Last year, the administration released
its analysis of premiums before the
start of open enrollment season. This
year’s snapshot came more than two
weeks after sign-ups had started and
covered 13 fewer states. Among the
missing states were two of the largest,
California and New York.
Last year’s report provided average
premiums for three types of plans
across 48 states — close to a national
number. This year’s report has no comparable statistic.
With both chambers of Congress
under Republican control next year, the
health care law will face even closer

scrutiny from opponents still pursuing
its repeal.
Nonetheless, industry experts said
the picture appears positive for consumers and the administration.
“Benchmark premiums going into
year two of the health law are very stable
nationally, driven largely by strong
competition among insurers,” said Larry
Levitt of the nonpartisan Kaiser Family
Foundation. “How the law is playing out
varies quite a bit across the country, with
premiums increasing in some areas but
actually going down in other places,
which is almost unheard of.”
Administration officials said that on
the whole, the market for individual
insurance has gotten better for consumers.
“In today’s marketplace, issuers are
competing for business,” Health and
Human Services Secretary Sylvia M.
Burwell said in a statement. “Returning
customers may find an even better deal
if they shop and save.”

24

COMICS/GAMES

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

DILBERT®

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 “Charlotte’s —”
4 Libras’ mo.
7 Hwys.
10 Yes, in Tokyo
11 “Mermaids” star
13 Fictional plantation
14 Big boat
15 Employ
16 White wader
17 Memory aid
19 Efficient
20 Fannie —
21 Spring month
23 Fuzzy fruit
26 Cuttlefish pigment
28 Misfortune
29 Boston — Party
30 Banana oil, e.g.
34 Corn coats
36 In the doldrums
38 Bullring shout
39 Raised the stakes
41 Deep black
42 Flower with a face

GET FUZZY®

44
46
47
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Everybody
Warbled
Ineffective one (2 wds.)
Faculty mem.
Mr. Sharif
Reunion crowd
Pakistan’s language
Taboo (hyph.)
Dog days in Dijon
Deli loaf
Pig’s digs
Understand

DOWN
1 Pow!
2 Merit
3 Ten-speed
4 LPGA star Lorena —
5 Takeout option
6 Garr of “Mr. Mom”
7 Torah reciter
8 Boring tool
9 Manuscript encl.
12 Summary
13 Glittering adornments

18
22
23
24
25
27
29
31
32
33
35
37
40
41
42
43
45
46
48
49
50
51

2001, to Augustus
Dappled
Elec. measure
Debt memo
Craven or Unseld
Move gingerly
Recipe amts.
Cargo unit
Isle of —
Breed of cat
Martial art (2 wds.)
Stubborn
Traffic cone
Prehistoric
Turn aside
Battery terminal
Director Mervyn —
Prod
Andy’s friend
Luau strummers
Give a ticket
Cypress feature

12-5-14

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2014
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Keep anyone
trying to persuade you to do something that goes
against your morals or beliefs at arm’s length.
Don’t give in to temptation or you will damage your
reputation and confidence.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Business and
pleasure will go hand-in-hand. You will make a
favorable impression on your peers with your
friendly and relaxed manner. Useful advice will
come from an unexpected source.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — You will be overtly
emotional to remarks or gestures made in your

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2014 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

THURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

presence. Step away from the situation before a
heated discussion breaks out. It’s better to retreat
than to have regrets.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Take time to have
some fun. Spend the day at a spa, take a hike or
listen to music. Time spent alone or with someone
you love will ease your jangled nerves.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Your earning potential
can increase if you are willing to learn new skills.
Take a close look at the qualifications you need to
land a top position and start the ball rolling.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Difficulties while
traveling will be aggravating. Keep a level head
during traffic delays or poor weather conditions.
It’s best to slow down and let everything around

12-05-14

Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

you unfold naturally.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Get out and interact
with people who appreciate your attributes and
stimulate your senses. Beneficial personal and
professional connections will be made if you network.
Share what you have to offer.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You can reduce your
stress level if you refuse to let others take advantage
of you. Following your intuition will enable you to
make the best choice.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Don’t be tempted to reveal
your personal secrets. Deal with unfinished projects
and chores. You will accomplish all you set out to do
and still have time left over for relaxation.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — The key to a current

situation can be resolved if you discuss your dilemma
with someone you trust and respect. The expertise
offered will ensure that you are on the right path.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Decisions regarding
your financial future should take top priority. Make a
list of everything you already have in place and set
realistic goals to achieve your desired outcome.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Deception is
evident. Someone will keep important information
from you. Don’t believe everything that you are told
or shown. Get the facts firsthand and you won’t
make a costly mistake.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

NOW HIRING!

welcomes applicants for our next hiring phase.
Seeking positive individuals with a traditional work ethic.
Join our new facility for the elderly in REDWOOD CITY.

110 Employment

110 Employment

CAREGIVERS

CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA

2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000

110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

CAREGIVERS
WANTED

in San Mateo and Redwood City. Call
(408)667-6994 or (408)667-6993.

t CAREGIVERS – Experience Only
t MED TECH – Experience Only
t MAINTENANCE/HANDY PERSON – On Call
t HOUSEKEEPING/LAUNDRY – English not required
t DISHWASHER/PREP COOK – English not required
t PART TIME COOK

Customer Service
Are you…..Dependable, friendly,
detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English
skills, a desire for steady
employment and employment
benefits?
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: 650-342-6978

25

110 Employment
KITCHEN -

NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff
$9.00 per hr.
Apply in Person at or
email resume to

info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

NOW HIRING!
Complete Senior Living welcomes applicants
for our next hiring phase. Seeking positive
individuals with a traditional work ethic.
Join our upscale and established facility
in SAN MATEO.

t CAREGIVERS – Experience Only
t LIVE IN or LIVE OUT – All Shifts

Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

NURSING -

NOW HIRING

Certified Nursing Assistants
(Must have Certificate)
$12 per hour
AM-PM Shifts available
Please apply in person
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required

RETAIL -

JEWELRY SALES
Full + Part +
Seasonal Positions
ALSO SEEKING
F/T ASST MGR
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
SOFTWARE Course Hero, Inc. located in Redwood
City, CA seeks Software Developer to
develop core apps on course-sharing
platform. BS in Comp Sci or Comp Eng
+1 year of exp. with PHP frameworks for
web app dev, JavaScript and frameworks, content mgmt system, databases
and SQL, production web servers and
Agile software dev. Send resume and
cover letter to: vchoi@coursehero.com.

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014
203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262926
The following person is doing business
as: Strive Swim School, 417 Grand Blvd.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered by the following owner: Austin Paul
Matthew Cuellar, 557 Antia Ln., Millbrae
CA 94030. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Austin Paul Matthew Cuellar /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/12/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/14, 11/21/14, 11/28/14, 12/05/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262910
The following person is doing business
as: 1) ITA-MED CO. 2) MEDBARN.COM,
310 Littlefield Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby registered
by the following owner: International
Trade Alliance, CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/02/1993
/s/ John Corden /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/10/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/14, 11/21/14, 11/28/14, 12/05/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262866
The following person is doing business
as: Concrete Couture Designs, 800 Polhemus Rd. #34, SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the following owner: Jonathan Ocon, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Jonathan Ocon /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/05/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/14, 11/21/14, 11/28/14, 12/05/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262843
The following person is doing business
as: Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 300
Pasteur Drive, STANFORD, CA 94305
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Stanford Health Care, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on October 9,
2014
/s/ Amir Dan Rubin /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/04/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/14, 11/21/14, 11/28/14, 12/05/14).

180 Businesses For Sale

For Sale
Mexican
Grill
Restaurant

in busy Redwood City plaza

$250,000
415-267-6952
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 530815
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Tracy Capulla Sevilla
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner: Tracy Capulla Sevilla filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Tracy Capulla Sevilla
Proposed Name: Tracy Capulla Bustamante
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December
10, 2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/28/2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/24/2014
(Published, 11/14/2014, 11/21/2014,
11/28/2014, 12/05/2014)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262908
The following person is doing business
as: Argentine Tango USA Offical Championship and Festival 1800 Bayshore,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered by the following owner: Andrea
Monica Monti, 2995 Melendy Dr., Apt 1,
San Carlos, CA 94070. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Andrea Monica Monti /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/07/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/14, 11/21/14, 11/28/14, 12/05/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262774
The following person is doing business
as: DarkNet BlackOps Intelligence, 334
Fifth Street, MONTARA, CA 94037 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
AFX Corp., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A
/s/ Celia M. Smith /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/29/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/14, 11/21/14, 11/28/14, 12/05/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262929
The following person is doing business
as: Care Patrol, 840 Wharfside Rd., SAN
MATEO, CA, 94404 is hereby registered
by the following owner: SLG Senior
Care, LLC, CA. The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Susan Gibson /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/12/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/14, 11/21/14, 11/28/14, 12/05/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262943
The following person is doing business
as: A & E Enterprises, 801 W. Santa Inez
Ave., Hillsborough, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Eve
Chan and Andrew Chan, same address.
The business is conducted by a Married
Couple. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
2009.
/s/ Eve Chan /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/13/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/14, 11/21/14, 11/28/14, 12/05/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262937
The following person is doing business
as: Sushi Yoshizumi, 325 E 4th Ave,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered by the following owner: Yoshizumi,
CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Akira Yoshizumi /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/12/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/14, 11/21/14, 11/28/14, 12/05/14).
LIEN SALE
On 12/21/2014 at 2259 SPRING
STREET REDWOOD CITY CA a Lien
Sale will be held on a 1955 CHEV VIN:
0379456F55B STATE: CA LIC: 8X02629
at 9am

HELP WANTED

SALES

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262630
The following person is doing business
as: Blue Orchid, 628 Macarthur Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered by the following owners: 1) Nina
Kirilova, 211 Elm Str #204, San Mateo,
CA 94401 2) Alona Kirilova, 1421 Bellevue Ave. #202, Burlingame, CA 94010
3) Doris Liu, 628 Macarthur Avenue, San
Mateo, CA 94402. The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Nina Kirilova /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/16/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/14, 11/21/14, 11/28/14, 12/05/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262868
The following person is doing business
as: ROUGE SALON, 1375 Burlingame
Ave., Suite 205, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the following owner: A&E Partnership LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Angela Monroy /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/05/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/14, 11/21/14, 11/28/14, 12/05/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263035
The following person is doing business
as: J.D. Media Solutions, 134 Elm St
#307, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: John
Drummond, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/ John Drummond /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/20/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/2114, 11/28/14, 12/05/14, 12/12/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263027
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Golden Bear Media, 2) Design
Mastery, 55 W. 5th Ave #12D, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Brian David Klackle,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/ Brian Klackle /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/19/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/2114, 11/28/14, 12/05/14, 12/12/14).

The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:

EVENT MARKETING SALES

TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES

Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.

We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.

To apply for either position,
please send info to

jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call

650-344-5200.

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

210 Lost & Found

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262953
The following person is doing business
as: Kiddoz, 1150 El Camino Real SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby registered
by the following owner: East West Imports & Exports LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Company The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Rasha Mohamed /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/18/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/2114, 11/28/14, 12/05/14, 12/12/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262924
The following person is doing business
as: David’s Dental Lab, 2613 Gellert Dr,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
is hereby registered by the following
owner: David S. Hanhan, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ David Hanhan /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/12/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/05/14, 12/12/14, 12/19/14, 12/26/14).

FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers
belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14.
Call 650 490-0921 - Leave message if no
answer.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262742
The following person is doing business
as: Sur Studios, 45 Big Tree Rd, WOODSIDE, CA 94062 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Brittney Andrews,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on 08/05/2014.
/s/ Brittney Andrews/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/27/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/2114, 11/28/14, 12/05/14, 12/12/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263145
The following person is doing business
as: SC Storage, 1731 Leslie Storage,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402. is hereby registered by the following owner: 1731 Leslie Street LLC. The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Spencer Covey /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/22014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/05/14, 12/12/14, 12/19/14, 12/26/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263008
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Caber Hill Advisors, 2) Bay Capital
Commerical, 36 W. Bellevue Ave, SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: David Howarth,
same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ David Howarth /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/18/14. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/2114, 11/28/14, 12/05/14, 12/12/14).

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
General Notice Of
Partnership Dissolution
Please be advised that the partnership
between Stephen Cohn, Gary Cohn, and
Lori Cohn (aka Lori Arkin) and known as
LSG Properties, doing business at 1408
Chapin Avenue Suite 4, Burlingame, Ca.
94010 will be dissolved by mutual consent of the partners as of December 31,
2014.
1. All claims against the assets of the
partnership must be made in writing and
include the claim amount, basis and origination date.
2. The deadline for submitting claims is
March 15, 2015.
3. Any claims that are not received by
the partnership prior to the date set forth
above will not be recognized.
4. Debtors are requested to pay all outstanding obligations no later than fifteen
days from the date of this notice. Payments should be made to Stephen Cohn
and/or LSG Properties.
5. All claims and payments must be sent
to 1408 Chapin Avenue, Suite 4, Burlingame, California, 94010.
Dated: December 3, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263100
The following person is doing business
as: eQ, 4100 East Third Ave, Suite 201,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby registered by the following owner: Special
Counsel, Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Diana R. Karabelas /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/26/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/04/14, 12/11/14, 12/18/14, 12/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262826
The following person is doing business
as: Virtuous Water Drops, 395 Larkspur
Dr, E. PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Arturo
Abad-Aviles, same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Arturo Abad-Aviles /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/3/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/05/14, 12/12/14, 12/19/14, 12/26/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263150
The following person is doing business
as: W & D Educational, 3338 Countryside Drive, SAN MATEO, CA 94403. is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Huiping Liao, same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Huiping Liao /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/2/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/05/14, 12/12/14, 12/19/14, 12/26/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #263065
The following person is doing business
as: Maheras Wealth Management Inc.,
155 Bovet Rd Suite 455, SAN MATEO,
CA 94402. is hereby registered by the
following owner: Maheras Wealth Management Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Leonidas Maheras /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/24/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/05/14, 12/12/14, 12/19/14, 12/26/14).
LIEN SALE
On 12/21/2014 at 233 RYAN WY S. SAN
FRANCISCO CA a Lien Sale will be held
on
a
2009
FORD
VIN:
2FMDK38C19BA35150 STATE: UNK
LIC: NO PLATE at 9am

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
General Notice Of
Partnership Dissolution
Please be advised that the partnership
between Stephen & Andrea Cohn and
Gary Cohn known as GSA Properties,
doing business at 1408 Chapin Avenue
Suite 4, Burlingame, Ca. 94010 will be
dissolved by mutual consent of the partners as of December 31, 2014.
1. All claims against the assets of the
partnership must be made in writing and
include the claim amount, basis and origination date.
2. The deadline for submitting claims is
March 15, 2015.
3. Any claims that are not received by
the partnership prior to the date set forth
above will not be recognized.
4. Debtors are requested to pay all outstanding obligations no later than fifteen
days from the date of this notice. Payments should be made to Stephen Cohn
and/or GSA Properties.
5. All claims and payments must be sent
to 1408 Chapin Avenue, Suite 4, Burlingame, California, 94010.
Dated: December 3, 2014

210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT (415)377-0859 REWARD!

FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

LOST CELL PHONE Metro PCS Samsung. Light pink cover, sentimental value. Lost in Millbrae on 9/30/14 Reward
offered. Angela (415)420-6606
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shopping Center, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.

Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

WW1

$12.,

JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

27

Books

296 Appliances

298 Collectibles

302 Antiques

304 Furniture

306 Housewares

NASCAR BOOKS - 1998 - 2007 Annuals, 50th anniversary, and more. $75.
(650)345-9595

WHIRLPOOL DEHUMIDIFIER. Almost
new. located coastside. $75 650-8676042.

UPPER DECK 1999 baseball cards #1535. $85 complete mint set Steve, San
Carlos, 650-255-8716.

MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038

HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

297 Bicycles

299 Computers

GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hardly Used $80 (650)293-7313

DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

TIME LIFE Nature Books, great condition
19 different books. $5.00 each OBO
(650)580-4763

295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166

296 Appliances
BREVILLE JUICER good cond. great
but $45. (650)697-7862

298 Collectibles

K'NEX BUILDING ideas $30.
(650)622-6695

1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833

LEGO DUPLO Set ages 1 to 5. $30
(650)622-6695

46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

1980 SYLVANIA 24" console television
operational with floor cabinet in excellent
condition. $35. (650) 676-0974.

PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$49 (650)591-9769

BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edison Mazda Lamps. Both still working $50 (650)-762-6048

RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878

ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858

CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763

COIN HOLDERS, used. 146 plastic
tubes. 40 albums. Cost $205. Sell $95
OBO. (650)591-4141

CHICKEN ROASTERS (4) vertical, One
pulsing chopper, both unopened, in original packaging, $27.(650) 578 9208

COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858

FRIDGE, MINI, unopened, plugs, cord,
can use for warmer also $40, (650) 5789208

MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.

PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR(415)346-6038

$40.,

SEARS KENMORE sewing machine in a
good cabinet style, running smoothly
$99. 650-756-9516.

MICKEY MINI Mouse Vintage 1997 Lenox Christmas plate Gold Trim, Still in
Box $65. (650)438-7345
NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260
OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
SILVER
LEGACY
Casino
four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good condition, $10. each, (650)571-5899

SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35. (650)558-8142
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, SOLD!

302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
73 HAPPY Meal toys. 1990's vintage, in
the
original
unopened
packages.
$100.(650)596-0513
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE MAYTAG Ringer type Washing Machine, (1930-35 era) $85.
650-583-7505
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 SEC nickname
5 Seating choice
10 Skills
14 Islamic leader
15 What recon may
provide
16 Famille member
17 Baseball, vis- vis jai alai?
19 Award for Jessica
Tandy
20 Poetic
preposition
21 Short time,
shortly
22 Wood shop tool
24 Scoff at
26 Hooked on
Bach company
27 GE range, vis- vis an Easy-Bake
toy?
33 Spread
36 A Challenge for
the Actor author
37 Commercial
ending?
38 Appear
dramatically
39 Hemingway and
others
40 Letters on a
cross
41 Tulsa sch.
42 Shell rival
43 Ryan of
Bones
44 SpongeBob s
underwear, vis- vis Mickey s?
47 __ block
48 Certain
evergreen seed
52 One taking a
shot
55 Grub
57 One or more
58 Sin City actress
59 Jeep, vis- -vis a
Cadillac?
62 Buck
63 Its second
movement
translates to
Play of the
Waves
64 First name in
design
65 Socks
66 Delight
67 Hill workers

VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

CHAMPION JUICER, very good, coral
color $25. Phone 650-345-7352

FRUIT PRESS, unopened, sturdy, make
baby food, ricer, fruit sauces, $20.00,
(650) 578 9208

300 Toys

STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65 SOLD!

DOWN
1 Human, e.g.
2 Love abroad
3 Auto attachment?
4 __ being
unreasonable?
5 Like some
rescues
6 Picnic
playwright
7 Mus. direction
8 10-Down vehicle
9 Ins
10 Mission program
11 Self-named
sitcom
12 Cut
13 Percolate
18 Fund
23 Large Hadron
Collider acronym
25 It s checked when
it s done
26 Capital of
Rwanda
28 Inferior
29 Piglike animal
30 Grape site
31 Poet friend of
T.S.
32 10-Down first
name
33 Challenging
roommate

34 1989 Lawn-Boy
acquirer
35 Gravy base
39 Easily moved
40 Part of MIT: Abbr.
42 Yom Kippur War
prime minister
43 Helpful
45 Film with Manny
the Mammoth
46 Complete
49 Heart of Georgia
50 Sign into law

51 Wrap relatives
52 Get money for
53 __ Rhapsody :
Brahms vocal work
54 Many CEOs have
them
55 Stone of The
Help
56 Miffed, with in
60 Flier with Chicago
H.Q.
61 Kelly Clarkson
label

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

303 Electronics
Very

BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767

LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429

NEW PORTABLE electric fan wind machine, round, adjustable— $15
Cell phone: (650)580-6324
SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUUM EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

307 Jewelry & Clothing
AMETHYST RING Matching earings in
14k gold setting. $165. (650)200-9730

OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167

ENGRAVED POCKET Watch, Illinois
watch company 1911. Works. $85.
(650)298-8546 PM only

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996

OVAL LIVING room cocktail table. Wood
with glass 48x28x18. Retail $250.
$75 OBO (650)343-4461

LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436

FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767

PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061

308 Tools

PATIO TABLE 5’x5’ round, Redwood,
rollers, 2 benches, good solid
condition $30 San Bruno (650)588-1946

BLACK AND Decker Electrical 17"
EDGE TRIMMER $20. (650)349-9261

INFINITY FLOOR speakers ( a pair) in
good condition $ 60. (650)756-9516. Daly City.
JVC DVD Player and video cassette recorder. NEW. $80. (650)345-5502
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PRINTER DELL946, perfect, new black
ink inst, new color ink never installed,
$75. 650-591-0063

PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337

WESTINGHOUSE 28" flat screen TV
LCD with Remote. works perfect, little
used.. $99. 6503477211.

ROCKING CHAIR, decorative wood /
armrest, it swivels rocks & rolls $99.
(650)592-2648

WESTINGHOUSE 32” Flatscreen TV,
model#SK32H240S, with HDMI plug in
and remote, excellent condition. Two
available, $175 each. (650)400-4174

SOFA - excelleNT condition. 8 ft neutral
color $99 OBO (650)345-5644
SOLD WOOD TV Tables, set of 4 + rack,
perfect cond $29 650-595-3933

304 Furniture

SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274

2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545

STEREO CABINET with 3 black shelves
42" x 21" x 17" exc cond $30. (650)7569516

3 PIECE cocktail table with 2 end tables,
glass tops. good condition, $99.
(650)574-4021l
BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safely.$99 650-375-1414
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549
CHANDELIER 3 Tier,
$95 (650)375-8021

made in Spain

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.00
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313

STURDY OAK TV or End Table. $35.
Very good condition. 30" x 24".
(650)861-0088
TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141
TABLE, OLD ENGLISH draw-leaf, barley twist legs, 36” square. $350
(650)574-7387

BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SKILL saw "craftman"7/1/4"
heavy duty never used in box $45.
(650)992-4544
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer. Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
HUSKY POWER inverter 750wtts.adaptor/cables unused AC/DC.$50.
(650)992-4544
HYDRAULIC floor botle jack 10" H.
plus. Ford like new. $25.00 botlh
(650)992-4544

TEA/ UTILITY Cart, $15. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057

MICROMETER MEASUREMENT brake/
drum tool new in box $25. (650)9924544

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

NEW FOLDING Hand Truck, 100 lb capacity, compact. lite, $29, 650-595-3933

TORCHIERE $35. (650) 631-6505

POWER MITER Saw, like new, with
some attachments $150 (650)375-8021

UPHOLSTERED SIDE office chairs (2).
3ft X 2ft, $85 each, (650)212-7151
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648

VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517
WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.
WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429

310 Misc. For Sale

WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent condition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712

EXECUTIVE DESK 60”, cherry wood,
excellent condition. $275 (650)212-7151

WHITE CABINETS (2) - each has a
drawer & 1 door with 2 shelves.
36x21x18. $25 each. (650)867-3257

CHRISTMAS TREE, 7.5 foot, $30. 650348-5229

EXECUTIVE DESK Chair, upholstered,
adjustable height, excellent condition,
$150 (650)212-7151

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169
ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021

FADED GOLD antique framed mirror,
25in x 33in— $15 Cell number:
(650)580-6324
GRACO 40" x28" x 28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City

12/05/14

LIVING & Dining Room Sets. Mission
Style, Trestle Table w/ 2 leafs & 6
Chairs, Like new $600 obo
(831)768-1680

COMBO COLOR T.V. 24in. Toshiba with
DVD and VHS Flat Screen Remote 06
$40: (650)580-6324

DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

xwordeditor@aol.com

LEATHER couch, about 6ft long— dark
brown $45 Cell number: (650)580-6324

HIGH END childrens bedroom set,
white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mattress (twin size) in great condition. Includes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with additional 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858

WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65.00 (650)504-6058
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
WOOD ROCKING chair with foam and
foot rest; swivels; very comfortable and
relaxing. $45 (650)580-6324

306 Housewares
8 SKEWERS, unopened, for fondue,
roasting marshmallows, or fruit, ($7.00)
(650) 578 9208
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037

CLASSIC COUNTRY MUSIC" Smithsonian Collection of Recordings, 4 audiotapes,
annotation booklet. $20.
(650)574-3229
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
FOLK SONG anthology: Smithsonian
Collection of Recordings, 4 audiotapes +
annotation booklet. $20 (650)574-3229
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840 leave a clear Message
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LIGHT GREEN Barbar Chair, with foot
rest good condition $80 Call Anita
(650)303-8390
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",
cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
POSTAL MAIL Box. Classy metal locking box for pillar mounting.
$100.
(650)245-7517
SEWING MACHINE Kenmore, blonde
cabinet, $25 (650)355-2167
STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720

By Marti DuGuay-Carpenter
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

12/05/14

VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014
310 Misc. For Sale

318 Sports Equipment

620 Automobiles

WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208

WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.

311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172
ROLAND GW-7 Workstation/Keyboard,
with expression pedal, sustain pedal, and
owner’s manual. $500. (415)706-6216
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
DOG CRATE like new, i Crate, two
door, divider, 30"L 19"w 21"H $40.
650 345-1234
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
GLASS LIZARD cage unused , rock
open/close window 21"W x 12"H x 8"D,
$20. (650)992-4544
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300
(650)245-4084
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large, Excellent
Condition, $275 (650)245-4084
PET FURNITURE covers. 1 standard
couch 2 lounge chairs. Like new $70
OBO (650)343-4461

315 Wanted to Buy
WE BUY

322 Garage Sales

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

FORD ‘07 500 Limited. Very good condition. Heated power seats. 130,000
miles. 1 owner. Black/Black leather.
$6,000 cash obo. SOLD!

335 Rugs
AREA RUG 2X3 $15. (650) 631-6505

340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598

345 Medical Equipment
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER HUGO Elite Rollerator, $50
(650)591-8062
WALKER WITH basket $30. Invacare
Excellent condition (650)622-6695

MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461

625 Classic Cars
90 MASERATI, 2 Door hard top and convertible. New paint Runs good. $4500
(650)245-4084
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,999 /OBO (650)364-1374

DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374

BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003

400 Broadway - Millbrae

316 Clothes

Call (650)344-5200

BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $65 (650)357-7484
NEW MAN'S Wristwatch sweep second
hand, +3 dials, $29 650-595-3933
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

HOUSE FOR Free
Redwood city home,
103 Wilson St.
You move it you can have it for $1.00
vgonzalez@greystar.com

440 Apartments
BELMONT – 1 BR, 2 BR, and 3BR
apartments No Smoking No Pets
(650)591-4046

470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink, $65. (650)348-6955

$49.- $59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax

318 Sports Equipment
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.
(650)637-0930
CASINO CHIP Display. Frame and ready
to hang, $99.00 or best offer.
650.315.3240
G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$15.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
GERMAN ARMY Helmet WW2, 4 motorbike DOT $59 650-595-3933
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 SOLD!
NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260
NORDIC TRACK
(650)333-4400

Pro,

$95.

POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

Call
$99

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804

Travel Inn, San Carlos

Tom 650.834.2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
License # 752250

620 Automobiles

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!

TWO SOCCER balls -- $10.00 each
(hardly used) (650)341-5347

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

TWO SPOTTING Scopes, Simmons and
Baraska, $80 for both (650)579-0933

CHEVROLET ‘09 Impala LS Sedan,
3,000 miles. Brand new car smell,
$12,000 obo. San mateo Location,
(321)914-5550

Since 1985

Decks & Fences

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

DRYWALL /
PLASTER / STUCCO
Patching w/
Texture Matching
Invisible Repair

Construction

(650)533-0187
Lic# 947476

650 RVs

Small jobs only
Local references
Free Estimates
30 years in Business

(650)248-4205
Electricians

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

COLEMAN LARAMIE
pop-up camper, Excellent Condition,
$2,250. Call (415)515-6072

650-322-9288

670 Auto Parts

for all your electrical needs

1961-63 OLDS F-85 Engine plus many
heads, cranks, Int., Manifold & Carbs. All
$500 (650)348-1449

ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

2006 CADILLAC Brake rotors, 4 available, $15 each (650)340-1225

ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs

2006 CADILLAC CTS-V Factory service
manuals, volumes 1 thru 3, $100
(650)340-1225

GPS PORTABLE Navigation- Moov 310.
Works great. Dashboard holder, recharging cord, 3" screen. $20. 650-654-9252

TWO BASKET balls - $10.00 each
(hardly used) (650)341-5347

WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878

MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
(650)670-2888

Mention Daily Journal

'06 MERCEDES AMG CL-63.. slate
gray, great condition, 1 owner, complete
dealer maintenance records available.
8,000 miles of factory warranty left. car
can be seen in Fremont...Best offer. Call
(408)888-9171
or
email:
nakad30970@aol.com

t Walkways
t Driveways
t 1BUJPT
t $PMPSFE
t "HHSFHBUF
t #MPDL 8BMMT
t 3FUBJOJOH XBMMT
t 4UBNQFE $PODSFUF
t 0SOBNFOUBM DPODSFUF
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Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283

(650) 593-3136

by Greenstarr
www.greenstarr.net

Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos

Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto

VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

Cleaning

Rambo
Concrete
Works

Concrete

381 Homes for Sale

Rooms For Rent

FLOORING - Carolina Pine, 1x3 T and
G, approximately 400+ sq. ft. $650. Call
(415)516-4964

650-294-3360

AAA CONCRETE DESIGN

317 Building Materials
CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041

or call

Construction

Drywall

ALPINESTAR JEANS Tags Attached
Twin Stitched Knee Protection Never
used Blue/Grey Sz34 $65 (650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975

Concrete

1966 CHEVELLE 396 motor. Standardbore block. Standard domed pistons,
rods, crank cam only. 360 HP, code
T0228EJ $600, (650)293-7568

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

bestbuycabinets.com

640 Motorcycles/Scooters

1973 FXE Harley Shovel Head 1400cc
stroked & balanced motor. Runs perfect.
Low milage, $6,600 Call (650)369-8013

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

t
Free showroom
design consultation & quote
t
BELOW HOME
DEPOT PRICES
t
PLEASE VISIT

1964 HARLEY DAVIDSON FHL Panhead (motor only) 84 stoker. Complete
rebuild. Many new parts.Never run. Call
for details. $6,000. Jim (650) 293-7568

379 Open Houses

List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.

Cabinetry

HONDA ‘96 LX SD all power, complete,
runs. $3,700 OBO, (650)481-5296 - Joe
Fusilier

630 Trucks & SUV’s

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

650-697-2685

DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$3,500 OBO (650)481-5296

Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing

Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952

CAR TOW chain 9' $35 (650)948-0912

HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRES 4 plus one spare. Finned rims,
165 SR15 four hole. $150 obo.
(650)922-0139
TONNEAU COVER Brand new factory,
hard, folding, vinyl. Fits 2014 Sierra 6.6
$475 (650)515-5379

680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

Gardening

Hardwood Floors

CALL NOW FOR
AUTUMN LAWN
PREPARATION

HARDWOOD FLOORING

A+ Member BBB • Since 1975

800-300-3218
408-979-9665

(415)971-8763

Sprinklers and irrigation
Pressure washing, rock gardens,
and lots more!
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

Hauling

Painting

Flamingo’s Flooring

SHOP
AT HOME

WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.

CARPET
LUXURY VINYL TILE
SHEET VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
Contact us for a
FREE In-Home
Estimate

650-655-6600

info@flamingosflooring.com
www.flamingosflooring.com
We carry all major brands!

Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate

Lic. #479564

New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY

(650)556-9780
OSCAR RAIN GUTTERS

• Gutters and downspouts • Rain
gutter repair • New Installation
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates

(650)669-1453
(650)302-7791
Lic# 910421

Handy Help
CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES
• Fences • Decks
• Concrete Work • Pebbles
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling
Free Estimates

License 619908

HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766

(650)740-8602
PACIFIC COAST

CONSTRUCTION & PAINTING

• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting

Call Joe

(650)701-6072
Lic# 979435

Family business, serving the
Peninsula for over 30 years

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

• Large

TAPIAROOFING.NET

(650)341-7482

NATE LANDSCAPING

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

* Tree Service * Paint
* Fence Deck
* Pruning & Removal
* New Lawn * Irrigation
* All Concrete
* Ret. Wall * Pavers
* Sprinkler System
* Yard Clean-Up
& Haul

Free Estimate

CHEAP
HAULING!

650.353.6554
Lic. #973081

Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

FREE ESTIMATES
(650)361-8773

by Greenstarr

• Yard clean up - attic,
basement
• Junk metal removal
including cars, trucks and
motorcycles
• Demolition
• Concrete removal
• Excavation
• Swimming pool removal

Tom 650.834.2365
Chris 415.999.1223
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
License # 752250

Painting
A+ PAINTING

Chris’s Hauling

Since 1985

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

Free
Estimates
Mention

Tile

JZ TILE

Design & Installation
All phases of tile & stone
Call for free estimate

John Zerille
(650)638-0565

20% WINTER DISCOUNT
Through Jan 2015
Thomas Cady, President

San Mateo
650-952-7587

www.paintsanfrancisco.me

JON LA MOTTE

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

CA Lic #670794

Plumbing
ECONOMY PLUMBING
Fast Free Estimate
24 Hour Emergency Service
$48.88 Drain & Sewer
Cleaning Special
(650)731-0510
MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

FRANK’S HAULING
Junk and Debris
Furniture, bushes,
concrete and more

&

Pruning

Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Landscaping

Junk & Debris Clean Up

• Trimming

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers

Free Estimates

CHAINEY HAULING

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000

FULLY INSURED / LICENSED & BONDED

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

A+ BBB Rating

Service

• Shaping

Screens

$40 & UP
HAUL

Hillside Tree

Dry Rot, Gutters & Down Spout Repair

LICENSE # 729271

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

Electrical and
General home repair
(650)341-0100
(408)761-0071

ROOFING
– SERVING THE PENINSULA –

AAA RATED!

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

HANDYMAN

TAPIA

(650) 367-8795

Hauling

Gutters

O.K.’S RAINGUTTER

Tree Service

NICK MEJIA PAINTING

KO-AM

Lic. #794899

Flooring

Roofing

29

Window Washing

GUTTER
CLEANING

Tree Service

Yardby Greenstarr
Boss
www.greenstarr.net
www.yardboss.net

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t 4XJNNJOH QPPM SFNPWBM

Tom 650.834.2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
License # 752250

Since 1985

Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

Art

Dental Services

Food

Health & Medical

Legal Services

Retirement

PORTRAITS BY HADI

RUSSO DENTAL CARE

SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR

BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

LEGAL

Independent Living, Assisted Living, and Memory Care. full time R.N.

Beautiful portraits by
experienced sketch artist. Pen &
Ink on 18”x 24” sketch paper.
Singles, couples, families.
Makes a wonderful gift. Can
create a sketch from any photo

(650)283-6836
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com

Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

Food

AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi &
Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212

CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo

Lunch• Dinner• Wknd Breakfast
OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

Financial

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

(650)372-0888

FREE REPORT
How to Reduce or Eliminate Your
Exposure to the 10
Biggest Portfolio Killers
650-730-6175
Burt Williamson - PlanPrep.com
CA Insurance Lic # 0D33315
Licensed professional will be
charged $1,000 in advance for a
copy of this report

RETIREMENT
PLAN ANALYSIS

Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

401(k) & IRA & 403(b)
(650)458-0312
New Stage Investment Group
Hans Reese is a Registered Representative with, and securities offered
through, LPL Financial,
Member FINRA/SIPC

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F

UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

(650) 295-6123

1221 Chess Drive Foster City

Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

EYE EXAMINATIONS

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE

Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com

www.steelheadbrewery.com

Furniture

Dental Services
ALBORZI, DDS, MDS, INC.

$500 OFF INVISALIGN TREATMENT
a clear alternative to braces even for
patients who have
been told that they were not invisalign
candidates
235 N SAN MATEO DR #300,
SAN MATEO

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo

(650)342-4171

www.sfpanchovillia.com

MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

RENDEZ VOUS
CAFE

Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

Holiday Gifts and Cold Beer
until 9PM weekdays !

106 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo

Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin

2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

CALIFORNIA

STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES

(650)591-3900

Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

(650)574-2087

legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

Loans

SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental

Marketing

GROW

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com

Massage Therapy

ASIAN MASSAGE

$55 per Hour

Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City

(650)556-9888

Housing

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR

Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY

We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo
(near Marriott Hotel)

Please call to RSVP

(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com

COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $19.99

Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame

(650)389-2468

HEALING MASSAGE
• Newly remodeled
• New Masseuses every two
weeks

$50/Hr. Special
2305-A Carlos St.,
Moss Beach
(Cash Only)

OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY

Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)

(650)212-2966

Insurance

BLUE SHIELD OF
CALIFORNIA

www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Please call us at (650)742-9150 to
schedule a tour, to pursue your lifelong dream.
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway
Millbrae, Ca 94030
www.greenhillsretirement.com

Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY

Where every child is a gift from God

K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco

(650)588-6860

ww.hillsidechristian.com

REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA

Sign up for the free newsletter

Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos

DOCUMENTS PLUS

1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com

Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS

We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

650-348-7191

Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Bureau of Real Estate

Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

CARE ON CALL
24/7 Care Provider
www.mycareoncall.com
(650)276-0270
1818 Gilbreth Rd., Ste 127
Burlingame
CNA, HHA & Companion Help

Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WORLD

Experts see Korean
parallels in Sony hack
By Brandon Bailey and Youkyung Lee
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEOUL, South Korea — Some cybersecurity experts say they’ve found striking
similarities between the code used in the
hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment and
attacks blamed on North Korea which targeted South Korean companies and government agencies last year.
Sony is working with the FBI and
Silicon Valley security firm FireEye to
investigate the attacks that apparently
gave access to unreleased movies as well
as personnel records, technical documents
and other material. It has not commented
on any Korean connection, except to deny
a report Wednesday that it was poised to
announce such a link. The FBI and FireEye
also had no comment Wednesday.
But three independent researchers told
the Associated Press there are intriguing
signs of a North Korean link to the attack,
even as others warned it’s difficult to make
a definitive connection.
Analysts said they were able to examine
code that was shared online after the FBI
sent a flash alert to businesses this week,
warning about a new threat from “destructive malware.” While the FBI alert did not
mention Sony Pictures by name,
researchers said the alert listed Internet
Protocol addresses that led them to samples of malware and references to Sony’s
internal network and passwords.
“We’ve seen it and it has a number of
similarities to the attack code used in
March 2013 during ‘Dark Seoul, ’” said
Tom Kellermann, chief cybersecurity officer for Trend Micro, a Japanese security
company with operations in the United
States. “Dark Seoul” refers to attacks last
March and in June 2013 on South Korean

“There are strong indications
of North Korean involvement.
All roads lead to Rome here.”
— Tom Kellermann, chief
cybersecurity officer for Trend Micro

companies and government servers, which
the South Korean government blamed on
the North.
Kellermann stopped short of saying the
attack that crippled Sony’s internal computer systems last week was definitely the
work of North Korea. But he said, “There
are strong indications of North Korean
involvement. All roads lead to Rome here.”
Speculation about a North Korean link
to the Sony hacking has centered on that
country’s angry denunciation of an upcoming Sony comedy film, in which two
American journalists are sent to North
Korea to assassinate its leader Kim Jong
Un. North Korea has threatened “merciless” retaliation for the movie, saying its
release would be an “act of war that we will
never tolerate.”
If the North Korean government were
involved in the Sony hack, it would be a
departure from the majority of high-profile
computer hacks in recent years, which
have been blamed on criminal groups
seeking financial data or other valuable
information. “It’s a harbinger of a new era
of hacking, one that’s going to be far more
problematic,” said Kellermann.
It would also make the Sony hack the
first known major North Korean cyber
assault targeted outside South Korea. Seoul
has recently stepped up the military’s
cyber warfare capabilities to better
respond to what it sees as a growing cyber
threat from Pyongyang.

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

Israel’s election a
referendum on Netanyahu

31

Around the world

JERUSALEM — The coming Israeli election amounts to a referendum on Benjamin
Netanyahu — hard-headed defender of Israel
to some, the man who buried dreams of
peace to others.
Early polls suggest Netanyahu, an enigmatic leader who has already served three
terms as prime minister, is likely to be
returned for a fourth on March 17. But new
developments, especially the emergence of
an array of unpredictable centrist parties,
make things difficult to predict.
Under Netanyahu, Israel is a nation in
bunker mode: The mindset is one of furrowed
brows, distrust of outsiders, and vigilance
against anti-Semitism. Despite some ideological feints, he and his Likud Party essentially represent continued occupation and
settlement of the West Bank — a territory
captured in the 1967 war that is the heartland of the would-be Palestinian state.

U.S. troops have immunity in Iraq
BAGHDAD — Washington has an agreement with Baghdad on privileges and immunities for the growing number of troops
based in Iraq who are helping in the fight
against the Islamic State group, the new

U.S. ambassador said Thursday.
In an exclusive interview with the
Associated Press, Stuart Jones said Prime
Minister Haider al-Abadi has given assurances that U.S. troops will receive immunity from prosecution. Under Iraq’s former
Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, that issue
was a major sticking point, ultimately leading to the decision to withdraw all remaining U.S. troops in late 2011.

Allies promise to support
Afghanistan beyond war
LONDON — The United States, Britain
and other allies promised Thursday not to
abandon Afghanistan’s new government,
and the country’s president said “peace is a
top priority” as international security missions end and Taliban attacks surge.
At a one-day meeting of envoys from
more than 60 countries, Afghan President
Ashraf Ghani said observers who had predicted doom for Afghanistan as the international military presence wound down were
wrong.
“History will not be repeated. We have
overcome the past,” Ghani told diplomats at
the end of the conference.

New England Lobster and
The Daily Journal
PRESENT THE TENTH ANNUAL

PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest

Week Fourteen
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 12/5/14
ROAD TEAM

HOME TEAM

ROAD TEAM

HOME TEAM

Baltimore

Miami

St. Louis

Washington

Indianapolis

Cleveland

Buffalo

Denver

Carolina

New Orleans

Kansas City

Arizona

Pittsburgh

Cincinnati

San Francisco

Oakland

Tampa Bay

Detroit

Seattle

Philadelphia

Houston

Jacksonville

New England

San Diego

N.Y. Jets

Minnesota

Atlanta

Green Bay

N.Y. Giants

Tennessee

TIEBREAKER: Atlanta @ Green Bay__________
How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks’ games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point total
on the Monday night game of the week. If there’s a tie on that total, then a random drawing will
determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certificates to New England
Lobster and Redwood General Tire. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pick’em Contest is free to play. Must
be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
What is the deadline?
All mailed entries must be postmarked by the Friday prior to the weekend of games, you may
also drop off your entries to our office by Friday at 5 p.m. sharp.
Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many
times as you like using photocopied entry forms. Multiple original entry forms will be discarded.
You may also access entry entry forms at www.scribd.com/smdailyjournal

NAME ____________________________________
AGE _____________________________________
CITY _____________________________________
PHONE ___________________________________

824 Cowan Road, Burlingame
t&BUFSZ  

t.BSLFU  

&"5&3:01&/:
Monday - Sunday 11:00 a.m. - 9 p.m.
."3,&501&/
Monday - Sunday 9:00 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Mail or drop off by 12/5/14 to:
Pigskin Pick’em, Daily Journal,
800 S. Claremont Street, #210,
San Mateo, CA 94402
The Daily Journal will not use
your personal information for
marketing purposes. We respect
your privacy.

We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted.
One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State & Local taxes associated with the receipt or
use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without
warranty of any kind, express or implied. The Daily Journal reserves the right in its sole discretion
to disqualify any individual it finds to be tampering with the entry process or the operation of the
promotion; to be acting in violation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry
constitutes agreement for use of name & photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the Daily Journal, Redwoo General Tire, and New England Lobster are not eligible to win. Must be at least 18 years
of age. Call with questions or for clarification (650) 344-5200.
Each winner, by acceptance of the prize, agrees to release the Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire,
and New England Lobster from all liability, claims, or actions of any kind whatsoever for injuries,
damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt,
ownership, or use of the prize.

32

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 5, 2014

OYSTER PERPETUAL DATEJUST II

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oyster perpetual and datejust are trademarks.