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Dotan Argano, Duncan B., Mike F., Tyler S.

09/15/2014
Period 2

Got SpeedWhile Running Backwards?


Objective:
The objective of the Physics 3000 Backwards lab was to calculate our average times and
speeds while running five different trials which each varied in 500 cm.
Procedural Notes and Data:
Before our group started the lab experiment, we all talked about how we were going to
split up the parts and assign each person a different job. For example, my job was to make the
data table on a piece of paper so I can record everyones different speed for each of the distances.
I split my paper into four sections and I wrote down each persons name, the five different
distances (1,000, 1,500, 2,000, 2,500, 3,000 cm), and I left three blank lines for each distance to
record their speed trials for each. It looked like this;
______'s Time
Distance (cm)

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

3,000

Trial 1(s)

__

__

__

__

__

Trial 2(s)

__

__

__

__

__

Trial 3(s)

__

__

__

__

__

Other people in your group should have jobs too. Before we could actually start our time trials,
someone had to use the measuring meter wheel. Every time you roll the wheel one meter you
heard one click. Because one meter is equal to 100 cm (if you didnt know you could plug into
the formula, WORK SHOWN BELOW), for the first distance of 1,000 cm you had to walk in a
straight line until you heard ten clicks. We put a marker down and wrote on our marker
indicating that was 1,000 cm. Then from that 1,000 cm mark, we walked straight again until we
heard 5 more clicks because that was our next distance of 1,500 cm. We then placed another
marker at that final spot. Then we continued from the 1,500 mark and walked in a straight line
again until we heard 5 clicks, and we placed another marker down with the distance written on it.
That was the 2,000 cm mark. We continued those steps until the final distance was 3,000 cm. If
you are using a meter measuring wheel, this should be a little easier to follow:
Formula: Meters = cm/ 100.00
Example: How many meters is 1,000 cm? Meters= cm/100.00 M = 1,000 cm / 100.00 = 10
Meters. Therefore, if there are 10 meters in 1,000 cm then each meter is 100 centimeters.
(Start) 0 cm = 0 clicks + 10 clicks =1,000 cm + 5 clicks = 1,500 cm + 5 clicks= 2,000
cm + 5 clicks= 2,500 cm + 5 clicks= 3,000 cm
TIP: It is easiest if you start from your most recent marker, and continue walking until you hear 5
clicks. That will give you your next distance for each.

Also, someone in our group was responsible for holding the stopwatch and he/she had to stand at
the finish line to stop the clock once the runner crossed the finish line. They screamed out the
time to me and I recorded it on my data table, however, I rounded to the nearest tenth each time.
For example; for trial one at 1,000 cm I ran it in 3.46 seconds, which if rounded to the nearest
tenth is 3.5 seconds. After we finished assigning our jobs, setting up our markers, and drawing
out our data table we were able to begin the actual trials. Each person had to run all of the 5
distances three times each, therefore, each person had a total of 15 times in the end. One person
started at the starting line and he/she ran backwards at any pace they wanted to until they reached
the distance being trialed. We recorded that persons time, rounded to the tenth, and then they
ran the same heat two more times. Each person did this three times each for 1,000, 1,500, 2,000,
2,500, and 3,000 cm. Times varied between each person. After recording all of the times, our
finished data table looked like this:

Dotan's Time
Distance (cm)
Trial 1 (s)
Trial 2 (s)
Trial 3 (s)
Average Time (s)

1,000
3.5
3.1
3.3
3.3

1,500
4.8
4.6
4.7
4.7

2,000
6.2
6.1
6.2
6.2

2,500
6.8
7
7.1
7

3,000
8.1
8.5
8.4
8.3

Duncan's Time
Distance
Trial 1 (s)
Trial 2 (s)
Trial 3 (s)
Average Time (s)

1,000
4
3.8
3.1
3.6

1,500
4.6
4.7
4.9
4.7

2,000
6
6.7
6.6
6.4

2,500
7
6.7
7.1
7

3,000
8.3
7.9
8.1
8.1

Mike's Time
Distance
Trial 1 (s)
Trial 2 (s)
Trial 3 (s)
Average Time (s)

1,000
3.8
4.3
3.9
4

1,500
4.8
4.8
5.2
4.9

2,000
6
6.4
6.8
6.4

2,500
7.5
8
7.8
7.8

3,000
8.1
9.3
8.8
8.7

Tyler's Time
Distance
Trial 1 (s)
Trial 2 (s)
Trial 3 (s)
Average Time (s)

1,000
3.8
3.4
3.6
3.6

1,500
5.4
5.1
4.9
5.1

2,000
6.7
6.7
6.4
6.6

2,500
7.2
7.2
7.5
7.3

3,000
8.4
8.5
8.7
8.5

In order to find the AVERAGE SPEED, we added up all three of recorded trial times for each
one of the distances (1,000, 1,500, 2,000, 2,500, 3,000 cm) and then we divided it by three. For
example;
Tylers Times for 1,000 cm was: 3.8 s, 3.4 s, 3.6 s
3.8 + 3.4 + 3.6 = 10.8 / 3 = 3.6 seconds was the average speed for 1,000 cm
**YOU MUST ROUND TO NEAREST TENTH**
However, once we recorded all of our times and found the Average Time (s) for each of the
distances, we had to find the Average Speed (cm/s). Each person had 5 average speeds. To find
the Average Speed you need to take each of the distances and divide it by the average time for
that distance.
Formula: Distance (cm) / Average Time (s) for the given distance
Example: Tylers Average Time for 1,000 cm was 3.6 seconds so plug into the formula
1,000 cm / 3.6 s = 277.77 round to tenth = 277.8 cm/s is Tylers Average Speed for 1,000
cm
We had to plug into that formula 5 times for each person. Results shown below:

Distance (cm)
Dotan's Average Speed (cm/s)
Duncan's Average Speed (cm/s)
Mike's Average Speed (cm/s)
Tyler's Average Speed (cm/s)

1,000
303
277.8
250
277.8

1,500
319.1
319.1
306.1
294.1

2,000
322.6
312.5
312.5
303

Graphs, Results, Sample Calculations and Responses:

GRAPH ON NEXT PAGE**

2,500
357.1
357.1
320.5
342.5

3,000
361.4
370.4
344.8
352.9

Distance vs. Average Time


3500
y = 403.01x - 377.79
R = 0.9914

Distance (cm)

3000
2500

y = 434.21x - 587.92
R = 0.9813

2000

y = 403.23x - 564.52
R = 0.9919

1500

Series2
Series3

y = 410.17x - 551.27
R = 0.9844

1000

Series1

Series4

500
0
0

10

Average Time (s)


***************
Dotan = Series 1
Duncan = Series 2
Mike = Series 3
Tyler = Series 4
The Graph above shows Distance (cm) vs Average Time (s) Graph. Our graph shows the trends
of each persons average time for each of the distances. Therefore, by looking at this graph it is
evident that when the distance was increased the average time also increased (meaning got
slower and longer) because of the longer distance you had to run, which as a result, was harder to
keep a fast steady pace. As a result, the average time was affected. By looking at this graph you
could also see slope of each person. The fastest person in the group would have a much steeper
slope because he/she would have a more constant average time, while someone who was a little
slower wouldnt have that steep of a slope because his/her average time is getting slower and
longer.
**Questions**
1. How far could you back pedal in 21 seconds?

2. How long would it take you to backpedal 2800 cm?

3. Using your trendline, how long would it take you to backpedal 5000 cm?

4. Explain how the slope of the graph is equal to the average velocity.

5. Calculate the time (in hours) that it would take you to backpedal to Kings Grant which is 3.5
miles from the Cherokee North front door.

Conclusion:
After finishing our lab and analyzing our results, we were able to report the outcomes of
our experiment. It was evident and obvious that as the distance was increased and got longer, our
average times got longer and our average speed was affected because of this. We ran a total of 15
times, therefore, fatigue kicked in. Our statement that as distance increased, our average times
got longer can easily be proven by looking at our scatter graph. By looking at everyones
trendline, you can see that when distance was increased each time at an increment of 500 cm, the
average times started getting longer and longer hence proving that the longer the distance the
slower your average time will be. Some people in our group ran much faster than others during
the trials, therefore, their average time are much lower and their line is much steeper because
they are rising faster. Anyhow, throughout this lab there were at least two sources of error that
could have impacted our results severely. Because we did our trials on the grass field (instead of
the turf) there could have been uneven surfaces on the field. Although our distance was correctly
measured out, the landscape of the field could have slowed our results down or increased them.
For example, during our 1,000 cm trial there was a little area of grass that went down (ditch),
therefore, this could have slowed down our results because you werent on a straight surface.
You had to run down a little, and then go back up to normal surface. If you run on a much
flatter/straighter surface your time will be faster than one that involves you having to run down a
little slope and back up it until youre on an even surface. Another source of error that we could
of experienced was the environment. First of all we did our experiment early in the morning,
therefore, the grass was soaking wet and it was windy out. Due to the grass being wet, the
measuring wheel we used could have not had as good of traction compared to doing it on a dry,
hard surface. What I mean by that is that since the field was drenched, the wheel could have spun
faster due to the wet grass and therefore, our distances would have been off due to this. Also,
since it was very windy out and we used a pencil or a very light object as our markers, the wind
could have pushed the item farther back or closer without us paying attention. This could easily
affect our results in two ways. It would either make our distances farther which would affect our
times, and or it was closer, therefore, our average times would be quicker than what they should
be. No matter what these would affect our results and our graph.