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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS School of Management BPS 6310-502: STRATEGIC MANAGEEMNT Instructor: Zhiang “John” LIN, Ph.D.

Class Time and Location Time: 7:00 – 9:45 PM, Thursdays Location: SOM 2.904 Instructor’s Contact Information Office Location: Office Hours: Phone: Fax: E-mail: Homepage: SOM 4.405 Before and after class, or by appointment 972-883-2753 972-883-6029 zlin@utdallas.edu http://www.utdallas.edu/~zlin (Please check regularly for lecture outlines and updates)

COURSE OUTLINE Spring 2005

Teaching Assistant Name: Office: Phone: E-mail: Irem Demirkan SOM 4.205 972-883-6268 irem@student.utdallas.edu

The teaching assistant will be responsible for the following activities: 1. Help proctor and grade exam; 2. Update student records; and 3. Other course related activities. Course Materials Textbook Title: Publisher: Authors: Strategic Management: Creating Competitive Advantages (2nd ed.) McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2005 G. G. Dess, G. T. Lumpkin, & M. L. Taylor

Reading Packet Available at Off Campus Books. 581 W. Campbell Road #101, Richardson, TX 75080; Phone: 972-907-8398. Course Description This is a MBA level course designed to prepare students to be senior managers for the increasingly competitive business world. The emphasis of this course will be on the overall effectiveness of businesses through purposeful strategies with the consideration of both the internal condition and the external

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environment. Through chapters, readings, and case analyses, we will also discuss issues related to ethical decision making, corporate social responsibility, stakeholder theory, and the relationship of business & government. There are five major objectives for this course. This course will 1. introduce students to some basic concepts and theories in the filed of strategic management; 2. provide opportunities for students to practice strategic management skills through real world case analyses; 3. train students to take leadership responsibilities and work with other people in teams; 4. offer opportunities for students to develop both oral and written communication abilities; and 5. provide knowledge and skills for students to conduct effective organizational research. Course Requirements This course requires extensive readings, active discussions, and diligent group work. The instructor’s main role will be to facilitate the implementations of these activities and provide constant guidance along each step of the way. A student’s final grade (A, B, C, and F) will be based on the weighted average of the following four categories: Individual Class Participation, Individual Case Analysis, Group Case Discussion, and Exam, each of which will be evaluated in the form of an expanded letter grade (A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, F). 1. Individual Class Participation (30%)

All students are expected to attend classes and be prepared for and actively involved in discussing the chapter and the reading listed in the schedule part of the syllabus. All students will be evaluated in the following two categories. a) (15%) Each student will be assigned to be one of the discussion leaders for a reading article (from the reading packet) for a certain week. Each individual discussion leader will need to submit to the instructor, a two to three page (double spaced) review of the reading at the time of the discussion, although coordination in leading discussions among multiple discussion leaders are permitted. The quality of each student's discussion will be evaluated in the following questions: − Does the student demonstrate a basic understanding of the assigned reading? − Does the student use the readings as a base to develop new ideas or insights? − Does the student apply theories and concepts learned from the course? − Can the student formulate appropriate critiques of the readings and defend his/her position in discussion with other class members? b) (15%) Each student will also be evaluated based on his/her attendance and overall participation throughout the whole semester. Generally, a student can get an A level grade in this category if he/she has few or no absence, is mostly on time, and participates actively on regular basis in class discussions. 2. Individual Case Analysis (15%)

Each student will conduct a two to three page (double spaced) case analysis for a designated case from the reading packet -- WFNX-101.7 FM and Boston’s Radio Wars. There is no fixed format for the case analysis but it generally should address the following issues:

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What are the key internal and external problems or challenges faced by the organization? What are the core strengths and weaknesses possessed by the organization? What are the main strategies used by the organization? Why are the strategies successful or not successful? What strategic management concepts and theories can you apply? What critical recommendations can you come up with for the future development of the organization?

The deadline for submission is at the beginning of the third class. No late or electronic submissions will be accepted. 3. Group Case Discussion (25%)

Each group will research one of the real world companies listed in the syllabus and conduct a case analysis. Students are required to find background information from various sources including libraries, internet sites, magazines, and newspapers. At the time of the group case discussion, the group as a whole should submit a two to three page (double spaced) analysis to the instructor. The format is similar to that of the individual case analysis. The credit will be based on both the submitted analysis and the actual case discussion in class. To ensure a good quality, each group is strongly urged to start the preparation process at least two weeks prior to the designated group case discussion date. 4. Exam (30%)

At the end of the semester, there will be a comprehensive exam to test the students’ understanding and application of main theories and concepts learned from Chapters 1 to 13. The exam will contain 50 multiple choice questions and take two hours. Students will be allowed to bring notes on two pieces of paper of the regular letter size (each double sided), although no make-up exam will be given. Important Notes 1. Final Grade Checking

After the final exam, there will be a designated office hour for final grade checking in the instructor’s office (see the schedule part for time and location). If a student cannot make this office hour, he/she can bring a self addressed and stamped envelope to class on the date of the exam, or simply wait for the university to mail the final grade. No additional office hours will be held. In compliance with the university’s policy on confidentiality, no grade information will be transmitted via phone or e-mail. 2. Class Policies

Throughout the semester, each student is expected to follow the university’s guideline on student conduct with regard to cheating and other dishonorable behaviors. Severe consequences can occur if such rules are not followed. A student is responsible for potential consequences that may result from missed classes, portions or whole. There will be no makeup exam or lectures.

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Class Schedule # 1 Date 1/13 − − − − 1/20 − − − 1/27 − − − − 2/3 − − − 5 2/10 − − − 2/17 − − − 7 2/24 − − − 8 3/3 − − − 3/10 − Activities Course Description, Expectation Sharing, and Group Forming Chapter 1: Strategic Management: Creating Competitive Advantage Chapter 14: Analyzing Strategic Management Cases Short Survey Announcement of Group Compositions and Group Case Discussion Assignments Announcement of Reading Article Assignments Chapter 2: Analyzing the External Environment of the Firm Chapter 3: Assessing the Internal Environment of the Firm Case Discussion: WFNX-101.7 FM and Boston’s Radio Wars (from the reading packet) Video: Strategic Management of Southwestern Airlines (9:43 Minutes) Individual Case Analysis Due Chapter 4: Recognizing a Firm’s Intellectual Assets: Moving beyond a Firm’s Tangible Resources Reading 1: Building Competitive Advantage through People (C. A. Bartlett & S. Ghoshal. 2002. MIT Sloan Management Review, 43(2): 34-41.) Group Case Discussion 1: TBA Chapter 5: Business-Level Strategy: Creating and Sustaining Competitive Advantages Reading 2: What is Strategy (M. E. Porter. 1996. Harvard Business Review, 74(4): 61-78.) Group Case Discussion 2: TBA Chapter 6: Corporate-Level Strategy: Creating Value through Diversification Reading 3: To Diversify or Not to Diversify (C. G. Markides. 1997. Harvard Business Review, 75(6): 93-99.) Group Case Discussion 3: TBA Chapter 7: International Strategy: Creating Value in Global Markets Reading 4: Converting Global Presence into Global Competitive Advantage (A. K. Gupta & V. Gouindarajan. 2001. Academy of Management Executive, 15(2): 45-56.) Group Case Discussion 4: 7 TBA Chapter 8: Digital Business Strategy: Leveraging Internet and E-Business Capabilities Reading 5: The Ten Deadly Mistakes of Wanna-Dots (R. Moss Kanter. 2001. Harvard Business Review, 79(1): 91-100.) Group Case Discussion 5: TBA Spring Break. No Class.

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Chapter 9: Strategic Control and Corporate Governance Reading 6: What’s Wrong with Executive Compensation? (C. Elson. 2003. Harvard Business Review, 81(1): 68-77.) Group Case Discussion 6: TBA Chapter 10: Creating Effective Organizational Designs Reading 7: Five Challenges to Virtual Team Success: Lessons from Sabre, Inc. (B. L. Kirkman et al. 2002. Academy of Management Executive, 16(3): 67-79.) Group Case Discussion 7: TBA Chapter 11: Strategic Leadership: Creating a Learning Organization and an Ethical Organization Reading 8: Leadership -- Warts and All (B. Kellerman. 2004. Harvard Business Review, 82(1): 40-45.) Group Case Discussion 8: TBA Chapter 12: Managing Innovation and Fostering Corporate Entrepreneurships Reading 9: The Questions Every Entrepreneur Must Answer (A. Bhide. 1996. Harvard Business Review, 74(6): 120-130.) Group Case Discussion 9: TBA Chapter 13: Recognizing Opportunities and Creating New Ventures Reading 10: How (Un)Ethical Are You? (M. R. Banaji, M. H. Bazerman, & D. Chugh. 2003. Harvard Business Review, 81(12): 56-64.) Overview for the Exam Exam (120 Minutes) Final Grade Checking (12:00 – 14:00 PM, at the instructor’s office)

10 3/24 − − − 11 3/31 − − − 12 4/7 − − − 13 4/14 − − − 14 4/21 − 4/25 −

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Group Compositions (To be finalized after the first class) Group # 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 Note: If you are in group N, do not choose reading article #N, as the group case discussion and the reading article discussion will be in the same week for you. Student Name Group # 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 9 Student Name

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List of Companies for Group Case Analyses and Discussions (To be determined after the first class) Company Name 7 ELEVEN INC (SE) AMAZON.COM INC (AMZN) CISCO SYSTEMS INC (CSCO) COSTCO WHOLESALE CORP (COST) EBAY INC (EBAY) ELECTRONIC DATA SYS ORP (EDS) ENRON (ENRNQ) E*TRADE FINANCIAL CORPORATION (ET) FORD MOTOR COMPANY (F) FOX ENTERTAINMENT GRP INC CL A (FOX) GENERAL ELECTRIC CO (GE) GENERAL MILLS INC (GIS) HEWLETT PACKARD COMPANY (HPQ) I2 TECHNOLOGIES INC (ITWO) INTEL CORP (INTC) INTL BUSINESS MACH CORP (IBM) INFOSYS TECHNOLOGIES LTD ADS (INFY) JOHNSON & JOHNSON (JNJ) KELLOGG CO (K) KROGER CO (KR) MCGRAW HILL INC (MHP) NINTENDO LTD ADR (NTDOY) NOKIA CORPORATION (NOK) PEPSICO INC (PEP) PFIZER INC (PFE) PROCTER & GAMBLE CO (PG) NEIMAN MARCUS GROUP INC (NMG.B) SAP AG (SAP) SBC COMMUNICATIONS INC (SBC) SONY CORP (SNE) SCHOLASTIC CORP (SCHL) TIME WARNER INC (TWX) TEXAS INSTRUMENTS INC (TXN) TOYS R US INC (TOY) TXU CORPORATION (TXU) YAHOO! INC (YHOO) Group Number

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List of Reading Articles and Discussion Leading Assignment (To be decided after the first class) Reading Article Reading 1 Reading 2 Reading 3 Reading 4 Reading 5 Reading 6 Reading 7 Reading 8 Reading 9 Reading 10 Students’ Names

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A Short Survey (To be submitted to the instructor after the first class)

Name (Please Print): Phone Number: E-mail Address:

1. What is your current position in your organization (or company)?

2. What is your career objective?

3. What are your general expectations from this course?

4. Are all the requirements and class policies listed in the syllabus clear to you? If not, which specific part do you need more clarifications?

5. How many hours do you plan to spend on this course each week?

6. Any specific suggestions you may have for the course to be successful?

(Thank you)

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