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SOCIAL AND POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS BA 4305-02 Spring 2006 TR 9:30am to 10:45am SOM 1.

117 Instructor: Office: Phone: Email: Office Hours: Bindu Arya 4.406 School of Management (972)-883-4468 bindu@utdallas.edu After class, or by appointment

COURSE OVERVIEW The Social and Political Environment of Business courseis a capstone course that is designed to build upon previous and concurrent work in the program. The knowledge acquired in various functional areas such as finance, accounting, operations, MIS, marketing, and organizational behavior classes will be integrated to provide a “total business” perspective. In particular, our perspective in this course is that of the general manager whose responsibility is the long-term health of the firm. Hence, we focus on the key tasks, skills and responsibilities of the general manager in diagnosing business situations and finding realistic solutions to strategic problems. The approach of this class is to incorporate a variety of instructional methodologies such as case discussions, presentations, group analysis, inputs from guest speakers and a simulation exercise. Students will be required to apply concepts and models taught in the class to analyze strategic issues that real world companies face. To ensure an interactive environment in the classroom, I will also utilize in-class exercises to make the experience informal and fun. However, since both students and the instructor are responsible for the learning that transpires in the classroom, I expect that students have read the assigned material prior to class, actively participate, and generally contribute to the flow of the class.

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COURSE REQUIREMENTS This course is case-intensive and requires extensive reading along with a great deal of discussion. Given that this is a somewhat demanding course, diligent completion of assignments may require students to put in several hours a week beyond class time. This effort should improve the student’s critical thinking skills while increasing the possibility of earning a good grade. Class contributions represent a substantial portion of the student’s final grade. Students are therefore encouraged to share their insights based on class materials and other experiences and beliefs from school or work in the course of class discussions. Students are responsible for understanding the course requirements and to keep track of all important dates specified in the syllabus to succeed in this course. COURSE ASSESSMENT Grades will be based on the following components: Group Simulation Group Case Presentation Individual writing assignments Individual exams Class participation REQUIRED MATERIALS Pearce, J. A., and Robinson, R. B. 2005: Formulation, Implementation, and control of competitive strategy, paperback, McGraw Hill, ISBN 0072980087 Gopinath, C., and Siciliano, J. 2005: Strategize! Experiential exercises in Strategic management, paperback, Southwestern Publishing, ISBN 0324259123 Additionally, the reader for the course that contains the cases can be purchased at the following website: http://www.hbsp.com/relay.jhtml?name=cp&c=c98553 FOR THE SIMULATION: SOFTWARE IS ONLY TO BE PURCHASED ONLINE [SEE PAGE 9 FOR WEBSITE INFO] 25% 10% 25% 30% 10%

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COURSE SCHEDULE WEEK 1: January 10: Introduction Topic: Introduction Simulation: Simulation Introduction and Group formation WEEK 1: January 12: Strategic Management: An Overview In class Exercise: Strategize Session 1 and Session 2 Topic: An Overview of Strategic Management Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 1 Simulation: Mike’s Bikes Registration complete WEEK 2: January 17: Simulation Simulation: Lab Session I WEEK 2: January 19: Mission Statement In class Exercise: Strategize Session 3 Ex1 and Ex2 Topic: Mission Statement and Corporate Social Responsibility Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 2 Simulation: Mike’s Bikes Introductory Practice Round due prior to class

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WEEK 3: January 24: Simulation Simulation: Lab Session II WEEK 3: January 26: Corporate Social Responsibility Topic: Mission Statement and Corporate Social Responsibility Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 2 Case: Conoco’s “Green” Oil Strategy (392133) Simulation: Mike’s Bikes Trial Round 1 due prior to class WEEK 4: January 31: External Analysis In class Exercise: Strategize Session 6 Topic: External Environment Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 3 Simulation: Mike’s Bikes Trial Round 2 due prior to class WEEK 4: February 2: External Analysis Topic: External Environment Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 3 Case: Airborne Express (798070) WEEK 5: February 7: Global Environment In class Exercise: Strategize Session 11

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Topic: Global Environment Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 4 Simulation: Mike’s Bikes Trial Round 3 due prior to class WEEK 5: February 9: Global Environment Topic: Global Environment Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 4 Case: Robert Mondavi and the Wine Industry (302102) WEEK 6: February 14: Internal Analysis In class Video/Exercise: Strategize Session 7 Ex 2 Topic: Internal Analysis Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 5 Simulation: Mike’s Bikes Decision Round 1 due prior to class WEEK 6: February 16: Internal Analysis Topic: Internal Analysis Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 5 Case: Starbucks: Delivering Customer Service (504016) WEEK 7: February 21: MIDTERM Exam 1: Chapters 1-5

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WEEK 7: February 23: Formulating Long-Term Strategic Objectives In class Exercise/Video: Strategize Session 10 and Competitiveness Topic: Formulating Long-Term Strategic Objectives Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 6 Simulation: Mike’s Bikes Decision Round 2 due prior to class WEEK 8: February 28: Formulating Long-Term Strategic Objectives Topic: Formulating Long-Term Strategic Objectives Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 6 Case: Shanghai General Motors: The Rise of a Late-comer (HKU395) WEEK 8: March 2: Strategic Analysis and Choice in Single Product Businesses In class: GUEST LECTURE Topic: Strategic Analysis and Choice in Single Product Businesses Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 7 Simulation: Mike’s Bikes Decision Round 3 due prior to class WEEK 10: March 14: Strategic Analysis and Choice in Single Product Businesses Topic: Strategic Analysis and Choice in Single Product Businesses Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 7 Case: Apple 2002 (702469)
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WEEK 10: March 16: Strategic Analysis in the Multi-Business Company In class Exercise: Strategize Session 14 Topic: Strategic Analysis and Choice in Multi-Business Companies Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 8 Simulation: Mike’s Bikes Decision Round 4 due prior to class WEEK 11: March 21: Strategic Analysis in the Multi-Business Company Topic: Strategic Analysis and Choice in Multi-Business Companies Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 8 Case: The Walt Disney Company: The Entertainment King (HBS 701035) WEEK 11: March 23: Implementing strategy: Structure, leadership and culture In class Video: Corporate Culture and Performance Topic: Implementing strategy: Structure, leadership and culture Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 10 Simulation: Mike’s Bikes Decision Round 5 due prior to class WEEK 12: March 28: Implementing strategy Topic: Implementing strategy: Structure, leadership and culture Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 10 Case: GE’s Two Decade Transformation: Jack Welch’s Leadership (9-399-150)

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WEEK 12: March 30: Implementing strategy II In class Exercise: Strategize Session 15 Topic: Implementing strategy: Structure, leadership and culture Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 10 Simulation: Mike’s Bikes Decision Round 6 due prior to class WEEK 13: Apr 4: Strategic Control and Continuous Improvement Topic: Strategic Control and Continuous Improvement Reading: Pearce and Robinson: Chapter 11 Simulation: Mike’s Bikes Decision Round 7 due prior to class WEEK 13: Apr 6: Final Exam Overview Topic: Overview Simulation: Mike’s Bikes Decision Round 8 due prior to class WEEK 14: Apr 11: Simulation Exercise Presentations WEEK 14: Apr 13: Simulation Exercise Presentations SESSION 24: Apr 18: FINAL EXAM Exam: Chapters 6-11[excluding Ch 9]

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EVALUATION Group Simulation The Mike’s Bikes simulation will be conducted with students organized into groups of no more than 5 students that represent separate firms within an industry. Every firm begins from the same starting p oint, but will compete based on various decisions made within your team. We will begin with an introductory practice round where you first play against the computer, then two trial rounds against the other groups to learn to play the game, and hopefully identify some fatal strategies. After that point, the simulation results count toward your final grade. As the simulation continues, each team will keep a record of decisions made, and the specific strategic reasons for those decisions. Simulations are fun, but take the competition seriously – there are winners and losers in this game! You will use the website www.smartsims.com and log in using the following details:
Login ID: stutexas Password: dallas

When the simulation ends, each group will prepare a final report (to be approximately 10 double-spaced, typed pages) that outlines actions taken throughout the life of the simulation. The report should include: 1. The firm’s mission statement. 2. Original strategic plan. 3. An environmental analysis – compare the status of the industry at the beginning and the end of the semester. 4. An internal analysis of strengths and weaknesses – compare the position of the firm at the beginning and the end of the semester. 5. Deviations/alterations to the strategic plan throughout the simulation. 6. A listing and description of all major decisions made, including assumptions made and justifications for the decisions. 7. Evaluation of the firm’s successes and failures. What decisions were correct? What should have been done differently? What strategies should be implemented for the future success of the firm? Each firm group will then make a final presentation to the class regarding their final firm report. Assume that you are top management making this presentation to

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the board of directors at the annual shareholders meeting. Be able to defend your decisions and assumptions. Finally, you will individually and confidentially grade each member of your group on participation and level of contributions. Grading for the simulation will be as follows: 15% Final written and oral report 5% Individual participation in the simulation 5% Simulation results Group Case Presentation Each week, one or two groups will be responsible for the assigned case of the week. Case assignment is on a first come first served basis. Individual Case Analysis Students can choose a total of 5 cases from the 8 cases listed in the syllabus for individual case analysis. Each week when you prepare for a case, it is recommended that you plan on reading the case at least three times. The first reading should be a quick run-through of the text in the case. At this stage you will want to differentiate between facts and opinions that may be expressed. On your second reading you should read in more depth and underline important points that may be useful. Your second reading should focus on understanding the business and the situation. Questions that you can ask yourself are: 1) Why has this company survived? 2) How does this business work? 3) What are the economics of this business? In the second reading you must carefully examine the exhibits as these contain information that will be useful in analyzing the situation. You may need to apply analytical techniques (such as ratio analysis, growth rate analysis, etc) to benefit from the information. Prior to your third reading, you may want to review the assigned questions. On your third reading, you should have a good grasp of the case. Now you will need to get at the root cause of the problem and gather data to make specific recommendations. There is no single correct solution and you are encouraged to deal with the case as presented. You are strongly discouraged from acquiring post-case data. Also in evaluating the case, you should use concepts and models discussed in readings and in class. Individual assignments will be graded on

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content and written skills. Questions assigned for the scheduled case should be answered in approximately two typed, double-spaced pages. Assignments must be turned in before the start of the class session. I do not accept late assignments. The university has mandated as part of this course a requirement of at least 15 double spaces pages of writing per individual student that will be evaluated on grammar, punctuation, and writing style. A writing tutor will assess the written assignments, provide detailed feedback, and determine whether a revision is necessary. Because of this requirement, please submit 2 copies of all individual written assignments. The writing tutor will grade your written assignments on a scale of 1-10. Any assignments receiving grades of 5 or below must be rewritten, and will be assessed again. Exams There will be two exams during the semester. These will be multiple choice exams. Please note the scheduled dates as no make-up exams will be given. Participation In evaluating student contribution, I factor in the following: responsible preparation, active participation, risk-taking, courtesy, and consistency with topic. Important Notes Through the semester, students are expected to follow the university’s guidelines on student conduct with regard to cheating and other dishonorable behavior. The instructor reserves the right to deduct points from a student’s class participation grade and/or take other disciplinary action if a student engages in non-constructive behavior (such as disrupting the class or abusing other individuals). For group assignments and presentations, you will be evaluated by your peers. Grading Policy A+: 97 and up; A: 94 -96; A-: 90 and up B+: 87-89; B 84-86; B-: 80-83; C+: 77-79; C: 74-76; C-: 70-73; D+: 67-69; D: 64-66; D-:60 and up F: Below 60

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