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ATEC-4370-002 STORYBOARD & ANIMATION PRE-PRODUCTION

SPRING 2006 INSTRUCTOR:Steve Galgas, The University of Texas at Dallas CLASS WEBSITE: http://www.galgas.com/students/ OFFICE HOURS: before and after class by request

CLASS DESCRIPTION:
This class teaches students previsualization techniques for planning out time-based media projects (film, video, animation, interactive, etc.). Students will be given a survey of visual storytelling techniques, such as framing and composition, camera movements, and editing techniques. They will also gain an understanding of narrative story structure and plot construction, as well as learn how to communicate their ideas quickly and clearly through the use of storyboards and concept art.

ASSIGNMENTS
Classwork will be divided into three parts: major projects, weekly exercises, and exams. The assignments below are subject to change based on the needs of the class and time constraints.
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MAJOR PROJECTS ¡ MAN vs. ENVIRONMENT- Students will be asked to create a set of storyboards with the environment as the primary source of conflict. ¡ MAN vs. MAN- Students will be asked to create a set of storyboards with physical character interactions providing the primary source of conflict. ¡ PITCH PRESENTATION- During the course of the semester, students will be working towards a final presentation of a story concept in front of the class. Presentation materials will include storyboards and concept art. WEEKLY EXERCISES: Smaller assignments will be given almost weekly working towards each of the major projects. These may include brainstorming sessions, concept art, reference collages, storyboard drafts, etc. EXAMS ¡ VISUAL STORYTELLING TECHNIQUES ¡ NARRATIVE STORY STRUCTURE

MATERIALS
Students will be required to purchase the following materials for class. Other items may be required through the course of the semester.
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Several packs of notecards (preferrably white and unlined) Drawing materials

POLICIES
LATE ASSIGNMENTS:
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Assignments which are turned in past their due date will lose a letter grade for each week they are late, regardless of excuse. The late policy goes into effect at the beginning of classes during which assighments are due, unless otherwise noted.

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All assignments must be completed in order to receive a passing grade for the class.

ATTENDANCE:
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If you arrive late, it is your responsibility to inform me of your attendance. As I may be in the middle of instruction upon your arrival, it is your responsibility to make sure I write your name down in my book at the next convenient moment. Come prepared to work during class time. If you are planning to work on a project primarily outside of class (on your home computer, for instance), you will still be require to bring materials on which you can work during class time. Do not leave early without permission. Schedule work hours around class time.

COMPUTER USAGE:
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Students should not be surfing the Internet during lectures, unless asked to do so, and all computer games and instant messenging programs must be closed during this time. Students are responsible for the safe storage and backup of their own projects. Computer failure should be expected and planned for, and will not be allowed as an excuse for late or missing projects. Computers must be turned off during written tests or quizzes. Exams from students who are surfing the Internet during exams will not be counted.

ACCOMODATION PROCESS
It is the policy of UTD to provide reasonable and appropriate accomodations for individuals with documented disabilities. This University will adhere to all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and guidelines with respect to providing reasonable accomodations as required to afford equal educational opportunity. It is the student's responsibility to contact the appropriate office in a timely manner if he or she desires to arrange for accomodations.

SCOLASTIC DISHONESTY
UTD may initiate disciplinary proceedings against a student accused of scholastic dishonesty. Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to statements, acts, or omissions related to application for enrollement, the ward of a degree, and/or the submission of one's work of material that is not one's own. Scholastic dishonesty may involve one or more of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion, and falsifying academic records. Cheating is the willful giving or receiving of information in an unauthorized manner during an examination, illicitly obtaining examination questions in advance, copying computer files, copying internet material, using someone else's work for assignments if it were one's own, or any other dishonest means of attempting to fulfill the requirements fo a course.