You are on page 1of 120

Programs of the

FISH AND
WILDLIFE
RESEARCH
INSTITUTE
20142015

Florida Fish and Wildlife


Conservation Commission
MyFWC.com

Contents
4
6

FWRI at a Glance
FWRI Locations

8 Marine Fisheries
Research

18 Freshwater Fisheries
Research
28 Wildlife Research

38 Ecosystem Assessment
and Restoration
52 Information Science
and Management

60 Office of the Director


64 Publications

70 Partnerships

80 20142015 Budget

98 Current Grant Awards

On the cover: Monroe County ospreys, as well as


some individuals living in Collier, Lee, and MiamiDade counties, are non-migratory and their nesting
chronology does not overlap with the rest of the North
American population. These unique characteristics
set southern coastal osprey apart from the majority of
the North American osprey subspecies. Researchers
are evaluating the taxonomic status of the southern
coastal osprey population using population genetic
methods to make recommendations regarding
whether to include it on the States Imperiled Species
list. It could potentially be a new subspecies and
osprey numbers in these areas are declining.

Gil McRae, Director


FW C Fis h and Wild life
Resea rch Ins titute

The magnificent resources of the state of Florida


support numerous multi-billion dollar industries
that form the foundation of our states economy.
Our world-renowned beaches, spectacular
variety of fish and wildlife, diverse habitats, and
navigable waters attract businesses and visitors
alike. There is no mistaking the fact that economic
prosperity, quality of life for Floridians, and the
satisfaction of our many visitors are all dependent
on a healthy environment. Floridas ecosystems
support fishing and hunting, nature viewing, and
other recreational and commercial activities easily
exceeding $20 billion in value annually.
Despite the natural wonders surrounding
us in Florida, too many people view the natural
world as somehow separate from their everyday
life. This is especially true for young people, many
of whom are less connected to the outdoors than
in previous generations. The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) operates
under the reality that people are a part of our
ecosystems, not separate from them. As one of the
most rapidly growing states in the nation, Florida
faces many environmental challenges in the
years ahead and it is critical that managers adopt
forward-looking, informed management policies to
protect critical resources and balance competing
demands for limited resources. These management
decisions must be driven by sound scientific
information. Planning and conducting research to
provide this information is the core of the Fish and
Wildlife Research Institutes (FWRI) mission.

As the research division within FWC, FWRI


operates programs statewide that focus on
obtaining the wide-ranging data and information
needed by fish, wildlife, and ecosystem
resource managers. We have established many
collaborative partnerships with other government,
academic, non-profit, and private fish and wildlife
research institutions. Our programs are diversely
funded from user fees such as hunting and fishing
licenses, specialty license plates, grants, and state
general revenue and are organized to rapidly
provide the vital scientific information necessary
to conserve and protect Floridas precious natural
resources.
This annual science programs document
provides an overview of our major programs and
is intended to present readers with an enhanced
understanding of the scope and purpose of the
technical information we produce. This summary
document cannot convey the details of each project
within our programs. Additional information is
available on our Web site.
Thank you for your interest in FWRI and the
health of Floridas resources. I assure you that
FWRI will continue to focus on the most pressing
needs relative to our resources. We encourage
you to become an active participant with us in
the wise management of our fish and wildlife and
their habitats and encourage you to provide us
with issues, concerns, and comments related to
our programs and our mission.

at a glance...

Fish and Wildlife


Research Institute
Total Budget: $67,471,093
Staff: 646

GENERAL
REVENUE
(8.22%)

CARLTF
(0.39%)

GDTF
(15.68%)

PRTF
(0.54%)

MRCTF
(30.74%)

Funding
Sources

FGTF
(24.23%)

SGTF/
GRANTS
(0.70%)

NGWTF/
GRANTS
(0.04%)
SGTF
(5.95%)

STMTF
(3.51%)

NGWTF
(4.51%)

MRCTF/
GRANTS
(5.49%)

Fund Terms
CARLTFConservation/Recreation Lands Program Trust Fund
FGTFFederal Grants Trust Fund
GDTFGrants and Donations Trust Fund
MRCTFMarine Resources Conservation Trust Fund
MRCTF/GrantsMarine Resources Conservation Trust Fund Grants Program
NGWTFNongame Wildlife Trust Fund
NGWTF/GrantsNongame Wildlife Trust Fund Grants Program
PRTFFlorida Panther Research and Management Trust Fund
SGTFState Game Trust Fund
SGTF/GrantsState Game Trust Fund Grants Program
STMTFSave the Manatee Trust Fund
4

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Office of
the Director
Science Programs
Marine
Fisheries
Research

Freshwater
Fisheries
Research

Keys
Fisheries
Research

Freshwater
Fisheries
Biology

Keys
Marine
Laboratory

Freshwater
Fisheries
Resource
Assessment

Marine
Fisheries
Biology
Marine
FisheriesDependent
Monitoring
Marine
FisheriesIndependent
Monitoring
Marine
Fisheries
Stock
Assessment
Marine
Fisheries
Stock
Enhancement

Wildlife
Research
Avian
Research
Marine
Mammal
Research
Marine
Turtle
Research
Reptile
and
Amphibian
Research

Ecosystem
Assessment and
Restoration

Information
Science and
Management

Fish
and
Wildlife
Health

Center
for
Biostatistics
and
Modeling

Habitat
Research
Harmful
Algal
Blooms
Research

Research
Information
Services
Socioeconomic
Assessment

Terrestrial
Mammal
Research

Computer
and Network
Services

Center
for
Spatial
Analysis

Research
Operations
Budget Office
Facilities
Management

FWRI AT A GLANCE

a look inside...

FWRI Locations
Holt
Quincy

Tallahassee
2

Pensacola

Jacksonville

Panama City
2

Gainesville

Eastpoint
De Leon
Springs

Cedar Key
Eustis

3 Melbourne
St. Petersburg
Port Manatee

Lakeland

Legend
One FWRI location in this city
2

Multiple FWRI locations in this city

Tequesta

Port Charlotte

(number of locations indicated on dot)

Naples

Long Key
Marathon

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Cedar Key
Senator George G. Kirkpatrick
Marine Laboratory
11350 SW 153rd Court
Cedar Key, FL 32625
De Leon Springs
De Leon Springs
Field Laboratory
5450 US Highway 17
De Leon Springs, FL 32130
Eastpoint
Apalachicola Field Laboratory
350 Carroll Street
Eastpoint, FL 32328
Eustis
Eustis Freshwater Fisheries
Research Laboratory
601 West Woodward Avenue
Eustis, FL 32726
Gainesville
Gainesville Freshwater
Fisheries Field Office
7386 NW 71st Street
Gainesville, FL 32653
Lovett E. Williams Jr.
Wildlife Research Laboratory
1105 SW Williston Road
Gainesville, FL 32601
Holt
Blackwater Fisheries Laboratory
8384 Fish Hatchery Road
Holt, FL 32564
Jacksonville
Marine Fisheries Research
Alumni River House
2800 University
Boulevard North
Jacksonville, FL 32211
Marine Mammal Research
Jacksonville Zoo Field
Laboratory
370 Zoo Parkway
Jacksonville, FL 32218

Lakeland
FWC Southwest Regional Office
3900 Drane Field Road
Lakeland, FL 33811
Long Key
Keys Marine Laboratory
PO Box 968
Mile Marker 68 ,
US Highway 1
Long Key, FL 33001
Marathon
South Florida
Regional Laboratory
2796 Overseas Highway,
Suite 119
Marathon, FL 33050
Melbourne
Indian River Field Laboratory
1220 Prospect Avenue
Suite 285
Melbourne, FL 32901
Melbourne Beach
Field Laboratory
Sebastian Inlet State
Recreation Area
9700 South A1A Highway
Melbourne, FL 32951
Melbourne Freshwater
Fisheries Laboratory
2595 McGraw Avenue
Melbourne, FL 32934
Naples
Big Cypress Field Office
298 Sabal Palm Road
Naples, FL 34114

Port Charlotte
Charlotte Harbor
Field Laboratory
585 Prineville Street
Port Charlotte, FL 33954
Port Manatee
Stock Enhancement
Research Facility
14495 Harllee Road
Port Manatee, FL 34221
Quincy
Joe Budd Field Office
5300 High Bridge Road
Quincy, FL 32351
St. Petersburg
Headquarters
100 Eighth Avenue SE
St. Petersburg, FL 33701
Marine Mammal
Pathobiology Laboratory
3700 54th Avenue South
St. Petersburg, FL 33711
Tallahassee
Koger Center
Marathon Building
2574 Seagate Drive
Suite 250
Tallahassee, FL 32301
Tequesta
Tequesta Field Laboratory
19100 SE Federal Highway
Tequesta, FL 33469

Panama City
FWC Northwest Regional Office
3911 Highway 2321
Panama City, FL 32409
Pensacola
Pensacola Field Office (LE)
1101 East Gregory Street
Pensacola, FL 32502
FWRI LOCATIONS

Floridas commercial stone crab fishery averages between 2 and 3 million


pounds of claws per season, accounting for 99 percent of landings in the U.S.
But because crabs are returned to the water after their claws are harvested,
researchers are unable to record important biological details about the crabs
or determine the number of crabs harvested. To address this information need,
researchers are conducting a long-term fishery-independent monitoring program
along Floridas west coast to better understand stone crab dynamics in Florida.

Marine
Fisheries Research
Luiz Barbieri, Section Administrator | Luiz.Barbieri@MyFWC.com

a look inside...

Marine Fisheries
Research
The waters along Floridas coastline attract millions
of recreational anglers and thousands of commercial
fishers. Marine Fisheries Research biologists study
the fish and invertebrates found in the states
saltwater environments, gathering data important
for the management of these species. The sections
research includes collecting and analyzing fishing
data, monitoring species status and abundance,
investigating biological information, and breeding
and rearing certain species to enhance or rebuild
their populations.

Top: Scientists in FWRIs


genetics laboratory are involved
in many projects, including
the Tarpon Genetic Recapture
Study. Anglers help collect skin
cell samples from tarpon they
catch, and geneticists can use
DNA from the cells to determine
whether the same fish has
been captured more than once.
The study provides important
information on tarpon movement
patterns and recapture rates in
the recreational fishery.
Bottom: Angler interviews
provide data that is crucial for
managing Floridas recreational
fisheries. FWRI field staff
conduct intercept surveys at
boat ramps and other fishing
access points to gather data that
helps researchers and managers
monitor the sustainability of
fisheries and the effectiveness of
conservation measures.
10

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Top: FWRI staff count bay


anchovies, one of the most
abundant fishes found in Florida
estuaries. Researchers gather
data on fish populations in
estuaries around the state to help
determine the health of these
important ecosystems. Keeping
state estuaries healthy
is crucial for the long-term
growth and sustainability of
Floridas recreational and
commercial fisheries.
Bottom: A biologist uses a
stereomicroscope to view features
of a fish that are not easily seen
by the naked eye. Scientists use
stereomicroscopes for dissections
and examinations of the surface
of solid objects. They provide a
three-dimensional view of the
specimen under magnification.
MARINE FISHERIES RESEARCH

11

Above: Researchers visit a line


nursery in the Florida Keys
National Marine Sanctuary to
select nursery-reared corals to plant
on nearby reefs. This effort aims to
restore populations of threatened
acroporid species, which include
staghorn and elkhorn corals. Coral
restoration is crucial for the longterm growth and sustainability of
Floridas reef systems.
Right: FWRI researchers attach
an acoustic tag to the back of a
spiny lobster caught near Garden
Key in the Dry Tortugas. These
tags transmit information to
underwater receivers, allowing
researchers to track the movements
of the lobsters as they feed, hide
from predators, mate and spawn.
12

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

at a glance...

Marine Fisheries
Research
Program Budget: $24,431,314
Staff: 291

MRCTF
(40.6%)

FGTF
(39.5%)

Funding Sources
Marine Fisheries Research; Charlotte Harbor National
Estuary Program; Department of the Army/Army Corps
of Engineers; Florida Department of Agriculture; Gulf
States Marine Fisheries Commission; Martin County; Mote
Marine Laboratory; National Fish and Wildlife Foundation;
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration;
Sarasota Bay Estuary Program; South Florida Water
Management District; Southwest Florida Water
Management District; St. Johns River Water Management
District; Suwannee River Water Management District;
Tampa Bay Estuary Program; The Nature Conservancy;
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; U.S. Geological Survey;
University of Florida; University of North Carolina;
University of South Florida; Wildlife Foundation of Florida

GDTF
(15.9%)

MRCTF/
GRANTS
(4.0%)

A researcher adds food


to an automated feeder
during investigations of
intensive larval culture of
red drum at FWRIs Stock
Enhancement Research
Facility in Manatee County.
Researchers at the facility
investigate the use of marine
fisheries stock enhancement
as a fisheries management
tool in Florida waters.
MARINE FISHERIES RESEARCH

13

T racking Down Reef


F ish on the East Coast
In order to identify population characteristics and where certain fish go to spawn,
researchers conduct surveys focused on grouper and snapper subspecies.
Counting fish can be tricky.
Historically, fish stock
assessments have been based
on harvest data collected from
the fishery. By definition, these
assessments are reactive in
nature to avoid further damage
to the fishery rather than
ensure sustainability for the
future. Also, the accuracy of
harvest estimates, particularly
on the recreational side, has
been challenged. There is a
critical need for research and

14

monitoring data that reflects


the status of fish populations
as a whole rather than just
the portion of the population
taken in the fishery. Surveys,
such as those conducted for this
project, address this problem.
Broadly speaking, this project
will lead to the development
of a safe sampling approach to
rapidly assess the status of adult
snapper and grouper populations
over a broad geographic area.
The ultimate measure of success

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

would be to incorporate these


lessons and methodologies in a
long-term fisheries independent
monitoring program.
During this study,
researchers are identifying and
characterizing the spawning
aggregations (groups) of three
different reef fish. This includes
two grouper subspecies, scamp
(Mycteroperca phenax) and gag
(Mycteroperca microlepis), as
well as red snapper (Lutjanus

Right: A FWC scientist


measures a red snapper
captured during ongoing
research efforts to characterize
aggregations in the South
Atlantic.
Opposite page: One of
the species studied in the
South Atlantic is the gag
grouper. Researchers collect
biological samples from the
fish to determine age, sex
and reproductive condition
to contribute to population
assessments.

campechanus). Research is
conducted in the Atlantic
Ocean from Cape Canaveral,
to the Florida-Georgia border.
Scientists sample gag and scamp
February-April and red snapper
from March-July. The data
collected helps scientists make
population assessments, and the
survey techniques used will help
identify the best practices for
future surveys.
The way a species survives
and reproduces plays a major
role in its ability to sustain a

healthy population. For this


study, a variety of techniques
are being used to assess
reproductive populations. One
method uses hydroacoustic
surveying (sonar or underwater
sound waves) to identify the
physical characteristics and
estimate the biomass of the
targeted species at potential
fish spawning locations. Video
surveys use cameras that are
towed or stationary to provide
information about the number
of fish in the area, fish size and

other spawning site information.


In addition, anglers perform
hooked-gear surveys, which are
more standardized approaches to
hook and line fishing. This is an
effective way to collect samples
around structures that would
interfere with nets and other
types of sampling gear. It also
enables researchers to better
estimate fish demographics
such as size, age, sex, etc. The
results of this study, so far,
have identified specific locations
where gag grouper go to spawn.

MARINE FISHERIES RESEARCH

15

Reassessing Red
Drum Spawning in th e
Eastern Gulf of Mexico
Researchers use aerial surveys and acoustic tagging to monitor and track
red drum population trends in the Gulf of Mexico.
Thousands of adult red drum
(Sciaenops ocellatus) gather
in nearshore waters during
spawning season. These
aggregations (groups) often
swim at the surface and look
like a river of flowing gold.
Tides carry the offspring into
an estuary where the fish spend
their first five to six years
and are heavily targeted by
anglers. This results in heavy
fishing of young red drum that
have not yet spawned. When
blackened redfish became the
craze in the 1980s, the red
drum aggregations made it
easy to catch huge numbers
of adult red drum in purse
seines. This combination of
events caused concern for the
sustainability of red drum
populations, leading to the
closure of red drum harvesting
in federal waters in the Gulf
of Mexico. Ironically, because
the population assessment of
marine fish stocks typically
depends on commercial landings
data, this led to a new problem:
The Gulf of Mexico Fisheries
Management Council (GMFMC)
does not have the data needed
to evaluate the status of red
drum populations. To address

16

A team of 10 biologists and three commercial fisherman work


together to capture and process over 1,000 live adult redfish
on the deck of the commercial purse boat. Each fish is quickly
measured, assessed for gender, and a small section of tail fin is
removed for genetic analysis before being released alive.
this problem, researchers at
the Fish and Wildlife Research
Institute initiated a new study
which integrates traditional
fishing methods (spotter planes
and purse seines) with emerging
scientific techniques (genetic

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

analysis and acoustic telemetry)


to estimate the red drum
spawning population size in the
Eastern Gulf of Mexico.
Researchers conduct aerial
surveys from Tampa Bay to

Charlotte Harbor during the


spawning season to identify
where red drum gather to
spawn. They work with
fishermen from Cortez, who
use purse seines (a type of
net) to collect a large number
of samples. These samples
are needed to genetically
characterize individual fish.
The fish are also measured for
length, and scientists sample
their reproductive glands
(gonads). The red drum are then
released. Each catch is compared
to previous data to see how
many repeated fish and new fish
are caught. Acoustic telemetry
uses small sound-emitting tags
to track fish movements to the
spawning grounds. These tags
also record data on the depth
the fish swims and the water
temperature, allowing scientists
to better understand individual
spawning behavior.
The research showed red
drum aggregations occur in
nearshore waters in August
and can continue through midNovember. In 2012, researchers
observed six aggregations during

A spotter plane is essential in locating aggregations of


adult redfish such as this one off Tampa Bay. Although
the aggregation is obvious from 700 feet in the air,
these fish can be difficult to spot from the water.

aerial surveys and 17 in 2013.


No aggregations were sighted
off Charlotte Harbor during the
2012 sampling season, possibly
due to a red tide occurrence. In
2013 aggregations were detected
throughout most of the coastal
area surveyed. Scientists took
biological and genetic samples
from 1,800 fish in 2012 (three
aggregations) and 3,400 fish in
2013 (six aggregations). Acoustic
telemetry data indicated that
most fish use a range larger
than the area between Tampa
Bay and Charlotte Harbor.
Spawning site fidelity was high:
92 percent of the fish detected
in both years returned to the
Tampa Bay area during the
spawning season.

Overall, the first year of


this project demonstrated the
efficiency and accuracy of the
research methods. The results
confirmed that genetic tagging is
a practical and reliable method
for individual identification
of red drum in capturerecapture studies. The acoustic
telemetry results have improved
researchers understanding
of how and where red drum
travel. Scientists analyzed and
recorded the genetic information
about each fish to compare to
others collected during future
sampling events. This data
provides insight about how red
drum population trends can
inform future conservation and
management decisions.

An adult redfish is released off the coast of Tampa Bay


following implantation of an acoustic tag inside its abdomen.
The tag transmits an identification code to moored
underwater receivers installed off Tampa Bay and Charlotte
Harbor, enabling scientists to learn more about residency
and spawning patterns along Floridas gulf coast.

MARINE FISHERIES RESEARCH

17

An FWRI biologist releases a 20-pound alligator gar (Atractosteus


spatula) as part of a telemetry study looking at the species habitat
use and movement in Northwest Floridas Escambia River. Data
collected during the study will provide a foundation for future
studies to estimate population size.

Freshwater
Fisheries Research
Jason Dotson, Section Administrator | Jason.Dotson@MyFWC.com

a look inside...

Freshwater
Fisheries Research
The fish in Floridas lakes and rivers are an important
natural resource. Fishing in these locations is a
significant contributor to tourism and the states
economy. Biologists with the Freshwater Fisheries
Research section collect and objectively analyze fish,
fishery, invertebrate, and habitat data. The results are
provided to internal and external resource managers
to aid them in developing scientifically informed
management strategies and policies. The information
is also made available to the public through news
releases, magazine articles, social media, and the web.

20

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

This page: Biologists use fyke


nets to survey the populations
of small freshwater fish species
living in shallow water. As
part of a long-term monitoring
project, FWRI researchers collect
data on fish communities from
30 lakes throughout Florida.
Monitoring these nearshore
environments and the small
fish that inhabit them will help
researchers assess the overall
health of each freshwater system.
Opposite, top: The FWC
cooperates with the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service to evaluate
stocking success of striped
bass in the St. Johns River.
Researchers use angler surveys
along with photo estimation of
Morone species (both striped
bass and hybrid striped bass)
to track year-to-year changes in
the population. To get the best
estimate, they conduct photo
surveys when fish gather in areas
such as Silver Glen Springs that
serve as thermal refuges during
the summer.
Opposite, bottom: Researchers
at the Blackwater Research
and Development Center in
Holt, Florida are developing
techniques to identify host
fish for freshwater mussel
reproduction. Larval mussels
attach themselves to the gills of
host fish and remain attached
for several weeks until they
transform into juveniles. Then
they fall off the host and settle
into the sediment where they
begin their journey to adulthood.
Learning more about the host
fish freshwater mussels depend
on will be vital to conservation of
the 14 threatened or endangered
mussel species found in Florida.
FRESHWATER FISHERIES RESEARCH

21

Above: A male largemouth bass


protects its fry during a study
conducted by FWRI freshwater
fisheries researchers to assess the
impacts of angling on nesting
largemouth bass. When adult
bass are caught, nest predators
eat the eggs and bass hatchlings.
With future largemouth bass
generations at stake, researchers
set out to study how largemouth
nest fishing in Florida will
impact the survival of future
generations of largemouth bass.
Right: FWRI limnology
staff members are collecting
dissolved oxygen (DO) data
from nearshore and open water
sites in collaboration with
FWRIs long-term monitoring
program. Dissolved oxygen is
oxygen that is dissolved in water
and adequate levels of DO are
necessary for good water quality.
This initial sampling focuses on
understanding the relationship
between DO trends in different
habitats. Future research will
assess the natural variations in
dissolved oxygen among different
types of freshwater systems
while exploring the factors that
influence DO trends.
22

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

at a glance...

Freshwater Fisheries
Research
Program Budget: $3,172,338
Staff: 58
Funding Sources
Aquatic Habitat and Restoration
Doc Stamps; Florida Department of
Environmental Protection; South Florida
Water Management District; St. Johns
River Water Management District; U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fish
Restoration

GDTF
(0.1%)

NGTF
(4.1%)

FGTF
(31.6%)

SGTF
(59.7%)

SGTF/
GRANTS
(4.5%)

Electrofishing is a common
method FWRI researchers use
to sample fish populations
on Floridas freshwater
systems. An electrofishing
boat uses a generator to
produce an electric current
that temporarily stuns the
fish, allowing researchers to
collect the fish with minimal
stress or injury. Researchers
then measure and record
each fishs length and weight,
and tag fish or take blood
samples if needed.
FRESHWATER FISHERIES RESEARCH

23

Biologists analyze bass genetics to determine the habitat ranges


of native and invasive bass species.
Florida bass, Micropterus
floridanus, grow larger than any
other black bass species, which
is part of the reason they are
the premier freshwater sport
fish in Florida. Recognizing the
ecological and economic value
of genetically-pure Florida
bass, FWRI biologists conduct
research to prevent these bass
from mating and producing
hybrid offspring with nonnative
northern largemouth bass, M.
salmoides.
24

The taxonomy of these two


bass has sparked a debate
amongst scientists. The
Florida bass and the northern
largemouth bass look very
similar, but do they represent
different species or subspecies?
They were originally described
as subspecies of largemouth
bass and the American Fisheries
Society (AFS) continues to use
this terminology. However,
many scientists have become
convinced that the Florida

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

bass is a distinct species based


on genetic, behavioral, and
environmental preference/
tolerance differences.
During a statewide genetics
study, scientists analyzed bass
collected from 48 freshwater
locations. The sampled water
bodies included populations of
pure Florida bass and intergrade
(or crossbred) populations
where Florida and northern
largemouth bass mixed. Genetic

Chapman

Studying Black Bass


Biology Down to the
Molecule

analysis indicates that there are


significant differences between
bass in four different regions
across the state. Research
determined that populations
of pure Florida bass are found
south of the Suwannee River,
while intergrade populations
were located in northern and
western parts of the state. This
led the FWC to adopt a statute
to designate pure largemouth
bass a conditional species
(dangerous to native ecosystems)
south of the Suwannee River.
This was intended to prevent
this non-native species from
being moved into the range of
pure Florida bass in peninsular
Florida by anglers, private pond
owners, or fish dealers.
Biologists collect tissue
samples from wild populations
and hatchery stocks and send
them to the FWRI fisheries
genetics laboratory for analysis.
Geneticists at FWRI have
developed a set of molecular
markers that effectively detect
hybrid fish. They work with
the Florida Bass Conservation
Center staff to ensure that only
pure Florida bass are allowed to
spawn at the hatchery so only
pure Florida bass are released
into water bodies during
stockings.
Since its creation, the bass
genetics project has expanded
to include research on all bass
species native to Florida. The
results of these studies will
provide resource managers
with information they can use
to protect the genetic integrity
of native species by preventing
or minimizing the chance of
hybridization with invasive
species.

Florida Bass are collected by electrofishing, temporarily


placed in an aerated live well, and then fin clipped to
determine their ancestry before released back into the
lake. Fin clips are sent to the FWRI Fisheries Genetics
Laboratory where DNA is extracted from the tissues.
FRESHWATER FISHERIES RESEARCH

25

Florida Freshwater
Mussel Conservation
Program
The species composition, abundance and age structure of mussel
communities can indicate the overall health of freshwater ecosystems.
Freshwater mussels are a
critical component of freshwater
ecosystems, but unfortunately
nearly 70 percent of the 300
mussel species known to inhabit
North America are considered
to be imperiled, making
freshwater mussels the most
threatened group of animals
on earth. The southeastern
United States supports the
greatest mussel diversity in
North America. Sixty mussel
species are known to inhabit
Florida, and of these, 60 percent
are considered imperiled.
Fifteen Florida species are
federally listed as endangered
or threatened and an additional
21 species are designated by
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission as
Species of Greatest Conservation
Need. The decline of Floridas
mussel fauna is attributable
to a number of factors
including habitat destruction,
deterioration of water quality,
declining water levels and flows,
toxic spills, and invasive species.
Mussels have an
important role in freshwater

26

Last summer mussel researchers rediscovered the Ochlockonee


Moccasinshell (Medionidus simpsonianus), a species that was
thought to be extinct. After a trek into an isolated stretch of
the lower Ochlockonee River, the mussel was found to still
exist at six locations within a short reach of the river.
environments because they
provide food to many other
species. They contribute to the
natural decomposition and
nutrient cycling processes in
freshwater by filter-feeding,
which improves water quality
by removing bacteria, algae
and sediments from the water.
Mussel communities are also
an important tool for scientists:

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

The species composition,


abundance and age structure of
mussel communities is a good
indicator of the overall health of
freshwater ecosystems.
The importance of mussels to
freshwater ecosystems combined
with the immediate need for
improved mussel conservation
efforts led to the development of

After diving in the Suwannee River, researchers identify and sort the different mussel species.
the Florida Freshwater Mussel
Conservation Program. The
primary goals of this long-term
effort are to document past and
current distribution, abundance
and habitat requirements, as
well as to promote management
and education activities to
ensure the sustainability of
Florida mussel communities. The
FWC is partnering with other
agencies including the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service, the U.S.
Geological Survey, the Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection, the Florida
Museum of Natural History,
the Alabama Department of
Natural Resources, and the
Georgia Department of Natural
Resources.

Scientists with FWC began


establishing monitoring sites and
sampling mussel communities
in 14 major river basins in July
2014. At each site, quantitative
and qualitative sampling
methods are employed to
document species composition
and abundance. Researchers
use scuba techniques, wade
and/or snorkel. A motorized
suction sampler is used to obtain
quantitative samples. Once
samples are collected, biologists
identify the mussel species,
measure their size, and count
them. The live mussels are then
returned to their habitat. Habitat
measurements are also obtained
at each site. Surveys will be
repeated on a five year cycle to

document changes in mussel


populations over time.
Data from these field
collections is added to a statewide
mussel database which contains
records of Florida mussel
collections from the early 1900s.
Analyses of this database will
allow researchers to determine
long-term population trends and
identify responses to changing
environmental conditions.
Results of these analyses will
provide resource managers with
the information needed to make
decisions to ensure the long-term
protection of mussel communities
and the overall health of Floridas
freshwater ecosystems.

FRESHWATER FISHERIES RESEARCH

27

The FWRI avian research group is currently conducting demographic and fire
management research on the Florida grasshopper sparrow, a critically endangered
songbird dependent on the remaining Florida dry prairie habitat fragments. The
population at Three Lakes Wildlife Management Area in Osceola county is colorbanded and monitored to help biologists better understand the birds habitat
management preferences. Important findings from this research are already being
applied in an attempt to slow the decline of this rare and elusive bird.

Wildlife Research

Robin Boughton, Section Administrator | Robin.Boughton@MyFWC.com

a look inside...

Wildlife
Research

From the tiny beach mouse to the not so tiny right


whale, Florida is home to a wide array of wildlife species.
Biologists with the Wildlife Research section monitor
the status of Floridas birds, mammals, reptiles and
amphibians. This includes species important to hunters
such as deer, alligator and waterfowl, and imperiled
species such as the Florida panther and the Florida
manatee. Wildlife managers rely on the information this
research provides to develop conservation and restoration
plans that ensure the long-term persistence of Floridas
wildlife populations.

Top: North Atlantic right whale


Catalog #1321 and calf sighted
on March 10, 2014. Researchers
documented 11 mother-calf pairs in
the waters off the southeast U.S. coast
during the 2013-2014 calving season.
Catalog #1321 is at least 31 years old
and this is her fifth calf.
Bottom: An 88-pound male alligator
snapping turtle that was trapped in
the Ochlockonee River in July 2014.
As part of a status assessment of
the newly described Apalachicola
alligator snapping turtle, researchers
are trapping alligator snapping turtles
in the Ochlockonee, Apalachicola and
Choctawhatchee rivers.
30

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Above: During a night-light


survey, an observer shines a
spotlight to illuminate the
eyes of any alligators in the
area. The observer then counts
the animals, places them in
size categories and relays the
information to the recorder.
Researchers use these surveys
to estimate alligator population
numbers in Florida.
Left: Wildlife biologists at FWRI
release a loggerhead sea turtle
into the Gulf of Mexico after
attaching a satellite transmitter
to track the turtles movements
as part of a study of loggerhead
foraging habitats on the West
Florida Shelf. Data collected
includes water temperature, dive
patterns and precise locations.
Tracking the turtles movements
will help FWC manage marine
habitats used by loggerheads
and reef fish.
WILDLIFE RESEARCH

31

Above: An FWC research project is


documenting marked and unmarked
Florida panthers in South Florida
using motion-activated camera
traps to more accurately estimate
the current panther population.
Given their endangered status, it is
important to have an established
methodology to determine
population size to monitor progress
towards recovery.
Right: Wildlife biologists are paying
close attention to three species of
bats that roost in Florida caves,
monitoring for the presence of
white nose syndrome (WNS). The
disease was first discovered in
2006 and is caused by a fungus
that appears on the bats muzzle
and can sometimes cause scarring
on the wings. No reports of WNS
have been documented in Florida,
but biologists continue to learn
more about the disease and focus
monitoring and conservation efforts
on preventing it from affecting
Floridas native bat species.
32

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

at a glance...

Wildlife
Research

Program Budget: $10,547,279


Staff: 106

PRTF
(1.9%)

GDTF
(1.9%)
FGTF
(11.8%)

MRCTF
(28.1%)

SGTF
(11%)

Funding Sources
Disney Wildlife Conservation Fund; FDEPDivision
of Recreation and Parks; Florida Power and Light
Company; John H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue
Assistance; Marine Mammal Center; National Marine
Fisheries Service; National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration; Raymond James Trust; Sea Turtle
Conservancy; Southwest Florida Water Management
District; Tampa Electric Company; U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service; U.S. Forest Service; Wildlife
Conservation Society; Wildlife Foundation of Florida

STMTF
(22.2%)
NGWTF
(22.5%)

MRCTF/
GRANTS
(0.6%)

When FWRI receives calls


from the public reporting
manatees in distress, field
staff members coordinate
a network of personnel
from various agencies and
organizations to rescue
and, when necessary,
transport manatees to
rehabilitation facilities.
WILDLIFE RESEARCH

33

Working to
P reserve the
F lorida Mottled
Duck from a
Muddled Future

With the help of high resolution photography and genetic testing,


researchers develop visual keys to identify mottled duck populations.
When most people think of
conservation they think large
scale (e.g. ecosystems and
wildlife populations) but in order
to preserve such vast resources,
researchers at the Fish and
Wildlife Research Institute
are working on a more specific
level: genetic preservation of a
species. Feral mallards (Anas
platyrhynchos) pose a significant
threat of hybridization, or crossbreeding, to native Florida
mottled ducks (Anas fulvigula).
This issue could potentially
lead to extinction of the native
mottled duck. The ultimate goal
of this research is to protect
this Florida duck from being
hybridized out of existence by
feral mallards.

34

A male mottled and mallard duck hybrid


swimming in East Central Florida.

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Recent research efforts


resulted in the creation of a
phenotypic (observable traits)
and morphometric (size and
shape) feather key to identify
pure mottled ducks. This key
will be used to distinguish
the number of pure mottled
ducks within the muddled
mess of hybrids and feral
mallards that currently swim
and fly throughout peninsular
Florida. The accuracy of the
key to distinguish mottled
ducks from mallards and
hybrids was confirmed through
genetic testing. This key will
help determine the overall
severity of the hybridization
problem, monitor the status of
hybridization over time, and
determine the effectiveness of
scientists efforts in reducing
cross-breeding.
Researchers will apply the
key to thousands of supposed
mottled ducks at locations
throughout the species habitat
range in Florida. High resolution
photography of each duck will
allow researchers to measure
various physical characteristics
within the photographs without
capturing the birds. The visual
feather traits, such as feather
length, determine mottled ducks
from hybrids. Researchers
developed a laser scaling device

A researcher uses a Canon high resolution digital single lens reflex


(DSLR) camera with a Canon 600mm image stabilized lens. In
partnership with NASA, researchers with FWC are developing a laser
scaling device to attach to cameras. The laser beams can be focused
exactly one inch apart on the object being photographed, providing a
scale for measurements.
which attaches to a digital
camera and accurately measures
feather length from a distance.
The next stage of this
research will finalize a
monitoring plan that will allow
researchers to measure and
track the population trends
of the Florida mottled duck.
The plan includes annual
assessments over a five-year
period. If successful, this effort

will provide the data necessary


for the research team to devise
effective management strategies
to minimize cross-breeding
in the Florida mottled duck
population. The information
obtained from this research will
also benefit researchers and
managers working on similar
hybridization problems facing
the Western Gulf Coast mottled
ducks in Texas and Louisiana.

WILDLIFE RESEARCH

35

Coyotes:
Opportunistic
Omnivores

Researchers study the diets of coyotes in different


habitats to analyze what they eat.
Their howls can be heard in
the night. They prowl about
in suburban neighborhoods,
so you may hear them in your
backyard. Coyotes, Canis
latrans, are well-camouflaged:
their brown, gray fur
camouflages their lean bodies
against dense brush. Coyotes
are habitat generalists, meaning
they live in almost every type of
habitat and are in every Florida
county. Because they adapt so
well to different environments,
coyotes often cross paths with
humans.
From insects to dog food,
coyotes are opportunistic
omnivores, meaning they eat
whatever plants and animals
are most readily available.
However, natural food sources
are not always easiest to come
by: Biologists have found fast
food containers and chocolate
wrappers in deceased coyotes
stomachs. One of the main
objectives of coyote research is to
study how humans affect coyote
eating habits. Scientists with

36

A researcher examines the stomach contents of a coyote.


Coyotes typically digest food in five hours or less.

FWRI intend to determine what


percentage of coyotes diets in
urban/suburban areas is from
human food. Researchers are
also evaluating whether wild

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

turkey (Meleagris gallopavo)


plays a major role in coyote
diets, with particular focus
on turkey nesting season.
Understanding the role coyote

Coyotes are now a common species in Florida due to natural range


expansion, and have been sighted in all Florida counties. Increased
presence of coyotes in Florida has led to increased incidences of humancoyote encounters, especially in urban and suburban areas.

predation plays on turkey


populations can help address
research and management
questions.
Because traditional scat
sampling may not provide
the most accurate results due
to the digestion process, this
study analyzes deceased coyote
stomach contents. So far,
researchers acquired 234 coyote
carcasses from urban and rural
landscapes statewide. This

habitat diversity provides a good


comparison between different
diets. Researchers evaluate the
dead animals for heartworms
which, if found, are counted and
collected to study the prevalence
of the parasite in coyotes.
Genetic samples of the coyotes
are sent to Princeton University
for analysis. Ticks and blood
samples are collected for the
University of Florida to examine
the animals for blood-related
diseases.

The different components


of this study provide the data
needed to better understand
coyotes and their role in
Floridas ecosystems. Coyote
populations remain steady in
some areas and are increasing
in others. It is important for
scientists to understand coyotes
impacts on humans and wildlife
in order to make informed
management decisions.

WILDLIFE RESEARCH

37

Florida Bay contains one of the worlds most extensive seagrass


communities. The South Florida Fisheries Habitat Assessment
Program (SF-FHAP) has provided spatially comprehensive data
on the distribution, abundance, and species composition of Florida
Bay seagrasses for the past 20 years. The changes in the Florida Bay
seagrass community structure documented by SF-FHAP are being used
to evaluate the effects of water-management alterations associated with
Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan.
Photo credit: A.V. Uhrin, NOAA

Ecosystem Assessment
and Restoration
Leanne Flewelling, Subsection Administrator for
Fish and Wildlife Health and Harmful Algal Blooms Research
Leanne.Flewelling@MyFWC.com
Amber Whittle, Subsection Administrator for Habitat Research
Amber.Whittle@MyFWC.com

a look inside...

Ecosystem
Assessment
and Restoration
Floridas diverse fish and wildlife species face threats
every day. Biologists with the Ecosystem Assessment and
Restoration section track many of these threats. Researchers
monitor harmful algal blooms, including Florida red tide,
that can cause human health and economic problems, and
monitor and investigate fish and wildlife diseases and dieoffs. Section researchers also evaluate the status of habitats,
providing data that aid in preservation, management and
restoration decision-making.

Above: A Fish and Wildlife


Health scientist conducts a
necropsy on a goliath grouper
that died as a result of cold
stress. Opportune sampling
during natural events allows
researchers to learn more about
protected species.
Right: A researcher handles
water containing Karenia
brevis, the organism responsible
for Florida red tides. Harmful
algal bloom researchers recently
demonstrated that bacteria play
an important role by making
otherwise unavailable nutrients
accessible to this organism.
This finding improves our
understanding of the conditions
affecting the formation of red
tides. High nutrient content
is one of several major factors
influencing red tide events.
40

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Above: FWRI scientists collect


water samples to measure trace
elements found in tidal creeks
along the Little Manatee River,
which empties into Tampa Bay.
These measurements will be
combined with trace element
analysis of snook otoliths
(earstones) to discover which
tidal creeks make the best
nurseries for juvenile snook.
Left: A researcher conducts field
sampling on Lake Istokpoga
in Highlands County to collect
data for comparing plant
communities before and after
herbicide treatments. This
research will help determine
which treatment strategy
achieved better results for
improving fish and wildlife
habitat conditions.
ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION

41

Above: A researcher collects coral


demographic (population) data
for the Coral Reef Evaluation
and Monitoring Project, a longterm monitoring effort that
began in 1996. At permanent
monitoring stations, FWRI staff
members identify each coral
colony to species, measure them
and record any diseases and
partial colony mortality. With
these data, researchers can
assess the health and status of
the population over time.
Right: Researchers monitor
native plant species at the Triple
N Ranch Wildlife Management
Area in Osceola County. FWRI
staff has monitored this site for
the FWCs Division of Habitat
and Species Conservation for
more than 10 years, identifying
potential negative impacts to
native plant communities from
cattle grazing.
42

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

at a glance...

Ecosystem
Assessment and
Restoration
Program Budget: $6,662,841
Staff: 84
Funding Sources
Conserve Wildlife Conservation
Trust Fund; Florida Department of
Environmental Protection; Florida
Sea Grant; FWC Hunting and Game
Management; FWC Florida Wildlife
Legacy Initiative - State Wildlife Grants
Program; FWC Habitat and Species
Conservation (HSC) Aquatic Habitat
Restoration and Enhancement; FWC HSC
Terrestrial Habitat Conservation and
Restoration; Georgia Aquarium; Indian
River Lagoon National Estuary Program;
Marine Biodiversity Observation Network
(Marine BON); Mote Marine Laboratory;
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration; National Fish & Wildlife
Foundation - Tampa Bay Environmental
Fund; National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA); National Park
Service, Dry Tortugas; NOAA National
Marine Fisheries Service; South Florida
Water Management District; Tampa Bay
Environmental Fund; Tampa Bay Estuary
Program; U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service;
U.S. Geological Survey; YSI/Xylem

FGTF
(20.7%)
GDTF
(2.4%)

GR
(36.4%)

CARLTF
(2.7%)
SGTF
(4.0%)
NGWTF (0.2%)
MRCTF/
GRANTS
(4.4%)

MRCTF
(27.0%)
PRTF
(2.2%)

A researcher uses a dissecting microscope to


observe abnormalities found in frog larvae
as part of a statewide amphibian disease
study focused on conservation of Floridas
amphibians. With help from other state agencies,
local governments and municipalities, FWRI
researchers aim to provide a complete picture of
amphibian health in Florida.
ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION

43

From Stony Corals to


Octocorals: Monitoring
changes in the Florida
Keys Reef Habitats

Researchers with the Coral Reef Evaluation and Monitoring Project identify trends
in changing habitats in tropical waters.
Coral reefs extend over the
tropical and subtropical
ocean floors and support
very diverse, productive,
marine ecosystems. Climate
and human impacts result
in mass mortalities of
stony, reef-building corals
worldwide. In Florida, coral

44

reef communities exist from


Martin County southwest to
the Dry Tortugas. Scientists
and conservation managers
recognize the importance of
coral reef habitats: Research
and management projects have
been conducted in Florida for
more than 100 years.

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

The Florida Keys National


Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS) was
designated in 1990. The FKNMS
covers approximately 2,900
square miles and is managed
by the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA). Recognizing the
critical role of water quality

in maintaining the habitat of


the FKNMS, Congress directed
the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency and the
State of Florida to develop
the Water Quality Protection
Program for the FKNMS. Three
different monitoring projects
were established as part of
this program: Scientists study
the regions seagrasses, water
quality and coral reef habitats.
The creation of the Coral
Reef Evaluation and Monitoring
Project (CREMP) was a
component of this protection
program. The CREMP scientists
have annually monitored reef
habitats in the Florida Keys
since 1996, southeast Florida
since 2003 and the Dry Tortugas
since 1999. Photographs, videos
and visual surveys assess the
abundance, condition and
population structure of all stony
corals, a subset of gorgonian
corals (soft corals), and the large
barrel sponge, Xestospongia
muta. During the demographic
surveys, researchers collect
information on diseases or other
conditions that negatively affect
the population.
This project is the third
longest tenured coral reef
monitoring studies in the world.
It has been extremely important
in documenting how a variety of
disturbances have altered the
structure of coral communities.
The CREMP team has been very
successful at describing how
local and global stressors (hot
and cold-water stress events,
coral disease outbreaks, and
harmful algal bloom impacts)
have resulted in short-term (e.g.
year-to-year differences) and
long-term changes in coral reef
communities in the FKNMS.

One of the more prominent


observations CREMP has
documented recently is that the
decline of corals on many reefs
has led to the proliferation of
octocorals (soft corals) as the
predominant reef creature in
the Florida Keys. It is likely
that this transition has been
happening for several decades
but has accelerated as conditions
appear more favorable for
non-scleractinian fauna, such
as octocorals and sponges.
Although the transition from
hard coral-dominated reefs to
ones composed primarily of

soft corals and sponges will


be different, they still provide
many of the beneficial ecosystem
functions, such as food and
shelter for a variety of fish and
invertebrates.
Nearly 25 percent of all
marine animals use coral reefs for
part of their life cycle. In order to
develop necessary management
actions to preserve these habitats
and to monitor the characteristics
of coral reef condition, CREMP
will continue to conduct vital
research throughout the south
Florida region.

ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION

45

Monitoring Seagrass
at Floridas Big Bend

Virtual Buoy Systems, satellite data, and ground surveys


provide data to researchers about seagrass habitats.
Beneath the shallow waters
surface, a vast grassy
habitat sways with the tides.
Seagrasses evolved from land
plants and are significantly
different than seaweed.
Apalachee Bay is home to
the second largest seagrass
bed in the country. Stretching
along more than 100 miles of
the Big Bend coastline and
across approximately 600,000
acres, these marine plants are
essential to Floridas ecosystems.
They provide food and shelter to
a variety of animals and serve
as a nursery for many juvenile
invertebrates and fish. Seagrass
roots anchor in the ground,
stabilize the sea bottom, and
prevent erosion.
Each of the seven species of
seagrasses have unique habitat
requirements for survival. All
seagrass needs sunlight, so
transparent water is essential.
In order to assess the health of
these marine plants, scientists
monitor the water clarity of
their surrounding habitats
year-round. Researchers conduct
annual surveys at approximately
300 sites in Florida. They also
perform frequent ground-truth
survey cruises which support
satellite data and distribution on
the web.
Researchers at FWRI and
partnering agencies developed

46

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

NASA

The dark clouds of coffee-colored water show plumes from the Suwannee
River and other coastal rivers in the northeast Gulf of Mexico.

the Virtual Buoy System (VBS)


to remotely identify water
information from satellite
imagery for the Big Bend
region and the Suwannee River
Estuary. The University of South
Florida Optical Oceanography
Lab manages and analyzes
the satellite data. The Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection staff at the Big Bend
Seagrass Aquatic Preserve
also perform field sampling for
seagrasses and water quality.

Because the satellite has been


in orbit since 2002, researchers
compare the trends in data over
the past 12 years to analyze
changes in water clarity and
seagrass characteristics. This
information helps scientists
track natural processes and
nutrient management activities
in and around these habitats.
This project has made a
number of important scientific
findings. The creation of the

VBS produced a new beneficial


tool for scientific monitoring and
information management that
decreases cost by minimizing
field time. The VBS delivers data
to an interactive map on the web
which allows anyone to access
information on these underwater
meadows. By tracking trends
in water quality and seagrass
abundance, scientists can better
assess the health of these vital
ecosystems.

ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION

47

Exploring New
Options for Managing
Coastal Scrub Plant
Communities
Researchers monitor vegetation heights, density, plant cover, and species abundance
to determine the best practices for conserving these habitats.
Florida scrub-jays and gopher
tortoises (both federally
threatened species) have been
losing coastal scrub habitat.
Fish and Wildlife Research
Institute scientists study
this valuable habitat type to
determine the best management
strategies to maintain or
improve coastal scrub habitat
throughout Florida.
Research is conducted
at the Guana River Wildlife
Management Area (WMA)
located 13 miles north of St.
Augustine in St. Johns County.
By experimenting with scrub
management techniques,
researchers develop a better
understanding of how to
manage coastal scrub vegetation
for wildlife while minimizing the
use of mechanical treatments.
Because much scrub habitat
has been encroached upon
by urban areas, and the use
of prescribed fire has become
problematic, there has been
an increase in mechanical
treatment. However, their
research has found that
48

The FWC manages several different scrub habitat locations


throughout the state. Scrub habitat occurs on well-drained,
sandy soils. This habitat has a patchy distribution and
occurs in both inland and coastal areas. It is fire-dependent,
meaning it is maintained by fires that occur infrequently at
intervals of 10-20 years or more.

mechanically treating scrub may


not always produce desirable
outcomes. Mechanical treatment

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

may reduce palmetto cover that


helps to carry fire, and this
may result in soil disturbance

Scrub test plots are mechanically treated by mowing or roller chopping


in a perimeter, strip or checkerboard pattern and burned with prescribed
fire. Each test plot receives one of the treatments. Researchers collect data
on the vegetation characteristics at each sample station within the test
plots for pre- and post-treatment conditions.

which often causes exotic plants


to invade. Also, mechanical
treatment can result in uniform
vegetation heights and is more
costly than prescribed fire alone.
Preliminary research
suggests that alternative
methods of mechanical
treatments (i.e., mowing in a
checkerboard or mowing linear
strips as opposed to mowing
entire units) should be used
in concert with prescribed
fire to minimize the impacts
of mechanical treatment.
Researchers are monitoring

a variety of factors including


vegetation heights, stem
density, plant cover, bare
ground estimates, and species,
to determine the best approach.
So far, the positive effects of
these alternative methods
correlate more with the amount
of habitat treated rather than
the specific method.
The staff at the Guana
River WMA are pleased with
the results of the experiment
and plan to incorporate the
techniques into their scrub
management plan, making the

study an excellent example


of applied research. It is
anticipated that modifying
their technique will result in
significant cost savings in terms
of equipment operation and man
hours required to treat scrub.
In addition, the final report
provides suggested acreage
guidelines in order to achieve
desired mean height of the scrub
vegetation. Ideally, the Guana
River WMA Coastal Scrub
Management Plan will become a
model for the rest of the states
scrub habitat.

ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION

49

Responding to
F ish Kills and the
F ish Kill Hotline
With the help of reports from the public, scientists respond to fish kills
to examine the cause of death.
The Fish and Wildlife Health
(FWH) group, based in St.
Petersburg and Gainesville,
conducts applied research to
determine the cause of mortality
and disease in fish and wildlife
populations. One significant
component of FWH activities
is to respond to fish kills or
disease events by addressing
recreational angler concerns.
For this purpose, FWH manages
and maintains the FWC
Fish Kill Hotline, where the
public can report fish kills and
disease while out on the water.
Scientists then determine
the appropriate response,
conduct an investigation when
needed, and collaborate with
appropriate staff or agency
partners.
The publics participation
is crucial in helping FWC track
fish kills and disease outbreaks.
Every report is documented
in our searchable database,
and each person receives a
reply. Public reports give
FWH staff the opportunity to
answer questions, initiate event
response when needed, provide
management recommendations
as appropriate, and identify fish
kill trends over time. Utilizing

50

The scientists thoroughly examine different characteristics of the


fish such as organ color, tissue damage and stomach contents. These
observations help scientists determine the cause of death.
the information and assistance
from concerned citizens obtained
through the hotline, FWH
staff document and investigate
mortality and disease events
around the state.
The FWH team gathers
and analyzes data from field
investigations, and a variety
of samples may be collected
through collaboration with
many groups, including:

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

FWRIs Harmful Algal Blooms


group, Fish Biology, Fisheries
Independent and Dependent
Monitoring, FWCs Division
of Freshwater Fisheries
Management, law enforcement
and other agencies. The FWH
group uses many diagnostic
tools to evaluate fish, such as
histology, microbiology, DNA
analysis, virology, hematology,
parasitology, and light and
electron microscopy.

A variety of factors, both naturally occurring and human-made, contribute to fish kills. In October 2014,
these dead fish washed ashore a shallow lagoon in St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. A shorebird survey
crew reported the fish kill to FWRI researchers, who determined that the event was most likely due to a
trawler dumping bycatch in the pass nearby.

Fish kills, while alarming,


can also provide researchers a
rare opportunity to collect life
history data on fish species they
would not normally survey.
Samples collected from fish
kills provide tissue for DNA
analysis, otoliths (ear bones)
and fin rays to determine age,
gut contents to learn about
feeding, muscle for mercury
analysis used for public health/
consumption recommendations,
gonadal tissue to learn about
reproduction, and data on the
geographic range of the species.

The samples are then tested


using a variety of diagnostic
tools to help researchers
understand what factors impact
Floridas fish populations.
Fish kills and disease events
affect Floridas fish populations
and often reflect the health of
the environment. Data can be
used to identify environmental
problems and in some cases,
measure the extent of fish kills to
help develop fishing regulations.
For example, an extensive snook
kill due to cold in 2010 resulted

in the closure of the snook


fishing season that year.
FWRI encourages the
public to participate as citizen
scientists to assist with our
research and management
efforts. When a member of the
public calls the hotline, they
provide valuable information
which is included in a long-term,
statewide dataset to monitor
the health of Floridas fish and
wildlife.

ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION

51

Center for Spatial Analysis staff use mapping technology that helps
researchers conduct marine, freshwater and terrestrial related
research. One example is using side-scan sonar to map the bottom
of the Chipola River as part of a study of shoal bass habitats and
spawning behavior. Once the map was created, the researcher in the
photo conducted an accuracy assessment.

Information Science
and Management

Henry Norris, Section Administrator | Henry.Norris@MyFWC.com

a look inside...

Information Science
and Management
Researchers in this section address complex natural
resource issues by integrating ecological, cultural and
socioeconomic information using statistical and spatial
analysis techniques. Staff develop maps and model
distribution patterns of fish and wildlife, identify lands
and waters that are conservation priorities, and assess
economic impacts of recreational activities. The sections
database experts, statisticians, research librarians,
specimen collection managers, outreach specialists and
scientific editor provide additional support to FWC
scientists and managers.

Above: An FWRI intern conducts


a post-burn assessment at Bell
Ridge Longleaf Mitigation Park.
Staff used the data collected
to calibrate post-burn satellite
imagery, which will be used to
map the extent and intensity of
the prescribed fire.
Right: To provide a better picture
of the current state of patch
reefs in the Florida Keys, FWRI
Center for Spatial Analysis
researchers started a project to
map reefs in the Upper, Middle
and Lower Keys, and determine
their coral cover. The team used
satellite data to map the number,
location and size of patch reefs
throughout the Keys, and then
divers (like the one pictured)
recorded the percentage of live
coral cover for each. These data
are valuable to researchers and
managers trying to keep these
important habitats healthy.
54

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

A technician sorts specimens from the Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment
Program (SEAMAP) Trawl Survey Project. Specimen Information Services staff
identify the invertebrate specimens that Fisheries-Independent Monitoring staff collect
during SEAMAP research trawls. Subsequently, the specimens are preserved and
catalogued for additional taxonomic research.
INFORMATION SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT

55

Above: Over 10,000 people


attended the three days of
MarineQuest 2014, the 20th
annual open house of the
Fish and Wildlife Research
Institute (FWRI). Each year at
MarineQuest, visitors of any
age can explore Floridas fish
and wildlife and their habitats
at FWRI headquarters in
downtown St. Petersburg.
Right: Research Information
Center staff members organize
reference materials, including
professional journals, stand
alone reports, government
documents, research publications
and books. They obtain,
maintain and distribute these
materials to fulfill the literature
needs of FWRI staff and the
public, making sure useful and
current scientific information is
accessible to those who need it.
Opposite page: Staff routinely
participate in oil spill drills with
partners. Here, participants are
collaborating to identify different
alternatives for the protection of
natural resources located close to
the spill site.
56

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

at a glance...

Information Science
and Management

PRTF
(0.1%)

Program Budget: $4,612,987


Staff: 63
Funding Sources
Coastal Protection Trust Fund; Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA); EPA Gulf of Mexico Program; Florida
Department of Environmental Protection; iDigBio;
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA);
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; South
Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Southeast Coastal
Ocean Observing Regional Association; Southwest
Florida Water Management District; State Wildlife
Grants Program; U.S. Coast Guard; U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service; USFWS/Peninsular Florida Landscape
Conservation Cooperative; Wildlife Foundation of Florida

FGTF
(21.6%)

CARLTF
(1.8%)

MRCTF
(43.3%)

SGTF
(9.3%)

NGWTF
(10.1%)
MRCTF/
GRANTS
(13.8%)

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT

57

Mapping out Floridas


F ish and Wildlife
Staff with the Center for Spatial Analysis use research data
to create visual models which represent the locations and
conditions of wildlife and their habitats.
How are animals and their
habitats distributed across
Floridas terrestrial, freshwater
and marine ecosystems? This
important and interesting
question is addressed daily by
the Center for Spatial Analysis
(CSA).
The CSA team develops
spatial models to delineate fish
and wildlife habitats across
the state to support the needs
of researchers, managers and
interested citizens. The term
spatial means the typical
product of the model is a map.
To build models that estimate
the locations of habitats
researchers use digital maps,
each representing a different
component of habitat, such as
land cover, soil type or elevation.
Modeling is conducted using
a Geographic Information
System (GIS), which involves
sophisticated computer
programs that layer the maps
and identify combinations
among the different habitats
associated with a greater
likelihood of hosting a specific
species. Researchers can then
create a final map of where

58

to expect fish or wildlife;


this final map is called the
species potential habitat.
Field biologists can visit these
potential habitat sites to see
if the animals actually live
there. These maps of potential
habitats help researchers better
understand important factors
which impact habitat-use by
fish and wildlife. These maps
can show the impacts of human
land-use, effects of sea level rise,
and the connectivity of habitats
which can enhance or inhibit
movement of native plants and
animals across Florida.

information become available


and then provide these updates
to researchers and managers.

Spatial models also


benefit the management
of the species because they
provide information about
habitats where protection or
restoration efforts may be
needed. Furthermore, they can
provide detailed information to
species and habitat monitoring
programs so they can add to or
make adjustments to existing
survey sites and monitoring
protocols. In the future, the
CSA will continue to build
on these habitat models by
refining them as new data and

The Center for Spatial


Analysis works across FWC
divisions using spatial
technologies to develop habitat
and species models that provide
improved visualization and
decision support for both
scientists and managers.
The models, built from many
different pieces of data, offer the
necessary insights concerning
species-habitat connections,
data gaps, and prioritization
of research and management
resources.

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

The CSA team coordinates


with researchers at the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service and
the Florida Natural Areas
Inventory to share analysis
techniques and data and to
ensure modeling efforts are
not redundant or duplicated.
Recently, a partnership was
formed with the South Florida
Water Management District
to develop models for certain
species.

Striped Newt Model: This map displays the degrees of likelihood for a striped newt to be living in its
potential habitat. There is a higher likelihood of suitable habitat occurring in the black areas although
white areas could still contain good habitat. The model output is shown on top of satellite imagery so
researchers and managers can zoom in to areas of interest to examine potential habitat.

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT

59

FWRI Director Gil McRae gives a presentation on stock assessments at an


FWC Commission meeting in Pensacola.

Office of the Direc tor


Gil McRae, FWRI Director | Gil.McRae@MyFWC.com

a look inside...

Office of
the Director

Program Budget: $10,453,268


Staff: 44

FGTF
(0.1%)
CARLTF (0.1%)
STMTF (1.4%)
NGWTF (1.6%)

The Office of the Director is responsible for managing


a budget of more than $67,000,000, which supports
all programs and operations of the Fish and Wildlife
Research Institute. FWRIs director leads the science
sections and oversees Institute-wide functions, such
as Research Operations, which provides facilities and
budget-related support.
More than 600 staff members make up FWRI.
FWRIs headquarters, located in downtown St.
Petersburg, is home base to nearly half of its
employees. More than 20 field stations enable other
FWRI staff members to be strategically located
throughout the state near the resources they study.

A grants office staff member


reviews requirements of a grant
award to track due-dates for
reports. These nonscientific
employees support the Institutes
scientific mission by reminding
researchers of reporting
requirements and submitting
reports on their behalf.

62

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

GDTF/GRANTS
(0.7%)

SGTF
(3.9%)

MRCTF/
GRANTS
(12.6%)

GENERAL
REVENUE
(30.2%)

MRCTF
(49.2%)

PRTF
(0.2%)

New Research
Institute Makes
Waves in Jacksonville
Scientists at the Marine Science Research Institute conduct fisheries research to advise
policymakers on species statuses and trends on the east coast.
Higher education provides the
opportunity for students to
learn from individuals with
similar passions by conducting
research and working directly
with scientists in their field of
interest. Theres a unique level
of synergy within an educational
institution, especially one such
as the Marine Science Research
Institute (MSRI) at Jacksonville
University. Located on the
St. Johns River, the institute
sits among the diverse aquatic
ecosystems of a freshwater
river, brackish marshes and
the marine environment of the
Atlantic Ocean.
The idea began in 1998 as
a collaborative effort amongst

Jacksonville University,
Duval County Public Schools,
Jacksonville Marine Charities,
the National Park Service, and
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC). The MSRI facility hosts
the St. Johns Riverkeeper office,
along with FWC staff from the
Jacksonville University Field
Laboratory, the Millar Wilson
Laboratory for Environmental
Chemistry, the Jacksonville
University sailing program,
and a new high school marine
education program.
One of the two FWC
programs located at this new
institute is the FisheriesIndependent Monitoring (FIM)

Fisheries-Independent Monitoring staff collect fishery samples in the


St. Johns River using a 183-m seine.

program. This research program


monitors the relative abundance
of fishery resources in Floridas
major estuarine, coastal and reef
systems. Scientists with the FIM
program conduct research on the
abundance, recruitment, habitat
use, and distribution of hundreds
of estuarine and marine species.
Contrary to FIM, the FisheriesDependent Monitoring (FDM)
program is also housed at
the Marine Science Research
Institute. The FDM program
collects data directly from
commercial and recreational
fishers on how many people are
fishing, as well as individual
fish information (size, species,
whether it was released or kept,
etc). Both of these monitoring
programs track species and
habitat characteristics for
economic and scientific value
for industry estimates and
management policies.
The Marine Science Research
Institutes ideal location coupled
with the collaborative network
of professionals creates a hub
for environmental studies on the
Jacksonville University campus.
The local waterways surrounding
this institute provide convenient
hands-on opportunities for
research that can be applied to
ecosystems nationwide.

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR

63

a look inside...

Research publications
Adams, Douglas H. and Christian Sonne. 2013.
Mercury and histopathology of the vulnerable
goliath grouper, Epinephelus itajara, in U.S.
waters: A multi-tissue approach. Environmental
Research 126:254-263.
Adams, Douglas, and Marc Engel. 2014. Mercury,
lead, and cadmium in blue crabs, Callinectes
sapidus, from the Atlantic coast of Florida, USA:
a multipredator approach. Ecotoxicology and
Environmental Safety 120:196-201.
Adimey, Nicole, Christine Hudak, Jessica Powell,
Kim Bassos-Hull, Allen Foley, Nicholas Farmer,
Linda White, and Karrie Minch. 2014. Fishery
gear interactions from stranded bottlenose
dolphins, Florida manatees and sea turtles
in Florida, USA. Marine Pollution Bulletin
81(1):103-115.
Addis, Dustin T., William F. Patterson III,
Michael A. Dance, and G. Walter Ingram Jr.
2013. Implications of reef fish movement from
unreported artificial reef sites in the northern
Gulf of Mexico. Fisheries Research 147:349-358.
Andrews, Allen H., Beverly K. Barnett, Robert
J. Allman, Ryan P. Moyer, and Hannah D.
Trowbridge. 2013. Great longevity of speckled
hind (Epinephelus drummondhayi), a deep-water
grouper, with novel use of postbomb radiocarbon
dating in the Gulf of Mexico. Canadian Journal
of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 70:1-10.
Arendt, Michael D., Jeffrey A. Schwenter, Blair
E. Witherington, Anne B. Meylan, and Vincent
S. Saba. 2013. Historical versus contemporary
climate forcing on the annual nesting variability
of loggerhead sea turtles in the northwest
Atlantic Ocean. PLOS ONE 8(12):1-11.

64

Backer, Lorraine C., Jan H. Landsberg, Melissa


Miller, Kevin Keel, and Tegwin K. Taylor. 2013.
Canine cyanotoxin poisonings in the United
States (1920s 2012): Review of suspected and
confirmed cases from three data sources. Toxins
5:1597-1628.
Bakenhaster, Micah D., Susan Lowerre-Barbieri,
Yasunari Kiryu, Sarah Walters, and Emma J.
Fajer-Avila. Philometra floridensis (Nematoda:
Philometridae) damages ovarian tissue without
reducing host (Sciaenops ocellatus) fecundity.
Diseases of Aquatic Organisms 108:227-239.
Barrett, Mark A., David J. Telesco, Sarah E.
Barrett, Katelyn M. Widness, and Erin H.
Leone. 2014. Testing bear-resistant trash cans
in residential areas of Florida. Southeastern
Naturalist 13(1):26-39.
Bert, Theresa M., William S. Arnold, Ami E.
Wilbur, Seifu Seyoum, Anne L. McMillenJackson, Sarah P. Stephenson, Robert
H. Weisberg, and Laura A. Yarbro. 2014.
Florida gulf bay scallop (Argopecten irradians
concentricus) population genetic structure: form,
variation, and influential factors. Journal of
Shellfish Research 33(1):99-136.
Borucinska, J.D. and D.H. Adams. Parasitic
metritis and oophoritis associated with
nematode larvae in an Atlantic sharpnose shark,
Rhizoprionodon terraenovae (Richardson),
collected in the western Atlantic off Florida.
Journal of Fish Diseases 36:811-817.
Brunell, Arnold M., J. Patrick Delaney, Richard
G. Spratt, Dwayne A. Carbonneau, and Jason
E. Waller. 2013. Record total lengths of the
American alligator in Florida. Southeastern
Naturalist 12(4):N9-N17.

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Capper, Angela, Leanne J. Flewelling, and


Karen Arthur. Dietary exposure to harmful algal
bloom (HAB) toxins in the endangered manatee
(Trichechus manatus latirostris) and green
sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) in Florida, USA.
Harmful Algae 28:1-9.
Castle, Kevin T., Leanne J. Flewelling, John
Bryan II, Adam Kramer, James Lindsay,
Cheyenne Nevada, Wade Stablein, David Wong,
and Jan H. Landsberg. Coyote (Canis latrans)
and domestic dog (Canis familiaris) mortality
and morbidity due to a Karenia brevis red tide in
the Gulf of Mexico. Journal of Wildlife Diseases
49(4):955-964.
Converse, Sarah J., Clinton T. Moore, Martin
J. Folk, and Michael C. Runge. A matter of
tradeoffs: Reintroduction as a multiple objective
decision. The Journal of Wildlife Management
77:11451156.
Decker, Daniel J., Ann B. Forstchen, John F.
Organ, Christian A. Smith, Shawn J. Riley,
Cynthia A. Jacobson, Gordon R. Batcheller,
and William F. Siemer. 2013. Impacts
management: An approach to fulfilling public
trust responsibilities of wildlife agencies. Wildlife
Society Bulletin. doi: 10.1002/wsb.380
Delany, Michael F., Richard A. Kiltie, and Ryan
S. Butryn. 2014. Land cover along breeding bird
survey routes in Florida. Florida Field Naturalist
42(1):15-28.
Delgado, Gabriel A., Robert A. Glazer, and Dana
Wetzel. Effects of mosquito control pesticides on
competent queen conch (Strombus gigas) larvae.
Biological Bulletin 225:79-84.

Delany, Michael F., Richard A. Kiltie, Stephen L.


Glass, and Christina L. Hannon. 2013. Sources
of variation in the abundance and detection of
the endangered Florida grasshopper sparrow.
Southeastern Naturalis 12(3):638-654.
Dorazio, Robert M., Julien Martin, and Holly
H. Edwards. 2013. Estimating abundance while
accounting for rarity, correlated behavior, and
other sources of variation in counts. Ecology
94(7):1472-1478.
Downs, J., H. Horner, R. Loraam, J. Anderson,
H. Kim, and D. Onorato. 2013. Strategically
locating wildlife crossing structures for Florida
panthers using maximal covering approaches.
Transactions in GIS. 20 p. doi: 10.1111/
tgis.12005.
Drexler, Michael, Melanie L. Parker, Stephen
P. Geiger, William S. Arnold, and Pamela
Hallock. 2013. Biological assessment of eastern
oysters (Crassostrea virginica) inhabiting reef,
mangrove, seawall, and restoration substrates.
Estuaries and Coasts. doi: 10.1007/s12237-0139727-8.
Edwards, Holly H. 2013. Potential impacts of
climate change on warmwater megafauna: the
Florida manatee example (Trichechus manatus
latirostris). Climatic Change. 12 p. doi: 10.1007/
s10584-013-0921-2
Enge, Kevin M., Andrew Jernigan, Russell
Johnson, Joan E. Diemer Berish, Paul E. Moler,
Travis M. Thomas, and Richard A. Kiltie. 2012.
What the world needs is a better gopher tortoise
trap. Herpetological Review 43(4):574578.

RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS

65

a look inside...

Research publications (cont.)


Enge, Kevin M., Dirk J. Stevenson, Matthew J.
Elliott, and Javan Bauder. 2013. The historical
and current distribution of the eastern indigo
snake (Drymarchon couperi). Herpetological
Conservation and Biology 8(2):288307.
Enge, Kevin M., Nancy J. Douglass, Jeffrey A.
Gore, Julie A. Hovis, Kenneth D. Meyer, George
E. Wallace, and Anna L. Farmer. 2014. Survey
of rare vertebrates in the Fisheating Creek
area, Glades Country, Florida. Florida Scientist
77(1):15-42.
Finn, Kyle T., Marc A. Criffield, Dave P. Onorato,
and David L. Reed. 2013. The impact of genetic
restoration on cranial morphology of Florida
panthers (Puma concolor coryi). Journal of
Mammology 94(5):1037-1047.
Flaherty, Kerry E., Theodore S. Switzer, Brent
L. Winner, and Sean F. Keenan. 2013. Regional
correspondence in habitat occupancy by gray
snapper (Lutjanus griseus) within estuaries of
the southeastern United States. Estuaries and
Coasts. 23 p. doi: 10.1007/s12237-013-9652-x.
Flaherty, Kerry E., Richard E. Matheson, Jr.,
Robert H. McMichael, Jr., and William B. Perry.
2013. The influence of freshwater on nekton
community structure in hydrologically distinct
basins in northeastern Florida Bay, FL, USA.
Estuaries and Coasts 36:918-939.
Flamm, Richard O., and Karin Braunsberger.
2014. Applying marketing to conservation: A
case study on encouraging boater reporting of
watercraft collisions with Florida manatees.
Ocean & Coastal Management 96:20-28.
Foley, Allen M., Barbara A. Schroeder, Robert
Hardy, Sandra L. MacPherson, Mark Nicholas,

66

and Michael S. Coyne. 2013. Postnesting


migratory behavior of loggerhead sea turtles
Caretta caretta from three Florida rookeries.
Endangered Species Research 21:129-142.
Folk, Martin J., Timothy A. Dellinger, and Erin
H. Leone. 2013. Is male-biased collision mortality
of whooping cranes (Grus americana) in Florida
associated with flock behavior? Waterbirds
36(2):214-219.
Folk, Martin J., Allan R. Woodward, and Marilyn
G. Spalding. 2014. Predation and scavenging
by American alligators on whooping cranes
and sandhill cranes in Florida. Southeastern
Naturalist 13(1):64-79.
Greene, D.U. and J.A. Gore. 2013. Coyote (Canis
latrans) in the Florida Keys. Florida Field
Naturalist 41:126-129.
Hyle, A. Reid, Richard S. McBride, and John E.
Olney. 2014. Determinate versus indeterminate
fecundity in American shad, and anadromous
clupeid. Transaction of the American Fisheries
Society 143:618-633.
Johnson, Kevin, G., Jason R. Dotson, William
F. Pouder, Nicholas A. Trippel, and Robert L.
Eisenhauer. 2014. Effects of hurricane-induced
hydrilla reduction on the largemouth bass fishery
at two central Florida lakes. Lake and Reservoir
Management 30:217-225.
Kaiser, Bernard W., Kimberly J. Osorio, Kevin
M. Enge, and Richard M. Engeman. 2013.
Tupinambis merianae (Argentine giant tegu),
Pantherophis guttatus (red cornsnake). Nonpredatory killing. Herpetological Review 44
(2):329.

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Keel, M. Kevin, David Stalknecht, David Cobb,


Mark Cunningham, Virginia Goekjian, Ara
Gordon-Akhvlediani, and John R. Fischer.
2013. The epizootiology of anatid herpesvirus 1
infection in free-flying waterfowl: A comparison
of latent and active infections among native
waterfowl, captive-reared released ducks, and
peridomestic or feral ducks. Journal of Wildlife
Diseases 49(3):486-491.
Krysko, Kenneth L., Christopher R. Gillette,
Rebecca M. Reichart, Leroy P. Nuez,
Nicholas T. Coutu, Joseph A. Wasilewski,
Kevin M. Enge, and Andrew P. Borgia. 2012.
Preliminary diet analysis for the non-indigenous
Oustalets chameleon, Furcifer oustaleti
(Mocquard 1894) (Squamata: Chamaeleonidae),
in southern Florida. IRCF Reptiles &
Amphibians 19(4):280287.
Landsberg, Jan H., Yasunari Kiryu, Maki
Tabuchi, Thomas B. Waltzek, Kevin M. Enge,
Sarah Reintjes-Tolen, Asa Preston, and Allan
P. Pessier. 2013. Co-infection by alveolate
parasites and frog virus 3-like ranavirus during
an amphibian larval mortality event in Florida,
USA. Diseases of Aquatic Organisms 105:89-99.
Lawrence, John M., Alicia Durn-Gonzlez,
Fransico A. Sols-Marn, Joan Herrera, and
Carlos Renato R. Ventura. 2013. Distribution
of Luidia clathrata and Luidia lawrencei
(Echinodermata: Asteroidea) along the coast of
the western Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico
and the Caribbean Sea. Cahiers de Biologie
Marine 54:525-529.
Martin, Julien, Holly H. Edwards, Florent
Bled, Christopher J. Fonnesbeck, Jrme A.
Dupuis, Beth Gardner, Stacie M. Koslovsky,
Allen M. Aven, Leslie I. Ward-Geiger, Ruth

H. Carmichael, Daniel E. Fagan, Monica A.


Ross, Thomas R. Reinert. 2014. Estimating
upper bounds for occupancy and number of
manatees in areas potentially affected by oil
from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. PLOS ONE
9:e91683.
Meylan, Anne B., Peter A. Meylan, and Cristina
Ordoez Espinosa. 2013. Sea turtles of Bocas del
Toro province and the Comarca Ngbe-Bugl,
Republic of Panam. Chelonian Conservation
and Biology 12(1):17-33.
McCleery, R., M.K. Oli, J.A. Hostetler, B.
Karmacharya, D. Greene, C. Winchester, J. Gore,
S. Sneckenberger, S.B. Castleberry, and M.T.
Mengak. 2013. Are declines of an endangered
mammal predation-driven, and can a captivebreeding and release program aid their recovery?
Journal of Zoology 291:59-68.
Moravec, Frantiek, and Micah Bakenhaster.
2013. Two new gonad-infecting philometrids
(Nematoda: Philometridae) from the yellowedge
grouper Hyporthodus flavolimbatus (Serranidae)
and the great northern tilefish Lopholatilus
chamaeleonticeps (Malacanthidae) in the
northern Gulf of Mexico. Systematic Parasitology
86:113-123.
Moyer, Ryan P., James E. Bauer, and Andra G.
Grottoli. 2013. Carbon isotope biogeochemistry of
tropical small mountainous river, estuarine, and
coastal systems of Puerto Rico. Biogeochemistry
112:589-612.
Munyandorero, Joseph. 2014. In search
of climate effects on Atlantic croaker
(Micropogonias undulates) stock off the U.S.
Atlantic coast with Bayesian state-space biomass
dynamic models. Fishery Bulletin 112:49-70.

RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS

67

a look inside...

Research publications (cont.)


Natanson, Lisa J., Douglas H. Adams, Megan V.
Winton, and Jasmine R. Maurer. 2014. Age and
growth of the bull shark in the western North
Atlantic Ocean. Transactions of the American
Fisheries Society 143:732-743.
Nero, Redwood W., Melissa Cook, Andrew T.
Coleman, Moby Solangi, and Robert Hardy.
2013. Using an ocean model to predict likely drift
tracks of sea turtle carcasses in the north central
Gulf of Mexico. Endangered Species Research
21:191-203.
Olin, Jill A., Nigel E. Hussey, Scott A. Rush,
Gregg R. Poulakis, Colin A. Simpfendorfer,
Michelle R. Heupel, and Aaron T. Fisk. 2013.
Seasonal variability in stable isotopes of
estuarine consumers under different freshwater
flow regimes. Marine Ecology Progress Series
487:55-69.
Parker, Melanie L., William S. Arnold, Stephen
P. Geiger, Patricia Gorman, and Erin H. Leone.
2013. Impacts of freshwater management
activities on eastern oyster (Crassostrea
virginica) density and recruitment: recovery and
long-term stability in seven Florida estuaries.
Journal of Shellfish Research 32(3):695-708.
Poulakis, Gregg R. 2013. Reproductive biology
of the cownose ray in the Charlotte Harbor
Estuarine System, Florida. Marine and Coastal
Fisheries: Dynamics, Management, and
Ecosystem Science 5(1):159-173.
Poulakis, Gregg R. and Harry J. Grier. 2014.
Ontogenetic testicular development and
spermatogenesis in rays: the cownose ray,
Rhinpotera bonasus, as a model. Environmental
Biology of Fishes 97(9):1013-1029.

68

Rhody, N.R., C.L. Neidig, H.J. Grier, K.L. Main,


and H. Migaud. 2013. Assessing reproductive
condition in captive and wild common snook
stocks: A comparison between the wet mount
technique and histological preparations.
Transactions of the American Fisheries Society
142: 979-988.
Ruzicka, R.R., M.A. Colella, J.W. Porter, J.M.
Morrison, J.A. Kidney, V. Brinkhuis, K.S. Lunz,
K.A. Macaulay, L.A. Bartlett, M.K. Meyers, and
J. Colee. 2013. Temporal changes in benthic
assemblages on Florida Keys reefs 11 years after
the 1997/1998 El Nio. Marine Ecology Progress
Series 489:125-141.
Sauls, Beverly. Relative survival of gags
Mycteroperca microlepis released within a
recreational hook-and-line shery: Application
of the Cox Regression Model to control for
heterogeneity in a large-scale mark-recapture
study. Fisheries Research 150:18-27.
Stacy, Brian. Allen Foley. Michael Garner.
Nancy Mette. 2013. Yolk embolism associated
with trauma in vitellogenic sea turtles in Florida
(USA): a review of 11 cases. Journal of Zoo and
Wildlife Medicine 44(4):1043-1048.
Stephenson, Sarah P., Nancy E. Sheridan,
Stephen P. Geiger, and William S. Arnold. 2013.
Abundance and distribution of large marine
gastropods in nearshore seagrass beds along
the Gulf Coast of Florida. Journal of Shellfish
Research 32(2):305-313.
Stevens, Philip W., Marin F.D. Greenwood, and
David A. Blewett. 2013. Fish assemblages in
the oligohaline stretch of a southwest Florida
river during periods of extreme freshwater
inflow variation. Transactions of the American
Fisheries Society 142:1644-1658.

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Thomas, Travis M., Michael C. Granatosky,


Jason R. Bourque, Kenneth L. Krysko, Paul E.
Moler, Tony Gamble, Eric Suarez, Erin Leone,
Kevin M. Enge, and Joe Roman. 2014. Taxonomic
assessment of alligator snapping turtles
(Chelydridae: Macrochelys), with the description
of two new species from the southeastern United
States. Zootaxa 3786(2):141-165.
Tremain, Derek M., and Kelli E. ODonnell.
2014. Total mercury levels in invasive lionfish,
Pterois volitans and Pterois miles (Scorpaenidae),
from Florida waters. Bulletin of Marine Science
90(2):565-578.

Young, Joy M., Beau G. Yeiser, and James A.


Whittington. 2014. Spatiotemporal dynamics of
spawning aggregations of common snook on the
east coast of Florida. Marine Ecology Progress
Series 505:227-240.
Zhao, Jun, Chuanmin Hu, Jason M. Lenes,
Robert H. Weisberg, Chad Lembke, David
English, Jennifer Wolny, Lianyuan Zheng, John
J. Walsh, and Gary Kirkpatrick. 2013. Threedimensional structure of a Karenia brevis bloom:
Observations from gliders, satellites, and field
measurements. Harmful Algae 29:22-30.

Uhrin, Amy, Thomas Matthews, and Cynthia


Lewis. 2014. Lobster trap debris in the
Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary:
distribution, abundance, density, and patterns
of accumulation. Marine and Coastal Fisheries:
Dynamics, Management, and Ecosystem Science
6(1):20-32.
Waters, John D., Rui Coelho, Joana FernandezCarvalho, Amy A. Timmers, Tonya Wiley,
Jason C. Seitz, Matthew T. McDavitt, George
H. Burgess, and Gregg R. Poulakis. 2014. Use
of encounter data to model spatio-temporal
distribution patterns of endangered smalltooth
sawfish, Pristis pectinata, in the western
Atlantic. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and
Freshwater Ecosystems, 17 pp. doi: 10.1002/
aqc.2461
Yarbro, Laura A., and Paul R. Carlson, Jr. 2013.
Seagrass Integrated Mapping and Monitoring
Program mapping and monitoring report no.
1. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission FWRI Technical Report TR-17,
135 pp.

RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS

69

a look inside...

Partnerships
ABQ BioPark

Boston University

City of Tampa

Alabama Department of
Conservation and Natural
Resources

Brevard Zoo

Clinic for the Rehabilitation of


Wildlife

Alachua Conservation Trust


American Museum of Natural
History
Apalachicola National Estuarine
Research Reserve
Archbold Biological Station
Atlantic Coastal Cooperative
Statistics Program
Atlantic States Marine Fisheries
Commission
Auburn University
Auburn University
Department of Fisheries and
Allied Aquacultures
Audubon EagleWatch
Audubon of Florida
Avian Research and
Conservation Institute

Bureau of Ocean Energy


Management, Regulation and
Enforcement Mapping and
Boundary Branch

Collier County Health


Department

Cedar Key National Wildlife


Refuge

Collier County Natural


Resources Department

Central Connecticut State


University

Collier County Pollution Control


and Prevention Department

Century Commission for a


Sustainable Florida the
Critical Lands and Waters
Identification Project

Colorado State University


College of Veterinary Medicine

Charlotte County Animal


Control
Charlotte County Health
Department
Charlotte County Natural
Resources Division

Bat Conservation International


Bay County Restore Act
Coordinator

Charlotte Harbor National


Estuary Program

Big Bend Coastal Conservancy

Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance

Big Cypress National Preserve

City of Marianna

Biscayne Bay Aquatic Preserves

City of St. Petersburg


Environmental Compliance
Division

70

College of Charleston

California State Polytechnic


University, Pomona

Charlotte County Parks,


Recreation and Cultural
Resources

Bonefish & Tarpon Trust

Coastal Plains Institute

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Conservancy of Southwest
Florida
Conservation Trust for Florida
Cornell University
Cornell University Human
Dimensions Research Unit
Czech Republic Institute of
Parasitology
Defenders of Wildlife
Department of Military Affairs
Disney Worldwide Conservation
Fund
Disneys Animal Kingdom
Duke Energy Crystal River
Mariculture Center
Eastern Kentucky University

Eckerd College
Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park
Emerald Coast Wildlife Refuge
Environmental Protection
Commission of Hillsborough
County
Escambia County Community
and Environment Department
Escambia County Marine
Resources Division
Estero Bay Aquatic Preserve
Florida A&M University
Florida A&M University
Graduate Council
Florida Aquarium
Florida Army National Guard
Florida Atlantic University
Florida Bat Conservancy
Florida Caribbean Science
Center
Florida Coastal Ocean
Observing System
Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services (FDACS)
FDACS Division of
Aquaculture
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
(FDEP)

FDEP Big Bend Seagrasses


Aquatic Preserve
FDEP Coastal Management
Program
FDEP Division of Law
Enforcement
FDEP Division of Recreation
and Parks

Florida Department of State


Division of Library and
Information Services
Florida Division of Emergency
Management
Florida Forest Service
Florida Gulf Coast University

FDEP Division of State Lands

Florida Institute of
Oceanography

FDEP Florida Coastal Office

Florida Institute of Technology

FDEP Florida Geological


Survey

Florida LakeWatch

FDEP Office of Coastal and


Aquatic Managed Areas
FDEP Office of Technology and
Information Services
FDEP Outer Continental Shelf
Program
Florida Department of Health
(FDOH)

Florida Museum of Natural


History
Florida Natural Areas Inventory
Florida Oceanographic Society
Florida Oceans and Coastal
Council
Florida Ornithological Society
Florida Park Service

FDOH Division of
Environmental Health

Florida Power and Light


Company

Florida Department of
Transportation (FDOT)

Florida Sea Grant

FDOT Environmental
Management Office
Florida Department of Revenue
Survey and Mapping Office
Florida Department of State
Division of Historical Resources

Florida State University


Florida Wildlife Federation
Flying Fish Fleet
Friends Seagrass Keepers
Georgia Aquarium

PARTNERSHIPS

71

a look inside...

Partnerships (cont.)
Georgia Department of Natural
Resources

Hubbs SeaWorld Research


Institute

Massachusettes Institute of
Technology

Georgia Southern University

Illinois Natural History Survey

Governors South Atlantic


Alliance

Indian River Lagoon National


Estuary Program

Medical University of South


Carolina and Hollings Marine
Lab

Greenwater Laboratories

InoMedic Health Applications,


Inc. (IHA) Environmental
Protection

Guana Tolomato Matanzas


National Estuarine Research
Reserve
Gulf Coast Ecosystem
Restoration Council

Interagency Ocean Observation


Committee Data Management
and Communications

Gulf Coast State College

International Crane Foundation


North America

Gulf County

Jackson County

Gulf of Mexico Alliance

Jacksonville University

Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean


Observing System

Jacksonville Zoo

Gulf of Mexico Fishery


Management Council

Lake County Water Authority

Gulf States Marine Fisheries


Commission
Gumbo Limbo Nature Center
Harbor Branch Oceanographic
Institute
Harmful Algal Blooms
Observing System
Harte Research Institute for
Gulf of Mexico Studies

James Cook University

Lee County
Louisiana State University

Michigan State University


Michigan Technological
University Laboratory of
Human-Computer Interaction
Mississippi State University
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Research Institute
Mote Marine Laboratory
Mount Desert Island Biological
Laboratory
Museu Nacional/UFRJ Dept.
Invertebrados
Museum and Art Gallery of the
Northern Territory, Australia
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration (NASA)

Louisiana State University


Louisiana Aquatic Diagnostic
Laboratory

NASA Ames Research Center

Maine Department of Marine


Resources

NASA Goddard Space Flight


Center

Manatee County Animal


Services

NASA Kennedy Space Center

NASA Earth Science

Harvard University

Manatee County Health


Department

NASA Kennedy Space Center


Ecological Program, IHA
Environmental Services

Hillsborough County

Marine Resources Council

NASA Stennis Space Center

72

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

National Audubon Society


National Cancer Institute
National Fish and Wildlife
Foundation
National Museum of Natural
History
National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA)
NOAA Florida Keys National
Marine Sanctuary
NOAA National
Environmental Satellite, Data,
and Information Service
NOAA National Marine
Fisheries Service
NOAA National Ocean Service
NOAA National Weather
Service
NOAA Office of Oceanic and
Atmospheric Research
NOAA U.S. Integrated Ocean
Observations System
National Park Service (NPS)
NPS Biscayne National Park
NPS Canaveral National
Seashore
NPS Dry Tortugas National
Park
NPS Everglades National Park

NPS Fort Matanzas National


Monument

Orange County Parks and


Recreation

NPS Gulf Islands National


Seashore

Oregon State University

NPS Timucuan Ecological and


Historic Preserve
National Undersea Research
Center
Natural History Museum
Vienna, Austria
Natural History Museum of Los
Angeles County
NatureServe
New Mexico State University
New Mexico Cooperative Fish
and Wildlife Unit

Palm Beach Zoo


Paynes Prairie Preserve State
Park
Penn State University
Pennsylvania Cooperative Fish
and Wildlife Research Unit
Pinellas County
Princeton University
Raymond James Trust
Rookery Bay National Estuarine
Research Reserve
Sanibel Sea School

Northwest Florida Water


Management District

Sanibel-Captiva Conservation
Foundation

Nova Southeastern University

Santa Fe College Teaching Zoo

Nova Southeastern University


National Coral Reef Institute

Sarasota Bay Estuary Program

Nova Southeastern University


Oceanographic Center

Sarasota County Department of


Health

Okeechobee County Emergency


Management

Sarasota County Water Services

Oklahoma State University

Sarasota County

Sea Turtle Conservancy

Old Dominion University

Skidaway Institute of
Oceanography

Orange County Environmental


Protection Division Compliance
and Waste Management Section

Smithsonian Institution
National Museum of Natural
History

PARTNERSHIPS

73

a look inside...

Partnerships (cont.)
Smithsonian Tropical Research
Institute

Southwest Florida Water


Management District

Snook & Gamefish Foundation

Spyglass Technologies, Inc.

Solutions To Avoid Red Tide,


Inc.

St. Andrew Bay Resource


Management Association

South Atlantic Fishery


Management Council

St. Johns County

U.S. Air Force

St. Johns County Habitat


Conservation Section

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

South Atlantic Landscape


Conservation Cooperative
South Carolina Department of
Natural Resources
South Carolina Sea Grant

St. Johns River Water


Management District
St. Petersburg College

The Marine Mammal Center


The Nature Conservancy
The Orianne Society
Tufts University

U.S. Coast Guard (USCG)


USCG Auxiliary Flotilla 7-2
USCG District 7 MSU
Charleston

South Florida Ecosystem


Restoration Task Force

State University of New York


College of Environmental
Science and Forestry

South Florida Water


Management District

Stony Brook University

USCG District 7 Sector


Jacksonville

Suwannee River Water


Management District

USCG District 7 Sector Key


West

Tall Timbers Research Station

USCG District 7 Sector Miami

Tampa Bay Estuary Program

USCG District 7 Sector San


Juan

Southeast Aquatic Resources


Partnership
Southeast Coastal Ocean
Observing Regional Association
Southeast Florida Coral Reef
Initiative

Tampa Bay Regional Planning


Council

Southeast Partners in
Amphibian and Reptile
Conservation

Tampas Lowry Park Zoo

Southeastern Bat Diversity


Network
Southeastern Cooperative
Wildlife Disease Study
Southeastern Fisheries
Association, Inc.

74

Tampa Electric Company


(TECO)
TECO Laboratory Services
Temple University
Texas Christian University
The Field Museum

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

USCG District 7 MSU Savannah

USCG District 7 Sector St


Petersburg
USCG District 8 Sector Mobile
U.S. Coral Reef Task Force
U.S. Department of Agriculture
(USDA), Animal and Plant
Health Inspection Service
(APHIS) Veterinary Services
USDA, APHIS Wildlife
Services

U.S. Department of Defense


U.S. Department of the Interior
U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (USEPA)
USEPA Gulf Ecology Division
Laboratory
USEPA Gulf of Mexico
Program
U.S. Food and Drug
Administration
U.S. Forest Service
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
USGS Coastal and Marine
Science Center
USGS Cooperative Wildlife
Research Units
USGS Earth Resources
Observation and Science Center
USGS Florida Cooperative
Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
USGS National Spatial Data
Infrastructure
USGS National Wetlands
Research Center

USGS Southeast Amphibian


Research and Monitoring
Initiative
U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
U.S. Navy Office of Naval
Research
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
(USFWS)
USFWS Endangered Species
Program
USFWS Florida Peninsular
Landscape Conservation
Cooperative

University of Florida (UF)


UF College of Agriculture and
Life Sciences
UF College of Public Health
and Health Professions
UF College of Veterinary
Medicine
UF Department of Biology
UF Florida Cooperative Fish
and Wildlife Research Unit
UF H. T. Odum Center for
Wetlands

USFWS National Conservation


Training Center

UF IFAS School of Forest


Resources and Conservation

USFWS National Wildlife


Refuge System

UF Institute of Food and


Agricultural Sciences (IFAS)

Universidad Nacional Autnoma


de MxicoInstituto de Ciencias
del Mar y Limnologa

UF/IFAS Extension Taylor


County

University of Arizona
University of British Columbia
University of California, Davis
University of California, Los
Angeles
University of Central Florida

USGS National Wildlife


Health Center

University of Central Florida,


College of Education

USGS Patuxent Wildlife


Research Center

University of Charleston/
SCDNR

University of Georgia
University of Idaho
University of Louisiana at
Lafayette
University of Maine
University of Maryland,
Baltimore County
University of Miami
University of Miami
Rosenstiel School of Marine and
Atmospheric Science

PARTNERSHIPS

75

a look inside...

Partnerships (cont.)
University of Michigan
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill
University of North Carolina
at Charlotte Department of
Bioinformatics and Genomics
University of North Carolina at
Wilmington
University of North Florida

USFSP Department of
Biological Sciences

Virginia Commonwealth
University

USFSP Environmental Science


And Policy Program

Virginia Institute of Marine


Science, Environmental
and Aquatic Animal Health
Laboratories

University of Southern
Mississippi
University of Southern
Mississippi Gulf Coast
Research Laboratory

Virginia Polytechnic Institute


and State University
Volusia County Sea Turtle
Program

University of Rhode Island

University of Southern
Mississippi Wise Laboratory
of Environmental and Genetic
Toxicology

University of South Alabama

University of Tennessee

Wildlife Foundation of Florida

University of South Florida


(USF)

University of Virginia

Woods Hole Oceanographic


Institution

University of North Texas

USF College of Marine Science


USF Department of
Integrative Biology
USF Environmental Science
and Policy Program
USF St. Petersburg (USFSP)
College of Business

76

University of Washington
University of West Florida
University of Windsor
University of Wisconsin
Vencore
Villanova University

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

White Oak Conservation Center


Wildlife Conservation Society

Wright State University


YSI/Xylem Inc.
Zoo Miami

a look inside...

Current staff
Acosta, Alejandro; Adams, Jessica; Adams, Aimee; Adams, Douglas; Addis, Dustin; Albritton, Janett;
Alfermann, Ted; Allen, Aarin; Allen, Tiffany; Alo, Micah; Alvar, Garrett; Alvarez (Roberts), Alicia; Amick,
Alison; Anderson, Christopher; Anderson, Christopher; Anderson, Stacey; Arnold, Mary; Ault, Erick;
Austin, Krista; Ayala, Oscar (Butch); Bailey, Rhonda; Bainbridge, III, James; Bainbridge, IV, James;
Bakenhaster, Micah; Baraoidan, Samantha; Barbara, Brittany; Barbera, Paul; Barbieri, Luiz; Barker,
Robert; Barlas, Margaret (Margie); Barrett, Mark; Barthel, Brandon; Bartlett, Lucy; Bartlett, Thomas;
Basino, Brandon; Bassett, Brandon; Baumstark, Rene; Beard, Candince; Beasley, Ashley; Bell, Griffin;
Bell, Stephen; Bemelmans, Christopher; Beneke, Brian; Benton, John; Berg, Brittany; Bernatis, Jennifer;
Berry, Christopher; Berry, Sidney; Bert, Theresa (Terrie); Bertelsen, Rodney; Bickford, Joel; Bielefeld,
Ronald; Billick, Catherine; Binder, Benjamin; Bisping, Scott; Black, Tiffany; Blackwood, Diane;
Blankenship, Emmet; Blewett, David; Bock, Jennifer; Bodine, Cameron; Bogdan, Jennifer; Boland,
Christopher; Bomba, John; Bonvechio, Kimberly; Bordelon, Whitney; Borowicz, Joseph; Bostick, Sherry;
Bottenberg, Mary; Boughton, Robin; Bourdeau, Alexis; Boyd, Denise; Boyett, Jan; Bradshaw, Christopher;
Branson, Neil; Bratcher-Covino, Amber; Brinkhuis, Vanessa; Brodbeck, James; Broderick, Melissa;
Brodie, Russell; Broome (Coyle), Jillian; Brost, Mary (Beth); Brown, Howard; Brown, Trevor; Brown,
Catalina; Brown, Steve; Brown, Catalina; Brunell, Arnold; Brush, Janell; Bruzek, Steven; Bucci, Frank;
Bullock, Lewis; Burd, Jr., James; Burnett, Gail; Burnsed (Walters), Sarah; Burton, Cecily; Busby, Patti;
Butler, Casey; Butryn, Ryan; Caillouet, Ryan; Cain, Stephanie; Cain, Tracey; Candileri, Steven; Carlson,
Jr., Paul; Carpenter, Bobbi; Carrigan, Abby; Carroll, Jessica; Carter, Cameron; Castellon, Traci; Caudill,
Charles (Danny); Caudill, Gretchen; Ceriani, Simona; Cermak, Bridget; Chabot, Colleen; Chagaris, David;
Chitakone (Nguyen), Trang; Christian, Julie; Clancy, Lisa; Clark, Bernice; Clemons, Shawn; Clemons
(Ferree), Bambi; Cody, Theresa; Cody, Richard; Colella, Michael; Collins, Angela; Combs, Brittany;
Connor, Lauren; Cook, Geoffrey; Cook, Kristin; Cooper, Wade; Corcella, III, Anthony; Corcoran, Alina;
Courtney, Francis; Cox, William; Crabtree, Laura; Crawford, Stephen; Crawford, Charles; Criffield, Marc;
Cross, Tiffanie; Crowley, Claire; Cunningham, Mark; Cunningham, Sean; Cuskley, Robert; Darling,
Susan; Darrow, Jamie; Davis, Lauren; Davis, Matthew; Davis, John; Davis, Carol; de Wit, Martine;
Delgado, Gabriel; Dellinger, Timothy; Delpizzo, Gina; Demay, Suzanne; Denesha, Kimberlee; Deutsch,
Charles; DiMartino, Nathan; Dix, Thomas; Do, Vincent; Dobson, Jeffrey; Dotson, Jason; Dowling, Anne;
Drakopulos, Lauren; Driscoll, Erin; Druyor, David; Duffey, Rene; Dungel, Candice; Dunham, Nicole;
Dutterer, Andrew; Eaken, David; Eberly, Kelly; Eckelbecker, Robert; Edwards, Dwayne; Edwards, Holly;
Eisenhauer, Robert; Emory, Travis; Endrzejewski, Kathleen; Enge, Kevin; England, John; Enloe, Carolyn;
Ennis, Bradley; Erickson, Kristin; Fabian, Nicole; Fagundez, Christy; Farmer, Andrew; Farmer, Anna;
Farrington, Sandra; Fasoli, Anna; Ferrell, William; Fertal, Kaeli; Fischer, Keith; Fisher, John; Flamm,
Richard; Flewelling, Leanne; Foley, Allen; Fontaine, Bradley; Ford, Ryan; Forstchen, Ann; Frantz, Kay;
Freed (McGrath), Stephanie; Gaesser, Rebecca; Gandy, David; Gandy, Ryan; Garcia, Sandra; Gardinal,
Christopher; Gardner, Charles; Gardner (Pouncey), Amber; Garrett, Matthew; Garrett, Andrew; Garrison,
Elina; Gartland, Jessica; Geiger, Stephen; Gianfrancesco, Hugo; Gillikin, Michael; Gipson, Jake;

CURRENT STAFF

77

a look inside...

Current staff (cont.)


Glazer, Robert; Goddard, Nathaniel; Goins, Lewis (Matt); Gordon, Nadia; Gore, Jeffery; Gorecki, Robert;
Gorham, Siobhan; Gornto, Virginia (Ginger); Gowan, Timothy; Granholm, April; Gray, Alisha; Gray,
Gregory (Clark); Gray, Kiley; Gray, Samantha; Green, Emily; Grier, Harry; Grunwald, Robin; Guenther,
Cameron; Guenthner, Jeffrey; Guindon, Kathryn; Hadden, John; Hamblen, Jeffrey; Hamilton, Jamie;
Hardy, Robert; Harmak, Craig; Harriger, Kathryn; Harris, Lindsay; Harris (Paolini), Denise; Hart,
Hannah; Harteau, Alicia; Harty-Allen, Rebecca; Haskell, Whitney; Havel (Fredericks), Hedy; Hayes,
Forest; Hayslip, Andrew; Heagey, Robert; Heath, Betty; Henderson, George; Henschen, Karen; Herrera,
Joan; Hertz, Karina; Hilber, Susan; Hill, Justin; Hill, Ashley; Hirama, Shigetomo; Hobbs, Sherri;
Holcomb, Jordan; Holder, Jay; Holding, James; Hooper, Justin; Howe, Kelsey, Howell, Amber; Hoyt,
Jeanne; Hubbard, Katherine; Huebner, Lindsay; Hulsey, Amy; Hults, Jordan; Hunjadi, Franc; Hunt,
John; Huston, Geoffrey; Hwang, Joonghyun; Hyle, Aaron (Reid); Iadevaia, Nicole; Ivey, James; Jackson,
Audrey; Jackson, Katherine; Jakush, Jennifer; James, Anne; Johansson, John (Roger); Johnson, Alison;
Johnson, Jennifer; Johnson, Kevin; Jones, David; Jones, Ryan; Jones, Heather; Jung, Robin; Karelus,
Dana; Kasumovic, Haris; Kauffman, Robert; Kaunert, Matthew; Kawula, Robert; Keating, Denis; Keenan,
Sean; Keller Abbe, Stephanie; Kerr, Michelle; Kidney, James; Kiermaier, Daniel; Kiltie, Richard; Kirby,
Amanda (Tiana); Kirby, Christopher; Kiryu, Yasunari (Yasu); Klink, Tara; Knapp, Anthony; Knight,
John; Knight, Julianne; Knudsen, Richard; Kolterman, Daniel; Koryak, Mark A; Kosempa, Michael;
Kosempa, Michael; Koslovsky, Stacie; Kowal, Kelley; Kozlowski, James; Kramer, Anita; Krause, Richard;
Kronstadt, Stephanie; Krzystan, Andrea; Kulaas, Kathy; Kurth, Benjamin; Ladd, Mark; Landers,
Shawna; Landsberg, Jan; Lange, Theodore; LaPuma, Kelli; Lavine, Craig; Lee, Kristi; Leffler, Deborah;
Lemus, Jason; Lenhart, Bradley; Leonard, Jr., Norman; Leone, Erin; Levine, Daniel; Lewis, Cynthia; Ley,
Janet; Linebaugh, Paul (Pete); Llull, Jr., Carlos; Lofts, Marjorie; Lonati, Gina; Lopez, Cary; LowerreBarbieri, Susan; Lowman, Brian; Lundy, Ronald (Earl); Lunz, Kathleen; Macaulay, Kevin; MacDonald,
Timothy; Mader, Kyle; Magee, Janis; Mahmoudi, Behzad; Mallison, Craig; Maloney, Ryan; Manivong,
Sourikot (Ricky); Marchionno, Joseph; Marin (Mansfield), Charlotte; Markley, Laura; Marotta, Dan;
Martin, Shannon; Martin Blanco, Felix; Martz, Megan; Mason, Alice; Mason, Ariana; Matheson, Richard
(Ed); Mathis, Christine; Mattair, Amanda; Matthews, Thomas; Maurer, Jr., Thomas; Maxwell, Mary
(Katie); Maxwell, Kerry; Mays, Jonathan; McCallister, Michael; McCown, James; McEachron, Lucas;
McGlothlin, Matthew; McGreenery, Gail; McGuigan, Charles; McKenzie, Ryan; McKinley, Donielle;
McLaughlin, Grant; McManus, Michael; McMichael, Jr., Robert; McRae, Gil; Meirose, III, Leo; Menzel,
Terri; Merello, Manuel; Mesner, Kerry; Meylan, Anne; Miller, Karl; Minch, Karrie; Mindyk, Eric; MonzonAguirre, Carlos; Morganstern, Janine; Morley, Danielle; Moser, Crystal; Mosier, Andrea; Moyer, Ryan;
Muhlbach, Eric; Muir, Vilma; Muller, Robert; Munyandorero, Joseph; Murasko, Sue; Murphy, Susan;
Murphy, Michael; Murray, Chrystal; Muza, Cheryl; Mzhen, Dmitriy; Nagid, Eric; Nappier, Sarah; Neal,
Stephanie; Neely, Karen; Netchy, Kristin; Netro, Richard; Neubauer, Nikki; Nguyen, Hoa Phong; Nguyen,
Khoi; Norberg, Michael; Norman, David; Norris, Henry; O Dea, Sheila; OBoyle, Michael; OConnor,
Jason; ODell (Berns), Donna; OHop, Joseph; OKeife, Kathleen; Onorato, David; Onorato, Gregory;

78

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Otto, George; Otto, Diane; Palfy, Theodore; Panike, Anna; Paperno, Richard; Parker, Melanie; Parks,
Sheri; Patrtridge, Lauren; Pawlikowski, Ryan; Pearson, Michelle; Perazio, Christina; Perna, Allison;
Pernell, Jessica; Perrin, Larry; Perry, Noretta; Pfadt, Jamie; Pickett (Brumer), Elise; Pitchford, Thomas;
Pittinger, Brett; Poniatowski, Michael; Pope, Jacquelyn; Porak, Wesley; Poulakis, Gregg; Powell,
Christina; Presley, Twanisha; Prueitt, Benjamin; Puchulutegui, Maria (Cecilia); Purdy, Adam;
Purtlebaugh, Caleb; Quasius, Sarah (Sadie); Radabaugh, Kara; Radigan, Richard; Ragheb, Erin; Ramage,
John; Ramage, Droucelle; Ramirez, Joshua; Randall, Patricia (Trish); Reckenbeil, Brian; Redner,
Jennylyn; Reed, David; Reeves, Julia; Rehrig, Ian; Reinert, Thomas; Renaldo, Janalea; Renchen,
Gabrielle; Renchen, Jeffrey; Richard, Andrew; Richard, Douglas; Richardson, Adam; Richardson, Ralph
(Bill); Richmond, Kelly; Riese, Amy; Rigney, Kane; Riley, Richard; Robb, Nathan; Robertson, Doug;
Roebuck, David; Rogers, Kristin; Rolls, Holly; Roman, Noelle; Rood, Kari; Rowe, Matthew; Ruark,
Margaret (Penny); Rubec, Peter; Ruben, Cheyanne; Ruccolo, Michael; Rudloe, Sky; Ruga, Adrienne; Rush,
Christine; Ruzicka, Richard; Salmeron, Ashley; Salmon, Brandi; Saltzman, David; Sandbank, Einat;
Sander, Theodor; Santi, Elizabeth; Sauer, II, Jeffrey; Sauls, Beverly; Sawyers, Reggie (Eric); Saxton,
John; Schaefer, Andrew; Schaf, Sue; Scharer, Rachel; Scharf (Hall), Brittany; Scheick, Brian; Schneider,
Jacob; Schubart, Matthew; Schwarzer, Amy; Scolaro, Sheila; Scott, Jaime; Sebastian, Agustin; Selden,
Corday; Seyoum, Seifu; Sharp, William; Shelley, Jamie; Shelton, Jeffrey; Silverman, Toby; Singer,
Michael; Singleton, Tonya; Smit, Reuben; Smith, Larry; Smith, Michelle; Smith, Marsha; Smith, Beverly;
Smith, Lisa; Smith (Canning), Amanda; Solomon, Justin; Spagnola, Tracie; Spellman, Ann; Stafford,
Christopher; Stahl, Scott; Stanley, Patrick; Steidinger, Karen; Stephenson, Sarah; Stevens, Philip;
Steward, Cheryl; Stoecklin, Grant; Strickland, Patrick (Andy); Stys, Elizabeth; Sullivan, Kelly; Swanson,
Christopher; Switzer, Theodore; Sympson, William; Szemer, Donna; Tabuchi, Maki; Takeuchi, Noel;
Taylor, Ronald; Teichert, Nicole; Therriault, Kati; Thomas, Travis; Thompson, Kevin; Thompson, Latosha;
Thompson, Aaron; Thompson, Brandon; Thomson, Alfred; Tilney, Charles; Tobin, Ariel; Torres, Linda;
Toth, Katie; Tran, Manny; Tremain, Derek; Trindell, Shawn; Tringali, Michael; Trippel, Nicholas; Trotter,
Alexis; Tucker, J Sheridan; Tuten, Michael (Travis); Tyler-Jedlund, Amanda; Udouj, Tina; Utley, Lydia;
Van Bibber, Nathan; Vitiello, Jeanette; Vitiello, Andrew; Vollemans, Rachel; Wald, Kyle; Walia
(Flaherty), Kerry; Walker, Bradley; Walker, Justin; Wallace, Elizabeth; Ward-Geiger, Leslie; Warner,
Steven; Warner (Kanaszka), Theresa; Warren, Gary; Watford, Miranda; Weather, Eric; Weaver, Yvonne
(Bonnie); Webb, Erika; Webber, Alyson; Wegener, Matthew; West, Laura; Westmark, David; Whaley,
Shannon; Wheat, William; Wheeler, Michael; Whittington, James; Whittle, Amber; Wiggins, Laura;
Williams, James; Williams, Jared; Williams, LaVerne; Williams, Jr., Barry (Jamie); Williges, Kent;
Wilson, Stephanie; Wilson, Patrick; Winchester, Christopher; Winn, Stephanie; Winner, Brent; Winston,
Bryan; Winston, Bryan; Wirt, Katherine; Wolf, Daniel; Wolfgang, Kristen; Wolfson, Jonathan; Wollangk,
Melissa; Woodruff, Blakely (Scott); Yagle, Gregory; Yarbro, Laura; Yeiser, III, Beverly (Beau); Young,
Chad; Young, Morgan; Young, Joy; Young, John; Zahara, Meredith; Zehr, Royce; Zsok, Istvan

CURRENT STAFF

79

a look inside...

20142015 Budget
GENERAL
REVENUE
(8.22%)

CARLTF
(0.39%)
GDTF
(15.68%)

PRTF
(0.54%)

MRCTF
(30.74%)

Funding
Sources

FGTF
(24.23%)

SGTF/
GRANTS
(0.70%)

NGWTF/
GRANTS
(0.04%)
SGTF
(5.95%)

STMTF
(3.51%)

NGWTF
(4.51%)

MRCTF/
GRANTS
(5.49%)

Total Budget: $67,471,093


Total appropriations for FWRI in fiscal year 20142015 are $67,471,093 (includes adjustments through
November 2014 plus carryover FCO projects from prior years). Slight differences in the total of all
programs represented in this document are due to overhead assessments to the programs. FWRI
assesses overhead to programs to supplement operational costs of the Office of the Director, Budget
Office, Outreach Coordination, and Facilities Management. Overhead assessments also fund services
used Institute-wide such as the Research Information Center, Specimen Collections, and Computer and
Network Support. The assessments are represented in this document as part of each program budget and
are also represented in the costs of the Institute operations and services mentioned above.
80

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Marine Fisheries
Research
Section Contact:
Luiz Barbieri
Luiz.Barbieri@MyFWC.com
MFR
(40.8%)

The waters along Floridas coastline attract


millions of recreational anglers and thousands
of commercial fishers. Marine Fisheries
Research biologists study the fish and
invertebrates found in the states saltwater
environments, gathering data important for
the management of these species. The sections
research includes collecting and analyzing
fishing data, monitoring species status and
abundance, investigating biological information,
and breeding and rearing certain species to
enhance or rebuild their populations.

#FTE
MRCTF 79.0
MRCTF/
Grants

4.0

GDTF

Total Section Budget


$24,431,314

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

$5,044,644

$1,574,128

$1,283,367

$1,197,427

$113,782

$0

$9,213,348

$710,572

$9,923,920

$213,568

$0

$0

$0

$0

$548,195

$761,763

$204,359

$966,122

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$3,708,274

$3,708,274

$188,367

$3,896,641

FGTF 59.0

$3,296,811

$0

$0

$0

$0

$4,692,541

$7,989,352

$1,655,279

$9,644,631

Totals 142.0

$8,555,023

$1,574,128

$1,283,367

$1,197,427

$113,782

$8,949,010

$21,672,737

$2,758,577

$24,431,314

20142015 BUDGET

81

Administrative Costs
#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

MRCTF

3.0

$208,781

$33,935

$315,366

$45,248

$16,254

$0

$619,584

$0

$619,584

Totals

3.0

$208,781

$33,935

$315,366

$45,248

$16,254

$0

$619,584

$0

$619,584

Keys Fisheries Research

Subsection Contact: John H. Hunt, John.Hunt@MyFWC.com


Keys Fisheries Research encompasses a variety of research and monitoring programs focused on
the recreationally and commercially important fish and invertebrate species inhabiting the Florida
Keys. Staff also conduct restoration research on critical fisheries habitat including nearshore
hardbottom and sponges and coral reefs.

#FTE

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

$31,900

$236,746

$39,734

$0

$1,452,544

$80,110

$1,532,654

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

MRCTF 13.0

$898,420

$245,744

FGTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$225,178

$225,178

$49,456

$274,634

GDTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$34,245

$34,245

$0

$34,245

Totals 13.0

$898,420

$245,744

$31,900

$236,746

$39,734

$259,423

$1,711,967

$129,566

$1,841,533

Keys Marine Laboratory

Subsection Contact: John H. Hunt, John.Hunt@MyFWC.com


This joint operation with the Florida Institute of Oceanography encourages and supports academic
research programs that benefit the unique Florida Keys ecosystem.

#FTE

82

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

MRCTF

4.0

$211,387

$0

$94,341

$0

$0

$0

$305,728

$30,573

$336,301

Totals

4.0

$211,387

$0

$94,341

$0

$0

$0

$305,728

$30,573

$336,301

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Marine Fisheries Biology

Subsection Contact: Luiz Barbieri, Luiz.Barbieri@MyFWC.com


Researchers collect and interpret data concerning the life history, biology, age structure, stock
abundance and fishery characteristics of important commercial and recreational fish and
invertebrate species in Florida.

#FTE
MRCTF 12.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT


$837,070

$439,611

$278,658

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

$168,129

$41,294

$0

$1,764,762

$92,817

$1,857,579

MRCTF/
Grants

2.0

$96,006

$0

$0

$0

$0

$75,489

$171,495

$166,272

$337,767

GDTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$1,694,395

$1,694,395

$89,386

$1,783,781

FGTF 14.0

$773,714

$0

$0

$0

$0

$745,679

$1,519,393

$269,244

$1,788,637

Totals 28.0

$1,706,790

$439,611

$278,658

$168,129

$41,294

$2,515,563

$5,150,045

$617,719

$5,767,764

Marine Fisheries-Dependent Monitoring

Subsection Contact: Richard Cody, Richard.Cody@MyFWC.com


Researchers collect and analyze data on the number of fish caught and the number of trips made
by commercial and recreational fishers, using this information to monitor trends in marine
fisheries throughout Florida. These data provide assessments of how management regulations
affect harvest and fishers.

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET
$871,057

MRCTF 12.0

$683,148

$35,265

$20,000

$53,457

$0

$0

$791,870

$79,187

FGTF 16.0

$811,445

$0

$0

$0

$0

$2,637,553

$3,448,998

$691,584

$4,140,582

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$988,785

$988,785

$49,439

$1,038,224

Totals 28.0

$1,494,593

$35,265

$20,000

$53,457

$0

$3,626,338

$5,229,653

$820,210

$6,049,863

GDTF

Marine Fisheries-Independent Monitoring

Subsection Contact: Luiz Barbieri, Luiz.Barbieri@MyFWC.com


Using statistically valid sampling methodologies, researchers capture, identify, count and release
millions of fish each year to monitor the status and relative abundance of economically important
fish and invertebrate species in six estuaries around the state.
PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

$1,768,194

$632,131

$243,102

$569,976

$10,750

$0

$3,224,153

$322,415

$3,546,568

2.0

$117,562

$0

$0

$0

$0

$472,706

$590,268

$38,087

$628,355

FGTF 22.0

$1,280,587

$0

$0

$0

$0

$918,631

$2,199,218

$461,090

$2,660,308

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$990,849

$990,849

$49,542

$1,040,391

Totals 53.0

$3,166,343

$632,131

$243,102

$569,976

$10,750

$2,382,186

$7,004,488

$871,134

$7,875,622

#FTE
MRCTF 29.0
MRCTF/
Grants

GDTF

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

20142015 BUDGET

83

Marine Fisheries Stock Assessment

Subsection Contact: Michael D. Murphy, Mike.Murphy@MyFWC.com


Researchers integrate the physical, biological and fisheries data gathered in the Marine FisheriesIndependent Monitoring, the Marine Fisheries-Dependent Monitoring and the Marine Fisheries
Biology programs to analyze Floridas marine fisheries stocks. This information is provided to marine
fisheries managers.
PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

MRCTF

5.0

$366,305

$85,808

$0

$5,000

$0

$0

$457,113

$45,711

$502,824

Totals

5.0

$366,305

$85,808

$0

$5,000

$0

$0

$457,113

$45,711

$502,824

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

Marine Fisheries Stock Enhancement

Subsection Contact: Chris Young, Chris.Young@MyFWC.com


Biologists focus on breeding and rearing marine sport fish for release, as well as on evaluating the
use of hatchery-reared animals as a management tool to enhance or rebuild coastal fisheries.
#FTE

84

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

MRCTF

1.0

$71,339

$101,634

$300,000

$118,871

$5,750

$0

$597,594

$59,759

$657,353

FGTF

7.0

$431,065

$0

$0

$0

$0

$165,500

$596,565

$183,905

$780,470

Totals

8.0

$502,404

$101,634

$300,000

$118,871

$5,750

$165,500

$1,194,159

$243,664

$1,437,823

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Fres hwater
Fisheries
Research

FFR
(5.3%)

Section Contact:
Jason Dotson
Jason.Dotson@MyFWC.com
The fish in Floridas lakes and rivers are an
important natural resource. Fishing in these
locations is a significant contributor to tourism
and the states economy. Biologists with the
Freshwater Fisheries Research section collect and
objectively analyze fish, fishery, invertebrate, and
habitat data. The results are provided to internal
and external resource managers to aid them in
developing scientifically informed management
strategies and policies. The information is also
made available to the public through news releases,
magazine articles, social media, and the web.

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

Total Section Budget


$3,172,338

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

0.0

$0

$95,270

$48

$27,240

$0

$0

$122,558

$6,126

$128,684

SGTF 25.0

$1,526,630

$90,360

$25,088

$138,122

$34,300

$0

$1,814,500

$79,836

$1,894,336

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$135,969

$135,969

$6,800

$142,769

FGTF 12.0

$736,536

$0

$0

$0

$0

$266,614

$1,003,150

$0

$1,003,150

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$3,399

$3,399

$0

$3,399

Totals 37.0

$2,263,166

$185,630

$25,136

$165,362

$34,300

$405,982

$3,079,576

$92,762

$3,172,338

NGTF

SGTF/
GRANTS

GDTF

20142015 BUDGET

85

Administrative Costs
#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

SGTF

2.0

$144,654

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$144,654

$0

$144,654

Totals

2.0

$144,654

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$144,654

$0

$144,654

Freshwater Fisheries Biology

Subsection Contact: Steve Crawford, Steve.Crawford@MyFWC.com


Researchers study the life history, ecology and health of important Florida sport fish species and
fish communities, while also looking at the effects of angler interactions and environmental factors.
Together, these efforts provide managers necessary information to adequately protect freshwater
fish communities.

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

NGTF

0.0

$0

$95,270

$48

$27,240

$0

$0

$122,558

$6,126

$128,684

SGTF

8.0

$516,550

$90,360

$25,088

$138,122

$34,300

$0

$804,420

$79,836

$884,256

Totals

8.0

$516,550

$185,630

$25,136

$165,362

$34,300

$0

$926,978

$85,962

$1,012,940

Freshwater Fisheries Resource Assessment

Subsection Contact: Dick Krause, Dick.Krause@MyFWC.com


Researchers collect population, life history, habitat and human impacts data on freshwater fish
species and analyze them to provide assessments to resource managers.
OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

$865,426

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$865,426

$0

$865,426

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$135,969

$135,969

$6,800

$142,769

FGTF 12.0

#FTE
SGTF 15.0
SGTF/
GRANTS

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

$736,536

$0

$0

$0

$0

$266,614

$1,003,150

$0

$1,003,150

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$3,399

$3,399

$0

$3,399

Totals 27.0

$1,601,962

$0

$0

$0

$0

$405,982

$2,007,944

$6,800

$2,014,744

GDTF

86

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Wildlife
Research

WR
(17.61%)

Section Contact:
Robin Boughton
Robin.Boughton@MyFWC.com
From the tiny beach mouse to the not so tiny right
whale, Florida is home to a wide array of wildlife
species. Biologists with the Wildlife Research
section monitor the status of Floridas birds,
mammals, reptiles and amphibians. This includes
species important to hunters such as deer, alligator
and waterfowl, and imperiled species such as the
Florida panther and the Florida manatee. Wildlife
managers rely on the information this research
provides to develop conservation and restoration
plans that ensure the long-term persistence of
Floridas wildlife populations.

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

Total Section Budget


$10,547,279

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

PRTF

2.0

$120,617

$11,160

$19,469

$40,774

$0

$0

$192,020

$8,374

$200,394

MRCTF

6.5

$498,925

$185,404

$2,118,772

$81,458

$10,191

$0

$2,894,750

$65,937

$2,960,687

MRCTF/
Grants

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$62,483

$62,483

$0

$62,483

NGWTF 13.0

$902,593

$345,187

$210,272

$272,102

$7,335

$556,800

$2,294,289

$73,979

$2,368,268

STMTF 15.0

$978,676

$473,220

$393,706

$358,900

$11,625

$0

$2,216,127

$124,929

$2,341,056
$1,165,316

SGTF 10.5

$655,497

$134,110

$17,578

$115,715

$9,458

$197,280

$1,129,638

$35,678

GDTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$183,976

$183,976

$16,930

$200,906

FGTF

6.0

$345,430

$0

$0

$0

$0

$723,613

$1,069,043

$179,126

$1,248,169

Totals 53.0

$3,501,738

$1,149,081

$2,759,797

$868,949

$38,609

$1,724,152

$10,042,326

$504,953

$10,547,279

20142015 BUDGET

87

Administrative Costs
#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET
$845,843

NGWTF

0.0

$0

$47,308

$133,856

$105,862

$7,335

$550,000

$844,361

$1,482

SGTF

1.0

$82,623

$0

$0

$3,514

$9,458

$0

$95,595

$4,780

$100,375

Totals

1.0

$82,623

$47,308

$133,856

$109,376

$16,793

$550,000

$939,956

$6,262

$946,218

Avian Research

Subsection Contact: Andrew Cox, Andrew.Cox@MyFWC.com


Researchers provide data on the life history, population biology and ecology of Floridas bird
species to aid managers in developing conservation plans and to assist recovery efforts.

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

NGWTF

9.0

$618,362

$106,391

$0

$55,720

$0

$0

$780,473

$39,024

$819,497

SGTF

4.0

$229,482

$12,000

$14,000

$32,000

$0

$0

$287,482

$0

$287,482

GDTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$172,884

$172,884

$16,930

$189,814

FGTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$2,915

$2,915

$161

$3,076

Totals 13.0

$847,844

$118,391

$14,000

$87,720

$0

$175,799

$1,243,754

$56,115

$1,299,869

Marine Mammal Research

Subsection Contact: : Leslie Ward-Geiger, Leslie.Ward@MyFWC.com


Researchers focus on key topics, from population assessment to behavioral ecology, to inform and
help guide manatee and right whale conservation and recovery planning.
OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

MRCTF

2.5

$190,607

$0

$2,116,276

$26,737

$4,183

$0

$2,337,803

$10,031

$2,347,834

MRCTF/
Grant

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$62,483

$62,483

$0

$62,483

STMTF 15.0

$978,676

$473,220

$393,706

$358,900

$11,625

$0

$2,216,127

$124,929

$2,341,056

GDTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$1,092

$1,092

$0

$1,092

FGTF

3.0

$178,817

$0

$0

$0

$0

$350,771

$529,588

$102,729

$632,317

Totals 20.5

$1,348,100

$473,220

$2,509,982

$385,637

$15,808

$414,346

$5,147,093

$237,689

$5,384,782

#FTE

88

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Marine Turtle Research

Subsection Contact: Allen Foley, Allen.Foley@MyFWC.com


Researchers investigate the life history, population biology, ecology, behavior and migrations of sea
turtles to guide conservation and recovery planning.

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

MRCTF

4.0

$308,318

$185,404

$2,496

$54,721

$6,008

$0

$556,947

$55,906

$612,853

FGTF

3.0

$166,613

$0

$0

$0

$0

$300,780

$467,393

$76,236

$543,629

Totals

7.0

$474,931

$185,404

$2,496

$54,721

$6,008

$300,780

$1,024,340

$132,142

$1,156,482

Reptile and Amphibian Research

Subsection Contact: Anna Farmer, Anna.Farmer@MyFWC.com


Researchers study a variety of topics related to amphibians and reptiles (other than sea turtles),
and monitor species populations while supporting conservation efforts.

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

NGWTF

0.0

$0

$112,411

$0

$26,530

$0

$0

$138,941

$6,947

$145,888

SGTF

4.5

$275,482

$122,110

$3,578

$80,201

$0

$50,000

$531,371

$28,622

$559,993

Totals

4.5

$275,482

$234,521

$3,578

$106,731

$0

$50,000

$670,312

$35,569

$705,881

Terrestrial Mammal Research

Subsection Contact: Jeffery A. Gore, Jeff.Gore@MyFWC.com


Researchers investigate the natural history, population biology, ecology and behavior of land-based
mammals, providing current scientific information necessary for maintaining viable populations of
Floridas native mammals.

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

PRTF

2.0

$120,617

$11,160

$19,469

$40,774

$0

$0

$192,020

$8,374

$200,394

NGWTF

4.0

$284,231

$79,077

$76,416

$83,990

$0

$6,800

$530,514

$26,526

$557,040

SGTF

1.0

$67,910

$0

$0

$0

$0

$147,280

$215,190

$2,276

$217,466

FGTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$69,147

$69,147

$0

$69,147

GDTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$10,000

$10,000

$0

$10,000

Totals

7.0

$472,758

$90,237

$95,885

$124,764

$0

$233,227

$1,016,871

$37,176

$1,054,047

20142015 BUDGET

89

Ecosystem
Assessment
and Restoration

EAR
(11.13%)

Section Contacts:
Fish and Wildlife Health,
Harmful Algal Blooms Research
Leanne Flewelling
Leanne.Flewelling@MyFWC.com

Total Section Budget


$6,662,841

Habitat Research
Amber Whittle
Amber.Whittle@MyFWC.com
Floridas diverse fish and wildlife species face
threats every day. Biologists with the Ecosystem
Assessment and Restoration section track many of
these threats. Researchers monitor harmful algal
blooms including Florida red tide that can cause
human health and economic problems, and monitor
and investigate fish and wildlife diseases and dieoffs. Section researchers also evaluate the status of
habitats, providing data that aid in preservation,
management and restoration decision-making.

#FTE

90

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

$341,939

$146,298

$0

$1,281,986

$2,388,582

$35,717

$2,424,299

$4,605

$20,247

$0

$0

$143,613

$6,465

$150,078

$39,176

$10,000

$62,502

$63,526

$0

$1,634,086

$162,916

$1,797,002

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

General
Revenue

0.0

$0

$618,359

PRTF

1.0

$77,695

$41,066

MRCTF 21.0

$1,458,882

MRCTF/
Grants

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$278,972

$278,972

$13,347

$292,319

NGWTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$12,505

$0

$0

$12,505

$704

$13,209

SGTF

3.0

$197,072

$0

$5,251

$48,601

$4,728

$0

$255,652

$12,280

$267,932

CARLTF

2.0

$102,079

$0

$0

$0

$0

$74,842

$176,921

$0

$176,921

GDTF

1.0

$14,153

$0

$0

$0

$0

$146,176

$160,329

$424

$160,753

FGTF 11.0

$350,983

$0

$0

$0

$0

$810,414

$1,161,397

$218,931

$1,380,328

Totals 39.0

$2,200,864

$698,601

$361,795

$290,153

$68,254

$2,592,390

$6,212,057

$450,784

$6,662,841

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Administrative Costs
#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET
$286,506

MRCTF

3.0

$187,369

$0

$10,000

$55,539

$8,000

$0

$260,908

$25,598

NGWTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$7,780

$0

$0

$7,780

$468

$8,248

SGTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$29,601

$0

$0

$29,601

$1,480

$31,081

Totals

3.0

$187,369

$0

$10,000

$92,920

$8,000

$0

$298,289

$27,546

$325,835

Fish and Wildlife Health

Aquatic Health Program Contact: Jan Landsberg, Jan.Landsberg@MyFWC.com


Sport Fish Health Program Contact: Theresa Cody, Theresa.Cody@MyFWC.com
Wildlife Health Program Contact: Mark W. Cunningham, DVM, Mark.Cunningham@MyFWC.com
Researchers monitor, investigate causes and assist in the management of fish and wildlife diseases
and die-offs. Staff members also conduct wildlife veterinary research.

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

PRTF

1.0

$77,695

$41,066

$4,605

$20,247

$0

$0

$143,613

$6,465

$150,078

$273,386

$39,176

$0

$6,963

$19,711

$0

$339,236

$33,924

$373,160

MRCTF

4.0

MRCTF/
Grants

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$5,272

$5,272

$264

$5,536

SGTF

1.0

$55,786

$0

$5,251

$9,000

$2,000

$0

$72,037

$3,602

$75,639

GDTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$140,203

$140,203

$0

$140,203

FGTF

5.0

$156,643

$0

$0

$0

$0

$82,308

$238,951

$118,844

$357,795

Totals 11.0

$563,510

$80,242

$9,856

$36,210

$21,711

$227,783

$939,312

$163,099

$1,102,411

20142015 BUDGET

91

Habitat Research

Coastal Wetlands Program Contact: Ryan Moyer, Ryan.Moyer@MyFWC.com


Coral Habitat Program Contact: Rob Ruzicka , Rob.Ruzicka@MyFWC.com
Seagrass Habitat Program Contact: Paul Carlson, Paul.Carlson@MyFWC.com;
Penny Hall, Penny.Hall@MyFWC.com
Freshwater Plants Program Contact: Craig Mallison, Craig.Mallison@MyFWC.com
Upland Habitat Program Contact: Kent Williges, Kent.Williges@MyFWC.com
Biologists collect and analyze freshwater, marine and upland habitat and species data to aid in
effective preservation, management and restoration decision-making.
PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

MRCTF

7.0

$505,218

$0

$0

$0

$35,815

$0

$541,033

$54,103

$595,136

MRCTF/
Grants

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$260,700

$260,700

$12,433

$273,133

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

NGWTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$4,725

$0

$0

$4,725

$236

$4,961

SGTF

2.0

$141,286

$0

$0

$10,000

$2,728

$0

$154,014

$7,198

$161,212

CARTF

2.0

$102,079

$0

$0

$0

$0

$74,842

$176,921

$0

$176,921

FGTF

5.0

$147,087

$0

$0

$0

$0

$617,564

$764,651

$53,706

$818,357

GDTF

1.0

$14,153

$0

$0

$0

$0

$3,150

$17,303

$0

$17,303

Totals

17.0

$909,823

$0

$0

$14,725

$38,543

$956,256

$1,919,347

$127,676

$2,047,023

Harmful Algal Blooms Research

Subsection Contact: Alina Corcoran, Alina.Corcoran@MyFWC.com


Staff monitor coastal waters for harmful algal blooms (HABs), working closely with other agencies
to protect public health, release up-to-date status reports and generate short term forecasts of red
tides. Researchers also study the Florida red tide organism and other HAB species to understand
the environmental factors that influence blooms.

#FTE

92

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

General
Revenue

0.0

$0

$618,359

$341,939

$146,298

$0

$1,281,986

$2,388,582

$35,717

$2,424,299

MRCTF

7.0

$492,909

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$492,909

$49,291

$542,200

MRCTF/
Grants

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$13,000

$13,000

$650

$13,650

GDTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$2,823

$2,823

$424

$3,247

FGTF

1.0

$47,253

$0

$0

$0

$0

$110,542

$157,795

$46,381

$204,176

Totals

8.0

$540,162

$618,359

$341,939

$146,298

$0

$1,408,351

$3,055,109

$132,463

$3,187,572

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Information
Science and
Management

ISM
(7.7%)

Section Contact:
Henry Norris
Henry.Norris@MyFWC.com
Researchers in this section address complex
natural resource issues by integrating ecological,
cultural and socioeconomic information using
statistical and spatial analysis techniques. Staff
develop maps and model distribution patterns of
fish and wildlife, identify lands and waters that
are conservation priorities, and assess economic
impacts of recreational activities. The sections
database experts, statisticians, research librarians,
specimen collection managers, outreach specialists
and scientific editor provide additional support to
FWC scientists and managers.

Total Section Budget


$4,612,987

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$1,671

$0

$0

$1,671

$74

$1,745

MRCTF 20.0

$1,329,764

$236,794

$116,920

$170,712

$15,621

$0

$1,869,811

$127,421

$1,997,232

#FTE
PRTF

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

MRCTF/
Grants

1.0

$66,208

$0

$0

$0

$0

$567,258

$633,466

$5,213

$638,679

NGWTF

4.0

$239,544

$92,118

$722

$113,886

$0

$0

$446,270

$19,630

$465,900

SGTF

6.0

$390,320

$0

$0

$13,207

$5,587

$0

$409,114

$22,171

$431,285

CARLTF

1.0

$66,757

$3,952

$0

$0

$0

$13,122

$83,831

$0

$83,831

FGTF 10.0

$604,434

$0

$0

$0

$0

$331,974

$936,408

$57,907

$994,315

Totals 42.0

$2,697,027

$332,864

$117,642

$299,476

$21,208

$912,354

$4,380,571

$232,416

$4,612,987

20142015 BUDGET

93

Administrative Costs
#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

PRTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$1,671

$0

$0

$1,671

$74

$1,745

MRCTF

4.0

$300,853

$14,446

$600

$62,100

$5,621

$0

$383,620

$38,362

$421,982

SGTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$5,587

$0

$5,587

$300

$5,887

CARLTF

0.0

$0

$3,952

$0

$0

$0

$6,122

$10,074

$0

$10,074

Totals

4.0

$300,853

$18,398

$600

$63,771

$11,208

$6,122

$400,952

$38,736

$439,688

Center for Biostatistics and Modeling

Subsection Contact: Erin Leone, Erin.Leone@MyFWC.com


Researchers help to make scientific results more reliable and useful by providing statistical
consulting support, developing study designs and statistical analysis plans, helping analyze
scientific data and producing user-friendly software tools for statistical analysis, modeling
procedures and information visualization.

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

MRCTF

0.0

$0

$24,145

$0

$0

$0

$0

$24,145

$2,415

$26,560

NGWTF

0.0

$0

$24,145

$0

$0

$0

$0

$24,145

$1,207

$25,352

SGTF

2.0

$126,619

$0

$0

$13,207

$0

$0

$139,826

$7,000

$146,826

CARLTF

1.0

$66,757

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$66,757

$0

$66,757

Totals

3.0

$193,376

$48,290

$0

$13,207

$0

$0

$254,873

$10,622

$265,495

Center for Spatial Analysis

Subsection Contact: Henry Norris, Henry.Norris@MyFWC.com


Using computer mapping and geographic data analysis methods, researchers map habitats, model
animal distributions, develop Internet mapping applications and produce digital and hard-copy
maps and graphics for distribution to natural resource managers and the public.
OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

MRCTF

6.0

$410,250

$198,203

$116,320

$97,612

$10,000

$0

$832,385

$86,544

$918,929

MRCTF/
Grants

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$4,739

$4,739

$5,213

$9,952

#FTE

94

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

FGTF

7.0

$437,467

$0

$0

$0

$0

$287,111

$724,578

$57,907

$782,485

NGWTF

4.0

$239,544

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$239,544

$9,294

$248,838

SGTF

3.0

$193,971

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$193,971

$11,371

$205,342

CARLTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$7,000

$7,000

$0

$7,000

Totals 20.0

$1,281,232

$198,203

$116,320

$97,612

$10,000

$298,850

$2,002,217

$170,329

$2,172,546

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Center for Spatial Analysis - Upland


#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET
$148,926

FGTF

2.0

$104,063

$0

$0

$0

$0

$44,863

$148,926

$0

NGWTF

0.0

$0

$67,973

$722

$113,886

$0

$0

$182,581

$9,129

$191,710

Totals

2.0

$104,063

$67,973

$722

$113,886

$0

$44,863

$331,507

$9,129

$340,636

Research Information Services

Subsection Contact: David Reed, David.Reed@MyFWC.com


Staff coordinates the management of FWRI databases; oversees production and distribution of
digital and hard-copy publications; implements statewide outreach programs presenting scientific
information for public audiences; and oversees one of the largest collections of marine fish and
invertebrate specimens in the southeastern U.S.

#FTE
MRCTF 10.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

$618,661

$0

$0

$10,000

$0

$0

$628,661

$0

$628,661

1.0

$66,208

$0

$0

$0

$0

$562,519

$628,727

$0

$628,727

1.0

$62,904

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$62,904

$0

$62,904

Totals 12.0

$747,773

$0

$0

$10,000

$0

$562,519

$1,320,292

$0

$1,320,292

MRCTF/
Grants
FGTF

Socioeconomic Assessment

Subsection Contact: Joonghyun Hwang, Joonghyun.Hwang@MyFWC.com


Staff conduct economic studies that provide information to the Florida Legislature, FWC resource
managers and the public with an understanding of the economic value, impact, benefits, costs and
efficiency measures directly related to the conservation of fish and wildlife resources.

#FTE
MRCTF

0.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT


$0

$0

$0

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

$1,000

$0

$0

$1,000

$100

$1,100

SGTF

1.0

$69,730

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$69,730

$3,500

$73,230

Totals

1.0

$69,730

$0

$0

$1,000

$0

$0

$70,730

$3,600

$74,330

20142015 BUDGET

95

Office of
the Director
OD
(17.46%)

Section Contact:
Gil McRae, FWRI Director
Gil.McRae@MyFWC.com
The Office of the Director is responsible for
managing a budget of more than $67,000,000,
which supports all programs and operations of
the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute. FWRIs
director leads the science sections and oversees
Institute-wide functions, such as Research
Operations, which provides facilities and budgetrelated support.

Total Section Budget


$10,453,268

More than 600 staff members make up FWRI.


FWRIs headquarters, located in downtown St.
Petersburg, is home base to nearly half of its
employees. More than 20 field stations enable
other FWRI staff members to be strategically
located throughout the state near the resources
they study.

#FTE
General
Revenue

96

0.0

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT


$0

$43,281

$0

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

$116,466

$0

$3,000,000

$3,159,747

$0

$3,159,747

PRTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$19,308

$0

$5,430

$24,738

$185

$24,923

MRCTF

17.0

$1,090,290

$76,935

$165,000

$1,104,109

$2,836

$2,688,150

$5,127,320

$15,607

$5,142,927

MRCTF/
Grants

6.0

$328,183

$0

$0

$0

$0

$986,897

$1,315,080

$0

$1,315,080

NGWTF

0.0

$0

$17,444

$0

$95,069

$0

$52,997

$165,510

$625

$166,135

STMTF

0.0

$0

$13,729

$0

$111,200

$0

$26,610

$151,539

$0

$151,539

SGTF

3.0

$185,814

$0

$0

$154,791

$0

$64,450

$405,055

$0

$405,055

CARLTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$4,551

$4,551

$0

$4,551

FGTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$7,902

$7,902

$2,879

$10,781

GDTF/
Grants

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$72,530

$72,530

$0

$72,530

Totals 26.0

$1,604,287

$151,389

$165,000

$1,600,943

$2,836

$6,909,517

$10,433,972

$19,296

$10,453,268

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

Office of the Director

Subsection Contact: Gil McRae, Gil.McRae@MyFWC.com


The Director of FWRI leads the major science sections: Marine Fisheries Research, Freshwater
Fisheries Research, Wildlife Research, Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration, and Information
Science and Management. The Office of the Director also oversees Institute-wide functions such as
Research Operations.
PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PRTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$5,430

$5,430

$0

$5,430

MRCTF

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

5.0

$413,304

$0

$0

$50,000

$0

$2,362,205

$2,825,509

$0

$2,825,509

MRCTF/
Grants

1.0

$68,154

$0

$0

$0

$0

$193,873

$262,027

$0

$262,027

NGWTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$52,997

$52,997

$0

$52,997

STMTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$26,610

$26,610

$0

$26,610

SGTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$64,450

$64,450

$0

$64,450

CARLTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$4,551

$4,551

$0

$4,551

Totals

6.0

$481,458

$0

$0

$50,000

$0

$2,710,116

$3,241,574

$0

$3,241,574

Research Operations

Subsection Contact: Trang Chitakone, Trang.Chitakone@MyFWC.com


The Research Operations Section supports the scientific activities of FWRI and consists of work
groups such as the Budget Office and Facilities Management. The Budget Office includes a small
Grants Office that provides central-division coordination and support for securing grant-funded
resources.

#FTE

FTE SALARIES OPS SALARIES OPS CONTRACT

EXPENSE

EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL
CATEGORIES

PROGRAM
OPERATIONAL
BUDGET

OVERHEAD
ASSESSMENT

TOTAL
PROGRAM
BUDGET

General
Revenue

0.0

$0

$43,281

$0

$116,466

$0

$3,000,000

$3,159,747

$0

$3,159,747

PRTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$19,308

$0

$0

$19,308

$185

$19,493

MRCTF 12.0

$676,986

$76,935

$165,000

$1,054,109

$2,836

$325,945

$2,301,811

$15,607

$2,317,418

$260,029

$0

$0

$0

$0

$793,024

$1,053,053

$0

$1,053,053

$0

MRCTF/
Grants

5.0

NGWTF

0.0

$0

$17,444

$0

$95,069

$0

STMTF

0.0

$0

$13,729

$0

$111,200

$0

$112,513

$625

$113,138

$124,929

$0

$124,929

SGTF

3.0

$185,814

$0

$0

$154,791

$0

$0

$340,605

$0

$340,605

FGTF

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

GDTF/
Grants

$0

$7,902

$7,902

$2,879

$10,781

0.0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$72,530

$72,530

$0

$72,530

Totals 20.0

$1,122,829

$151,389

$165,000

$1,550,943

$2,836

$4,199,401

$7,192,398

$19,296

$7,211,694

20142015 BUDGET

97

a look inside...

Current Grant Awards


Note: New awards and amendments to existing awards are received throughout the year
GRANT NAME
Granting Agency
Grant start date
# State Wildlife Grant (SWG), administered by FWC, Division of Habitat and Species Conservation

as of November 1, 2014

MARINE FISHERIES RESEARCH


CHARLOTTE HARBOR/LEMON BAY WATER QUALITY MONITORING
Southwest Florida Water Management District

$414,285 Grantor

May 7, 2001

$414,285 Total

MONITORING POPULATIONS OF FISH AND MACROINVERTEBRATES


IN FLORIDA BAY
U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service

$450,000 Grantor

May 30, 2006

JUVENILE FISH MONITORING - FISH ANALYSIS IN THE


CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER ESTUARY
South Florida Water Management District
November 19, 2007

FISHERIES-INDEPENDENT MONITORING - DATA ANALYSIS FOR


ESTERO BAY
South Florida Water Management District
November 20, 2007

INVESTIGATION OF FRESHWATER INFLOW EFFECTS ON FISH AND


INVERTEBRATES USE OF THE CRYSTAL RIVER ESTUARY
University of South Florida, College of Marine Science
June 1, 2008

ENVIRONMENTAL DREDGING OF THE SEBASTIAN RIVER: FISH


EFFECTS
St. Johns River Water Management District
October 1, 2008

98

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

$0 State/In-Kind

$0 State/In-Kind
$450,000 Total

$20,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$20,000 Total

$20,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$20,000 Total

$115,709 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$115,709 Total

$57,508 Grantor
$9,000 State/In-Kind
$66,508 Total

HYDRO-BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR TAMPA BYPASS


CANAL/ALAFIA RIVER WATER SUPPLY PROJECTS
University of South Florida, College of Marine Science
January 12, 2009

ST. JOHNS RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT FRESHWATER


INFLOW EFFECTS ON FISHES AND INVERTEBRATES
St. Johns River Water Management District
March 19, 2009

CONTINUATION OF RELATIVE ABUNDANCE MONITORING AND


SAMPLE PROCESSING OF SMALLTOOTH SAWFISH IN THE CHARLOTTE
HARBOR ESTUARINE SYSTEM, FLORIDA
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$593,760 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$593,760 Total

$20,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$20,000 Total

$40,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$40,000 Total

April 8, 2009

LEMON BAY FISHERIES-INDEPENDENT MONITORING PROJECT


Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council

$42,000 Grantor

April 27, 2009

$42,000 Total

CORAL REEF FISH SPAWNING AGGREGATION RESEARCH IN THE


FLORIDA KEYS
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
May 15, 2009

$0 State/In-Kind

$136,294 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$136,294 Total

SARASOTA BAY FISHERIES-INDEPENDENT MONITORING SAMPLING


Sarasota Bay Estuary Program

$225,000 Grantor

June 24, 2009

$255,000 Total

FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION, FISH


AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE/GULF STATES MARINE
FISHERIES COMMISSION RECFIN/COM/FIN INFORMATION AND DATA
MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES
Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$0 State/In-Kind

$8,335,288 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$8,335,288 Total

January 1, 2010

FEATHER SOUND RESTORATION


Tampa Bay Estuary Program

$60,000 Grantor

February 19, 2010

$60,000 Total

DEFINING FISH NURSERY HABITATS: AN APPLICATION OF OTOLITH


ELEMENTAL FINGERPRINTING IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey

$20,000 Grantor

April 1, 2010

$0 State/In-Kind

$0 State/In-Kind
$20,000 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

99

INCREASE INTERCEPT SAMPLING LEVELS FOR THE MARINE


RECREATIONAL FISHERIES STATISTICS SURVEY, FOR-HIRE
METHODOLOGY OF THE CHARTER BOAT AND HEADBOAT FISHERY ON
THE ATLANTIC COAST (FLORIDA PORTION)
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$282,540 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$282,540 Total

August 1, 2010

AN ECOSYSTEM-BASED APPROACH TO EVALUATING THE BURDEN


AND EFFECTS OF DIETARY MERCURY ON ATLANTIC BOTTLENOSE
DOLPHINS
Florida Atlantic University

$19,170 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$19,170 Total

September 23, 2010

IMPACTS OF THE 2010 DEEP-WATER HORIZON OIL SPILL ON


ESTUARINE BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN POPULATIONS IN THE WEST
FLORIDA PANHANDLE
University of Central Florida

$22,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$22,000 Total

November 30, 2010

#SWG - CORAL REEF RESTORATION AND CONSERVATION: ENHANCING


HERBIVORY TO RESTORE THE HEALTH AND RESILIENCY OF
FLORIDAS CORAL REEF ECOSYSTEM
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$76,107 Grantor
$40,981 State/In-Kind
$117,088 Total

January 1, 2011

SOUTHEAST AREA MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM 2011-2016


U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$1,591,356 Grantor

February 1, 2011

$1,591,356 Total

USE OF OTOLITH MICROCHEMISTRY TO IMPROVE FISHERIESINDEPENDENT INDICES OF RECRUITMENT FOR GAG (MYCTEROPERCA
MICROLEPIS): LINKING ESTUARINE NURSERIES TO NEARSHORE
REEFS IN THE EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO
University of South Florida, College of Marine Science

$0 State/In-Kind

$19,525 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$19,525 Total

March 1, 2011

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: THE ROLE OF SPONGES IN THE


COASTAL NITROGEN CIRCLE
University of North Carolina
September 1, 2011

EXPLORING THE UTILITY OF SIDE-SCAN SONAR AND


EXPERIMENTAL Z-TRAPS
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
September 1, 2011

100

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

$45,827 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$45,827 Total

$329,987 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$329,987 Total

FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION, FISH


AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE/GULF STATES MARINE
FISHERIES COMMISSION MARINE RECREATIONAL INFORMATION
PROGRAM STRATIFICATION PROJECT
Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$402,102 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$402,102 Total

September 1, 2011

CHARLOTTE HARBOR MONITORING NETWORK STRATA PROJECT


Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program

$53,550 Grantor

October 1, 2011

$53,550 Total

OYSTER MONITORING IN THE NORTHERN ESTUARIES ON THE


SOUTHEAST COAST OF FLORIDA
South Florida Water Management District
December 1, 2011

FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION, FISH


AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE/GULF STATES MARINE
FISHERIES COMMISSION BIOLOGICAL SAMPLING PROGRAM
Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$0 State/In-Kind

$408,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$408,000 Total

$489,860 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$489,860 Total

January 1, 2012

FLORIDA/NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE REGIONAL


COOPERATIVE STATISTICS PROGRAM
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
April 1, 2012

LOWER ST. JOHNS RIVER FISHERIES-INDEPENDENT


MONITORING PROGRAM
St. Johns River Water Management District
June 20, 2012

FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION, FISH


AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE/GULF STATES MARINE
FISHERIES COMMISSION FLORIDA EAST AND WEST COAST HEAD-BOAT
DATA COLLECTION
Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$600,101 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$600,101 Total

$169,936 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$169,936 Total

$756,608 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$756,608 Total

July 1, 2012

FLORIDA ATLANTIC COAST STOCK ASSESSMENTS


U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$393,998 Grantor

September 1, 2012

$393,998 Total

$0 State/In-Kind

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

101

SURVEY-CHARACTERIZE HARVEST AND REGULATORY DISCARDS


IN OFFSHORE RECREATIONAL CHARTER FISHERY, ATLANTIC
COAST FLORIDA
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$458,646 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$458,646 Total

September 1, 2012

MAPPING OF HARD-BOTTOM HABITATS AT REEF MORPHOLOGY


SCALES TO IMPROVE SAMPLING DESIGNS AND ANALYSES OF SPATIAL
DYNAMICS FOR REEF FISHES IN THE GULF OF MEXICO
University of Florida

$27,870 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$27,870 Total

September 1, 2012

COMBINING FISHERY-INDEPENDENT AND FISHERY-DEPENDENT


METHODS: A PILOT STUDY ON A HYBRID APPROACH TO SAMPLING
REEF FISHES
University of South Florida, College of Marine Science

$50,400 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$50,400 Total

September 1, 2012

BIOLOGICAL SAMPLING AND CATCH/EFFORT ESTIMATION DURING


EMERGENCY SOUTH ATLANTIC RED SNAPPER RE-OPENING
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
September 13, 2012

$28,152 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$28,152 Total

FISH HABITAT ASSESSMENT IN TIDAL RIVER ESTUARIES


Southwest Florida Water Management District

$43,860 Grantor

September 24, 2012

$43,860 Total

MCKAY BAY SEDIMENT CONTAMINANT BIOTIC EFFECTS STUDY


Tampa Bay Estuary Program

$61,700 Grantor

October 1, 2012

$61,700 Total

HYDRO-BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR TAMPA BYPASS


CANAL/ALAFIA RIVER WATER SUPPLY PROJECTS
University of South Florida, College of Marine Science
October 1, 2012

ASSESS THE EFFECTS OF MOSQUITO CONTROL PESTICIDES ON


NON-TARGETED ORGANISMS IN THE FLORIDA KEYS NATIONAL
MARINE SANCTUARY
Mote Marine Laboratory

$0 State/In-Kind

$0 State/In-Kind

$282,295 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$282,295 Total

$35,120 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$35,120 Total

October 1, 2012

FISCAL YEAR 13 COASTAL CHARLOTTE HARBOR MONITORING


NETWORK WATER-QUALITY MONITORING IN SIX UPPER CHARLOTTE
HARBOR STRATA PROJECT
Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program
October 1, 2012

102

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

$110,160 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$110,160 Total

WATER QUALITY MONITORING IN LOWER CHARLOTTE HARBOR


Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program

$18,207 Grantor

October 1, 2012

$18,207 Total

FWC-FWRIS PARTICIPATION IN THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF


AGRICULTURAL AND CONSUMER SERVICES SEAFOOD SAFETY SCOPE
OF WORK PLAN
Florida Department of Agriculture

$0 State/In-Kind

$221,109 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$221,109 Total

October 15, 2012

EVALUATION OF HOW DEEPENING JACKSONVILLE HARBOR MAY


AFFECT FISHERIES
Army Corps Of Engineers
January 25, 2013

DETERMINING WHICH TIDAL TRIBUTARIES ARE THE BEST SNOOK


NURSERIES (FLORIDA)
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
June 1, 2013

MONITORING OF A CONSTRUCTED OYSTER REEF IN THE ST. LUCIE


ESTUARY
Martin County
June 17, 2013

#SWG - DEVELOPING A COMPREHENSIVE RESEARCH STRATEGY FOR


CORAL REEF RESTORATION FOR FLORIDA
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2013

PROMOTING RECOVERY AND ADDRESSING NEW SMALLTOOTH


SAWFISH MANAGEMENT NEEDS
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
July 1, 2013

EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF LIONFISH ON SELECT HABITATS IN THE


FLORIDA KEYS
Wildlife Foundation of Florida
July 1, 2013

ANGLER LOG DATA COLLECTION PROGRAM


Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
August 1, 2013

$12,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$12,000 Total

$100,000 Grantor
$151,696 State/In-Kind
$251,696 Total

$62,470 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$62,470 Total

$201,594 Grantor
$67,861 State/In-Kind
$269,455 Total

$201,594 Grantor
$67,861 State/In-Kind
$269,455 Total

$43,600 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$43,600 Total

$188,496 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$188,496 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

103

ASSESSING THE LOCATIONS AND STATUS OF REEF FISH SPAWNING


AGGREGATIONS IN THE FLORIDA KEYS
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
August 1, 2013

CONVERSION OF RESEARCH TO ECOSYSTEM PROTECTION: MARINE


DEBRIS IN SOUTH FLORIDA
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
August 1, 2013

A MULTI-SPECIES APPROACH FOR IMPROVING ASSESSMENT AND


MANAGEMENT OF ESTUARINE AND COASTAL SPORTFISH STOCKS
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
August 15, 2013

RESTORING THREATENED CORALS AS FISHERIES HABITAT


The Nature Conservancy
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
August 27, 2013

RED DRUM SPAWNING STOCK SIZE AND STRUCTURE IN THE EASTERN


GULF OF MEXICO
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
September 1, 2013

IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF REEF FISH SPAWNING


AGGREGATIONS ALONG FLORIDAS ATLANTIC COAST
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
September 1, 2013

EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF RECREATIONAL CATCHAND-RELEASE ANGLING ON THE SURVIVAL OF GAG GROUPER
(MYCTEROPERCA MICROLEPIS), ADDITIONAL INVESTIGATION INTO
GEAR/STRATEGIES TO REDUCE FISHING TRAUMA
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$57,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$57,000 Total

$49,443 Grantor
$49,887 State/In-Kind
$99,330 Total

$515,763 Grantor
$171,921 State/In-Kind
$687,684 Total

$48,000 Grantor
$28,000 State/In-Kind
$76,000 Total

$175,862 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$175,862 Total

$299,293 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$299,293 Total

$113,749 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$113,749 Total

September 1, 2013

POPULATION SURVEYS OF SPAWNING BLUE CRABS RESULTING IN


THE DEVELOPMENT OF LARVAL DISPERSAL MODELS FOR FLORIDA
COASTAL WATERS
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$99,927 Grantor
$33,309 State/In-Kind
$133,236 Total

September 1, 2013

FISHERIES DIET DATA COMPILATION AND RESEARCH: TOWARD AN


INTEGRATED ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT IN THE GULF OF MEXICO
University of South Florida, College of Marine Science
September 1, 2013

104

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

$15,352 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$15,352 Total

TESTING AN ALTERNATIVE METHOD FOR THE SAFE RELEASE OF REEF


FISHES CAUGHT ON HOOK-AND-LINE GEAR IN THE RECREATIONAL
FISHERY IN THE GULF OF MEXICO
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$185,843 Grantor
$23,799 State/In-Kind
$209,642 Total

October 1, 2013

STAGHORN AND ELKHORN CORAL RESTORATION IN THE FLORIDA


KEYS: INCREASING POPULATION NUMBERS FOR TWO ENDANGERED
SPECIES ACT LISTED SPECIES
Coral Reef Foundation

$45,000 Grantor
$45,000 State/In-Kind
$90,000 Total

December 1, 2013

ENHANCED ASSESSMENT FOR RECOVERY OF GULF OF MEXICO


FISHERIES (FLORIDA)
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
January 1, 2014

$3,000,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$3,000,000 Total

APALACHICOLA BAY OYSTER RESTORATION (FLORIDA)


National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

$4,189,400 Grantor

January 1, 2014

$4,189,400 Total

FY14 CORAL CREEK RESTORATION FISHERY COMMUNITY


MONITORING PROJECT
Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council
for Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program

$0 State/In-Kind

$40,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$40,000 Total

January 10, 2014

TRACKING JUVENILE SMALLTOOTH SAWFISH TO CHARACTERIZE


USE OF CREATED OYSTER REEF AT TRABUE HARBORWALK, PUNTA
GORDA, FLORIDA
The Nature Conservancy

$29,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$29,000 Total

February 1, 2014

FWC/FWRI/GULF STATES MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION - DETAILED


ANALYSIS OF THE FWC SALTWATER ANGLER LICENSING SYSTEM
Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$117,757 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$117,757 Total

March 1, 2014

ASSESSMENT OF FLORIDAS MARINE HATCHERY PROGRAMS,


SEGMENT 5
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
April 1, 2014

POPULATION GENETICS OF MARINE SPORTFISH SPECIES FOR


FISHERIES MANAGEMENT AND STOCK ENHANCEMENT, SEGMENT 22
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
April 1, 2014

$898,603 Grantor
$299,534 State/In-Kind
$1,198,137 Total

$302,507 Grantor
$100,836 State/In-Kind
$403,343 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

105

FLORIDA MARINE RECREATIONAL FISHERY STASTICAL DATA


COLLECTION, SEGMENT 30
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
April 1, 2014

INVESTIGATIONS INTO ESTUARINE REEF FISH ABUNDANCE,


ECOLOGY, AND LIFE HISTORY IN FLORIDA
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
April 1, 2014

$1,127,414 Grantor
$375,805 State/In-Kind
$1,503,219 Total

$1,057,790 Grantor
$352,597 State/In-Kind
$1,410,387 Total

MARINE RESOURCES INFORMATION SYSTEM UPGRADE


Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission

$16,670 Grantor

April 1, 2014

$16,670 Total

UPGRADE TO THE FWC FISHERY-DEPENDENT BIOLOGICAL SAMPLING


DATABASE
Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission

$16,953 Grantor

April 1, 2014

FRESHWATER INFLOW EFFECTS ON FISHERIES AND INVERTEBRATES


OF THE ST. JOHNS RIVER ESTUARY
St. Johns River Water Management District
April 29, 2014

SOUTHEAST FLORIDA CORAL REEF FISHERY-INDEPENDENT


BASELINE ASSESSMENT
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
May 7, 2014

$0 State/In-Kind

$0 State/In-Kind
$16,953 Total

$25,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$25,000 Total

$3,500 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$3,500 Total

FISHERY-DEPENDENT SPORT FISH DATA COLLECTION


U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$161,818 Grantor

June 1, 2014

$215,757 Total

#SWG - IMPLEMENTATION OF A SCENARIO-BASED MODEL OF


ADAPTATION PLANNING FOR THE SOUTH FLORIDA MARINE
ENVIRONMENTS (KEYSMAP)
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$53,939 State/In-Kind

$84,000 Grantor
$45,231 State/In-Kind
$129,231 Total

July 1, 2014

#SWG - ESTABLISHING PROTOCOLS FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF


GASTROPOD ABUNDANCE AND LIFE HISTORY PARAMETERS ACROSS
MULTIPLE HABITATS USING THE BANDED TULIP FASCIOLARIA
LILIUM AS THE MODEL SPECIES
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2014

106

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

$93,983 Grantor
$50,606 State/In-Kind
$144,589 Total

#SWG - EVALUATING THE ROLE OF THE PREDATORY SNAIL, THAIS


DELTOIDEA, ON ENHANCING SURVIVAL OF OUTPLANTED STAGHORN
CORALS AS PART OF A COMPREHENSIVE CORAL REEF RESTORATION
STRATEGY
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$22,678 Grantor
$12,211 State/In-Kind
$34,889 Total

July 1, 2014

A MULTI-SPECIES APPROACH FOR IMPROVING ASSESSMENT &


MANAGEMENT OF ESTUARINE & COASTAL SPORTFISH STOCKS, F-123-8
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
August 1, 2014

$415,763 Grantor
$171,865 State/In-Kind
$587,628 Total

DREDGE HOLE STUDY


Southwest Florida Water Management District

$33,800 Grantor

August 29, 2014

$33,800 Total

RED DRUM SPAWNING STOCK SIZE AND STRUCTURE IN THE EASTERN


GULF OF MEXICO
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
September 1, 2014

PILOT STUDY FOR DEVELOPING FISHERIES-INDEPENDENT INDICES


OF ABUNDANCE FOR JUVENILE RED SNAPPER IN THE U.S. SOUTH
ATLANTIC
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$0 State/In-Kind

$140,988 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$140,988 Total

$173,689 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$173,689 Total

September 1, 2014

EVALUATION AND FISHER EDUCATION OF CORAL MARINE


PROTECTED AREA NON-TRAP AREAS
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
September 1, 2014

POPULATION STRUCTURE AND RECRUITMENT FOR TARPON AND


BONEFISH
Bonefish & Tarpon Trust
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

$72,961 Grantor
$72,961 State/In-Kind
$145,922 Total

$405,292 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$405,292 Total

September 16, 2014

LOWER ST. JOHNS RIVER FISHERIES MONITORING EXPANSION


PROJECT V
St. Johns River Water Management District
October 1, 2014

$150,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$150,000 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

107

FRESHWATER FISHERIES RESEARCH


MACROINVERTEBRATE TAXONOMIC SUPPORT SERVICES
South Florida Water Management District

$11,000 Grantor

April 9, 2013

$11,000 Total

LAKE EUSTIS PUPFISH EVALUATION


Wildlife Foundation of Florida

$20,843 Grantor

July 1, 2013

$20,843 Total

#SWG - FILLING DATA GAPS FOR FLORIDA MUSSEL SPECIES OF


GREATEST CONSERVATION NEED
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$45,534 Grantor

July 1, 2013

$0 State/In-Kind

$0 State/In-Kind

$24,519 State/In-Kind
$70,053 Total

FRESHWATER FISHERIES RESEARCH F-175-4


U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$1,044,913 Grantor

July 1, 2014

$1,564,871 Total

#SWG - POST-RESTORATION EVALUATION OF CHIPOLA RIVER


FRESHWATER INVERTEBRATE INDICATOR COMMUNITIES
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2014

VERIFICATION OF FRESHWATER MUSSEL MUSEUM RECORDS FROM


FLORIDA DRAINAGES
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
September 11, 2014

108

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

$519,958 State/In-Kind

$106,619 Grantor
$57,410 State/In-Kind
$164,029 Total

$9,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$9,000 Total

WILDLIFE RESEARCH
#SWG - SURVEY OF WINTER-BREEDING AMPHIBIAN SPECIES
IN THE PENINSULA
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
January 1, 2010

TELEMETRY - CAPE CANAVERAL ENERGY CENTER


CONVERSION PROJECT
Florida Power and Light
March 3, 2010

$28,378 Grantor
$28,400 State/In-Kind
$56,778 Total

$250,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$250,000 Total

BLACK BEAR HABITAT USE STUDY - CAMP BLANDING


Florida Department of Military Affairs

$112,100 Grantor

September 29, 2010

$112,100 Total

$0 State/In-Kind

2010-11 BALD EAGLE NESTING SURVEY AND CONSERVATION


U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$81,967 Grantor

January 26, 2011

$81,967 Total

DEPREDATION/PREDATION RATES BY FLORIDA PANTHERS ON


LIVESTOCK AND WILD PREY
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$95,159 Grantor

July 31, 2011

$0 State/In-Kind

$0 State/In-Kind
$95,159 Total

RIGHT WHALE RECOVERY PLAN IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIES


U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$1,287,014 Grantor

October 1, 2011

$1,287,014 Total

$0 State/In-Kind

BALD EAGLE POPULATION MONITORING


Wildlife Foundation of Florida

$162,993 Grantor

May 23, 2012

$162,993 Total

DOCUMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF SEA TURTLE MORTALITY AND


MORBIDITY IN FLORIDA
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
July 1, 2012

LEVEL 1 AND 2 NECROPSY TRAINING FOR INCREASED QUALITY


OF LEVELS A, B, C DATA COLLECTION BY SOUTHEAST CETACEAN
STRANDING NETWORK
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$0 State/In-Kind

$45,769 Grantor
$17,179 State/In-Kind
$62,948 Total

$99,999 Grantor
$44,799 State/In-Kind
$144,798 Total

August 1, 2012

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

109

MANATEE WARM-WATER REFUGIA AND MORTALITY


Wildlife Foundation of Florida

$25,000 Grantor

October 1, 2012

$25,000 Total

DOCUMENTATION OF MANATEES AT TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY


POWER PLANTS - 2013
Tampa Electric Company
March 14, 2013

$0 State/In-Kind

$5,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$5,000 Total

FLORIDA MARINE TURTLE RESEARCH AND CONSERVATION


U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$248,855 Grantor

June 1, 2013

$337,056 Total

IMPACT OF HYDRILLA ON USE OF THE LITTORAL ZONE BY FORAGING


LIMPKINS AND WADING BIRDS IN CENTRAL FLORIDA
Wildlife Foundation of Florida
July 1, 2013

$88,201 State/In-Kind

$28,026 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$28,026 Total

BEAR ABUNDANCE IN OCALA NATIONAL FOREST


Wildlife Foundation of Florida

$32,350 Grantor

July 1, 2013

$32,350 Total

#SWG - GENETIC ASSESSMENT OF GOPHER FROG POPULATIONS IN


FLORIDA
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$49,580 Grantor

July 1, 2013

#SWG - GENETICS AND CONSERVATION SIGNIFICANCE OF OSPREY IN


SOUTHERN FLORIDA
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2013

$0 State/In-Kind

$26,697 State/In-Kind
$76,277 Total

$19,000 Grantor
$10,231 State/In-Kind
$29,231 Total

PANTHER RESEARCH
Raymond James Trust

$5,000 Grantor

August 15, 2013

$5,000 Total

RIGHT WHALE AERIAL SURVEYS, RIGHT WHALE COORDINATOR/


ACTIVITIES, GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM/AUTOMATIC
IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM SUPPORT: RIGHT WHALE RECOVERY PLAN
IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIES
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
October 1, 2013

110

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

$0 State/In-Kind

$650,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$650,000 Total

ENHANCED SEA TURTLE CONSERVATION PROGRAM, FLORIDA


NESTING BEACH SURVEYS PROGRAM
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
October 1, 2013

FLORIDA GRASSHOPPER SPARROW RECOVERY: IDENTIFICATION


OF NEST PREDATORS OF DRY PRAIRIE BIRDS USING VIDEO
SURVEILLANCE TECHNIQUES
Wildlife Foundation of Florida

$19,116 Grantor
$6,372 State/In-Kind
$25,488 Total

$17,397 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$17,397 Total

December 11, 2013

MANATEE PHOTO ID PROGRAM, DOCUMENTATION OF MANATEES AT


TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY
Tampa Electric Company
January 3, 2014

A QUANTITATIVE FRAMEWORK TO EVALUATE VESSEL COLLISION


RISK FOR MARINE MAMMALS IN FLORIDA
University of Florida
February 1, 2014

LONG-TERM MONITORING OF BEACH MOUSE POPULATIONS AND


HABITAT IN NORTHWEST FLORIDA
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2014

AVIAN AND TERRESTRIAL WILDLIFE DISEASE SURVEILLANCE AND


RESPONSE PROGRAM
Wildlife Foundation of Florida
July 1, 2014

REFINING THE FWC BEACH-NESTING BIRD PROTOCOL FOR


THREATENED GROUND-NESTING SEABIRDS
Wildlife Foundation of Florida
July 1, 2014

AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER HABITAT RESTORATION (FLORIDA)


National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
Shell Program
July 1, 2014

#SWG - ADDRESSING DATA GAPS FOR THE EVERGLADES MINK AND


THE SHERMANS SHORT TAILED SHREW
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2014

$5,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$5,000 Total

$89,887 Grantor
$49,858 State/In-Kind
$139,745 Total

$17,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$17,000 Total

$60,500 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$60,500 Total

$37,970 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$37,970t Total

$141,085 Grantor
$141,085 State/In-Kind
$282,170 Total

$63,291 Grantor
$34,080 State/In-Kind
$97,371 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

111

#SWG - WORTHINGTONS MARSH WREN ABUNDANCE AND HABITAT


ASSOCIATIONS IN NORTHEAST FLORIDA
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2014

FLORIDA MARINE MAMMAL STRANDING NETWORK COORDINATION


AND RESPONSE IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
October 1, 2014

NORTHWEST FLORIDA MARINE MAMMAL STRANDING NETWORK


RESPONSE ENHANCEMENT
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
October 1, 2014

ENHANCED SEA TURTLE CONSERVATION PROGRAM, FLORIDA


NESTING BEACH SURVEYS PROGRAM
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
October 1, 2014

112

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

$37,120 Grantor
$19,988 State/In-Kind
$57,108 Total

$80,593 Grantor
$28,018 State/In-Kind
$108,611 Total

$41,895 Grantor
$14,586 State/In-Kind
$56,481 Total

$19,117 Grantor
$4,670 State/In-Kind
$23,787 Total

ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION


RELATED RESEARCH TO THE OCEANS AND HUMAN HEALTH
INITIATIVE/BREVETOXIN ACCUMULATION IN FISH AND
POTENTIAL IMPACTS
University of North Carolina Wilmington
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$222,706 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$222,706 Total

October 1, 2005

JOHNSONS SEAGRASS FIELD SURVEY ANALYSIS AND DOCK


IMPACT STUDY
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
July 15, 2007

JOHNSONS SEAGRASS DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE SURVEY,


MONITORING OF POPULATIONS IN THE SOUTHERN RANGE AND
INVESTIGATION OF THE SOUTHERN LIMIT
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$32,298 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$32,298 Total

$50,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$50,000 Total

February 29, 2008

INVESTIGATION THE EFFICACY OF CHOLESTYRAMINE AS A


TREATMENT FOR BREVETOXICOSIS IN STRANDED LOGGERHEADS
AND DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS
Mote Marine Laboratory

$14,220 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$14,220 Total

September 1, 2008

SOUTHEAST FLORIDA CORAL REEF EVALUATION AND MONITORING


PROJECT
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
February 23, 2009

$650,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$650,000 Total

SOUTH FLORIDA FISHERIES HABITAT ASSESSMENT PROGRAM


South Florida Water Management District

$756,500 Grantor

March 25, 2009

$756,500 Total

JOHNSONS SEAGRASS DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE SURVEY,


MONITORING THE POPULATIONS IN THE SOUTHERN RANGE AND
INVESTIGATION INTO THE BIOLOGICAL THREAT OF SALINITY
THROUGHOUT THE SPECIES RANGE
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$355,767 Grantor

$0 State/In-Kind

$0 State/In-Kind
$355,767 Total

April 13, 2009

CORAL REEF/HARDBOTTOM MONITORING FLORIDA KEYS NATIONAL


MARINE SANCTUARY
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
October 1, 2009

$1,510,000 Grantor
$191,783 State/In-Kind
$1,701,783 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

113

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY COASTAL WATERS


SURVEY
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
May 1, 2010

$528,152 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$528,152 Total

DEVELOPMENT OF A JOHNSONS SEAGRASS RESTORATION PLAN


U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$20,000 Grantor

July 22, 2010

$20,000 Total

MONITORING OF TOXIC ALGAE IN THE INDIAN RIVER LAGOON


St. Johns River Water Management District

$76,000 Grantor

September 27, 2010

$76,000 Total

BREVETOXIN METABOLISM AND PHYSIOLOGY - A FRESHWATER


MODEL OF MORBIDITY IN ENDANGERED SEA TURTLES
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
September 1, 2011

HIGH RESOLUTION ASSESSMENT OF CARBON DYNAMICS IN SEAGRASS


AND CORAL REEF BIOMES
UAV Collaborative
October 11, 2011

$0 State/In-Kind

$0 State/In-Kind

$123,987 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$123,987 Total

$130,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$130,000 Total

SOUTH FLORIDA FISH HABITAT ASSESSMENT MONITORING NETWORK


South Florida Water Management District

$705,000 Grantor

December 1, 2011

$705,000 Total

NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION ATLANTIC


OCEAN ACIDIFICATION TEST-BED CARBONATE CHEMISTRY
VALIDATION SAMPLING
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$0 State/In-Kind

$14,985 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$14,985 Total

March 6, 2012

SURVEILLANCE FOR NEUROTROPIC VELOGENIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE


VIRUS IN DOUBLE CRESTED CORMORANTS IN FLORIDA
Wildlife Management Institute
May 23, 2012

#SWG - DEVELOPMENT OF A SEAGRASS MONITORING PROGRAM FOR


THE SPRINGS COAST
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2012

114

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

$50,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$50,000 Total

$105,000 Grantor
$105,000 State/In-Kind
$210,000 Total

AUTONOMOUS WATER QUALITY AND HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOM


MONITORING PROJECT
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
May 1, 2013

AVIAN AND TERRESTRIAL WILDLIFE DISEASE SURVEILLANCE AND


RESPONSE PROGRAM
Wildlife Foundation of Florida
July 1, 2013

#SWG - MONITORING AND MAPPING OF DENDROGYRA CYLINDRUS OF


THE FLORIDA REEF TRACT
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2013

#SWG - INVESTIGATION OF A PREVIOUSLY UNDESCRIBED OCTOCORAL


DISEASE AFFECTING THE FLORIDA REEF TRACT
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2013

#SWG - RESPONSE OF ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION IN MANGROVE FORESTS


TO SEA-LEVEL RISE AND CLIMATE CHANGE
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2013

#SWG - COASTAL HABITAT INTEGRATED MAPPING AND MONITORING


PROGRAM
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2013

$50,000 Grantor
$76,118 State/In-Kind
$126,118 Total

$50,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$50,000 Total

$99,998 Grantor
$53,845 State/In-Kind
$153,843 Total

$20,000 Grantor
$11,000 State/In-Kind
$31,000 Total

$124,095 Grantor
$66,821 State/In-Kind
$190,916 Total

$96,724 Grantor
$52,200 State/In-Kind
$148,924 Total

MARINE TOXINS IN SEAFOOD ITEMS USED TO FEED AQUARIUM ANIMALS


Georgia Aquarium

$18,000 Grantor

August 26, 2013

$18,000 Total

CORAL REEF ECOSYSTEM STUDIES: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL


CHARACTERISTICS OF REEF SYSTEMS
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
U.S. Geological Survey

$0 State/In-Kind

$8,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$8,000 Total

August 19, 2013

LONG-TERM MONITORING OF SELECT CORAL REEFS AT DRY


TORTUGAS
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
October 1, 2013

$40,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$40,000 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

115

PHYTOPLANKTON ANALYSES
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
July 1, 2013

$40,400 Grantor

EXAMINING THE EFFICACY OF CORALLIVOROUS SNAIL REMOVAL AS A


METHOD TO PROMOTE CORAL HEALTH IN THE THREATENED SPECIES
ACROPORA PALMATA
Wildlife Foundation of Florida

$17,303 Grantor

$0 State/In-Kind
$40,400 Total

$0 State/In-Kind
$17,303 Total

July 1, 2014t

#SWG - SEAGRASS MONITORING IN THE FLORIDA PANHANDLE


U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$50,000 Grantor

July 1, 2014

$76,923 Total

#SWG - NET ECOSYSTEM PRODUCTIVITY, CALCIFICATION, AND


BIOCHEMICAL PREDICTORS OF OPTIMAL HABITAT FOR ACROPORA
CERVICORNIS NURSERY OUTPLANTS
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$26,923 State/In-Kind

$85,711 Grantor
$46,152 State/In-Kind
$131,863 Total

July 1, 2014

#SWG - CORAL SETTLEMENT AT PATCH REEFS IN THE FLORIDA KEYS


U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$42,500 Grantor

July 1, 2014

$65,385 Total

FISH AND WILDLIFE REPORTING APP: FISH DISEASE AND MORTALITY


EVENTS
Wildlife Foundation of Florida
July 1, 2014

INVESTIGATING HOW CORAL RECRUITMENT AND JUVENILE


SURVIVORSHIP VARIES ALONG THE FLORIDA REEF TRACT
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
August 14, 2014

MISSISSIPPI CANYON 252 OIL SPILL EMERGENCY RESTORATION PLAN


FOR RESPONSE IMPACTS TO SEAGRASSES OF THE NORTHERN GULF
OF MEXICO TASKS FOR SEPTEMBER 2014 PEAK-SEASON MONITORING
EVENT
Natural Resource Damage Assessment/BP

$22,885 State/In-Kind

$35,614 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$35,614 Total

$89,741 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$89,741 Total

$26,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$26,000 Total

September 3, 2014

MOLECULAR TOOL DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION TO


ADVANCE MONITORING OF PICO- AND NANO-PLANKTONIC ALGAE IN
THE INDIAN RIVER LAGOON
St. Johns River Water Management District
November 3, 2014

116

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

$49,769 Grantor
$67,971 State/In-Kind
$117,740 Total

INFORMATION SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT


DIGITIZE AREA CONTINGENCY PLAN FOR SAN JUAN AND U.S.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. Coast Guard
September 16, 2008

GEODATABASE DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE FOR


ACROPORA SPAWNING
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
March 23, 2009

SATELLITE EARTH IMAGES FOR THE REGULATORY DEVELOPMENT OF


WATER QUALITY STANDARDS
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
January 8, 2010

FLORIDA KEYS NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY WATER QUALITY


PROTECTION PROGRAM
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
October 1, 2010

LIFE HISTORY SUMMARIES AND CREATION OF THE ECOSPECIES


DATABASE TO PROVIDE WEB-ENABLED INFORMATION TO SUPPORT
SOUTH ATLANTIC FISHERIES MANAGEMENT COUNCIL HABITAT
MANAGEMENT AND SOUTHEAST DATA, ASSESSMENT, AND REVIEW
South Atlantic Marine Fisheries Commission

$65,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$65,000 Total

$70,600 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$70,600 Total

$150,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$150,000 Total

$195,000 Grantor
$17,037 State/In-Kind
$212,037 Total

$75,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$75,000 Total

July 1, 2011

REVISION OF AREA CONTINGENCY PLAN FOR SECTORS KEY WEST,


MIAMI AND ST. PETERSBURG
U.S. Coast Guard
August 17, 2011

$85,510 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$85,510 Total

REVISION OF AREA CONTINGENCY PLAN FOR SECTOR MOBILE


U.S. Coast Guard

$95,203 Grantor

September 30, 2011

$95,203 Total

#SWG - MAXIMIZING THE VALUE OF FLORIDAS PRIORITY SCIENTIFIC


INFORMATION THROUGH DATA COORDINATION AND QUALITY
ASSURANCE
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$91,966 Grantor

$0 State/In-Kind

$91,966 State/In-Kind
$183,932 Total

July 1, 2012

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

117

WEB APPLICATION AND DEVELOPMENT TO SUPPORT ECOSYSTEM


BASED MANAGEMENT IN THE SOUTH ATLANTIC REGION
South Atlantic Marine Fisheries Commission
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$38,250 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$38,250 Total

January 1, 2013

LIFE HISTORY SUMMARIES AND REFINEMENT OF THE ECO-SPECIES


DATABASE TO PROVIDE WEB-ENABLED INFORMATION TO SUPPORT
SOUTH ATLANTIC FISHERIES MANAGEMENT COUNCIL HABITAT
MANAGEMENT AND SOUTHEAST DATA, ASSESSMENT, AND REVIEW
South Atlantic Marine Fisheries Commission
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$38,250 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$38,250 Total

January 1, 2013

MAPPING FLORIDAS EAST COAST CURRENTS AND OUTFLOWS


Florida Department of Environmental Protection

$22,000 Grantor

May 13, 2013

$22,000 Total

COORDINATED CORAL/HARD BOTTOM ECO-MAPPING, MONITORING


AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM, YEAR 3
Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Coastal Management
Program

$0 State/In-Kind

$168,091 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$168,091 Total

July 1, 2013

REVIEW AND PERFORM UPDATE TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION


SYSTEM SHORELINE CLEAN-UP ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUE
GEODATABASE FOR MARINE SAFETY UNIT SAVANNAH COASTLINE
U.S. Coast Guard

$20,000 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$20,000 Total

September 6, 2013

ENHANCEMENT FOR COORDINATED CORAL AND HARDBOTTOM


ECOSYSTEM MAPPING, MONITORING, AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Coastal Management
Program

$126,357 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$126,357 Total

October 1, 2013

WEB APPLICATION AND DEVELOPMENT TO SUPPORT ECOSYSTEM


BASED MANAGEMENT IN THE SOUTH ATLANTIC REGION
South Atlantic Fishery Management Council
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

$38,250 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$38,250 Total

January 1, 2014

ONLINE BOATING AND ANGLING GUIDE TO TAMPA BAY - UPDATES


AND UPGRADES
Tampa Bay Estuary Program
January 9, 2014

118

PROGRAMS OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE 20142015

$4,976 Grantor
$2,530 State/In-Kind
$7,506 Total

ENHANCEMENT OF A RECREATIONAL FISHERIES COMPONENT OF THE


MARINE RESOURCES GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
May 1, 2014

FISH AND WILDLIFE REPORTING APP: FISH DISEASE AND MORTALITY


EVENTS
Wildlife Foundation of Florida
July 1, 2014

ENHANCEMENT FOR COORDINATED CORAL AND HARDBOTTOM


ECOSYSTEM MAPPING, MONITORING, AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Coastal Management
Program

$318,607 Grantor
$106,203 State/In-Kind
$424,810 Total

$35,614 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$35,614 Total

$175,429 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$175,429 Total

July 1, 2014

#SWG - IMPACTS OF SHIFTING ENVIRONMENTS ON FRESHWATER


STREAMS IN THE FLORIDA PANHANDLE
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2014

#SWG - LANDSCAPE LEVEL IN-STREAM HABITAT MAPPING - SIDE SCAN


SONAR
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
July 1, 2014

#SWG - OF SUITABLE CORAL RESTORATION SITES AND RESILIENT


CORAL REEF COMMUNITIES THROUGH ASSESSMENT OF EXISTING
CORAL MONITORING DATA
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

$135,320 Grantor
$72,865 State/In-Kind
$208,185 Total

$198,088 Grantor
$106,664 State/In-Kind
$304,752 Total

$100,000 Grantor
$53,846 State/In-Kind
$153,846 Total

July 1, 2014

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR


FLORIDA COYOTES: REFINING A COMPREHENSIVE MODEL OF
MANAGEMENT
Wildlife Foundation of Florida
July 1, 2013

COORDINATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF FLORIDAS MARINE SPORT


FISH RESTORATION GRANTS - SEGMENT 4
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
March 1, 2014

$35,447 Grantor
$0 State/In-Kind
$35,447 Total

$20,190 Grantor
$6,730 State/In-Kind
$26,920 Total

CURRENT GRANT AWARDS

119

OUR MISSION
Through effective research and technical knowledge, we provide
timely information and guidance to protect, conserve, and manage
Floridas fish and wildlife resources.

FWC FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE


100 Eighth Avenue Southeast
St. Petersburg, Florida 33701
(727) 896-8626
MyFWC.com/Research
Find us on Facebook: Facebook.com/FWCResearch
Follow us on Twitter: Twitter.com/MyFWC
View our pictures on Flickr: Flickr.com/MyFWC
Watch our videos on YouTube: YouTube.com/FWCResearch
Read our documents on Scribd: Scribd.com/MyFWC