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Faculty of Technology, Design and Environment

Department of Real Estate


and Construction

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management


Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors

Student Handbook
2014/2015

Head of Department
Prof Joseph Tah BSc (Hons), MSc, PhD, MCIOB, ACM
Programme Lead
Mr Michael Hill BEng (Hons), CEng, MICE, MIStructE
Subject Coordinator
Rebecca Gee BSc (Hons), PG DipPropInv, MRICS

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

The Faculty of Technology, Design and Environment


promotes an inclusive learning environment in which
individuals are valued and supported in achieving their full
potential. The Faculty endeavours to meet its duties under
the Equality Act 2010 to eliminate unfair discrimination and
promote equality of opportunity and good relations among
members of the university community. For the university
statement on Equal Opportunity and Diversity please see
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/hr/eod/statement.html

Our programmes endeavour to deliver a teaching and


learning experience, which reflects the Universitys
regulations and the Faculty of Technology, Design and
Environments commitment to meeting the requirements of
the relevant/various legislations and codes of practice and
offers inclusive opportunities to all appropriately qualified
students.

The details in the handbook were correct at the time of going


to press. However, the Department cannot guarantee that
minor details of the actual programme delivery may not differ
slightly from those stated in this handbook.

If you have any difficulty accessing the information


contained in this document please let us know by contacting
the Programme Administrator, Daniel Vicars
Telephone:
Email:

(01865) 483909
dvicars@brookes.ac.uk

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Student Handbook

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. Introduction ..................................................................................................... 1
2. Course Structure ............................................................................................ 2
3. Subject List ..................................................................................................... 5
4. Subject Diagram BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management ........................... 6
5. Teaching, Learning and Assessment Strategies......................................... 7
6. Student Guidance Teaching, Learning and Assessment ........................ 9
7. Student Participation and Representation ................................................. 14
8. Student Feedback and Review of the Course............................................ 15
9. Supporting Students at Oxford Brookes University ................................. 16
10. Module Description .................................................................................... 21
U35001: Economics of Built Environment ..............................................................................21
U35008: Introduction to Spatial Planning ...............................................................................25
U35009: Introduction to Valuation ..........................................................................................28
U35010: Foundation Real Estate Law 1 ................................................................................31
U35011: Foundation Real Estate Law 2 ................................................................................35
U35012: Integrative Project I .................................................................................................39
U35013: Introduction to Property, Management and Professional Practice ...........................43
U35014: Introduction to Building Design and Construction ....................................................47
U35020: The Construction and Appraisal of Real Estate .......................................................51
U35024: Town Planning Practice ..........................................................................................54
U35025: Real Estate Integrative Project II .............................................................................57
U35026: Real Estate Economics and Finance .......................................................................60
U35028: Research Methods ..................................................................................................64
U35029: Statutory Valuation ..................................................................................................67
U35030: Land Law ................................................................................................................70
U35034: Landlord and Tenant Law........................................................................................73
U35071: Commercial and Residential Development ..............................................................76
U35072: Advanced Valuation ................................................................................................80
U35073: Property Management.............................................................................................84
U35074: Management of Corporate Real Estate ...................................................................88
U35094: Real Estate Integrative Project (Professional Practice Test)....................................93
U35097: Real Estate Investment ...........................................................................................96
U35099: Dissertation .............................................................................................................99

APPENDICES: .................................................................................................. 102


Appendix A - Programme Specification ........................................................ 103
BSc (Hons) in Real Estate Management .............................................................................103

Appendix B Brookes Assessment Compact ........................................... 113


Appendix C

Undergraduate Programme Assessment, Feedback and


Marking Guidelines ............................................................. 115

Appendix D Course Assessment Schedule ............................................... 117


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Appendix E Consideration of Mitigating Circumstances ......................... 118


Appendix F Cheating .................................................................................... 120
Appendix G Citing Your Sources ................................................................ 121
Appendix H Turnitin ..................................................................................... 124
Appendix I Departmental Staff Contact List .............................................. 125
Appendix J Support Services Contact Details .......................................... 126
Appendix K - Rooms ....................................................................................... 127
Appendix L Headington Campus Maps ...................................................... 128
Appendix M Health and Safety Regulations: Guide for Students ............ 130
Appendix N Alumni: Keeping in Touch ...................................................... 134

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1. Introduction
Welcome to the Department of Real Estate and Construction at Oxford Brookes University.
This document is your guide to the Department and the course in Real Estate Management. It
provides useful information to assist you throughout your course.
In addition to this guide, you should have electronic access to the Undergraduate Modular
Programme Handbook and Regulations and the Undergraduate Modular Programme
Guide for Students these are accessed via your Brookes electronic Personal Information
Portal (PIP) page. You will find that these will provide the answers to many of the questions you
have concerning the Undergraduate Modular Programme. The Undergraduate Modular
Programme Guide also contains the framework of rules within which the Undergraduate
Modular Programme runs, and wherever this guide provides conflicting information the
Undergraduate Modular Programme Guide should take precedence.
In addition to the documentation, we recommend that you get to know the Student Support
Coordinator and staff in the Department as soon as you can, as they will be one of your main
resources during your time here. A list of key staff roles is given in Section 9 and a full list
of staff is given in Appendix I. We recognise that you may find life at University difficult
initially, during the important settling in period, so please do not hesitate to seek advice from us,
we are here to provide pastoral as well as academic guidance.
Rebecca Gee
Subject Coordinator
Important Note:
Regulations and procedures change from time to time and it is your responsibility to stay up to
date. If in doubt see your Student Support Coordinator or Academic Adviser for guidance.
Feedback
The hope is that this guide will be helpful as well as informative but you are the best source of
information as to what you need to know. Later in the year, you will be asked to evaluate this guide
- suggest changes, provide feedback on what would have been useful to have been included for
the benefit of future students. Your co-operation in this evaluation will be valuable and
appreciated.

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2. Course Structure
The BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management is a three year full-time course that provides an
education in real estate management and the disciplines that contribute to it. It is accredited by
the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and is therefore structured and designed for
students that wish to go on and gain membership of this professional body. In particular the
course is structured for the RICS pathways for Commercial Property Practice, Valuation, and
Planning & Development.
The course allows you to combine your academic and professional interests in ways that open
up potential career paths and extend your personal development. Although most graduates go
on to work in the property industry, the course also provides a solid foundation for those
intending to take up roles in general management in other industries
The curriculum for the course has the main themes: Management, Economics & Valuation,
Law, and Planning and Development. Each theme comprises a group of related modules
whose inter-relationships and complexity are developed as the course progresses. Additionally,
the themes are prevented from becoming in any way separate entities by the incorporation of
integrative project modules in each year of the course, whose purpose is to equip you with the
understanding and skills to integrate the processes of estate management within a commercial
and professional context.
The full details of the aims and objectives, the teaching and assessment methods, and the
mapping against professional competences, for the course are given in the Programme
Specification in Appendix A.
Course Outline
Whilst the course has been structured to be compatible with the University Undergraduate
Modular Programme and contains modules of equal academic merit, the choice open to you is
constrained by the inclusion of compulsory modules and prerequisite chains, which dictate
which modules you can take in each year of the course.
The course is divided into Levels 4, 5 & 6 representing the three years of the course.
Due to the 1st year of the course having similar professional competency requirements and
learning outcomes as those in other courses within the Faculty, and in order to encourage
cross-discipline synergy and awareness, students from other courses within the Faculty will also
study on the 1st year (Level 4) modules. In the 2nd & 3rd year (Levels 5 & 6) the modules focus
on the development and progression of the core professional competencies for Real Estate
Management and therefore are taken almost exclusively by these students see Sections 3 &
4 for Subject List and Diagram.
Level 4
Level 4 is concerned with the fundamental knowledge and skills required to understand the
process of real estate management. Students will acquire and apply knowledge of property &
commercial management, law, economics, planning and construction, and will develop the skills
required in working and communicating with others.
Your Academic Advisor, whose name and location will be found on your Student Record issued
when you enrol and on your Records & Results page on your Personal Information Portal (PIP)
page, will deal with your Level 4 programme of study and any modifications to it. Due to the
requirements of the professional bodies, all of the Level 4 modules are compulsory, and
therefore your 1st year programme is registered for you on the University computer system. You
should ensure that your Level 4 programme includes all the compulsory modules for your
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subject and any recommended modules, which will compensate for any previous weak
performance of study or any you have not previously studied. You must discuss and agree your
programme with your Academic Advisor as soon as possible, during enrolment week. You can
use the Online Programme Registration (OLPR) facility to manage and make changes to your
programme of study, i.e. add and delete modules, via your PIP page - always think carefully
about your reasons for changing.
The responsibility for drawing up your programme rests entirely with you no one will chase
you up if you forget to register your programme.
Levels 5 and 6
Level 4 students must make a preliminary choice of their Level 5 & 6 modules before the end of the
Second Semester of Level 4. Level 5 & 6 modules are all compulsory, however there is an
opportunity to add additional acceptable language modules to study in these years. Remember
that the choice of modules can be changed at the beginning of the semester in which they run.
Module Descriptions for the subject are included in Section 10 of this Handbook. Other module
descriptions are held at Student Central and on the University's computer network. For further
information on a particular module contact the module leader.
Level 5 & 6 study develops and progresses the main themes of Real Estate Management and the
performance in these modules determines the degree classification.
Level 5 focuses on the further development of knowledge and skills related to the discipline. The
studies cover the important areas of land law, landlord & tenant law, real estate economics &
finance, statutory valuation, and real estate appraisal & planning. This level also includes a
research methods module that provides knowledge, understanding and practice in independent
research and prepares students for their final year dissertation. At the same time there is an
opportunity to continue (or begin) the acquisition of language skills through the study on language
modules that are acceptable to the course see Section 3 Subject List.
Level 6 modules are all honours level modules and therefore provide the advanced study of the
main themes and encourage more reflective and independent learning. The studies include
property & corporate management, advanced valuation, real estate investment, and commercial &
residential management. The integrative project module provides a residential professional practice
test which simulates a variety of tasks and problems related to real estate management, and
therefore pulls together all the knowledge and skills attained during the three years of the course.
The dissertation module provides students with the opportunity to carry out independent research
into areas of interest which relate to their preferred career progression.
If there are any questions you have which are not answered by either this handbook or the
Undergraduate Modular Programme documents, please feel free to ask any of your tutors, in
particular your Academic Advisor.
Final award
To obtain a BSc degree with honours a student must pass within eight years at least twenty-four
module credits including at least eight level 4 module credits and at least sixteen acceptable
module credits. To obtain a BSc degree without honours a student must pass within eight years
at least twenty module credits including at least eight level 4 module credits and at least twelve
acceptable module credits. For both honours and non-honours there are modules that are
compulsory as shown in Section 3 - Subject Lists. There are no specific subject requirements
for interim exit awards. For full details of requirements for awards please refer to the
undergraduate modular programme (UMP) regulation B2 at:
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/regulations

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Grade Point Average


Grade Point Average (GPA) is a calculation of how well a student is performing based on their
complete set of marks. GPA is understood internationally on the graduate job market and its
introduction at Brookes, alongside Degree Classification, is intended to improve employment
prospects.
The calculation of the degree classification is entirely independent of the calculation of the GPA.
Rules concerning the classification of degrees are contained in the relevant Specific
Regulations for the programme concerned and briefly described above.
In contrast to a degree classification, e.g. 2:1, 2:2, the GPA score is a simple, mean average
with each module counting equally according to its credit value, i.e. 1 credit carries equal
weighting irrespective of level, subject, when taken etc. This means that, for example, at level 4,
5, or 6 a single module (15 credits) counts once in the calculation of the GPA, a double module
(30 credits) counts twice and so on. The GPA score is capped at 4.00. Full details of the
regulations concerning GPA can be found at:
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/regulations/current/core/a3/a3-14/
Module definitions:
Basic (Level 4) Module
Is a module that introduces you to a subject area or discipline. These modules are normally taken
in the 1st year of your programme of study.
Advanced (Level 5) Module
Is a module that builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding achieved through taking basic
modules. These modules are normally taken in the 2nd of your programme of study.
Honours (Level 6) Module
Is a module which is part of the honours level component of a degree and is normally taken in the
final year of your programme of study. It is at an advanced level and intended to engage students
in reflective and independent learning.
Compulsory Module
A compulsory module is a module that must be taken and passed. In combination the compulsory
modules will provide you with the skills, knowledge and understanding to achieve the course
profile.
Acceptable Module
A module that has been specified as part of a course in addition to the compulsory modules. The
marks achieved in acceptable modules contribute to the class of degree you will be awarded.
Single Module
A module worth one credit
Double Module
A module worth two credits
Prerequisite Module
A module you have to take and pass before taking certain advanced modules
Co-requisite Module
A module you normally have to take in conjunction with another module(s)

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3. Subject List
BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)
Single Honours
Level 4
Compulsory Modules
U 35001 Economics of Built Environment
U 35008 Introduction to Spatial Planning
U 35009 Introduction to Valuation
U 35010 Foundation Real Estate Law 1
U 35011 Foundation Real Estate Law 2
U 35012 Integrative Project I
U 33513 Introduction to Property, Management and Professional Practice
U 33514 Introduction to Building Design and Construction
Level 5
Compulsory Modules for Degree/Honours Degree
U 35020 The Construction and Appraisal of Real Estate
U 35024 Town Planning Practice
U 35025 Integrative Project II
U 35026 Real Estate Economics and Finance
U 35028 Research Methods
U 35029 Statutory Valuation
U 35030 Land Law
U 35034 Landlord and Tenant Law
Level 6
Compulsory Modules for Honours Degree
U 35071 Commercial and Residential Development
U 35072 Advanced Valuation
U 35073 Property Management
U 35074 Management of Corporate Real Estate
U 35094 Integrative Project III Professional Practice Test
U 35097 Real Estate Investment
U 35099 Dissertation (Double)
Acceptable Modules (Maximum of 2)
U6xxxx Language modules from list below
U61500 French A1
U61501 French A2
U61512 French B1(1)
U61513 French B1(2)
U61514 French 4A
U61515 French 4B

U63500 Spanish A1
U63501 Spanish A2
U63512 Spanish B1(1)
U63513 Spanish B1(2)
U63514 Spanish 4A
U63515 Spanish 4B

U62000 German A1
U62001 German A2

U62700 Mandarin Chinese 1A


U62701 Mandarin Chinese 1B
U62712 Mandarin Chinese 2A
U62713 Mandarin Chinese 2B

U63010 Japanese 1A
U63011 Japanese 1B
U63012 Japanese 2A
U63013 Japanese 2B
U63022 Japanese 3A
U63023 Japanese 3B

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)

4. Subject Diagram BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management


KEY
L S1
E
V
E
L
4

S2

L
E S1
V
E
L
5 S2

L S1
E
V
E
L
6

S2

U 35013
Introduction to
Property,
Management
and Professional
Practice

U 35014
Introduction to
Building
Design and
Construction

U35010
Foundation
Real Estate
Law 1

U35011
Foundation
Real Estate
Law 2

U 35030
Land Law

U 35034
Landlord and
Tenant Law

U 35074
Management
of Corporate
Real Estate
(H)

U 35001
Economics
of Built
Environment

U35008
Introduction
to Spatial
Planning

U 33512
Integrative
Project I

U 35009
Introduction to
Valuation

Compulsory

U 35026
Real Estate
Economics
and Finance

U 35024
Town
Planning
Practice

U 35020
The Construction
and Appraisal
of
Real Estate

U 35029
Statutory
Valuation

U 35025
Integrative
Project II

U 35072
Advanced
Valuation

U 35028
Research
Methods

U 35099
Dissertation
(Double)

(H)

(H)
U 35073
Property
Management
(H)

U 35097
Real Estate
Investment

U 35094
Integrative
Project III PPT
(H)

(H)

U6xxxxx
Language

U6xxxxx
Language

U 35071
Commercial
and
Residential
Development

U6xxxxx
Language

(H)
U6xxxxx
Language

Acceptable

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5. Teaching, Learning and Assessment Strategies


The Department of Real Estate and Construction is committed to achieving high quality in
teaching, learning and assessment and to thorough evaluation of its programmes. As a result
students are expected to develop as independent learners and to acquire knowledge and skills
which will enhance their employability and prepare them for professional roles in the built
environment.
The Department pursues its aims through:

course structure, which is designed to meet the requirements of the relevant


professional bodies and provide students with a career pathway choice;
course content, with its mix of subject knowledge and both professional and transferable
skills;
course delivery, reflected in the variety of teaching and learning and assessment
methods, feedback to students and appropriate course materials;
student evaluation and quality enhancement.

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion The Department embraces the Universitys policy on
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion as set out in the OBU Policy Statement
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/hr/eod/statement.html.
The course is designed to ensure that the structure, content and assessment and quality and
availability of the facilities and resources supporting them, provide equal opportunities for all
students to study and do not discriminate, directly or indirectly on the grounds of ethnicity,
gender, sexual orientation and religious belief. The teaching and learning styles used are ones
which enable students to learn equally effectively whatever their ethnicity, gender etc.
Teaching and Learning
A wide range of teaching and learning methods are used to achieve programme objectives,
including lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, site visits, fieldwork, case studies, simulations
and group work.
Smaller group sessions, such as seminars, foster discussion, analysis and the development of
interpersonal and problem-solving skills. Independent learning is developed and nurtured
through student-led seminars, individual and group project work, the dissertation and the
professional practice experience. The dissertation is supported by a structured programme
aimed at leading students through the key stages in its development, focusing on the
importance of research and research methods, as well as individual supervision. Office hours
and tutorials allow individual and small group consultations with lecturers around matters of
course content, coursework and the practical demands of learning.
Various learning resources have been developed to support independent learning. Module
guides, reading lists and assignment briefings underpin independent learning. They outline the
aims and objectives of the module, its structure, week-by-week content and the tasks that
students must undertake. They enable students to make informed choices and to exercise selfdirection in pursuing aspects that are of interest to them within the framework of the module as
a whole.
The University uses Moodle as its virtual learning environment. All modules have a Moodle
site where students can find details about the module, including the assessment for the module
and usually a week by week guide as to the modules contents. Lecturers may add their notes,
useful information and other material to their module sites.
The student Moodle guide can be found at:
https://wiki.brookes.ac.uk/display/BVhelp/Moodle+Guides+-+STUDENTS

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You can log on at http://moodle.brookes.ac.uk/ with your PIP username and password. Moodle
contains essential information about the modules you are registered for, or a link to this
information if it is stored elsewhere.
For each module this includes:
the module description - including module title, module number, module leader, level, number of
credits, pre-requisites, co-requisites etc, any restrictions or requirements, learning outcomes,
teaching, learning and assessment, learning hours; module reading list;
links to important University-wide information including the policy for: Mitigating Circumstances,
Dyslexia, Plagiarism, Syndication and Collusion, University wide regulations and Examination
Guidance;
Module tutor(s) and contact details;
Programme administrator and contact details;
Assessment details and arrangements;
Specimen Examination Papers (where relevant);
Useful web links and other resources;
Use of student feedback to improve the module;
Teaching materials like lecture notes and practical exercises.
Students are also encouraged to attend Library and IT training sessions, and draw upon
appropriate software and networked facilities for presentations by making use of Media
Workshop resources and expertise.
The University uses Google for a suite of applications including Google Mail, Google
Calendar, Google Contacts and Google Drive (where you create and store your Docs, Forms,
Spreadsheets etc.). For more information see - https://obis.brookes.ac.uk/google/
Assessment and Feedback
Assessment encompasses all judgements made about the work of a student and/or their skills,
abilities and progress, and the associated provision of feedback. The Brookes Assessment
Compact sets out the aims and responsibilities for assessment for both the University and
students. The Brookes Assessment Compact is provided in Appendix B.
The course attempts to provide an appropriate balance of assessment methods throughout its
duration and on a semester by semester basis. It is intended that the assessment method
employed in each individual module will examine the general educational aims and assess the
learning outcomes as detailed in the syllabus of that particular subject area, whilst
complementing the teaching and learning methods and the variety of your learning and
experience.
Assessment in form other than in unseen exam may be new to you and you may experience
novel situations of peer assessment and self-assessment. It is our intention to provide an
appropriate balance between the following forms of assessment




diagnostic: that which provides information about the individual


formative: that which helps you in your learning
summative: that which gives a final and total measure of your attainment.

Please ensure that you are always clear as to which criteria are involved in the assessment of
any of your work and if necessary seek further guidance from the module leader.
All module handbooks contain both general and specific assessment criteria used by staff in the
awarding of grades. Group work that is assessed is closely monitored in line with University
policy to ensure equity in the provision of marks awarded to a group. Where appropriate,
students enter into a contract with each other over the conduct of group work, providing the
module leader with a consensual basis for assessing those not contributing to the group effort.
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On modules with a coursework component the aim is to give individual written feedback within
two weeks from the coursework submission deadline. All dissertation and Independent Study
Modules are double marked. A percentage of other assessed work is double marked within the
Department to ensure that the standard and profile of marking is appropriate. A sample of
examination and coursework is passed to the External Examiners. The sample sent will
normally include all A-grades; all fails, borderline cases and some examples of middle-grade
marks. The Real Estate Management Subject Examination Committee meets on a semesterly
basis to discuss student progression and performance with the External Examiners present.
These meetings are followed by meetings of the full Modular Examinations Committee where
awards are made.
The External Examiner carries out the important function of ensuring that a high level of
academic standards and quality assurance are maintain. Although the External Examiners do
not mark students work, they do oversee the assessment process through their review of exam
papers, sample exam and coursework, and their participation in the examination committees.
The External Examiners annual report can be read on PIP.
See Section 10: Module Descriptions for description of the assessment types and methods
used in each module and Appendix D: Course Assessment Schedule for the timetable of
assessment during each semester.
Feedback can be about your individual assignments, group work, a draft that you have prepared
or even your ideas about a future project (independent study or dissertation).
Feedback can help you to self-assess your work against assessment criteria as well as
understanding what you have done wrong in an assignment. It will help you to improve your
future assignments and to approach work in further modules.
Feedback comes in many different forms including
Written comments on your work
Verbal comments about your own work or some group work
Comments made during class discussions
Finally, feedback can come from module leaders, seminar tutors and fellow students.
For more detailed advice on how to make feedback work for you, consult
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/aske/documents/StudentFeeback_makeitwork.pdf

6. Student Guidance Teaching, Learning and Assessment


Attendance
You cannot expect to perform well in modules unless you attend lectures and seminars. Almost all
students who fail modules and experience academic difficulties during the course are those who do
not attend their classes regularly. If you are taking paid employment you MUST organise this
around your modules; they must take priority. We expect you to attend regularly and participate
actively in your classes. If you are encountering any problems with your attendance please seek
advice from your Student Support Coordinator or Academic Adviser immediately.
Deadlines and Policy on Late Submission of Assignments
At the beginning of each module which has an assessed coursework component you will be
informed of the deadline for submission. This is the last point at which your work will be accepted
and these deadlines must be adhered to. Should you be unable to hand in work on time due to
mitigating circumstances, it is your responsibility to discuss this with the module leader or tutor in
advance of the deadline. Should you fail to negotiate an extension, a zero mark will be given for the
coursework item concerned. It will be possible to appeal a zero, but the student will need to
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demonstrate why they were unable to request the extension in advance as well as that they had
valid mitigating circumstances.
The module handbook, published to students at the start of the module, will state the deadlines
for each element of coursework assessment. It will also state if penalties will be imposed for
work which exceed the specified word limit.
Under normal circumstances, the only basis for awarding extensions will be due to illness. It is
each individual students responsibility to manage their own coursework and it is important that you
plan and manage your time and commitments to enable you to meet deadlines.
Consideration of Mitigating Circumstances
The University provides students with the opportunity to raise issues that may have affected (or are
currently affecting) their performance in an assessment (exams or coursework). These
circumstances may include sickness and personal problems. The University defines mitigating
circumstances as:
Circumstances which are beyond the control of the student and which could not be reasonably
accommodated by the student and which seriously impair performance in assessment
All three elements of the definition must be met in order to substantiate a claim for mitigating
circumstances. A policy statement is provided in Appendix E. Full guidance for students
submitting a request following Mitigating Circumstances can be found at:
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/students/your-studies/mitigating-circumstances/
In most circumstances students will need to provide sufficient documentary evidence (medical
certificate, etc.) to support a claim for mitigating circumstances. For circumstances where a
students performance is affected for 1 week or less, self-certification may be acceptable.
Allowing Time for Study
In addition to your contact hours for each module (i.e. lectures, seminars and tutorials) you will
need to undertake a considerable amount of independent study if you want to achieve satisfactory
results. Independent study is the time spent alone or with other students in which you develop your
knowledge and understanding of the issues that are introduced in lectures and seminars. It is also
the time during which you prepare coursework for assessment.
You are expected to spend approximately 150 hours working towards the successful completion of
each single credit module (or 300 hours for double modules). If you have 24 contact hours for a
particular module, this leaves 126 hours in which you should be undertaking independent study.
Please remember that you are reading for a degree. You will not fulfil your potential without
completing an appropriate amount and level of study. Also remember to plan your work across
the semester, bearing in mind that you will be taking an average of four modules a semester. Do
not leave everything to the last minute before a deadline. If you have genuine difficulties in
planning your workload go and see your Student Support Coordinator or, if necessary, Student
Services who can offer expert advice.
Presentation of Written Work
The Department of Real Estate and Construction expects that students provide essays and
other written work in word-processed form. Students must ensure that the work is wellpresented, checked for grammar and spelling errors, is within the word limits set out for the
assignment and is appropriately referenced.

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The Library
The course library materials are based at the Gipsy Lane Campus. It is essential that you
become familiar with the facilities of the library at an early stage in your course. Geoff Morgan is
the Subject Librarian and his office is based in the Library.
In addition to a wide range of textbooks, journals, magazines and newspapers, access is also
available to on-line databases. Free information leaflets are available in the library concerning
the services offered, and library tours are arranged at the beginning of each semester.
You will be given a guided tour of the library in your first week here. It is an invaluable aid and
crucial if you are going to get the full benefit of the range of services on offer. Remember to
pick up the free library publications, which will help you find your way around the Construction
and Commercial Management literature. There will also be a session specifically designed for
students on how to make the best use of the library. Remember that the Subject Librarian is
available to answer your queries.
The Faculty also has its own Resources Room, located in Abercrombie Extension, which has
copies of useful materials for your course.
Computer Services
Oxford Brookes Information Solutions (OBIS) is the directorate providing, managing and
supporting the University's IT services and infrastructure for all staff and students. Information
on computer facilities including, printing, PC hire, anti-virus software, etc., can be found at
http://www.obis.brookes.ac.uk
A wide range of computing facilities is available to all students. All students are automatically
assigned a computer account on enrolment and will have access to all Computer Services
facilities, including email and the World Wide Web within 24 hours. There are over 500
networked PCs available to students in the open access rooms across the campuses. A typical
room has 20 Pentium PCs and a laser printer. PCs are also installed in foyers and corridors
around the University, for quick access to email, and many of the rooms are open 24 hours a
day.
The Gipsy Lane Campus Computer Services help desk is located on the ground floor of the
John Henry Brookes Building and is open weekdays from 8.30am to 8pm, and weekends 11am
to 4pm. During vacation it is open weekdays from 9.00am to 5.00pm (4.30pm on Fridays).
Examinations
It is important that you become familiar with the requirements and regulations regarding
examinations. You should refer to the Undergraduate Modular Programme Guide for Students for
detailed information concerning the organisation of examinations at the University. During the
middle of each semester you should check that your name is entered on the draft examination lists
for all modules that you are taking during that semester by referring to your Personal Information
Page (PIP) (see below).
Students must check the time of their examinations on the official exam timetable or on
their PIP Page. It is essential that you arrive at the exam room by that time. If you are late
you will be refused admission and thus fail the exam. Remember to take your
enrolment/library card to all your examinations and place it on your desk.
Cheating and Plagiarism
The University has strict rules to ensure that students work for assessment is actually the result of
their own individual effort, skills and knowledge and has not been produced by means that will give
them an unfair advantage over other students. The University takes the issue of cheating very
seriously and students have been expelled or had their degree withheld. Cheating may take a
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variety of forms and includes submitting another students work as ones own, impersonation,
plagiarism and collusion with others when the work is supposed to be an individual assignment.
Make sure you read Appendix F: Cheating, which sets out the Universitys regulations on
Cheating and gives more details. In order to avoid accusations of plagiarism in particular you
should take care in referencing the sources of your work; see the section on Citing Your Sources
in Appendix G.
Turnitin
Turnitin is a web-based text matching tool that supports students in the development of good
academic practice when preparing written work for assessment. It may also be used as part of an
investigation into an alleged case plagiarism. In each year of the course, students will study on a
designated Turnitin module which will require them to submit one coursework element through
Turnitin via the module Brookes Virtual site. More details about Turnitin are provided in
Appendix H.
Module Results
The Real Estate Management Subject Examination Committee comprises the Subject's teaching
staff and the External Examiners. It meets in the vacation after each semester to approve the
examination and coursework results. The External Examiners check and approve the marks
awarded, and ensure that the standards and results are comparable with other universities.
If you are not successful in passing a module, you will be awarded a resit if you obtain a mark
between 30% and 39%. Detailed information regarding possible grades following assessment is
included in the Undergraduate Modular Programme Guide and an outline is set out later in this
section. Resits for semester 1 modules are held during the Easter Break in semester 2 and resits
for semester 2 modules are held in July.
Personal Information Portal (PIP)
Your Personal Information Portal (PIP) is a suite of web pages that you will rely upon a great
deal during your time at Oxford Brookes, so it is important to familiarise yourself with it. Using
PIP you will be able to:

enrol online
view your personal details and course fees
maintain your address, emergency contact and mobile phone details
request attendance and council tax exemption certificates
view your student record, timetable and examination timetable
make various online change requests and view online messages regarding the status of
these requests
make a mitigating circumstances application
use the Undergraduate Modular Programme (UMP) Handbook which contains all current
field lists, up-to-date module descriptions, programme regulations, syllabuses and the
General University Calendar
use the 'Online Programme Registration' (OLPR) facility which will enable you to
manage your own programme i.e. add and delete modules
register for your graduation ceremony.

PIP training and drop-in sessions run during Week 0 and Week 1 in Semester 1 and Week 0 in
Semester 2.
A helpful PIP 'Guide for Students' is available from Student Central (located on the ground floor
of the John Henry Brookes Building) and PIP queries can also be sent to the Systems Team at
ard-systems@brookes.ac.uk.
Dissertations
Students will write a dissertation as part of the honours element of their programme. The
dissertation differs markedly from most conventional modules. It provides an opportunity for
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long-term, self-generated study and research, under supervision. You will be asked to start
thinking about a likely topic for your dissertation during your second year, and to pursue work on
it throughout most of your final year. Dissertations are taken for two credits, and will be on a
subject chosen by the student related to Real Estate Management. The dissertation is usually
between 8000 and 10,000 words long.
You should agree a topic with a supervising tutor before the start of the first semester of your final
year and complete the appropriate form, M199. Your completed dissertation will be submitted in
week 8 of the final semester of your degree.
Study Visits and Field Trips
A number of modules include site visits and field trips. Some trips are planned to take place within
semester time, perhaps outside "normal" module slots, and others take place in the vacation,
normally immediately preceding the semester in which the module takes place.
Where trips are residential, you are required to make a contribution to accommodation costs. The
present rate is between 10.00 & 15.00 per day. You may also be required to meet other costs,
e.g. travel, entry charges etc.
Students behaviour on any study visit or field trip is expected to be responsible and mature. In
particular, students should be aware of the University Regulations. Any notification of
inappropriate behaviour will be taken very seriously by the University and could lead to
disciplinary action being taken.
It is your responsibility to make yourself available for field trips so check arrangements with your
module leaders early on.
Be sure you have appropriate clothing, footwear, headgear, equipment: notepad, pen/pencil,
camera (and film); documentation (e.g. passport and visas as necessary for trips abroad, form
E111 for emergency healthcare), money, foreign currency, travellers cheques etc.
Progression Rules
Brief summaries of the rules which relate to your progression from one year of study to the next are
given here. You will find full details of the progression rules in both the Undergraduate Modular
Programme Handbook and the Guide to Students. Please note:

A student who passes fewer than 3 modules in a year will be required to withdraw from
study at the University.
A student who passes fewer than 7 Modules in Level 4 will be asked to retake the failed
modules, and may be refused permission formally to progress to Level 5.
A student who has not passed all the compulsory Level 4 modules for their course may
be refused permission to progress to Level 5 by that course and be required to retake
the failed modules while formally remaining in Level 4.
A student within paragraph above who wishes to remain full-time may take Level 5 and 6
modules although still within Level 4, provided that the student has passed any
prerequisite module(s) for any such module.
A student who passes fewer than 6 modules in Level 5 (i.e. 2nd year) will not be allowed
to progress to their final year. They will need to repeat failed 2nd year modules,
especially those prerequisite to final year modules, to get back up to 6 in order to
progress into final year.
The 22 Rule: A student cannot ordinarily graduate with honours if they have taken
more than 22 modules in Level 5 and 6. That means that as an absolute maximum a
student can only afford to fail 6 modules in Level 5 and 6, as that will take him/her to 22.
The non-honours degree does not carry RICS accreditation.
A student will not normally be allowed to take a module which has a prerequisite module
which they have not passed.
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Grades of Assessment
Assessment will be based on the following grading system:

Percentage

Grade

75 100
70 74
65 69
60 64
55 59
50 54
45 49
40 44

A+
A
B+
B
C+
C
D+
D

RC
RE
RB
F
FR
S
MS
DC
DE
DB
DF
CE
P
DD

Grade
Point
4.5
4.0
3.5
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0

Pass
Fail
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass

30-39% (resit coursework)


30-39% (resit examination)
30-39% (resit both coursework and examination)
Less than 29% - fail at first attempt
Less than 39% - fail at resit
Pass when assessment based on pass/fail basis only
Ungraded pass arising from mitigating circumstances
0-99% Resit through mitigating circumstances (Coursework).
All marks obtained will be awarded
0-99% Resit through mitigating circumstances (Examination).
All marks obtained will be awarded
0-99% Resit through mitigating circumstances (Exam and Coursework).
All marks obtained will be awarded
Deferred Assessment - decision to be made at a later stage
Credit for prior experiential learning
Capped at 40% (passing a resit)
Ungraded deferred assessment (Disciplinary)

Generic assessment criteria for the grades above is given in Appendix C


Opportunities to Study Abroad
Oxford Brookes has links with a number of universities in other countries and students may
spend a semester or more abroad while obtaining credits towards their degree programmes.
Students must make sure that they agree the exchange and the programme of study abroad
with the Subject Coordinator before they depart. For more information see
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/international/study-abroad-and-exchanges/
The Department of Real Estate and Construction coordinator for European university
exchanges is Dr Albert Cao (AB1.08, ext. 3473).

7. Student Participation and Representation


The University have a policy of involving students in all of their committees and decision-making
bodies. Within the programme, student representatives are elected to represent the student

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body as a whole. Student representatives are encouraged to play an active role in directly
influencing the way in which the programmes are administered and developed.
Faculty Academic Enhancement and Standards Committee
The Faculty AESC comprises programme leaders in the faculty, student representatives and
representatives from the various academic support services. It is ultimately responsible for
overseeing the implementation of University teaching and learning strategies, ensuring the
effective operation of the Universitys processes for managing quality and standards, and for
facilitating communication within and across Faculties. As part of the function of this committee,
student representatives will participate in periodic reviews and programme approval events.
Subject Committee
Membership consists of all staff, the subject Librarian, and up to two student representatives from
each year group. It is very important that all years are fully represented and elections will take
place early in the first semester.
The Committee is responsible for all academic and administrative aspects of the teaching on the
course. This includes proposed changes and planning of the overall structure of the course. It is
the most important forum in which student opinion can be brought to bear to influence present
practice and future policy. The agendas and minutes of the Subject Committee are available
electronically for all students to see.
The Committee also functions as the Examination Committee (without the student
representatives and the subject librarian). This is undertaken with the External Examiner.
Degree classifications are also discussed at the meeting in July. The Committee's decisions are
taken to the Modular Course Examinations Committee for approval each semester.
Student Representatives
Student representatives are elected to the Subject Committee by the students on the Course. Their
role is to represent student interests, and to give students the opportunity to contribute to matters
relevant to the Subject's current practice, policies and future development. Many positive
suggestions have come from students on the Committee and it is an effective forum for the airing
of issues of concern.
If you have any comments to make, contact the student representative of your year and should you
wish to stand as a representative you can nominate yourself for the Subject Committee. Student
representatives have access to block email facilities so that they can contact and communicate
easily with all course students.
The Subject Committee usually meets once each semester.
Staff/Student Meetings
Apart from the regular Subject Committee meeting, general subject meetings of all staff and
students can be called at any time at the request of either staff or students to discuss any particular
problem or issue that may arise. Requests should be made to the Subject Coordinator.
There is also a specific meeting for Year 1 students in Semester 2 to discuss Year 2 & 3
programmes.

8. Student Feedback and Review of the Course


At the end of each module you take on the course you will be given an opportunity to express
your views about your experience. This will normally be done by the completion of a feedback
survey administered during the class or online. The surveys are anonymous and the results can
therefore not have any effect on your grade. Teaching staff obtain important feedback from
these surveys and the results form an important part of the module report which the module
leader prepares and submits to the Subject Committee the following semester.

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Positive suggestions from students can lead to changes in the way the module is delivered in
future. Feedback from students is treated very seriously and so we ask that you complete the form
carefully after thinking about your responses.
In addition to individual module questionnaires the Department organises student focus groups to
gain feedback on current issues pertaining to the taught programmes and student experience.
Also, the National Student Survey administers (via an independent market research company) an
exit survey which is completed by each student in their last semester before graduating. This asks
students about their experience on the course as a whole and their time at Oxford Brookes
University. Views of graduating students provide staff with invaluable information for the future
planning and development of the course.
Each course in the University is subject to an Annual Review process which is carried out in the
first semester during the autumn and examines the previous academic years performance. The
report of the Subject Coordinator and the module reports, including the student evaluation results,
are the central agenda items for the Annual review meeting which also includes the student
representatives from the Course. Individual course reviews feed into the Faculty and eventually the
University review meetings.

9. Supporting Students at Oxford Brookes University


The University has committed itself to providing a supportive environment where respect is
shown to all and where all staff and students, regardless of their gender, race, ethnic
background, culture, (dis)ability, age, faith or any other factor are encouraged to perform at their
potential.
Most students enjoy their time at Oxford Brookes University and complete their studies without
experiencing any particular difficulties. However, problems, big and small, can and sometimes
do arise. It is important to stress that you should always seek help sooner rather than later from
your friends, the course staff or the University. Remember, we cannot help if we do not know
there is a problem! It can be difficult to ask for help or advice but there are a number of points of
support and contact within the University. This section of the Student Handbook sets out the
Student Support Framework and describes the key staff roles involved in supporting students
within the Faculty and the wider University.
Student Support Framework
The School provides an academic and personal support framework for all undergraduate
students. This comprises two tiers of support:
A. Programme Support - that embeds the academic and professional development of all
students into programmes in a proactive, and compulsory, manner.
B. Student Support Co-ordinators - who respond to students who have personal or
academic problems in a fast, appropriate and coordinated manner, making referrals to
other University services as necessary.

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The framework is represented in the diagram below:


Student Programme-based Academic Experience
Induction, Academic and Professional Development, Careers

Student Issues

Student Issues

Student Support Coordinators

Referrals
Academic
Advisors and
Subject
Coordinators
Key
Staff:

Student
Services

Referrals
Counselling

Referrals
Student Union

Head/Deputy of
Department

Student Support Coordinators (Michele Jacobs and Marta Solsona)


The Student Support Coordinators should be your first port of call for any of the following types
of issue PIP problems, choosing your programme of study, personal issues, financial issues,
disability or sickness and learning difficulties. Michele and Marta will refer you on to the
appropriate support if they cannot provide you with a solution to your problem. You can drop
into the Student Support Office (Abercrombie Extension AB3.16) during the working week or
you can email or phone the office to make an appointment.
Head of Department (Joseph Tah)
The Head of Department is responsible for all aspects of the programmes we offer, as well as all
activities within the Department. Much of Josephs work is outside of the Department on Faculty and
University committees,however, students should feel free to approach Joseph directly where
necessary.
Programme Lead (Michael Hill)
The Programme Lead is responsible for managing the Departments undergraduate programmes,
overseeing the quality and standards of the teaching and assessment processes.
Subject Coordinator (Rebecca Gee)
The Subject Coordinator is responsible for co-ordinating the activities of the course, monitoring
student progress and liaising between staff and students.
Academic Advisor (shown on PIP Page)
Academic Advisor available to help and assist you with advice and information on all aspects of your
course during your time at Oxford Brookes.
Senior Programme Administrator (Ruth Collins)
The Senior Programme Administrator is responsible for the general administration and admissions in
the Faculty.
Programme Administrator (Daniel Vicars)
The Programme Administrator provides support to both students and staff in matters relating to
course administration and is located in the Programme Administrators Office in the Abercrombie
Extension AB2.21.
Module Leaders
Every module within the University has a leader, who is a full-time member of staff, even when the
teaching is shared by several staff or undertaken by part-time or external staff. The Module Leader
is responsible for the overall operation of the module including study programmes, reading lists,
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assessment and appraisal of the module by students and through the Annual Review. If you need
information about a module guidance about prerequisites, for example you should contact the
Module Leader.
Contacting Staff
All Real Estate and Construction staff are based in offices on the first floor of the Abercrombie
Building on the Gipsy Lane Campus. There are various channels for communication within the
University.
All staff and students are registered on email via the computer system. This is often the fastest
and easiest method of conveying messages within the University (and elsewhere)! Please get
into the habit of regularly checking your email for messages. Your email address will be your
studentnumber@brookes.ac.uk. For help or information on computer services within the
University contact OBIS Service Desk on ext. 3311 or at servicedesk@brookes.ac.uk.
On occasions it may be necessary to contact you via the post, so if you change your address, then
please notify Student Central immediately. Important messages may be sent directly to your home
address.
In order to maintain confidentiality, please note that department staff cannot enter into
communication with others on your behalf, even members of your family.
There are a number of other methods by which staff can be contacted. Members of staff will
normally assign a number of hours a week when they have office hours. These are times at which
they will be available to see students without prior appointment. These are good times to see staff
for signatures, general information or advice. If you wish to see a member of staff outside of their
office hours you should arrange an appointment via email, telephone or written communication.
Staff telephone numbers and email addresses are given in Appendix I. If you are unable to
contact a member of staff in an emergency, please contact the Programme Administrator, who will
find another member of staff to assist you.
Noticeboards
There is a noticeboard on the first floor of the Abercrombie Corridor that will regularly have
important messages and information relating to courses and course organisation. This may well
include times, class lists, reading lists, module guides, and announcements of meetings,
research seminars and talks. So please check the notice boards on a regular basis.
On-Line Programme Registration
The University operates an on-line programme registration scheme which enables you to design
and manage your own programme, i.e. add or delete modules, without completing forms. You
will receive training in how to use the system in induction week. Your Academic Advisor can still
provide you with valuable advice on amending your programme and if you are in any doubt
about whether you have the right number or combination of modules make sure you do consult
him or her. As an alternative to the on-line scheme it is still possible to amend your programme
by completing form M99 and obtaining your Academic Advisors signature.
You will have the opportunity to meet your Academic Advisor during your induction week (before
the academic year begins) so that you know where they are to be found if you need advice or
assistance later.
New students will find that the University computer has already prepared a programme for them.
This may be what you would have chosen for yourself but, if not, it is easy to change it. If you
wish to make any amendments to your programme of study this should be done with the
assistance of your Academic Advisor. Please note that:
If you miss the deadline for adding modules at the start of the semester then you will have to
request a late module addition. You can do this via PIP by going to the module description and
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clicking on the request late addition link, next to relevant semester start and end dates. Follow
the instructions on the screen and submit the request, this will then go to the module leader for
them to consider. If the module leader allows you on to the module, it will be added to your
programme the moment they authorise the request.
- It is not possible to withdraw from any module after 4.30 pm on the Friday of week 2 of the
semester in which the module runs. If you do not delete the module by this deadline it will show
an F grade on your student record. Therefore please ensure you withdraw from a module
by the deadline.
The Academic Advisor must sign your Level 4 forms if you choose not to make changes on-line.
The Subject Coordinator must sign Level 5 and 6 forms and change of Field forms. He is also
available to advise on programmes and course matters generally.
Upgrade Study Advice Centre
Upgrade is the Universitys study advice service for anyone who wants advice on:
Study skills planning and writing essays, assignments and dissertations
Statistics, maths
Finding information, literature searching
Drop-in sessions are available at the Gipsy Lane Library Monday-Friday - check the website for
semester and vacation times. See website - http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/upgrade
Careers and Employability
Real Estate Management offer good graduate employability. Most of the leading firms of
Chartered Surveyors, property development and investment companies, house builders and
housing associations (or Registered Social Landlords as they are now known) regularly recruit
our graduates. Oxford Brookes students have established a reputation for achieving high
levels of professional, interpersonal and business skills, which appeal to prospective employers.
Because of this, Oxford Brookes is one of very few departments of Real Estate where leading
property companies proactively visit to meet and interview students during our Milk Round
process. Other areas of employment include financial services, town planning and law.
The University Careers and Employment Centre has information and links on a vast range of
occupations and employment sectors, employers and courses. The online vacancy service,
Talentbank, has hundreds of full and part time jobs, and offers the support of individual
professional Careers Counsellors. The Centre can help you whether you are looking for your
first graduate job, a work placement, part-time/ casual work or going on to further study. Its
never too early to make a start and Brookes students can use the service for free for 3 years
after graduating. More details of the services provided by the Careers Centre can be found at
http://www.brookescareerscentre.co.uk.
Complaints
The Faculty, and the University, recognise that there may be occasions when student feedback
mechanisms are not sufficient to deal with every type of problem that might occur. A formal
procedure exists that allows you to lodge complaints with the Faculty or University, if you feel that
you have a justified cause. Any complaints will be treated seriously, with appropriate confidentiality
and you should have no fear of subsequent victimisation. Should you wish to lodge a complaint it is
important that you follow the correct University procedure. Full details of the Universitys Student
Complaint Procedure can be found, via the computer network, on the Regulations homepage. The
full web address is: http://www.brookes.ac.uk/regulations/current/appeals-complaints-conduct/

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Appeals
The University has formal procedures that allow you, on specific grounds, to appeal against a
decision of an examination committee (i.e. against a mark you are awarded for coursework or
examination). You may appeal on the grounds that:

medical evidence has not been considered by the committee


the assessment was not conducted in accordance with the regulations for the programme
the judgement of an examiner or examiners was improperly affected by personal bias
there was a material administrative error or some other material irregularity in the conduct of
the assessment

Should you wish to lodge an appeal it is essential that you follow the correct University procedure.
Full details of the Appeal Procedure can be found, via the computer network, on the Regulations
homepage. The full web address is:
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/regulations/current/appeals-complaints-conduct/

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10. Module Description


Module descriptions, pre-requisites and slotting times change from time to time, often
significantly. You may obtain copies of the latest module descriptions via the
University Computer Network and are advised to do so when deciding on your
programme. This especially applies to non U350xx modules.

U35001: Economics of Built Environment


Module Leader: Mrs Claire Roberts

croberts@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483852

Module Description
This module provides an introduction to the micro-economics of markets, in particular the
market for land and property. Students analyse prices and markets and the organisations
operating in property market and how their decisions need to be guided by the planning
system.
Students examine land and capital in the context of this economic and
organisational framework. Using the description of the macro-economy as a foundation,
students investigate the inter-relationships between the property market and the activity of
the whole economy. The role of government, and selected government policies are
examined, particularly in terms of the property market. Investment markets are examined as
well as the role that real estate plays in investment strategy by government and the private
sector. Successful completion of this module provides students with the pre-requisites
required for more advanced Real Estate and Construction Management and Planning
modules.
Originating School:
Level:
Size:
Status:

Field:
Pre-requisite:
Co-requisite:
Placing:
Years running:
Restrictions:
Exclusions:
Timetable Slots:
Context:

The Built Environment


Basic Level 4
Single
Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management RICS/RTPI
Joint Route (RI), BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM),
BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS), BSc
(Hons) Construction Management (CZ), and BA (Hons) City and
Regional Planning (RP), BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM),
BA Planning and Property Development (DV), MPlan City and
Regional Planning (MPL) and alternative pathway for BA (Hons)
Cities - Environment, Design and Development (DT).
RI, QM, QS, CZ, RP, EM, DV, MPL, DT
None
None
Semester 2
Every Year
Cannot be counted with:
U51013 Economics in Context
None
Wednesday 9.0010.00 (G) Lecture
Wednesday 10.00-12.00 (G), 13.00-15.00 (H) - Seminars
This module provides students with broad grounding in theory relating
to economics in the built environment, to enable detailed
consideration and analysis of issues underlying the built environment.
Successful completion of this module will provide students with the
knowledge and understanding of economics required for Level 5 and
6 in Real Estate and Construction Management and Planning.

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Course Content
Microeconomic market theory, in particular the market for land and property;
Price and market analysis including price determination, including supply and demand,
elasticity and the limitations of the price system;
Organisations, their production and decision-making in relation to the residential and
commercial property markets and the construction industry;
Market structures and performance, including competition and market entry;
Land and capital in the context of the built environment, in particular land and capital
markets and pricing, rents and interest rates;
The inter-relationships between the property market and the activity of the whole
economy;
The role of government, and selected government policies, particularly in terms of the
property market;
Changes and growth in the level of macro-economic activity and the governments role
in the economy, including key taxation and monetary policies.
Learning Outcomes
In successfully completing this module, the student will be able to:
1. Knowledge and Understanding
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
i. Explain the demand and supply mechanisms
through which markets operate.

ii. Use cost/revenue data to explain aspects of
organisations economic market behaviour, with

particular reference to property and construction.
iii. Discuss the performance implications of

alternative market structures.
iv. Apply market analysis to the land, construction

and capital markets.
v. Explain the role of the planning system in

overcoming market inefficiencies and
imperfections.
vi. Discuss the macro-economic context of the market

for property and construction.
vii. Explain the effects of changes in the level of

economic activity upon the macro-economy and
the market for property and construction.
viii.Use appropriate data and simple economic
models to explain aspects of government policy.


Practiced Assessed








Practiced

Assessed

2. Disciplinary/Professional Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
ix. Outline the economic methodology in the context
of property markets, and the planning of these,

and interpret economic concepts in relation to the
government policy framework within which the
market for real estate operates.

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3. Transferable Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
x. Calculate from Simple Data

xi. Analyse Economic Data

xii. Problem Solving

xiii.Analyse Technical Material


Practiced Assessed










Teaching and Learning Experience


Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:

attend lectures, which address core economic concepts and their application to
property markets.
study independently using the teaching material, which contains key concepts, in-text
questions and study guidance.
attend tutor-led seminars, including group workshop sessions, to reinforce
understanding of the core concepts and demonstrate their applications to markets.
attend and participate in student-led seminars to reinforce understanding of the core
concepts and develop oral communication, report writing and self-appraisal skills.

Notional Learning Time


Lectures
Seminars/Workshop Sessions
Directed Study

12 hours
12 hours
126 hours

Assessment
Coursework (50%)
Exam (50%)

Moodle online test 1


Moodle online test 2
Unseen written examination

Learning Outcome
i, ii, iii, iv, v, vi, vii, viii, ix
i, ii, iii, iv, v, vi, vii, viii, ix
i, ii, iii, iv, v, vi, vii, viii, x, xi, xii, xiii

15%
35%
50%

The main criteria for assessment are:

Use of key economic concepts.


Demonstration of knowledge of the relevant economic theory.
Use of appropriate diagrams.
Application of relevant economic theory.
Ability to structure a logical argument.
Clear presentation (including word processed text for the coursework).

To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also
obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination elements
of the assessment. Any failure to attempt any element of assessment on the module
without reasonable excuse will result in a failure of the module without the right to resit.
Indicative Reading List
Warren, M. (2000) Economic Analysis for Property and Business
Begg D, Fischer S and Dornbusch R (2005) Economics 8th edition, McGraw Hill

23

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

Validation History
November 2003
Revised on merger of U35001 and U37704 July 2005
Amended 2008
Validated March 2010
Amended 2011

24

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

U35008: Introduction to Spatial Planning


Module Leader: Dr Michael Stubbs mdstubbs@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483487

Module Description
This module provides an introduction to spatial planning and deals with some of
the challenges currently faced by the system. The teaching approach deals with a
predominant workshop style, in which students work on problem-solving exercises to
address issues pertinent to the submission of planning applications, development of urban
renewal and renaissance, sustainable development/climate change, countryside and urban
restraint policy and sustainable communities policies. A new focus deals with the mitigation
of and adaptation to climate change.
Originating School:
Level
Size
Status

Field
Pre-requisite
Co-requisite
Placing
Years running
Restrictions
Exclusions
Timetable Slots
Context:

The Built Environment


Basic Level 4
Single
Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM), BA
(Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU), BSc (Hons) Construction
Project Management (QM), BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying &
Commercial Management (QS), BSc (Hons)
Construction
Management (CZ), BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management
RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI), BA (Hons) City and Regional
Planning (RP), Certificate in Spatial Planning studies, BA (Hons)
Cities - Environment, Design and Development (Single &
Combined Honours) (DT/DE), BA Planning and Property
Development (DV), MPlan City and Regional Planning (MPL),
and alternative compulsory for Foundation Built Environment
(FBE).
EM, RU, QM, QS, CZ, RI, RP, DT/DE, DV, MPL, FBE.
None
None
Semester 1
Every Year
None
None
Wednesday 9.00 -12.00 (G) and 13.00 -16.00 (H),
and Thursday 13.00 - 16.00 (K)
This module introduces students to the theory and practice of
land-use planning, with wider links to sustainable development
issues

Course Content
Problem-solving exercises based on planning practise.
Urban policy and renaissance, heritage and countryside policy.
Sustainability and climate change policy.
Linking planning to wider property development processes

25

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

Learning Outcomes
In successfully completing this module, you will be able to:
1. Knowledge and Understanding
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
i. Explain the ideologies and origins of planning; the
development of planning legislation; social and

economic objectives of planning; the promotion
and control of development.
ii. Discuss the appropriateness, relevance and
impact of planning policies; the current planning

system; legislation and case law.
iii. Consider the best means by which planning and
property development industry may deliver an
urban renaissance.
iv. Consider practical case studies, Project work and
the ability to write cogent examination answers.
2. Disciplinary/Professional Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
v. Understand the implementation of planning
controls, urban design concepts, mechanisms for

renewal, climate change and the relationship
between policy and the environment.
3. Transferable Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
vi. Written Presentation

vii. Oral Presentation

viii.Group Work
ix. Report Writing
x. Data Analysis
xi. Word Processing

Practiced Assessed

Practiced Assessed

Practiced Assessed







Teaching and Learning Experience


Students undertaking this module will have the opportunity to:
 Attend workshops which address the core principles of development management, urban
renewal/ renaissance, climate change, countryside protection and development feasibility.
 Attend and participate in a variety of student led, group led, and tutor led sessions within
those workshops, to reinforce their understanding and enhance their skill development.
 Study independently through the medium of set assignments, information gathering and
problem-solving exercises.
 Utilise a module workbook, set reading (including textbooks) and Brookes Virtual resources,
to assist.
Notional Learning Time
Lecture/Workshops (10 x 2.5)
Examination briefing session
Directed Study

25 hours
2 hours
123 hours

26

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

Assessment
Coursework (workbook exercises)
Written Exam

(50%)
(50%)

Learning Outcomes
i - vi
i vi

Students will be required to complete a set of independent week-by-week problem-solving


exercises, dealing with key parts of the syllabus.
The Main criteria for assessment are:

Demonstration of an understanding of the key issues and techniques involved in


urban growth/restraint, climate change/sustainability and site development/feasibility
An ability to apply skills, theories and knowledge to a given problem or issue
An ability to present material effectively both orally and in written form (only oral is
assessed).

To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also
obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination elements
of the assessment. Any failure to attempt any element of assessment on the module
without reasonable excuse will result in a failure of the module without the right to resit.
Indicative Reading List

Bentley, I. et al (1985) Responsive Environments, Butterworth Architecture, Oxford.


DETR (2000) By Design, CABE & DETR, London.

Flannery, T (2005) The Weather Makers. London, Macmillan.

The Princes Foundation (2000) Sustainable Urban Extensions: Planned through


Design, London.

Ratcliffe, J., Stubbs, M. & Keeping, M. (2009) Urban Planning & Real Estate
Management, 3rd Edition, Taylor & Francis Press, London.

Rogers, R. & Power, A. (2000) Cities for a Small Country, Taylor Francis, London.

Power, A & Houghton, J (2008) Jigsaw Cities: Big Places, small spaces. London:
Policy Press.

Smith-Morris, E. (1997) British Town Planning and Urban Design, Longman, London.

Urban Task Force (2005) Towards an Effective Urban Renaissance, Thomas Telford,
London.
Validation History
November 2003
Amended 2008
Validated March 2010
Amended 2011

27

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

U35009: Introduction to Valuation


Module Leader:

Mrs Rebecca Gee

rgee@brookes.ac.uk

01865 484090

Module Description
This module introduces students to the various financial aspects of the real estate market, such
as types of property, and their functions and uses. It involves examination of valuation
techniques employed in assessing market value of different types of property, an
understanding of why valuations are required, and the concept of price, value and worth. You
will be introduced to the basic investment concepts including the development of your
knowledge of financial mathematics, such as the use of formula to calculate present and future
values, the concepts of time value of money, cash-flows and income streams. You will also
study the principal factors affecting property valuation.
Originating School:
Level:
Size:
Status:

Field:
Pre-requisite:
Co-requisite:
Placing:
Years running:
Restrictions:
Exclusions:
Timetable Slots:
Context:

The Built Environment


Basic Level 4
Single
Compulsory BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM), BA (Hons)
Business of Real Estate (RU), BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management:
RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI), BA (Hons) City and Regional Planning
(RP), MPlan City and Regional Planning (MPL), and BA (Hons)
Planning and Property Development (DV).
EM, RU, RI, RP, MPL, DV
None
None
Semester 2
Every Year
None
None
Thursday 9:00 12:00 (J)
This module introduces students to foundation valuation and
commercial management issues relevant to the property industry.

Content
Characteristics of markets
Valuation and measurement
Methodologies of valuation
Cash flows
Preparation of reports
Learning Outcomes
In successfully completing this module, the student will be able to:

1. Knowledge and Understanding


Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
i. Explain the characteristics of the real estate

industry, how markets function, and the principal
requirements of those who own or occupy
buildings.

28

Practised Assessed

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

ii. Describe the time value of money and illustrate


through calculation the various ways of
expressing a financial return (including the
relationship between price paid, value, yield,
target return and the implied growth in rental
value).
iii. Undertake valuations of real estate interests
using
conventional
and
contemporary
techniques.
iv. Analyse different methods of valuation and
discuss when and why they are appropriate.
v. Synthesise information when preparing a
professional report.

2. Disciplinary/Professional Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:

vi. Apply financial formulae to cash flows for specific
purposes.
vii. Choose and use appropriate statistical and

numeric techniques.
viii. Collect relevant data for producing professional

reports and valuations.
ix. Understand how to apply professional guidance

in practical scenarios.
x. Use appropriate skills to inspect and measure

property.

Practised Assessed


3. Transferable Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
xi. Independent & Self-directed Learning

xii. Independent & Group Research

xiii. Information Gathering Skills

xiv. Analytical Skills

xv. Report Writing

xvi. Problem Assessment

xvii. Data Analysis


Practised Assessed

Teaching and Learning Experience


Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:
Attend lectures, which will examine the key principles in the subject area.
Attend seminars, which reinforce knowledge of valuation techniques.
Visit local commercial properties in order to develop professional skills.
Study independently using the module lecture notes and reading lists.
Notional Learning Time
Lectures
20 hours
Workshops
20 hours
Directed Study 110 hours

29

















BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

Assessment
Coursework
Exam

50%
50%

Learning Outcome
i to xix
i to xix

Indicative Reading List


Isaac, D. (2002). Property Valuation Principles. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
Millington, A.F. (2000). An Introduction to Property Valuation, 5th Edition. London: Estates
Gazette.
Scarrett, D. (2008). Property Valuation The Five Methods. 2nd Edition, London:
Routledge.
Note that some of these books have several previous editions, which, for the purposes of this
module, are likely to be adequate. If in doubt, ask the Module Leader or relevant tutor.
Validation History
Validated March 2011

30

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

U35010: Foundation Real Estate Law 1


Module Leader:

Dr Sally Sims ssims@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483459

1. MANAGEMENT DETAILS
Module title:

Foundation Real Estate Law 1

Module number:

U35010

Module leader:

Sally Sims

Level:

No. of credits:

15

Mode of delivery:

Face to face

Pre-requisites:

None

Co-requisites:

None

Barred combinations:

U35002 Foundation Real Estate and Construction Law


U22100 Introduction to Law

Other restrictions or
requirements:

None

Timetable information:

Semester 1 - running for 12 Weeks


Monday 11.0012.00 (A) - Lecture
Monday 13.0016.00 (B) - Seminars

Programme/s in which this module may be taken

Status

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)

Compulsory

BA (Hons) Planning and Property Development (DV)

Compulsory

2. MODULE AIMS
This module introduces students to the study of law, using specifically the substantive areas of
contract law. The module compliments the follow-on module Foundation Real Estate Law 2 and
provides a foundation for the advanced legal specialisms studied in Stage II. It also provides
preparation for other real estate management modules with inherent legal perspectives, such as
advanced valuation and professional practice test.
3. LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this module,
students will be able to:
i. Describe the operation of the machinery of
the civil justice system and its constituent
parts in England and Wales
ii. Demonstrate an understanding of the basis
of civil obligations and contractual liability, in
England and Wales
iii

Demonstrate an understanding of contract


formation, contractual terms and breach.
31

Graduate Attribute
developed

Other GAs
developed

Academic Literacy

Global Citizenship

Academic Literacy

Global Citizenship

Academic Literacy

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

iv

Conduct effective research using primary and


secondary legal sources
v Identify and analyse legal problems in given
factual situations utilising both common law
and statutory principles
vi. Undertake basic analysis

Research Literacy

Academic Literacy

Academic Literacy

Research Literacy

Research Literacy

vii. Produce a clear and precise piece of written


argument
viii. Work independently to develop skills in
problem solving

Critical SelfAwareness and


Personal Literacy
Critical SelfAwareness and
Personal Literacy

Critical SelfAwareness and


Personal Literacy
Academic literacy

4. OUTLINE SYLLABUS
Course Content:
The doctrine of judicial precedent and the structure of the courts.
The business context of contracts, the essential elements of a valid contract: offer,
acceptance, consideration, intention to create legal relations, capacity, formalities, and
legality.
The contents of contracts, express terms, implied terms, the doctrine of incorporation,
contracts of agency, performance and termination of contracts, and remedies.

5. TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY


Teaching Learning
Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:

Attend lectures, which address the key conceptual themes and explain fundamental legal
principles.

Attend seminars, which develop the skills of identification and classification of problems
and their resolution through the application of pre-acquired knowledge.

Study independently using the module workbook/lecture notes, online resources and
primary and secondary research in the University Library and School Resource Centre.

To develop their ability to analyse situations and apply the law in class tests and
coursework.
Assessment Strategy
Assessment and the opportunity to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes is provided by
two law essays and a class test

32

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

6. LEARNING HOURS
Scheduled learning and teaching activities
Lectures
Seminars
Guided independent study
Directed/independent study
Preparation for assessments

12 hours
12 hours
56 hours
70 hours

7. ASSESSMENT TASKS
Word count/
length of
exam

Learning
outcomes
assessed

Weighting

Coursework 1:
Legal Essay

1500

i, ii, iv-viii

45%

Coursework 2:
Legal Essay

1500

ii-viii

45%

Coursework 3:
Class Test

1 hour

i-iii, v-vii

10%

7.1 Summative assignments

To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also
obtain a minimum of 30% in each component of coursework. Failure to attempt any
element of assessment on the module without mitigating circumstances will result in a
failure of the module without the right to resit.
7.2 Opportunities for formative assessment and feedback
Formative assessment and feedback on performance is provided through the three
coursework elements, tutor-led seminars, group feedback and non-scheduled informal
tutorials (including via Wimba Classroom, Skype and e-mail). Aural feedback may, on
occasion, also be provided.

8. INDICATIVE READING LIST


General

Card R., Murdoch J. and Murdoch S. (2011) Estate Management Law 7th Edition,
published by Oxford University Press
Additional Reading
Ruff A. (2011) Nutcases Contract Law published by Sweet & Maxwell 6th ed.

Fafinski S. and Finch E. (2010) Law Express: Contract Law. Published by Pearson
Education Limited. 2nd ed.

Poole J. (2010) Textbook on contract law. Published by Oxford University Press. 10th
ed.
33

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

Poole J. (2010) Casebook on contract law. Published by Oxford University Press 10th
ed.Atiyah, P. S. and Smith, S.A. (2006) Atiyah's introduction to the law of contract. 6th
edition. Oxford University Press.

Brookes Virtual
Brookes Virtual supports the module with supplementary reading, additional information
and online assignments to improve your essay writing and exam skills.

Date module first approved:

February 2013

Date of most recent revision:

N/A

34

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

U35011: Foundation Real Estate Law 2


Module Leader:

Dr Sally Sims ssims@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483459

1. MANAGEMENT DETAILS
Module title:

Foundation Real Estate Law 2

Module number:

U35011

Module leader:

Sally Sims

Level:

No. of credits:

15

Mode of delivery:

Face to face

Pre-requisites:

U35010 Foundation Real Estate Law 1

Co-requisites:

None

Barred combinations:

U35002 Foundation Real Estate and Construction Law


U22100 Introduction to Law

Other restrictions or
requirements:

None

Timetable information:

Semester 2 - running for 12 Weeks


Monday 11.0012.00 (A) - Lecture
Monday 13.0016.00 (B) - Seminars

Programme/s in which this module may be taken

Status

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)

Compulsory

BA (Hons) Planning and Property Development (DV)

Compulsory

2. MODULE AIMS
This module builds on Foundation Real Estate Law 1 and introduces students specifically to the
substantive areas of the law of tort. The module focuses on negligence, professional liability
under the law of tort, and on the property torts, including trespass, nuisance and occupiers
liability. The module provides a foundation for the advanced legal specialisms studied in Stage II,
and for other real estate management modules with inherent legal perspectives, such as
advanced valuation and professional practice test.

3. LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this module, students will be
able to:
i. Describe the operation of the machinery of the civil
justice system and its constituent parts in England
and Wales
ii. Demonstrate an understanding of the basis of civil
obligations, including both contractual and tortious
liability, in England and Wales

35

Graduate Attribute
developed

Other GAs
developed

Academic Literacy

Global Citizenship

Academic Literacy

Global Citizenship

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

iii

Demonstrate an understanding of professional liability


issues affecting the practice of general practice
surveying
iv Conduct effective research using primary and
secondary legal sources
v Identify and analyse legal problems in given factual
situations utilising both common law and statutory
principles
vi. Undertake basic analysis
vii. Produce a clear and precise piece of written argument
viii. Work independently to develop skills in problem
solving

Academic Literacy
Research Literacy

Academic literacy

Academic Literacy

Research Literacy

Research Literacy
Critical SelfAwareness and
Personal Literacy
Critical SelfAwareness and
Personal Literacy

Academic literacy

4. OUTLINE SYLLABUS
Course Content
The doctrine of judicial precedent and the structure of the courts.
Purpose of tort, principles of negligence, duty of care, breach and standard of conduct,
doctrine of causation, loss and damage, defences, the limitation defence, and professional
negligence.
Nuisance, occupiers liability, trespass, strict liability, the development of environmental law,
and remedies.

5. TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY


Teaching Learning
Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:

Attend lectures, which address the key conceptual themes and explain fundamental legal
principles.

Attend seminars, which develop the skills of identification and classification of problems
and their resolution through the application of pre-acquired knowledge.

Study independently using the module workbook/lecture notes, online resources and
primary and secondary research in the University Library and School Resource Centre.

Demonstrate and apply the knowledge they have gained by completing coursework
assignments and an unseen written examination.
Assessment Strategy
Assessment and the opportunity to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes is provided by a
law essay, class tests, and a written examination

36

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

6. LEARNING HOURS
Scheduled learning and teaching activities
Lectures
Seminars
Guided independent study
Directed/independent study
Preparation for assessments

12 hours
12 hours
56 hours
70 hours

7. ASSESSMENT TASKS
Word count/
length of
exam

Learning
outcomes
assessed

Weighting

n/a

i-iii, v-vii

10%

Coursework 2:
Essay

1000 words

i -viii

30%

Coursework 3:
Class test

n/a

i-iii, v-vii

10%

2 hours

i-iii, v-vii

50%

7.1 Summative assignments

Coursework 1:
Closed book classroom test

Written Examination

To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also
obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination
elements of the assessment. Failure to attempt each element of assessment on the
module without mitigating circumstances will result in a failure of the module without
the right to resit.
7.2 Opportunities for formative assessment and feedback
Formative assessment and feedback on performance is provided through the three coursework
elements, tutor-led seminars, group feedback and non-scheduled informal tutorials (including
via Wimba Classroom, Skype and e-mail). Aural feedback may, on occasion, also be provided.

8. INDICATIVE READING LIST


General
Card R., Murdoch J. and Murdoch S. (2011) Estate Management Law 7th Edition,
published by Oxford University Press
Additional Reading
Rogers, W. (2002) Winfield and Jolowicz on Tort, 16th Edition, Sweet & Maxwell.
Giliker, P. (2011) Tort 4th Edition, Sweet & Maxwell London
Deakin, S., Johnston, A, and Markesinis B. (2008) Markesinis & Deakins Tort Law 6th Edition
Oxford University Press

37

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

Brookes Virtual
Brookes Virtual supports the module with supplementary reading, additional information and
online assignments to improve your essay writing and exam skills.

Date module first approved:

February 2013

Date of most recent revision:

N/A

38

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

U35012: Integrative Project I


Module Leader:

mdstubbs@brookes.ac.uk

Dr Michael Stubbs

01865 483487

1. MANAGEMENT DETAILS
Module title:

Integrative Project I

Module number:

U35012

Module leader:

Mr Mike Stubbs

Level:

No. of credits:

15

Mode of delivery:

Face to face

Pre-requisites:

None

Co-requisites:

None

Barred combinations:

U33509 Integrative Project I

Other restrictions or
requirements:

None

Timetable information:

Semester 1 - running for 12 Weeks


Friday 9.0012.00 (M) Lecture

Programme/s in which this module may be taken

Status

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)

Compulsory

2. MODULE AIMS
This module addresses discipline-based and transferable skills that students will need during their
years of study and as professionals in real estate management. These skills are explored and
developed through a series of activities which involve viewing real estate from a range of
perspectives. In broad terms, this includes the subject areas of planning, construction,
sustainability, law, economics, management and valuation.

3. LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this module, students
will be able to:
i. Understand the professional competencies of
a chartered surveyor.
ii. Communicate effectively in written and oral
media
iii.

Graduate Attribute
developed
Academic Literacy
Critical Self-awareness
and Personal Literacy

Understand and carry out secondary research


Research Literacy

iv. Produce a structured and well written


report/essay appropriate to professional
practice
39

Other GAs
developed

Academic Literacy

Academic
Literacy
Digital and
Information
Literacy
Critical Selfawareness and
Personal Literacy

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

v.

Apply the processes of analysis and reflection


to research projects in real estate
management
vi. Understand and apply basic maths techniques
in the solution of discipline based problems
vii. Apply IT software to the solution of problems
in real estate management
viii. Work effectively in a team environment.

Research Literacy

Academic Literacy
Digital and Information
Literacy
Critical Self-awareness
and Personal Literacy

Academic
Literacy
Digital and
Information
Literacy
Academic
Literacy
Academic
Literacy

4. OUTLINE SYLLABUS
The module consists of a series of lectures and workshops which together with a field trip provide
students with the background knowledge of the profession and fundamental skills that are
required in the discipline. The course content includes:
Core Skills of a Chartered Surveyor the background to the profession;
Report Writing;
Presentation Skills;
Basic Maths Techniques;
Independent Learning and Secondary Research;
Reasoned Opinion and Critical Review the analysis of data;
Introduction to IT software skills for Real Estate Education.

5. TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY


Teaching and Learning:
Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:
Work in teams with other members of their discipline.
Attend lectures and tutorials which address and strengthen key professional skills
Attend workshops to practice the application of basic maths techniques to discipline based
problems
Attend workshops to practice their ability to use IT software
Attend a field trip to carry out research into the real estate markets
Study independently using the teaching material, which contains key concepts and study
guidance.
Produce an individual analysis that develops and tests professional skills and to present
this in written and oral form
Assessment Strategy:
Assessment and the opportunity to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes is provided by
the essay/report, presentation and computer assignments.

40

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

6. LEARNING HOURS
Scheduled learning and teaching activities
Lectures
Workshops
Field Trips
Tutorials
Guided independent study
Directed/independent study
Preparation for assessments

12 hours
6 hours
6 hours
2 hours
70 hours
54 hours

7. ASSESSMENT TASKS
7.1 Summative assignments

Coursework 1
Report/Essay
Coursework 2
Oral Presentation
Coursework 2
Computer Application Assessment

Word count/
length of
exam

Learning
outcomes
assessed

Weighting

1500

i-v

40%

N/A

i-iii, v, viii

20%

N/A

vi, vii

40%

To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also
obtain a minimum of 30% in each component of coursework. Failure to attempt any
element of assessment on the module without mitigating circumstances will result in a
failure of the module without the right to resit.

7.2 Opportunities for formative assessment and feedback


Formative assessment and feedback on performance is provided through the three coursework
elements, presentation critiques, group and workshop debriefs and non-scheduled informal
tutorials (including via Skype and e-mail).
8. INDICATIVE READING LIST
Books:
Bowcock, P. & Bayfield, N. (2001) Excel for Surveyors, London: Estate Gazette
Bradbury, A. (2010) Successful Presentation Skills (4th Edition), London: Kogan Page
Brett, M (2007) Property and Money: A Simple Guide to Commercial Property Investment
and Finance, London: Estate Gazette
Copus, J. (2009) Brilliant Writing Tips for Students, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan
Creme, P. & Lea, M. R. (2003) Writing at University - A Guide for Students (2nd Edition),
Maidenhead: Open University Press
Godwin, J (2009) Planning Your Essay, Palgrave Macmillan
Mandel, S. (2000) Effective Presentation Skills - A Practical Guide for Better Speaking
(3rd Edition), CA: Crisp Publications
Williams, G. (2004) Professional Conduct for Chartered Surveyors, Coventry: RICS Books
Williams, K. et al (2011) Get Critical, Palgrave Macmillan
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Student Handbook

Williams, K. et al (2012) Reflective Writing, Palgrave Macmillan


Williams, L. & Carroll, J. (2009) Referencing & Understanding Plagiarism, Palgrave
Macmillan
Wyatt, P (2007) Property valuation in an economic context, Oxford: Blackwell Publishing

Website:
Website for professional reports and guidance: www.isurv.com
Website for professional news and conducts: www.rics.org
Website for real estate market information: www.ipd.com

Date module first approved:

February 2013

Date of most recent revision:

N/A

42

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

U35013: Introduction to Property, Management and Professional Practice


Module Leader:

ycho@brookes.ac.uk 01865 483941

Dr Youngha Cho

MODULE TITLE:
MODULE NUMBER:

Introduction to Property, Management and Professional


Practice
U35013

1. MANAGEMENT DETAILS
Module leader:

Dr Youngha Cho

Level:

Level 4

No. of credits:

15

Mode of delivery:

Face to face

Pre-requisites:

None

Co-requisites:

None

Barred combinations:

None

Other restrictions or
requirements:

None

Timetable information:

Semester 1
Thursday 11:00-12:00 (J) Lecture
Thursday 13.00-15.00 (K) - Seminars

Programme/s in which this module may be taken


BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)

Status on programme
Compulsory

2. MODULE AIMS
This module is designed to provide students with understanding of property industry, the macro and
micro economic environment and basic concepts of business and management theory. Students will
learn about current issues of property industry, principles of business operations, different types of
property development, nature of organisations including their structure and influence on property
related decision-making. Students will also learn about the role of the different forms of property
organisations in contemporary business environment and professional skills and techniques which will
be applicable to future studies.

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3. LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this module, students will
be able to:
1. Demonstrate awareness of the property profession
and industry, the interrelationships of the main
participants and professionals as part of business
planning and operation.
2. Identify the different roles of the participants in
property development and investment including
issues of sustainability and insight into the
economic and social performance of the built
environment.
3. Understand issues of health & safety and
environmental risks in development activity with an
emphasis on ethical and professional conduct.
4. Demonstrate ability to work within a team, to
interact effectively with team members, and to take
responsibility for own work.
5. Competently use communication and information
technology and software for the solution of
problems in real estate decision making.
6. Structure and write professional reports, including
executive summaries, as used in practice.

Graduate Attribute
developed

Other GAs
developed

Academic Literacy

Global Citizenship

Global Citizenship
Academic Literacy

Global citizenship

Critical SelfAwareness and


Personal Literacy
Critical SelfAwareness and
Personal Literacy
Academic Literacy

Academic Literacy

Digital and
Information Literacy
Critical SelfAwareness and
Personal Literacy

4. OUTLINE SYLLABUS
The delivery of the course is designed to incorporate personal and business oriented management
skills and their practical application in an academic and professional environment. Through a series
of case studies, how the core principle and techniques of management are used in the context of
providing property related services will be studied.
Indicative weekly themes include
Overview of the property industry: the market conditions that influence property industries,
the roles of the industries in the macro and micro economy.
Fundamental characteristics and operation of property development and investment
companies.
Various types of property development which are interested and transacted in the market,
the stakeholders of the market and the appropriate legal frameworks.
The process of development and investment in the property industry
Basic principles of management and business operation
Market research and marketing practice in property industry: competitiveness and global
dimension
Business ethics, H&S, sustainable development and the role of property professional
Real estate management in its national and international contexts
Study skills: team working, presentation skills and professional and academic report
writing
Use of information and technology skills and software in real estate profession

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Student Handbook

5. TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY


Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:
Attend lectures that address key themes, concepts and background information.
Attend seminars that provide interactive learning exercise using case studies.
Study independently using the module courses key concepts and study guidance.
Make individual and team presentations
Perform distance learning tasks
Academic concepts as well as practical case studies will be delivered mainly in the lectures.
Application of these concepts will be addressed and discussed in the seminar session, supported by
handouts and pre-set tasks. During the seminar session there will be informal session for formative
assessment and feedback which will allow students to discuss and assess their responses.
Teaching and learning will also be supported by the team and individual coursework undertaken in
module assignments so fostering the academic literacy attributes.
 The team assignment will allow students to undertake critical analysis of a mixed use regeneration
scheme: overall business objectives of the project, identification of main stakeholders involved in
the project, and the funding resources. Students are required to research the tasks given for the
development site as a team and demonstrate the findings in professional form. This will involve
application of management process in the real life example and presenting their findings through
oral and written presentation, developing Critical Self-Awareness and Personal Literacy and
Academic Literacy.
 The individual assignment will require reflection on all the concepts that have been covered over
the semester and demonstration by the students of their understanding of the major issues by
answering the questions. This will involve research that develops both academic and professional
literacies as well as real life examples. Students will have to articulate their opinion and
propositions in a written report thus enhancing the Research Literacy attribute.
The summative and formative exercises will allow the students to explore a range of different real
estate decisions, analysis tools and problem solving approaches using real life examples.
All assessments will lead to timely feedback using a variety of mechanisms such as the Universitys
VLE, individual oral and class-based feedback in accordance with the Brookes Assessment Compact.
To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also obtain a
minimum of 35% in each component of coursework. Failure to attempt any element of
assessment on the module without valid mitigating circumstances will result in a failure of the
module without the right to resit.

6. LEARNING HOURS (10 notional learning hours per credit)


Scheduled learning and teaching activities (contact hours)*
Lectures
Seminars
Guided independent study*
Directed/independent study
Preparation for assessments
Placement/Study Abroad*

11 hours
11 hours
58 hours
70 hours

TOTAL:

45

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Student Handbook

7. ASSESSMENT TASKS
7.1 Summative assignments

Indicative coursework
Coursework 1
On-line class test
Coursework 2
Team assignment (Presentation)
Coursework 3
Individual Reflective Report
Written examinations

Word count/
length of
exam

Learning
outcomes
assessed

Weighting

KIS
category

1-3

25%

Coursework

3,000

4-6

30%

Coursework

1,500

1-3 & 5-6

45%

Coursework

Other

7.2 Opportunities for formative assessment and feedback


Formative assessment and feedback on performance is provided through the interactive class sessions
and the three coursework elements, and informal tutorials (including by telephone and e-mail). Several
tasks will be introduced in the class and all students as a small team are required to present their
analysis and opinion over the pre-set tasks. The students level of engagement, academic and/or
affective behaviour will be observed by the tutor. Instant oral feedback will be given to the students
discussion and participation.

8. INDICATIVE READING LIST


 Daft, Richard L. (2011) The New Era of Management, Thompson South-Western.
 Deakin, M. (2004), Property management: corporate strategies, financial instruments and the urban
environment, Aldershot : Ashgate.
 Grewal, D. Levy, M. (2013) Marketing, McGraw-Hill Higher Education
 Myers, D. (2011) Economics & property, EGbook, Published Amsterdam; London
 Havard, Timothy( 2011) Contemporary property development, RIBA publishing
 Challinor D. (2009)The top ten business models, RICS

Date module first approved:

April 2014

Date of most recent revision:

46

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

U35014: Introduction to Building Design and Construction


Module Leader:

Mr David Shiers

davidshiers@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483962

MODULE TITLE:

Introduction to Building Design and Construction

MODULE NUMBER:

U35014

1. MANAGEMENT DETAILS
Module leader:

David Shiers

Level:

Level 4

No. of credits:

15

Mode of delivery:

Face to face

Pre-requisites:

None

Co-requisites:

None

Barred combinations:

None

Other restrictions or
requirements:

None

Timetable information:

Semester 1: Tuesday 14.00 15.00 (E)


Semester 2: Tuesday 13.00 14.00 (E)

Programme/s in which this module may be taken


BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)

Status on programme
Compulsory

2. MODULE AIMS
This module introduces students to the principles of building design, property development,
construction and property management, including the statutory requirements affecting these
processes. The construction of buildings is explained using simple building typologies and knowledge
gained from this module will be applicable to both other subject areas and more complex forms of
building dealt with in later construction and building appraisal modules.

3. LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this module, students will
be able to:
1. Describe methods of construction, types of
components and elements of buildings; apply current
Building Regulations and other industry standards
and describe the performance of building materials in
relation to their normal use.
2. Collect and process information relating to common
construction practices including recent research on
building-related legal and technical change and
innovation.
47

Graduate Attribute
developed

Academic Literacy

Research Literacy

Other GAs
developed

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

3. Apply appropriate IT software and techniques to


measure, record, analyse and present building data.
4. Relate technological issues to global concerns
including sustainability, environmental protection and
design economy.

Digital and
Information Literacy
Global Citizenship

4. OUTLINE SYLLABUS
Topics to be covered:

The property development process


The professional team
Physical appraisal of the site
Building performance parameters
Building Regulation and Development Control legislation requirements in the context of new-build
development
Foundation types
Building structural form
Principles and practice of construction: walls, frame, roofs and floors
Building costs and site management
Measurement of buildings
Buildings in use; building surveys, defects, maintenance, refurbishment
Environmental context, building services and sustainability
Site Plant and Equipment
Construction Materials

5. TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY


Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:
Attend lectures which address the core issues of building design & construction, in particular
for small-scale residential buildings and explain the principles of traditional forms of Building
Surveys and Appraisals.
The lecture series in Semester 1 is designed to explain the principles of building design and
construction in the context of UK residential development including site appraisal, the professional
team, buildings and the law, structural design, building enclosure and energy use in buildings. The
lectures are complemented by a Building Logbook group project in which students, working in groups,
are asked to describe the construction process using an actual building currently under construction.
This project is intended to enable the student to gain an understanding of the interrelationship between
different stages and trades involved in the construction process and the use and assembly of building
materials and components observed over time.
The RICS HomeBuyer Report (HBR) is the marketing leading property survey report. It provides a
clear assessment of the property indicating what actions may need to be taken. It also comes with a
current market valuation. In Semester 2, students will work in groups to study techniques used in
carrying out Building Surveys and Appraisals and will prepare a basic version of the RICS Homebuyer
Report using the recommended structure and layout. These projects are also designed to encourage
team working, good organisational and time management skills tested over an extended period and to
develop observational, analytical and presentation skills through the production of an extended report.
Work is assessed on the basis of student ability to produce:

Clear, well organised reports with a logical sequence and structure showing evidence of

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BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

consistently thorough observation and analysis


Evidence of technical understanding, research and necessary background reading
Good presentation and communication skills

The knowledge gained from these projects and from the associated lectures is further developed and
assessed by written examination at the end of Semester 2.
To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also obtain a
minimum of 35% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination elements of the
assessment. Failure to attempt any element of assessment on the module without valid
mitigating circumstances will result in a failure of the module without the right to resit.

6. LEARNING HOURS (10 notional learning hours per credit)


Scheduled learning and teaching activities (contact hours)*
Lectures
Seminars
Practical classes/workshops
Tutorials
Guided independent study*
Directed/independent study
Preparation for assessments
Placement/Study Abroad*

20 hours
20 hours
2 hours
3 hours
85 hours
20 hours

TOTAL:

150 hours

7. ASSESSMENT TASKS
7.1 Summative assignments
Describe assessment tasks
below*

Coursework
Construction Log Book Group
Exercise
Building Survey & Valuation
Report (based on RICS
Homebuyer Report) - Group
Exercise
Written examinations
Unseen Written Examination

Word count/
length of
exam

Learning
outcomes
assessed

Weighting

KIS
category**

2500 or
equivalent
2500 or
equivalent

1-4

25%

Coursework

1-4

25%

Coursework

2 hours

1, 2 & 4

50%

Written
Examination

Other

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BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

7.2 Opportunities for formative assessment and feedback


Formative assessment and feedback on performance is provided through the three coursework
elements, lectures, group workshop sessions and non-scheduled informal tutorials (including by
telephone and e-mail). Also, students will be provided with sample mock examination questions to
facilitate their preparation for the final exams.

8. INDICATIVE READING LIST


Barry R., (2009) The Construction of Buildings Vols. 1 to 5 Crosby Larchwood
Billington, M., Simmons, M. and Waters, J (2007). The Building Regulations Explained
and Illustrated, Blackwell
Chudley R., (2010) Building Construction Handbook, Laxtons
Noy, (2005) Edward Building Surveys and Reports, Blackwells
Parnham P. and Rispin C. (2001) Residential Property Appraisal, Spon
Reid, E. (2008) Understanding Buildings, Longman
Taylor, G.D. (2013), Materials in Construction: An Introduction. (3rd Ed). Longman
Williams, Andrew (2003) Domestic Building Surveys, Spon

Date module first approved:

April 2014

Date of most recent revision:

50

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

U35020: The Construction and Appraisal of Real Estate


Module Leader: Mr David Shiers

davidshiers@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483962

Module Description
This module provides an opportunity for the advanced study of methods of construction of
commercial, industrial and residential buildings, the related statutory requirements and the
techniques and procedures adopted by Chartered Surveyors in the appraisal of buildings.
Students will also examine the formulation of maintenance programmes, the economics of
building design and environmental issues and building services. Successful completion of this
module will provide students with the pre-requisites required for more advanced Real Estate
Management modules.
Originating School:
Level:
Size:
Status:

The Built Environment


Advanced Level 5
Single
Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM) and
BA (Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU), BSc (Hons) Real Estate
Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI), and Acceptable for BSc
(Hons) Cities - Environment, Design and Development (DT).
EM, RU, RI, DT
U33504 Introduction to Building Design and Construction
None
Semester 1
Every Year
Cannot be counted with:
M09811 Construction & Appraisal of Commercial, Industrial and
Residential Real Estate
None
Monday 10.00 12.00 (A)
This module draws upon the knowledge and experience gained in
Year 1 and through an understanding of more complex construction
issues, enables the student to examine the links between building
design and other subject areas including property valuation, portfolio
management, and the appropriate RICS standards and methods of
property appraisal.

Field:
Pre-requisite:
Co-requisite:
Placing:
Years running:
Restrictions:

Exclusions:
Timetable Slots:
Context:

.
Course Content
Building design, construction and performance of common building types and materials
Building economics and procurement
Types of building survey, schedule and report, including Schedules of Dilapidation and
Condition.
Statutory requirements under Building Regulations and CDM regulations.
Maintenance programmes and historic building conservation

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BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

Learning Outcomes
1. Knowledge and Understanding
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
i. Describe various methods of construction of

commercial, industrial and residential buildings.
ii. Apply the Building Regulations and other
appropriate legislative standards to such

construction.
iii. Prepare Schedules of Dilapidation and Condition

under various lease terms.
iv. Formulate maintenance programmes for

commercial and industrial buildings.
v. Assess the economic use of space in existing and

proposed buildings.
2. Disciplinary/Professional Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
vi. Identify and analyse various forms of commercial

and industrial building construction
vii. Comment upon constraints in the design process

imposed by Building Regulations and other criteria
viii. Prepare building appraisal reports in accordance

with professional guidance notes and standards

3. Transferable Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
ix. Group Research

x. Report Writing

xi. Data Collection and Analysis

xii. Graphic Skills


Practiced Assessed

Practiced Assessed

Practiced Assessed










Teaching and Learning Experiences


Students undertaking this module will have the opportunity to:
 attend lectures, which address the principle issues concerning professional practice in the
commercial, industrial and residential property sectors.
 attend seminars and workshops, which develop in an analytical manner, the knowledge gained
from lectures.
 examine a range of commercial and residential property through site visits and building
appraisal projects.
Notional Learning Time
Lectures
Seminars, Workshops and Site Visits
Directed Study

20 hours
20 hours
110 hours
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BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

Assessment
Exam (50%)
Coursework (50%)

Coursework

- Schedule of Dilapidation
- Case Study Report
Unseen Written Exam

25%
25%
50%

Learning Outcomes
i-xii
i-xii
i-viii

The main assessment criteria are:


 Knowledge of the design and construction of buildings including the principal Building
Regulation requirements.
 Ability to prepare building appraisal reports in accordance with recommended professional
standards.
 Ability to observe, record and analyse building design and functional, aesthetic and economic
performance characteristics.
To pass this module, students must obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework
(aggregate) and examination elements of the assessment. In order to pass the module,
students must achieve an overall mark of 40% or greater. Any failure to attempt any
element of assessment on the module without reasonable excuse will result in a failure of
the module without the right to resit.
Indicative Reading List
Barry, R. (1985) The Construction of Buildings, Vol 3&4, Crosby Lockwood. BRE
Noy (2005) Building Surveys and Reports, Blackwells.
Reid, E. (1988) Understanding Buildings, Longman
RICS (2008) Dilapidations 5th Edition, RICS Guidance Notes, RICS, London.
Seeley, I. (1996) Building Economics, Macmillan Press Ltd.
Seeley, I. (1987) Building Maintenance, Macmillan Press Ltd.
Watt (2007) Building Pathology, Blackwell Science.
Validation History
November 2003
Validated March 2010

53

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

U35024: Town Planning Practice


Module Leader:

Dr Michael Stubbs

mdstubbs@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483487

Module Description
This module aims to provide a critical understanding of the UK planning system and how it
works in practice. It looks at how planning law, policy and procedure is evolving and it considers
some of the key issues facing planners today. Project work and presentations by visiting
speakers from professional practice are key elements of this module.
Successful completion of the module will provide students with the pre-requisites required for
Level 6 Real Estate Management modules.
Originating School:
Level:
Size:
Status:

Field:
Pre-requisite:
Co-requisite:
Placing:
Years running:
Restrictions:
Exclusions:
Timetable Slots:
Context:

The Built Environment


Advanced Level 5
Single
Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM) and BA
(Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU), and BSc (Hons) Real Estate
Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI).
EM, RU, RI
U35008 Introduction to Spatial Planning
None
Semester 1
Every Year
None
None
Monday 13.00 16.00 (B)
This module provides students with an understanding of UK planning
system required for Level 6 modules in Development Planning.

Course Content
The Town and Country Planning Acts and the system created by them
The main national, regional and local planning policies and how to go about interpreting
them for development purposes
How development control works and what the government is doing to speed up the
decision making process
Practicing relevant skills such as preparing a planning application and appeal statement

Developing a critical understanding of the key planning issues facing the practitioner today
Learning Outcomes
1. Knowledge and Understanding
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
i. Analyse topical planning issues in the context of

policies, legislation, environment economic and
social impact.
ii. Explain the structure and functions of local

planning authorities in England and Wales.
iii. Demonstrate an understanding of the

development plan system of England and Wales.
iv. Demonstrate an understanding of the

development control system in England and
Wales
54

Practiced Assessed


BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

v.

Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship


between development plans and development
control.

2. Disciplinary/Professional Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
vi. Research, interpret and apply relevant planning

information to practical problem scenarios.
vii. Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of

the different levels of planning
viii. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of
planning professionals in the land use planning

system
ix. Advise on appropriate courses of action/make

rational decisions in dealing with practice related
issues
x. Prepare a planning application and appeal

statement

3. Transferable Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
xi. Undertake Group/Team Work

xii. Prepare applications

xiii. Solve Problems

xiv. Prepare professional statements

xv. Report Writing

xvi. Analyse Policy Statements


Practiced Assessed




Practiced Assessed














Teaching and Learning Experiences


Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:
attend a series of lectures, which address topical planning issues, combined with
procedural and policy matters.
attend a series of small group sessions organised to foster discussion and develop the
skills for identification and resolution of problems through the application of pre-acquired
knowledge and advocacy skills.
study independently and in group project work.
undertake problem solving exercises.
Notional Learning Time
Lectures
Seminars
Directed Study

18 hours
12 hours
120 hours

Assessment
Exam (50%)
Coursework (50%)
Exam
Planning Project

50%
50%

Learning Outcome
i - vi, viii x, xiii
i vi, viii - xvi
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BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

The assessments are based on a planning project and a two hour written examination.
The main criteria for assessment are:

demonstration of knowledge of both planning policy and planning procedure, as


appropriate.
ability to research the planning merits of a case and to prepare and present an
application/appeal statement
ability to develop a broader understanding of contemporary planning practice

To pass this module students must obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework
(aggregate) and examination elements of the assessment. In order to pass the module,
students must achieve an overall mark of 40% or greater. Any failure to attempt any
element of assessment on the module without reasonable excuse will result in a failure of
the module without the right to resit.
Indicative Reading List
Barker, K (2006) Barker Review of Land Use Planning HMSO, Norwich
Cullingworth, J.B. and Nadin, V. (2006) Town and Country Planning in the UK, , *
14th Edition Routledge, London
DCLG (2007) Planning for a Sustainable Future HMSO, Norwich
DETR (2000) Our Towns and Cities. The Future Delivering an Urban Renaissance,
(Urban White Paper), London,
Duxbury, R. (2006) Telling and Duxburys Planning Law and Procedure, 13th Edition,
Butterworth.
Grant, M. (ed) Encyclopaedia of Planning Law and Practice, Sweet & Maxwell, updated
monthly
Moore V. (2002) A Practical Approach to Planning Law 8th Edition, OUP, Oxford
ODPM (2003) Sustainable Communities; Building for the Future
Owens, S. and Cowell, R. (2002) Land and Limits, Routledge, London
Parfect, M. and Powers, G. (1997) Planning for Urban Quality, Routledge, London
Ratcliffe, J., Stubbs, M. and Keeping, M. (2009) Urban Planning and Real Estate *
Development, 3rd Edition, Routledge, London
Rydin, Y (2003) Urban and Environmental Planning in the UK 2nd Edition, Built
Environment Series, London
Ward, S. (2004) Planning and Urban Change, 2nd Edition, Sage Publications
Validation History
November 2003
Validated March 2010

56

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

U35025: Real Estate Integrative Project II


Module Leader: Dr Sally Sims

ssims@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483459

1. MANAGEMENT DETAILS
Module title:

Integrative Project II

Module number:

U35025

Module leader:

Sally Sims

Level:

No. of credits:

15

Mode of delivery:

Co-requisites:

Face to face
U33504 Introduction to Building Design and Construction
U35008 Introduction to Spatial Planning
One of either U33509 or U35012 Integrative Project 1
None

Barred combinations:

None

Other restrictions or
requirements:

None

Timetable information:

Semester 2 - running for 12 Weeks

Pre-requisites:

Wednesday 11.0012.00 (G) Lecture


Wednesday 13.00-15.00 (H) - Seminars
Programme/s in which this module may be taken

Status

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)

Compulsory

2. MODULE AIMS
This advanced module aims to give students the opportunity to integrate the disparate knowledge
and experience that they have already gained during the last two years by completing a project
which focuses on property investment and redevelopment. Completing this module will require
students to apply their knowledge of town planning, development constraints, sustainability,
property and land values, project management, property research and marketing. They will also
have an opportunity to develop their IT skills through the use of a variety of software including
GIS, Digimap and Google SketchUp.
3. LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this module, students
will be able to:
i. Learn to apply theories and ideas from the
pre-requisite modules to a concrete and
complex case study.
ii. Engage in primary research and design,
implement and analyse such research.
57

Graduate Attribute
developed

Other GAs
developed

Academic Literacy

Research
Literacy

Research Literacy

Academic
Literacy

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

iii.

Produce a structured and well written


report/essay appropriate to professional
practice.
iv. Critically evaluate theories of sustainable
development in the built environment.

v.

Academic Literacy

Academic Literacy

Deal with issues associated with global


warming
vi. To develop a critical understanding of
research techniques used in the property
profession.

Academic Literacy

vii. Use and develop your IT and presentation


skills

Digital Information
Literacy

viii. Developing negotiation and collaboration skills


through participation in group work

Research Literacy

Research
Literacy
Digital and
Information
Literacy
Research
Literacy,
Academic
Literacy
Critical Selfawareness and
Personal Literacy

Critical Self-awareness
and Personal Literacy

4. OUTLINE SYLLABUS
The course content is primarily delivered by guest lecturers from within the property profession
and is supported by two field trips. The lecturer series will focus on the key elements of this
module which include, planning, undertaking development, sustainability, investment, marketing
and presentation. Seminars will facilitate group discussion and provide opportunities for the
practical application of research tools such as Excel, Digimap, GIS and Google SketchUp.
Students will also have an opportunity to develop their presentation skills.
Whilst some background information will be provided, students are expected to thoroughly
research each element associated with their proposed development, paying particular attention to
the viability and long term sustainability of their chosen scheme. In addition, students will be
expected to consider the various options for designing carbon neutral buildings (residential or
commercial). They will also be expected to undertake a financial analysis and produce a finance
model for their scheme. Students will be expected to produce a detailed report giving advice to
the client and a plan of the group's development plan.
To encourage team work, it will not be possible for any one individual to complete the required
tasks alone.
5. TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY
Teaching Learning
Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:
Work in teams with other members of their discipline.
Apply their knowledge in a practical context to a project.
Undertake research.
Examine different aspects of the built environment.
Undertake development and investment appraisal
Develop their IT and presentation skills
Develop their report writing skills
Assessment Strategy
Assessment and the opportunity to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes is provided by
the development proposal report and presentation assignments, which include elements of both
individual and group work.
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6. LEARNING HOURS
Scheduled learning and teaching activities
Lectures
Seminars
Guided independent study
Directed/independent study
Preparation for assessments

12 hours
12 hours
56 hours
70 hours

7. ASSESSMENT TASKS
7.1 Summative assignments

Coursework is adapted to suit the focus of


the project on an annual basis but will
consist of a report, a development proposal
and 3D plan, a video presentation and face
to face presentation.

Word count/
length of
exam

Learning
outcomes
assessed

Weighting

n/a

i-viii

100%

To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also
obtain a minimum of 30% in each component of coursework. Failure to attempt any
element of assessment on the module without mitigating circumstances will result in a
failure of the module without the right to resit.
7.2 Opportunities for formative assessment and feedback
Formative assessment and feedback on performance is provided through the coursework
elements, tutor-led seminars, group feedback and non-scheduled informal tutorials (including via
Wimba Classroom, Skype and e-mail). Audio feedback may, on occasion, also be provided.
8. INDICATIVE READING LIST
Core Text: Desai Pooran (2010) One Planet Communities: A Real Life Guide to Sustainable
Living. Published by John Wiley & Son, Inc.
Additional Material:
Asla DanielTal (2009) Google SketchUp for Site Design: A Guide to Modelling Site Plans, Terrain
and Architecture. Published by John Wiley & Son, Inc.
Supplementary articles, texts and information will be listed on BV
However, you are expected to make your own notes from the lectures held throughout the term
and will be expected to research relevant issues through the use of information available from the
library, internet, and provided on Moodle, in addition to industry journals such as:

The Estates Gazette

Property Week

RICS Business

Sustainable Development

Green Building Magazine


Date module first approved:

February 2013

Date of most recent revision:

N/A
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Student Handbook

U35026: Real Estate Economics and Finance


Module Leader: Mr Richard Grover rgrover@brookes.ac.uk 01865 483488
1. MANAGEMENT DETAILS
Module title:

Real Estate Economics and Finance

Module number:

U35026

Module leader:

Richard Grover

Level:

No. of credits:

15

Mode of delivery:

Face to face

Pre-requisites:

U35001 Economics of Built Environment


U35009 Introduction to Valuation

Co-requisites:

None

Barred combinations:

None

Other
restrictions
requirements:

or None

Timetable information:

Semester 1 - running for 12 Weeks


Tuesday 09.00 10.00 (D) Lecture
Tuesday 13.00-16.00 (E) - Seminars

Programme/s in which this module may be taken

Status

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)

Compulsory

BA (Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU)

Acceptable

2. MODULE AIMS
This module takes the understanding of real estate economics and valuations, gained in the
prerequisite basic modules, and develops these into an understanding of the financial context
of real estate and real estate markets. It enables students to gain a range of financial skills
related to real estate, including how to interpret accounts, investment appraisal, the use of
methods of reflecting risk and uncertainty in analysis, and costing. The module examines the
sources of capital available to fund real estate investments and businesses, the assumptions
behind key models of the finance markets, and why markets can fail.

3. LEARNING OUTCOMES
Attribute Other
GAs
On successful completion of this module, students will Graduate
developed
developed
be able to:
i. Understand
how
International
Accounting
Standards affect real estate markets and
Global
Academic Literacy
Citizenship
businesses and how they relate to International
Valuation Standards

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Student Handbook

ii.

iii
iv
v

Understand how public sector accounts are


changing as public sector bodies adopt the
principles of financial reporting for companies
Understand the sources and costs of different types
of capital
Understand the development of indirect vehicles for
investment in real estate
Critically evaluate the key theories that lie behind
theories of real estate markets

vi. Be able to interpret a set of annual accounts and


reports for a property business and identify its
strengths and weaknesses
vii. Be able to value real estate in appropriate
situations using the receipts and expenditure
method
viii. Be able to undertake an investment appraisal

Academic Literacy
Academic Literacy
Academic Literacy
Academic Literacy

Academic Literacy

Academic Literacy

Academic Literacy

ix. Be able to reflect risk and uncertainty in an


investment appraisal
x.

Academic Literacy

Collect and analyse data and reason out problems,


Critical self-awareness
and personal literacy

xi. Analyse technical material.

Critical self-awareness
and personal literacy

xii. Present information orally, including quantitative


data
xiii. Present information in written form, including
quantitative data

Global
Citizenship

Critical self-awareness
and personal literacy
Critical self-awareness
and personal literacy

Digital and
Information
Literacy
Digital and
Information
Literacy
Digital and
Information
Literacy
Digital and
Information
Literacy
Digital and
Information
Literacy
Digital and
Information
Literacy,
Research
Literacy
Digital and
Information
Literacy
Research
Literacy
Research
Literacy

4. OUTLINE SYLLABUS
Topics to be covered:

International Accounting Standards and their relationship to International Valuation


Standards
The content and interpretation of financial reporting statements published by companies
and other corporate bodies
Whole of government accounts and the use of accruals accounting in the public sector
The receipt and expenditure method of valuation
Sources and costs of capital for real estate
Securitisation of real estate and indirect investment vehicles
The efficient market hypothesis in real estate markets and its critics
Investment appraisal methods
Financial management of risk
Pricing and costing
Understanding property cycles and asset price bubbles

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5. TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY


Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:

Attend lectures, which address core concepts and knowledge and their application to
property markets.

Study independently using the teaching material, which contains key concepts, in-text
questions and study guidance.

Attend tutor-led seminars, including group workshop sessions, to reinforce


understanding of the core concepts and knowledge and demonstrate their
applications to markets.

Attend and participate in student-led seminars to reinforce understanding of the core


concepts and develop oral communication skills.

Produce an individual analysis that develops and tests financial skills and to present
this in written and oral form.

6. LEARNING HOURS
(10 notional learning hours per credit)
Scheduled learning and teaching activities
Lectures
Seminars/workshops
Guided independent study
Directed/independent study
Preparation for assessments

12 hours
12 hours
56 hours
70 hours

7. ASSESSMENT TASKS
7.1 Summative assignments

Coursework 1
Company Accounts Exercise
Coursework 2
Online Financial Exercise Quiz
Written Examination

Word count/
length of
exam

Learning
outcomes
assessed

Weighting

n/a

i, iii, vi, ix-xiii

40%

n/a

i-ix

10%

2 hours

i-ix

50%

To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also
obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination elements
of the assessment. Failure to attempt each element of assessment on the module
without mitigating circumstances will result in a failure of the module without the right to
resit.
7.2 Opportunities for formative assessment and feedback
Formative assessment and feedback on performance is provided through the two coursework
elements, tutor-led and student-led seminars, group workshop sessions and non-scheduled
informal tutorials (including by telephone and e-mail).
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8. INDICATIVE READING LIST

Attrill P & McLaney E (2008) Financial Accounting for Non-specialists, 6th edition,
Financial Times/Prentice Hall
Ball M, Lizieri C & MacGregor BD (2008) The Economics of Commercial Property
Markets, 2nd edition, Routledge
Elliott B & J (2008) Financial Accounting and Reporting, 12th edition, FT Prentice Hall
Lumby S & Jones C (2003), Corporate Finance: Theory & Practice, 7th edition,
Thomson
Clarke, William C (2008) How the City of London Works, Sweet & Maxwell

Date module first approved:

March 2010

Date of most recent revision:

February 2012

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BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

U35028: Research Methods


Module Leader: Mrs Gina Dalton

gdalton@brookes.ac.uk

01865 484142

Module Description
This module provides students with an introduction to research methodology necessary for
completion of an undergraduate level dissertation. Specific reference is made to qualitative and
quantitative research techniques as applicable to real estate subject disciplines. Successful
completion of this module will provide students with the pre-requisites required for further Stage
II Real Estate Management modules.
Originating School:
Level:
Size:
Status:

Field:
Pre-requisite:
Co-requisite:
Placing:
Years running:
Restrictions:
Exclusions:
Timetable Slots:
Context:

The Built Environment


Advanced Level 5
Single
Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM) and
BA (Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU), BSc (Hons) Real Estate
Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI).
EM, RU, RI
U33509 Integrative Project I
None
Semester 2
Every Year
None
None
Friday 09.00 12.00 (M)
This module builds on the knowledge gained in previous modules
by developing critical thinking, exploring different research
paradigms, developing research frameworks, gaining an
understanding of issues related to undertaking real research and
provides students with a foundation for their final year dissertation.

Course Content
Qualitative and quantitative research methodologies.
Evaluation of existing literature and information from a variety of sources.
Developing research questions and hypotheses.
Developing research frameworks.
Statistical analysis using Excel.
Mapping techniques using Digimap and GIS.
Developing research proposal.
Developing dissertation proposal.
Learning Outcomes
1. Knowledge and Understanding
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
i. Construct a research hypothesis and justify related

research objectives.
ii. Prepare a research programme that is aware of

empirical and theoretical issues.
iii. Link the construction of a literature review with the

hypothesis in pursuit of filling a gap in knowledge.
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Practiced Assessed

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

iv. Demonstrate critical ability with respect to


inductive or deductive research choice of sample
frame, preservation of research rigour and the
presentation of defensible conclusions.

2. Disciplinary/Professional Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
v. Conduct a review of current knowledge and

consider areas of future study.
vi. Develop further analytical skills in appraisal and
evaluation of previously published research

material.
3. Transferable Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
vii. Empirical & Theoretical Analysis
viii. Construction of a Hypothesis
ix. Sourcing Literature & Producing a Review
x. Data Collection, Review & Consideration of
Rigour
xi. Report Writing and Defence of Conclusions


Practiced Assessed

Practiced Assessed














Teaching and Learning Experiences


Student undertaking this module will have the opportunity to:
Attend a series of workshops in which maters of research design/justification, data
collection/analysis and literature review will be considered.
Participate in a variety of group/student led and tutor-led sessions to reinforce understanding
and enhance critical ability of previous cognate research.
Study independently by completing set exercises in review of previous research and in
preparing research objectives, hypothesis and research design.
Notional Learning Time
Lectures and Seminars
Individual Tutorials
Directed Study

20 hours
2 hours
128 hours

Assessment
Coursework (100%)
Literature critique (500 words)
Online statistics quiz
Dissertation proposal

35%
15%
50%

Learning Outcome
i xi
i xi
i xi

The main assessment criteria are:


The quality of the hypothesis the student intends to test or relevance of the research
questions.
The range and depth of the critically analysis of the existing body on knowledge.
The identification, through the literature review, of a gap in knowledge which forms the focus of
the research and provides the basis for the development of the hypothesis
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Student Handbook

The appropriateness of the proposed research methodology to the problem area.


The viability of the proposed research.
To pass this module students must complete ALL THREE PIECES of coursework and
must obtain a minimum of 35% in each element. To pass the module students must
achieve an overall mark of 40% or greater. Any failure to attempt any element of
assessment on the module without reasonable excuse will result in a failure of the module
without the right to resit.
Students MUST pass this module before they will be allowed to register for and take the
Dissertation module (U35099) in their final year. Students will NOT be able to trail this
module. Therefore, failure on this module will always mean ADDING A YEAR TO YOUR
PROGRAMME
Indicative Reading List
Walliman, N. (2000) Your Research Project: a step-by-step guide for the first-time
researcher, London, Sage.

Bell, J. (1993) Doing Your Research Project, Open University Press.

Bryman, A. (2001) Social Research Methods Oxford University Press.

Clegg, F. (2005) Simple Statistics: A course book for the social sciences. Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press

Coolican, H. (2009) Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology 5th Edition. Hodder
Education

Pallant J. 2007) The SPSS Survival Manual 3rd Edition McGraw-Hill


Additional Text:
Additional texts and reading material will be recommended in the module

Validation History
November 2003
Validated March 2010
April 2014 Semester slot change

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BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

U35029: Statutory Valuation


Module Leader:

Dr Junjian Albert Cao

jcao@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483473

Module Description
This module applies the principles of valuation, gained in prerequisite modules, to situations in
which valuation is determined by statute supported by case law. The principal areas in which law
influences valuation are valuations for tax purposes, valuations for compulsory purchase and
compensation, and landlord and tenant valuations. Although the general principle in the UK is
that such valuations shall be on the basis of open market values, the law influences the valuation
model to be applied and the assumptions that valuers must make when valuing real estate
interests in these circumstances. The module examines the statute and case law relevant to these
valuations as well as the methods and valuation models to be used.

Originating School:
Level:
Size:
Status:

Field:
Pre-requisite:
Co-requisite:
Placing:
Years running:
Restrictions:
Exclusions:
Timetable Slots:
Context:

The Built Environment


Advanced Level 5
Single
Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM) and BA
(Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU), BSc (Hons) Real Estate
Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI) and BA (Hons) Planning and
Property Management (DV).
EM, RI, RU, DV
Either U35026 Real Estate Economics and Finance
or U37721 Urban Development Processes and Finance
U35022 Land Law and Landlord and Tenant Law
Semester 2
Every Year
None
None
Monday 09.00-10.00 (A) Lecture
Monday 13:00-16:00 (B) - Seminars
This module draws upon the knowledge and experience in valuation
economics, and landlord and tenant law and applies this to the valuation
of real estate interests in situations in which the approach and methods
of valuation are determined by legislation and case law, in particular
taxation, compulsory purchase and compensation, and landlord and
tenant.

Course Content
The taxation of incomes from real estate by income and corporation tax
The taxation of the occupancy of real estate through national non-domestic rates and
council tax
The taxation of transfers of real estate through stamp duty land tax, capital gains tax, and
inheritance tax
Value Added Tax on real estate and construction
Compulsory purchase and compensation
Leasehold enfranchisement
The valuation of leasehold interests
Landlord and tenant valuations

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Learning Outcomes
1. Knowledge and Understanding
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
i. Understand how the income from, occupancy of

and transfer of real estate is taxed in the UK
ii. Understand the system of compulsory purchase in

the UK
iii. Understand the impact of leasehold reform on

residential property
iv. Comprehend how the Landlord and Tenant

legislation affects value

2. Disciplinary/Professional Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
v. Value real estate interests in the UK for tax

purposes
vi. Assess the compensation due for real estate

interests for compulsory purchase and planning
vii. Conduct valuations according to landlord and

tenant legislation
viii.Analyse a valuation problem within its legal

context and find an appropriate solution
ix. Development their understanding of the

quantitative techniques and mathematical logic
behind valuation

3. Transferable Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
x. Analyse technical material

xi. Written presentation skills

xii. Problem solving skills

xiii. Analysis of data

xiv. Computational skills


Practiced Assessed


Practiced

Assessed

Practiced Assessed












Teaching and Learning Experiences


Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:

Attend lectures, which address the application of core valuation concepts and their
application to situations in which valuation is determined by statute and supporting case
law

Study independently using the teaching material, which contains key concepts, in-text
questions and study guidance.

Attend tutor-led seminars, including group workshop sessions, to reinforce understanding


of the core valuations concepts and demonstrate their applications to situations in which
valuation is determined by statute and supporting case law

Attend and participate in student-led seminars to reinforce understanding of the core


valuation concepts and develop oral communication, report writing and self-appraisal
skills.
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Student Handbook

Complete assignments to reinforce understanding of the core valuation concepts and


their applications to situations in which valuation is determined by statute and supporting
case law
Attend unseen examinations to apply knowledge and skills to solve valuation problems
and to explain key issues arising in the field of statutory valuation

Notional Learning Time


Lectures
Seminars/Workshops
Directed Study

12 hours
12 hours
126 hours

Assessment
Exam (50%)
Coursework (50%)
Exam
Report (1500 words)
Diagnostic test

Learning Outcome
i to ix, xii to xiv
i - xiv
i - iv

50%
45%
5%

To pass this module students must obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework
(aggregate) and examination elements of the assessment. In order to pass the module,
students must achieve an overall mark of 40% or greater. Any failure to attempt any
element of assessment on the module without reasonable excuse will result in a failure of
the module without the right to resit in the event of the aggregate mark being below 40%.
Indicative Reading List
Baum A, Sams G, Ellis J, Hampson C & Stevens G (2007) Statutory Valuations, 4th
edition, EG Books, London
Bond P & Brown P (2006) Rating Valuation: Principles and Practice, EG Books, London
Melville A (updated annually) Taxation: Finance Act 20xx FT Prentice Hall, Harlow
Deyner-Green B (2005) Compulsory Purchase and Compensation, 8th edition, Estates
Gazette, London
RICS Valuation Standard (6th Edition) and valuation information papers
Shapiro, E et al (2009) Modern Methods of Valuation, EG Books, London
Validation History
Validated March 2010
Amended 2011

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BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

U35030: Land Law


Module Leader:

Dr Sally Sims

ssims@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483459

1. MANAGEMENT DETAILS
Module title:

Land Law

Module number:

U35030

Module leader:

Sally Sims

Level:

No. of credits:

15

Mode of delivery:

Face to face

Pre-requisites:

U35002 Foundation Real Estate and Construction Law or U35011


Foundation Real Estate Law 2

Co-requisites:

None

Barred combinations:

U35022 Land Law and Landlord and Tenant Law


U22182 Property Law

Other restrictions or
requirements:

None

Timetable information:

Semester 1 - running for 12 Weeks


Tuesday 10.0012.00 (D) Lecture
Tuesday 13.00-16.00 (E), 17.00-18.00 (F) - Seminars

Programme/s in which this module may be taken

Status

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)

Compulsory

BA (Hons) Planning and Property Development (DV)

Compulsory

2. MODULE AIMS
This module provides a study of the common law and equitable principles governing the law of
real property, which builds on legal studies completed in Stage I. The module shows the
evolution of the common law from the tenurial aspects (briefly) to the 1925 and 2002 legislation
and emphasises the continuing importance of the common law in the modern context and its
application to the transfer of land ownership and especially to rights over land such as covenants
easements and mortgages. The course also includes consideration of some of the very important
changes wrought by the Land Registration Act 2002.

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Student Handbook

3. LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this module, students
will be able to:
i. Demonstrate knowledge of the statutory,
common law, and equitable principles which
underpin the law of property in England and
Wales
ii. Understand the basis of covenants,
easements and mortgages
iii Explain the principal stages of the
conveyancing process and the formalities
necessary for the creation and transfer of
interests in property
iv Identify the constituent parts of leases in
differing contexts
v Compare differing covenants in leases and
explain their varying legal effects
vi. Read legal documentation and explain its
effect to non-lawyers
vii Identify and analyse legal problems in given
factual situations utilising both common law
and statutory principles
viii. Undertake basic analysis
ix. Produce a clear and precise piece of written
argument
x.

Work independently to develop skills in


problem solving

Graduate Attribute
developed
Academic Literacy

Other GAs
developed
Global Citizenship

Academic Literacy

Academic Literacy

Academic Literacy
Academic Literacy

Research Literacy

Academic Literacy
Academic Literacy

Research Literacy
Critical SelfAwareness and
Personal Literacy
Critical SelfAwareness and
Personal Literacy

Research Literacy

Academic Literacy

4. OUTLINE SYLLABUS
Course Content:
Estates, tenures, legal interests in land and Equity.
The Conveyance process.
The Registration of Title.
Freehold and Leasehold covenants over land including discharge and modification.
The running of the burden and benefit of freehold covenants.
Privity of estate and contract.
Easements and the creation of easements at law and in equity.

5. TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY


Teaching Learning
Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:
Gain knowledge of the principles and concepts involved in real property law
Practise the legal analysis required in relation to some of the complex concepts involved
such as the running of the burden of a freehold covenant.
Attend weekly tutorial sessions with a staff member to apply the principles discussed in
lectures to real problems.
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Student Handbook

To develop their ability to analyse situations and apply the law in the coursework and class
test.

Assessment Strategy
Assessment and the opportunity to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes is provided by
two law essays and the class test.

6. LEARNING HOURS
Scheduled learning and teaching activities
Lectures
Seminars
Guided independent study
Directed/independent study
Preparation for assessments

12 hours
12 hours
56 hours
70 hours

7. ASSESSMENT TASKS
Word count/
length of
exam

Learning
outcomes
assessed

Weighting

1500 words

i, ii, iv-x

45%

1500 words

i-x

45%

1 hours

i-v, vii-ix

10%

7.1 Summative assignments

Coursework 1:
Legal Essay:
Coursework 2:
Legal Essay:
Coursework 3:
Class Test

To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also
obtain a minimum of 30% in each component of coursework. Failure to attempt any
element of assessment on the module without mitigating circumstances will result in a
failure of the module without the right to resit.
7.2 Opportunities for formative assessment and feedback
Formative assessment and feedback on performance is provided through the two coursework
elements, tutor-led seminars, group feedback and non-scheduled informal tutorials (including via
Wimba Classroom, Skype and e-mail). Aural feedback may, on occasion, also be provided.
8. INDICATIVE READING LIST

Card R., Murdoch J. and Murdoch S. (2011) Estate Management Law 7th Edition,
published by Oxford University Press.
Gray, K, and Gray, S. (2008) Elements of Land Law, 5th Edition, Oxford University Press.
Jackson, N., Stevens, J. & Pearce, R. (2008) Land Law, 4th Edition. Sweet & Maxwell.

Date module first approved:

February 2013

Date of most recent revision:

N/A
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Student Handbook

U35034: Landlord and Tenant Law


Module Leader:

Dr Sally Sims

ssims@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483459

1. MANAGEMENT DETAILS
Module title:

Landlord and Tenant Law

Module number:

U35034

Module leader:

Sally Sims

Level:

No. of credits:

15

Mode of delivery:

Face to face

Pre-requisites:

U35030 Land Law

Co-requisites:

None

Barred combinations:

U35022 Land Law and Landlord and Tenant Law


U22182 Property Law

Other restrictions or
requirements:

None

Timetable information:

Semester 2 - running for 12 Weeks


Tuesday 10.0012.00 (D) Lecture
Tuesday 13.00-16.00 (E), 17.00-18.00 (F) - Seminars

Programme/s in which this module may be taken

Status

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)

Compulsory

BA (Hons) Planning and Property Development (DV)

Compulsory

2. MODULE AIMS
This module provides a study of the common law and statutory provisions governing the
relationship between a landlord and tenant. This module builds on legal studies completed in
Stage I and Stage II. Students will study the principal statutes affecting business leases and the
case law which interprets the statutory provisions. They will consider the differing requirements of
landlords and tenants and learn to advise on lease contents accordingly

3. LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this module, students
will be able to:
i. Demonstrate knowledge of the statutory,
common law, and equitable principles which
underpin the law of property in England and
Wales
ii

Describe the effect of the common law on the


relationship of landlord and tenant
73

Graduate Attribute
developed

Academic Literacy

Academic Literacy

Other GAs
developed

Global Citizenship

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

iii
iv.
v.

vi.

vii.
viii.

ix.
x.
xi

xii.
xiii.

Identify the constituent parts of leases in


differing contexts
Compare differing covenants in leases and
explain their varying legal effects
Consider the differing requirements of
landlords and tenants and advise on lease
contents accordingly
Describe the effects of statute law on the
relationship of landlord and tenant in a
business context
Demonstrate knowledge of the content of the
Landlord and Tenant Act 1954, Part II
Identify areas of legal consequence in
negotiations between intending business
lessors and lessees
Examine a business lease and comment
critically on its contents.
Read legal documentation and explain its
effect to non-lawyers
Identify and analyse legal problems in given
factual situations utilising both common law
and statutory principles
Undertake basic analysis
Produce a clear and precise piece of written
argument

xiv. Work independently to develop skills in


problem solving

Academic Literacy
Academic Literacy

Research Literacy

Academic Literacy

Academic Literacy
Academic Literacy
Academic Literacy
Academic Literacy

Research Literacy

Academic Literacy
Research Literacy
Research Literacy
Critical SelfAwareness and
Personal Literacy
Critical SelfAwareness and
Personal Literacy

Academic Literacy

Academic literacy

4. OUTLINE SYLLABUS
Course Content:
Landlord and Tenant relationship.
Creation and types of lease including requirements of form.
Content of leases.
Landlord and Tenant Act 1954 Part II.
Definition of Business and continuation of tenancies under S. 24.
Mortgages and the remedies available to mortgagees.

5. TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY


Teaching Learning
Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:
Gain knowledge of the principles and concepts involved in real property law
Practise the legal analysis required in relation to some of the complex concepts involved in
the landlord and tenant relationship.
Attend weekly tutorial sessions with a staff member to apply the principles discussed in
lectures to real problems.
To develop their ability to analyse situations and apply the law in coursework, online tests
and an unseen written examination.
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Assessment Strategy
Assessment and the opportunity to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes is provided by
two law essays and an unseen written examination

6. LEARNING HOURS
Scheduled learning and teaching activities
Lectures
Seminars
Guided independent study
Directed/independent study
Preparation for assessments

12 hours
12 hours
56 hours
70 hours

7. ASSESSMENT TASKS
7.1 Summative assignments

Coursework 1:
Legal Essay
Coursework 2:
Legal Essay
Unseen Written Examination

Word count/
length of
exam

Learning
outcomes
assessed

Weighting

1000 words

i-xiv

25%

1000 words

i-xiv

25%

2 hours

i-ix, xi-xiii

50%

To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also
obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination elements
of the assessment. Failure to attempt each element of assessment on the module
without mitigating circumstances will result in a failure of the module without the right to
resit.

7.2 Opportunities for formative assessment and feedback


Formative assessment and feedback on performance is provided through the two coursework
elements, tutor-led seminars, group feedback and non-scheduled informal tutorials (including
via Wimba Classroom, Skype and e-mail). Aural feedback may, on occasion, also be provided.
8. INDICATIVE READING LIST

Card R., Murdoch J. and Murdoch S. (2011) Estate Management Law 7th Edition,
published by Oxford University Press.
Davey, M. (1999) Landlord & Tenant Law, Sweet & Maxwell.
Wilkie, M. Luxton, P., Morgan, J. and Coel, G. (2006) Landlord and Tenant Law 5th
Edition, Palgrave Macmillan.

Date module first approved:

February 2013

Date of most recent revision:

N/A

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Student Handbook

U35071: Commercial and Residential Development


Module Leader: Mrs Rebecca Gee rgee@brookesac.uk

01865 484090

Module Description
Students will have the opportunity to develop further knowledge and professional skills of
particular relevance to real estate development in both the public and private sectors.
Successful completion of this module will provide students with an understanding of the
fundamental components of the development process, including project appraisal, design,
procurement and marketing. Within this context, the legal, financial, social and environmental
constraints within which the real estate development process takes place and the core activities
and skills used are explored. Students will have the opportunity to learn from and to question
developers and their advisers, to learn from project case examples and to make use of current
property sector research sources.
Originating School:
Level:
Size:
Status:

Field:
Pre-requisite:
Co-requisite:
Placing:
Years running:
Restrictions:
Exclusions:
Timetable Slots:
Context:

The Built Environment


Honours - Level 6
Single
Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM) and
BA (Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU), BSc (Hons) Real Estate
Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI), and Acceptable for BSc
(Hons) Cities - Environment, Design and Development (DT).
EM, RU, RI, DT
Either U35020 The Construction and Appraisal of Real Estate
or U37723 Politics and Planning
None
Semesters 1 & 2
Every Year
None
None
Thursday 10.00 12.00 (J) - Lectures
Thursday 13.00 15.00 (K) - Seminars
This module draws upon and develops the knowledge and
experience gained in Planning, Design and Construction,
Valuation, Management and Law modules in Years 1 & 2. The
programme of study seeks to help students understand the key
objectives of the property development process and provides
context for the legal, financial and practical issues discussed in
other final year Investment, Management and Professional
Practice modules.

Course Content
Risk assessment and management of real estate developments, both commercial and
residential.
Site finding, site acquisition and land purchase contracts
Long term investment planning.
Financial appraisals, including the use of residual and DCF calculations.
Planning consents, site planning, design, internal layouts and landscape design.
The relationship between the Local Authority and the developer.
Sources of development funding and finance,
The contractual relationships and tendering procedures within the real estate development
process.
Market and selling process.
Strategic land management and environmental issues within the real estate development
context.
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Public sector housing, the role of Local Authorities, the Housing Corporation and Housing
Associations.
Initiatives in research and design, such as green/low energy buildings, mixed used
developments, conversion and adaptation of buildings and apartment design.
Management and operation of real estate development companies, including comparisons
and contrasts.
Learning Outcomes
1. Knowledge and Understanding
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
i. Demonstrate and understanding of the inputs and
outcomes of the real estate development process

and describe its key stages.
ii. Understand the risks associated with the real
estate development process and set out how

these can be managed.
iii. Appraise potential real estate developments in
terms of town planning and financial objectives.

iv. Evaluate the key funding considerations and
techniques related to real estate development.

v. Appreciate what the environmental implications
of real estate development can be.

vi. Select appropriate contractual and tendering
procedures within the commercial real estate
development process.

vii. Obtain and synthesise relevant information and
research sources related to the viability and

marketing of residential schemes.
2. Disciplinary/Professional Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
viii.evaluate information in the development context
and expand and deepen his/her knowledge and
understanding of this process, the participants,

parameters and techniques involved in property
developments
ix. identify problems and evaluate approaches to
providing solutions and/or the minimising of harm

or maximising of benefits
x. extrapolate and extract appropriate and relevant
information from current affairs to deepen and

stimulate an interest in topical aspects within the
real estate development process
xi. develop further the ability to structure questions,
collect and analyse data and present results in a

lucid and appropriate form
xii. identify the necessary criteria to improve
presentation skills in written and oral forms for
public scrutiny by peer group, professionals and

be able to enhance these skills for better working
practices

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Practiced Assessed

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Student Handbook

3. Transferable Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
xiii. Individual/Oral Presentations

xiv. Group research/Presentations

xv. Business Report Writing

xvi. Learning Skills/Independent Study

xvii. Communication Skills

xviii.Problem Solving

xix. Data Collection and Analysis


Practiced Assessed
















Teaching and Learning Experiences


Students undertaking this module will have the opportunity to:
Attend lectures designed to provide a general framework of information, highlight essential
skills and explain key concepts. External speakers will be used to give current market
information and to provide professional expertise and guidance.
Participate in task oriented sessions using real and simulated project situations and
appropriate property development software tools.
Locate, analyse and apply findings from academic and market research and utilise property
sector database information to solve project based problem scenarios.
Study and evaluate case example property development projects in terms of social,
environment and economic performance criteria.
The delivery of the course is designed to move logically through the development process
itself. It is co-ordinated around a set of lectures, seminars, workshops and supervised
projects, which will be supplemented by visiting lecturers. The course makes use of topical
issues and examples, including real and simulated projects where possible, and
progressively places more onus on your own ability to find and evaluate relevant academic
research and market data.
Notional Learning Time
Lectures
Seminars and Workshops
Directed Study

20 hours
20 hours
110 hours

Assessment
Exam (60%)
Coursework (40%)
Unseen Written Examination
Coursework Development Appraisal & Proposal

(60%)
(40%)

Learning Outcomes
i-xii
i-xix

The coursework will take the form of a project on the local real estate development market,
involving the submission of a word-limited report. The examination is an unseen written
examination of two hours in duration.
The main assessment criteria are:
Demonstration of an understanding of real estate development process key stages.
Application of relevant financial, town planning, construction and marketing theories,
research findings, principles and techniques.
Practical knowledge of the objectives and constraining factors affecting the successful real
estate developer, including risk management.
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To pass this module, students must obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework
(aggregate) and examination elements of the assessment. In order to pass the module,
students must achieve an overall mark of 40% or greater. Any failure to attempt any
element of assessment on the module without reasonable excuse will result in a failure of
the module without the right to resit.
Indicative Reading List
Adams, D. (1994) Urban Planning and the Development Process, UCL Press, London.
Bentley, I. et al (2001) Responsive Environments, Butterworth.
Bridger, A. (1998) Small-scale Residential Development, Routledge.
Cadman, D. & Topping, R. (1996) Property Development, London, E & FN Spon.
Duxbury, R. (2002) Telling & Duxburys Planning Law & Procedure, 12th Edition,
Butterworths, London.
Havard, T. (2002) Contemporary Property Development, RIBA, London.
Isaac, D. Property Development: Appraisal and Finance, Macmillan.
Keeping, M. & Shiers, D. (2003) Sustainable Property Development, Blackwell Science,
Oxford.
Mackmin, D. The Valuation and Sale of Residential Property, Routledge, London.
Millington, A. (2000) Property Development, Estates Gazette, London.
Newman, M. (1997) Marketing in Commercial Property, Estates Gazette, London.
Oxford City Council Local Plan 1991-2001.
Oxford City Council Second Draft Oxford Local Plan 2001-2016.
Oxfordshire County Council Oxfordshire Structure Plan 2011.
Oxfordshire County Council Review of the Oxfordshire Structure Plan Issues Paper.
Ratcliffe, J. & Stubbs, M. (2009) Urban Planning and Real Estate Development, E & FN
Spon Press, London.
Syms, P. (2002) Land, Development & Design, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford.
Telford, T. (2001) Better Places to Live a companion guide to PPG3, E & FN Spon
Press, London.
Woodson, R. (2000) Be A Successful Residential.
Validation History
Validated March 2010

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Student Handbook

U35072: Advanced Valuation


Module Leader: Dr Junjian Alberta Cao jcao@brookes.ac.uk 01865 483473
1. MANAGEMENT DETAILS
Module title:

Advanced Valuation

Module number:

U35072

Module leader:

Dr Junjian Albert Cao

Level:

No. of credits:

15

Mode of delivery:

Face to face

Pre-requisites:

U35022 Land Law and Landlord and Tenant Law


U35029 Statutory Valuation

Co-requisites:

None

Barred combinations:

None

Other
restrictions
requirements:

or None

Timetable information:

Semester 1 - running for 12 Weeks


Monday 13.00 15.00 (B) Lectures
Monday 15.00 16.00 (B), 17.00 18.00 (C) - Seminars

Programme/s in which this module may be taken

Status

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)

Compulsory

BA (Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU)

Compulsory

BA (Hons) Planning and Property Development (DV)

Compulsory

2. MODULE AIMS
This module examines valuation methods used for valuing both conventional commercial
properties and specialised properties for a wide range of purposes. The valuation of
conventional commercial, i.e. industrial, office, retail property, includes consideration for
special characteristics of these properties and advanced topics in rent reviews, lease renewal
and securitisation. The valuation of specialised properties cover a wide range of property
types, i.e. agricultural property, residential property, pubs, hotels, leisure properties, petrol
filling stations and motorway service areas. Relevant RICS valuation standards are scrutinised
to provide guidance on professionally acceptable practices. Students will be able develop their
ability to combine valuation principles into the peculiarities of these properties to solve practical
valuation problems.

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3. LEARNING OUTCOMES
Attribute Other
GAs
On successful completion of this module, students Graduate
developed
developed
will be able to:
i. Understand property-specific characteristics
Academic Literacy
important to value consideration
ii. Understand how rent reviews and lease
Academic Literacy
renewals affect commercial property value
iii Appreciate and comply with professional
Critical selfAcademic Literacy
awareness and
standards in valuation in general and of
personal literacy
specialised properties
iv Comprehend
valuation
principles
and
Academic Literacy
techniques for valuing specialised properties
v Value leases and provide advice on strategic
Academic Literacy
property management
Digital and
vi. Analyse market conditions, market evidence,
Information
leases and other relevant data independently
Academic Literacy

vii. Transform market and property data for


presentation in valuation reports and provide
opinions of value
viii. Investigate the reliability and validity of data
and critically evaluate market evidence in
arriving at opinions of value
ix. Be confident and flexible in identifying and
defining complex valuation issues and apply
appropriate knowledge and skills to their
solution
x. Interact effectively within a team to take or
support leadership, negotiate in a professional
context and manage conflict
xi. Manage own learning using available
resources
xii. Have confidence in using own criteria of
judgement and in challenging received opinion
and data
xiii. Select and manage information for straightforward research tasks with minimum
guidance
xiv. Ability to organise oneself and perform as an
autonomous, self-critical, independent learner
xv. Engage effectively in debate in a professional
manner and produce detailed and coherent
valuation reports
xvi. Identify and define complex valuation
problems and find solution to the problems

81

Academic Literacy

Academic Literacy

Literacy &
Research Literacy
Digital and
Information
Literacy
Digital and
Information
Literacy

Academic Literacy

Critical self-awareness
and personal literacy
Critical self-awareness
and personal literacy
Critical self-awareness
and personal literacy
Digital and Information
Literacy

Research Literacy
Digital and
Information
Literacy
Critical selfawareness and
personal literacy &
Research Literacy

Critical self-awareness
and personal literacy
Critical self-awareness
and personal literacy
Academic Literacy

Academic Literacy

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

4. OUTLINE SYLLABUS
Topics to be covered:

Special characteristics of commercial property


Implicit and explicit valuation approaches
Price, value and worth
Sustainability and valuation
Valuations undertaken for both landlords and tenants
Valuation of a range of different types of properties
Relevant RICS valuation standards and information papers
Relevant IVSC International Valuation Standards

5. TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY


Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:
Attend lectures, which address the application of core valuation concepts and
principles to value different types of properties
Study independently using the teaching material, which contains key concepts, intext questions and study guidance.
Attend tutor-led seminars, including group workshop sessions, to reinforce
understanding of different valuation methods and demonstrate their applications to
the valuation of different types of properties
Attend and participate in student-led seminars to reinforce understanding of the core
valuation methods and develop oral communication, report writing and self-appraisal
skills.
Complete assignments to enhance understanding of the core valuation methods and
relevant professional standards to value different properties in real world scenarios

6. LEARNING HOURS
(10 notional learning hours per credit)
Scheduled learning and teaching activities
Lectures
Seminars/workshops
Guided independent study
Directed/independent study
Preparation for assessments

20 hours
9 hours
85 hours
36 hours

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7. ASSESSMENT TASKS
7.1 Summative assignments

Word count/
length of
exam

Learning
outcomes
assessed

Weighting

n/a

i-v

10%

1200

i-xvi

40%

2 hours

i-ix, xii-xvi

50%

Coursework 1
Diagnostic Online Tests
Coursework 2
Professional Report to Client
Written Examination

To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also
obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination elements
of the assessment. Failure to attempt each element of assessment on the module
without mitigating circumstances will result in a failure of the module without the right to
resit.
7.2 Opportunities for formative assessment and feedback
Formative assessment and feedback on performance is provided through the two coursework
elements, tutor-led and student-led seminars and group workshop sessions.
8. INDICATIVE READING LIST

Baum, A & Crosby, N (2009) Property investment appraisal, 3rd edition, Blackwell,
Oxford
Baum, Mackmin and Nunnington (2011) The Income Approach to Property Valuation
6th Edition
Hayward, R (ed) (2008) Valuation: principles into practice, 6th edition, EG Books,
London
Mackmin et al (2009) Modern Methods of Valuation, EG Books, London
Journal of Property Investment & Finance
RICS Valuation Standards (8th Edition, 2012) and valuation information papers

Date module first approved:

March 2010

Date of most recent revision:

February 2012

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Student Handbook

U35073: Property Management


Module Leader:

TBC

@brookes.ac.uk

01865 48

1. MANAGEMENT DETAILS
Module title:

Property Management

Module number:

U35073

Module leader:

TBC

Level:

No. of credits:

15

Mode of delivery:

Face to face

Pre-requisites:

U33503 Introduction to Construction and Property Management


U35022 Land Law and Landlord and Tenant Law or U35034
Landlord and Tenant Law

Co-requisites:

None

Barred combinations:

U35070 Property and Corporate Management

Other restrictions or
requirements:

None

Timetable information:

Semester 1 - running for 12 Weeks


Monday 10.00 12.00 (A) Lecture

Programme/s in which this module may be taken

Status

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)

Compulsory

2. MODULE AIMS
This module develops the skills of a commercial surveyor when managing real estate from both a
practical and strategic viewpoint. It provides an examination of the role of the property manager,
an understanding of management objectives and the relevance and enforcement of institutional
lease terms and statutory regulation. It provides students with the opportunity to develop further
knowledge and professional skills specific to the management of commercial real estate when
acting for a property owner.

3. LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this module, students
will be able to:
i. Demonstrate a comprehensive and detailed
knowledge in respect of the subject area of
property management informed by up to date
research and practice with an accent on
practical research-led study and understand
the role of the property manager when
managing commercial properties
84

Graduate Attribute
developed

Academic literacy

Other GAs
developed

Research literacy

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

ii.

Understand the statutory duties of a


commercial property surveyor when managing
property
iii. Be aware of current topical issues relating to
property management
iv. Act as a property manager showing an
awareness of personal responsibility for the
RICS Rules of Conduct and various practice
statements and guidance notes relating to the
area of study
v. Prepare a report to a client in respect of
managing a commercial property
vi. Understand problem solving techniques when
faced with a new instruction to manage a
commercial property and advising on landlord
and tenant matters

Research literacy

Academic literacy

Academic literacy

Research literacy

Global citizenship

Critical selfawareness and


personal literacy

Digital and
information literacy

Academic literacy,
Research literacy

Academic literacy

Research literacy

4. OUTLINE SYLLABUS
Course Content:
The semester starts by examining the role of the property manager when managing
commercial real estate. Issues to be covered will include understanding the principles of
property management and the role of property managers in real estate.
The module will initially concentrate on occupied property, examining such issues as new
lettings and the selection of tenants, the contents of an institutional lease and key issues
relating to the management an occupied property.
The second half of the semester will start with the consideration of aspects relevant to the
management of vacant property, covering such issues as repairs and maintenance, void
costs and health and safety and other aspects of statutory compliance.
An examination of the role of the property manager acting in respect of rent reviews and
lease renewals will also be examined.
The last week of the semester will examine topical issues of real estate management in
changing environment such the changing relationship between the landlord and tenant in
the current economy and the drive to add or maintain asset value.

5. TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY


Teaching Learning
Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:
Attend lectures that address key themes, concepts and background information.
Study independently using the module courses key concepts and study guidance.
Prepare two professional reports based on case studies selected by the student.
Assessment Strategy
Assessment and the opportunity to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes is provided by
two written reports.

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6. LEARNING HOURS
Scheduled learning and teaching activities
Lectures
Guided independent study
Directed/independent study
Preparation for assessments

24 hours
63 hours
63 hours

7. ASSESSMENT TASKS
7.1 Summative assignments

Coursework 1:
Professional advice in respect of the
management of a shopping centre set out
in a report
Coursework 2:
Professional advice in respect of the
management of a vacant commercial
property set out in a report

Word count/
length of
exam

Learning
outcomes
assessed

Weighting

1,500 words

i- vi

50%

1,500 words

i-vi

50%

To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also
obtain a minimum of 30% in each component of coursework. Failure to attempt any
element of assessment on the module without mitigating circumstances will result in a
failure of the module without the right to resit.
7.2 Opportunities for formative assessment and feedback
Formative assessment and feedback on performance is provided through the lecturers advice
given in lectures and to individual students on a one to one basis. A detailed briefing session will
be provided before both pieces of coursework are set for the student to fully understand the
coursework and ask any questions. A formal feedback seminar will be provided after completion
of Coursework 1.

8. INDICATIVE READING LIST


.
Banfield, A. (2005) Stapletons Estate Management Practice, EG Books
Bannister, E (2007) Commercial Leases 2008; A Surveyors Guide, RICS Books
Butt, P (2010) Commercial Property 2010, CLP.
Deakin, M (2002) The Transition to Property Management, Estates Gazette.
Eddington, G. (1997) Property Management: A Customer Focused Approach, Macmillan.
Fife, G., Hilditch, B. & Marco, P. (2001) Renewing Business Tenancies, Jordans.
Forrester, P.( 2004) Case in Point -Service Charges, RICS Books.
Fox- Andrews, J. (2002) Business Tenancies, Estates Gazette
Greed, J. Heath, R. Steel, M & Wood, S. (2002) An Essential Guide to Property
Management Estates Gazette.
Lamont, C. Siefert, A. & Stacey, M. (2005) Case in Point- Lease Renewals, RICS Books
Male, J and Jeffries, T. (2005), Case in Point- Rent Review, RICS Books
Pawlowski, M. (2002) Leasing Commercial Premises, Estates Gazette
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Philpott, G. & Hicks, G. (1994) Managing Business Tenants, EG Books


Scarratt, D. (1995) Property Management, Taylor & Francis
RICS (2011) Code of Practice for Service Charges, RICS
RICS (2012) Commercial Property Management Guidance Note, RICS
RICS (2011), Surveying Safely. RICS

In addition you should also be keeping up to date with real estate and general business market
conditions, emerging management issues and the economic climate by reading the following on a
regular basis:

RICS Modus magazine


The Estates Gazette (or EGi)
Property Week

Date module first approved:

February 2013

Date of most recent revision:

N/A

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Student Handbook

U35074: Management of Corporate Real Estate


Module Leader: Dr Youngha Cho

ycho@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483941

1. MANAGEMENT DETAILS
Module title:

Management of Corporate Real Estate

Module number:

U35074

Module leader:

Youngha Cho

Level:

No. of credits:

15

Mode of delivery:

Face to face

Pre-requisites:

U35073 Property Management

Co-requisites:

None

Barred combinations:

U35070 Property and Corporate Management

Other restrictions or
requirements:

None

Timetable information:

Semester 2 - running for 12 Weeks


Monday 10.00 12.00 (A) Lecture

Programme/s in which this module may be taken

Status

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)

Compulsory

2. MODULE AIMS
This module aims to provide a framework for an analysis of the corporate real estate resource
and to explore effect and contribution to organisations business success. Students will study
various theoretical bases of corporate management and strategic planning process and how the
theories can be applied to real estate management. This module provides students with the
opportunity to develop further knowledge and professional skills specific to the management of
corporate real estate resources. Students will develop their understanding of the rationale behind
of real estate decision at tactical and strategic levels. The module will also provide an opportunity
for students to explore and develop appropriate strategies to ensure effective management of real
estate asset which best serves the needs of the corporate organisation.

3. LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this module, students
will be able to:
i. Demonstrate critical awareness of different
organisational structures and corporate
environments and the consequent implications
for real estate.
88

Graduate Attribute
developed

Academic Literacy

Other GAs
developed

Global
Citizenship

BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM)


Student Handbook

ii.

iii.

iv.

v.

vi.

Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding


of the role of real estate resources within
organisations and responsibilities of the real
estate manager in relation to corporate
business.
Demonstrate an awareness of the real estate
issues raised in organisations and develop
real estate strategies for corporate
organisation to ensure effective and efficient
management of real estate assets.

Academic Literacy

Global
Citizenship

Academic Literacy

Global
Citizenship

Demonstrate an awareness and use of current


research and practice in effective and efficient
management of corporate real estate,
including application of relevant analytical
techniques.

Research Literacy

Conduct effective primary and secondary


research in this subject area and demonstrate
the findings in professional form.

Research Literacy

Demonstrate ability to work within a team, to


interact effectively within the team, and to take
responsibility for own work.

Academic
Literacy, Digital
and Information
Literacy

Digital and
Information
Literacy

Critical SelfAwareness and


Personal Literacy

4. OUTLINE SYLLABUS
This module starts with the understanding of the concepts and techniques of management
required to develop and maintain effective real estate strategies in corporate environment. This
module will explore various corporate organisations and critically analyse the business position of
the organisations. The second half of the second semester will examine topical issues of real
estate management in changing environment such as outsourcing and partnering, strategic
response to the new economy and climate change. This module will also provide an
understanding real estate as part of corporate strategy and the role of real estate in the strategic
planning process.
Indicative weekly themes

Introduction to the module and framework of corporate real estate analysis tool in business
world


The changing environment and the changing role of real estate management

Framework of corporate real estate management: operational portfolio management

Real estate asset management practice in retail sector

Facilities management: real estate solutions in flexible working environment (office sector)

Corporate property acquisition

Outsourcing and partnering. value chain analysis


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The new economy and the role of real estate

Strategic real estate practice in charity organisations

Change management: strategic solution in real estate

Developing corporate property strategy: the process

Understanding of real estate in the corporate environment: final overview

5. TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY


Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:
Attend lectures that address key themes, concepts and background information.

Study independently using the module courses key concepts and study guidance.

Make individual and team presentations

Perform distance learning tasks

Academic concepts as well as practical case studies will be delivered mainly in the lectures.
Application of these concepts will be addressed and discussed in the second half of the teaching
session, supported by handouts and pre-set reading tasks. During the session there will be
informal session for formative assessment and feedback which will allow students to discuss and
assess their proposed real estate decisions.
Teaching and learning will also be supported by the team and individual coursework undertaken
in module assignments so fostering the academic literacy attribute.
 The team assignment will allow students to undertake critical analysis of how real estate is
managed within an organisation and evaluate the extent of which the process is integrated into
the organisations business strategy. Students are required to develop alternative property
strategy(ies) which the company could pursue. This will involve application of strategic
management process in the real life example and presenting their recommendations through
oral and written presentation.
 Individual assignment will require to research the potential contributions that real estate
decisions can make to the overall success of an organisation. This will involve research both
academic and professional literatures as well as real life examples. Students will have to
articulate their opinion and propositions in a written report thus enhancing the research literacy
attribute.
The summative and formative exercises will allow the students to explore a range of different real
estate decisions, analysis tools and problem solving approaches using real life examples.
All assessments will lead to timely feedback using a variety of mechanisms such as the
Universitys VLE, individual oral and class-based feedback in accordance with the Brookes
Assessment Compact.

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6. LEARNING HOURS
Scheduled learning and teaching activities
Lectures
Guided independent study
Directed/independent study
Preparation for assessments

24 hours
56 hours
70 hours

7. ASSESSMENT TASKS
7.1 Summative assignments

Coursework 1:
Team assignment (4 members in a team):
Critical analysis report - management of
real estate and organisational business
strategy.
Coursework 2:
Individual assignment:
Critical evaluation report impact of real
estate decisions on the success of an
organisation.

Word count/
length of
exam

Learning
outcomes
assessed

Weighting

3000 words

i-vi

30 %

2,000 words

i-v

70 %

To pass this module, students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater, and also
obtain a minimum of 30% in each component of coursework. Failure to attempt any
element of assessment on the module without mitigating circumstances will result in a
failure of the module without the right to resit.
7.2 Opportunities for formative assessment and feedback
Formative assessment and feedback on performance is provided through the interactive class
sessions and the two coursework elements, and informal tutorials (including by telephone and email).
Several case studies will be studied in the class and all students as a small team are required to
present their analysis and opinion over the pre-set tasks. The students level of engagement,
academic and/or affective behaviour will be observed by the tutor. Instant oral feedback will be
given to the students discussion and participation.

8. INDICATIVE READING LIST

Edwards, V. and Ellison, L. (2003) Corporate Property Management: Aligning Real Estate
with Business Strategy, Blackwell

Haynes, B.P and Nunnington N. (2009), Corporate Real Estate Asset Management:
Strategy and Implementation, EG books, Elsevier.

Johnson, G. and Scholes, K. (2006) Exploring Corporate Strategy, Text and Cases, 7th
Edition, Prentice Hall Europe.
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Scarrett D. (2011) Property Asset Management, 3rd ed. Routledge.

Thompson J. and Martin F. (2005), Strategic management: Awareness and Change, 5th
Edition, Thomson.

Weatherhead, M. (1997) Real Estate in Corporate Strategy. Macmillan Press.

Journals
Students should be keeping up to date with real estate and general business market conditions,
emerging management issues and the economic climate by reading the following on a regular
basis:
Corporate Real Estate Management

Facilities Management

Journal of Corporate Real Estate

Property Management

The Estates Gazette (or EGi)

Property Week

Date module first approved:

February 2013

Date of most recent revision:

N/A

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U35094: Real Estate Integrative Project (Professional Practice Test)


Module Leader:

TBC

@brookes.ac.uk

01865 48

Module Description
The professional practice test stimulates a variety of tasks and problems related to real estate
management. It is a residential based test, which will take place outside of Oxford and extend
over 4 days. Students will study the chosen city in situ and complete both group and individual
tasks. Students will also be examined on an individual basis by a viva voce (oral examination)
and written report. The tasks are set, supervised and assessed by a multi-disciplinary team.
The main aim of this module is to integrate the diverse subjects that comprise real estate
management. It requires students to demonstrate multi-disciplinary understanding, as well as
the professional skills needed to co-ordinate responses to varied and complex tasks, in a short
pressurised time period, akin to actual professional practice. The course is designed to
rehearse and build on skills and theories developed to date in level 5 and 6 modules and acts
as a detailed reference for completion of your level 6 modules and as a precursor to
professional practice.
Originating School:
Level:
Size:
Status:

Field:
Pre-requisites:

Co-requisites:
Placing:
Years running:
Restrictions:
Exclusions:
Timetable Slots:

The Built Environment


Honours - Level 6
Single
Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM) and BSc
(Hons) Real Estate Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI) and
Acceptable for BA (Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU)
EM, RI, RU
U35020 The Construction and Appraisal of Real Estate
U35022 Land Law and Landlord and Tenant Law
U35024 Town Planning Practice
U35029 Statutory Valuation
U35070 Property and Corporate Management
U35071 Commercial and Residential Development
Semester 2
Every Year
None
None
Wednesday 10.00 12.00 (G) plus one week away from Oxford for
projects and assessment

Course Content
As the primary aim of the module is to assess whether students are able to apply the range of
discipline knowledge, skills and competencies in a simulated practice environment, it draws
upon the content of the pre- and co-requisite modules and provides the opportunity for review
and reflection. To these it adds knowledge and skills about their application to professional
practice.
The ethics and regulation of professional practice, including the RICS By-laws and Rules of
Conduct, 2007
Estate agency legislation
Professional liability and negligence and professional indemnity insurance
Terms of engagement and charging for professional services

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Learning Outcomes
1. Knowledge and Understanding
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
i. Demonstrate understanding and ability to apply
appropriately knowledge gained from BSc (Hons)

Real Estate Management modules.
ii. engender skills of time management, professional
conduct/ethics and liability, presentation skills and

negotiation skills by working on practically based
projects and submitting work to deadlines.

2. Disciplinary/Professional Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
iii. Implement knowledge, understanding and
analytical skills in providing definition, approach

and (where appropriate) solutions to real estate
problems.
iv. apply legal knowledge of landlord and tenant law,

professional liability and estate agency legislation
to a property scenario.

v. develop skills of professional presentation, to be
assessed in viva voce format.
.3. Transferable Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
vi. Written Presentation Skills

vii. Oral Presentation Skills
viii.Information Gathering Skills
ix. Analytical Skills
x. Time Management Skills
xi. Group Working Skills

xii. Problem Solving Skills

Practiced Assessed

Practiced Assessed

Practiced Assessed
















Teaching and Learning Experiences


Students undertaking this module will have the opportunity to:
Attend lectures, which address the core contents of the module.
To revise and reflect upon the core knowledge, skills and competencies in real estate
management
Attend a location other than Oxford and research its property market and the factors
affecting it.
Study independently, and undertake, individually and as part of a team, a variety of tasks
and problems posed.
Apply legal knowledge of landlord and tenant law, professional liability and estate
agency legislation to a property scenario.
Undertake practical-based projects and associated problem solving while working to deadlines.
Interact with simulated clients and real professionals and other persons relevant to
providing recommendations to meet the clients brief.
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Make and be questioned on oral presentations in a simulated client environment.


Draft terms of engagement and fee structure for professional work.

Notional Learning Time


A series of lectures and class discussions on professional practice and professional
ethics
The assessed tasks will be undertaken over a period of five days involving a minimum
student input of 40 hours (i.e. four working days and briefings of projects plus one day of
report writing) during which period staff and local professional practitioners will be
available for appropriate consultation.
Assessment
Coursework (100%)

Learning Outcomes
i-xii

Each student will be assessed by means of:


A viva voce examination on professional conduct and estate agency law and practice
using scenario based questions (25%)
A viva voce examination on law of real estate management (delete) using scenario
based questions (25%)
A viva voce examination on a property problem scenario (25%)
A written report on a property problem scenario (25%)
The main assessment criteria are:
Demonstration of a knowledge of all topics included in the modules content.
Quality of research undertaken in the formulation of solutions to problems raised.
Analysis of factual scenarios and application of real estate business skills to formulate
solutions to problems raised.
Ability to communicate with clients verbally and in written form.
Quality of advice given to the client.
Whether the work has been undertaken in accordance with appropriate legislation, rules of
practice and professional ethics
Indicative Reading List
Baker, E & Lavers, A. (2005) Case in Point- Expert Witness. RICS Books.
Murdoch, J (2002) Professional Negligence, RICS. (This has been updated?)
Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (2009) Valuation Standards, RICS.
Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (2005) Manual of Estate Agency Law and
Practice, RICS.
Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (2007) Rules of Conduct & Help Sheets for
Chartered Surveyors, RICS.
Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (2002) Acting as an Expert Witness, RICS.
Williams, G. (2004) Professional Conduct for Chartered Surveyors. RICS Books.
A selection of reference material will be available during the PPT week, including
appropriate Planning Policy Guidance Notes, Unitary Development Plan/Local plans, and
RICS codes of practice.
Validation History
November 2003
Validated March 2010

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U35097: Real Estate Investment


Module Leader: Mr Mike Patrick

mpatrick@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483275

Module Description
This module is concerned with the role of commercial property as an investment in the context
of the wider economy and financial markets. It also covers fund management of commercial
investment property including valuation, financing, taxation, investment theory and portfolio
strategy, risk analysis, performance measurement and socially responsible investment.
Students study other asset classes such as equities and bonds in order to develop an
understanding of how investment in property is assessed against alternative opportunities.
Students examine investment and portfolio theories and their application to property portfolio
construction. The implications of socially responsible investment (SRI) for investment policy are
also studied. Techniques of investment risk assessment and performance measurement are
introduced, as applied to investment property. Approaches to gaining investment exposure to
property risk are studied including different capital structures, indirect investment vehicles and
derivatives. Specific attention is given to understanding the use of spreadsheets in applying
DCF based techniques in the solution of property portfolio management problems including
capital structuring and performance measurement.
Originating School:
Level:
Size:
Status:

Field:
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisite:
Placing:
Years running:
Restrictions:
Exclusions:
Timetable Slot:
Context:

The Built Environment


Honours - Level 6
Single
Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM) and
BA (Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU), BSc (Hons) Real Estate
Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI), BA (Hons) Planning and
Property Development (DV) and Acceptable for BSc (Hons) Cities
- Environment, Design and Development (DT).
EM, RU, RI, DV, DT
U35072 Advanced Valuation
None
Semester 2
Every Year
None
None
Tuesday 09.00 10.00 (D) - Lectures
Tuesday 10.00 12.00 (D), 13.00 14.00 (E) - Seminars
This module draws upon the knowledge and experience gained in
earlier modules on Economics, Finance and Valuation to apply it to
an understanding of property portfolio investment. It relates
property investment to investment in other asset classes and to its
role in the economy both national and international.

Course Content
Portfolio and investment theory
Indirect property investment
Performance measurement
The course is co-ordinated around a series of lectures and seminars designed to provide the
integrative skills needed to address module U35094 Real Estate Integrative Project
(Professional Practice Test).

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Learning Outcomes
1. Knowledge and Understanding
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
i. Explain the limitations of portfolio theory for

property portfolio construction
ii. Apply concepts of value and worth to constructing

a property investment portfolio
iii. Assess alternative methods of indirect investment

in property.
iv. Describe at least two different methods of

measuring investment performance
v. Evaluate the implications of SRI for property

portfolio management.
2. Disciplinary/Professional Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
vi. Analyse data using computer models for solving

portfolio management problems
vii. Evaluate the suitability of investment strategies for

different investors
viii.Explain the implications for property of events in

the wider economy.

3. Transferable Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
ix. Study independently

x. Apply spreadsheet based techniques to the

analysis of investment problems
xi. Write clearly on complex issues

xii. Critically read the financial and business press

xiii.Reflect on the role of property investment in
meeting wider economic, political and social goals.

xiv.Make decisions in situations of incomplete

information

Practiced Assessed

Practiced Assessed


Practiced Assessed















Teaching and Learning Experiences


Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:
Students undertaking this module will have the opportunity to attend lectures designed to
give an overall insight into the subject areas, signpost reading material and highlight
problem areas.
Attend workshops involving practical problem solving to reinforce theoretical concepts
Use computers to complete investment analyses.
Participate in discussions on current issues in the economy and real estate markets
Complete assignments to consolidate understanding of issues covered in lectures

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Notional Learning Time


Lectures
Seminars and Workshops
Directed Study

9 hours
9 hours
132 hours

Assessment
Exam (50%)
Coursework (50%)
Exam
Coursework - 2000 word Report

50%
50%

Learning Outcome
i - viii, xi, xiii-xiv
i - xi, xiii - xiv

The main assessment criteria are:

the ability to provide a client with advice based on sound reasoning and supported by
systematic interpretation of facts and use of appropriate methodology.
the ability to integrate material from other disciplines with valuation.
the ability to construct and use spreadsheets in property investment analysis.
the ability to structure a logical argument and present it in written and numerical form.

To pass this module students must obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework
(aggregate) and examination elements of the assessment. In order to pass the module,
students must achieve an overall mark of 40% or greater. Any failure to attempt any
element of assessment on the module without reasonable excuse will result in a failure of
the module without the right to resit.
Indicative Reading List
Barter, S.L. (ed) (1998) Real Estate Finance, Butterworth.
Baum, A (2nd ed.2009). Commercial Real Estate Investment, A Strategic Approach,
Kidlington: EG Books
Baum, A. & Crosby, N. (3rd ed. 2008) Property Investment Appraisal, Routledge.
Coggan, Philip (6th ed 2009) The Money Machine. How the City Works
Frazer, W.D. (2nd ed. 1993) Principles of Property Investment and Pricing, Macmillan.
Investment Property Forum (IPF) Derivatives Guide
Investment Property Forum (IPF) Stock Selection
Investment Property Forum (IPF) Alpha in UK property
Investment Property Forum (IPF) Risk & Diversification
Isaac, D. (1994) Property finance, Macmillan.
Journal of Property Investment & Finance.
Kay, John (2009) The long and the short of it.
Lumby, S. (1990) Investment Appraisal and Financial Decisions, 3rd Edition, Chapman
Hall.
Rutterford J (3rd 2007) An Introduction to Stock Exchange Investment
Stoakes, Christopher (2009) All you need to know about the City
Validation History
November 2003
Validated March 2010
Validated March 2011

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U35099: Dissertation
Module Leader: Dr Sally Sims

ssims@brookes.ac.uk

01865 483459

Module Description
This module provides students with the opportunity to produce a detailed and structured report
on an area of the property market in which they are especially interested. It provides students
with the experience of conducting and analysing primary research, of critically reviewing
secondary materials and presenting their findings in accordance with academic conventions.
The process enables them to be critical reviewers of the reports they will have to study as
qualified practitioners. The Dissertation module is to be undertaken in the final complete
academic year of your studies, with the dissertation to be submitted at a stated date at the start
of Semester 2. Successful completion of this module is required for the award of any honours
Real Estate degree.
Originating School:
Level:
Size:
Status:

Field:
Pre-requisite:
Co-requisite:
Placing:
Years running
Restrictions:
Exclusions:
Timetable Slots:

The Built Environment


Honours - Level 6
Double
Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM) and
BA (Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU), BSc (Hons) Real Estate
Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI).
EM, RU, RI
U35028 Real Estate Research Methods
None
Semester 1 and 2
Every Year
None
None
None

Course Content
This follows on from the Research Methods module
Enables students to develop their research and critical evaluation skills.
To plan and implement an appropriate research strategy to answer research questions
and test hypotheses.
To explore an area of the property market in detail.
To develop their communication, information presentation and written skills.
Develop an ability to critically evaluate existing literature and express this in a structured,
referenced and professional manner as part of a report.
To be able to identify a gap in knowledge and develop a research strategy designed to
fill that gap.
To be able to justify and defend their work, chosen methodology and research findings/
conclusions
To understand the limitations of research and the robustness of results.
Learning Outcomes
1. Knowledge and Understanding
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
i. Apply the methods and techniques they have
learned to review and consolidate existing

knowledge and extend that knowledge by
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carrying out primary research.


To design a research programme and schedule
of work for undertaking the research and writing
up of their dissertation.
iii. Develop time management skills to implement
this programme Set and meet self-imposed
deadlines within the programme.
ii.

2. Disciplinary/Professional Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
iv. Perform literature and database searches for
secondary material.

v. Critically review secondary materials (bringing
out clearly the limits of previous work, challenging

the assumptions built into the previous work).
vi. Determine specific research goals.

vii. Be aware of the range of research methods
available.

viii. To initiate enquiries and undertake research
using the appropriate methodology to achieve

chosen goals.
ix. Develop research tools that conform to the

chosen research methods (questionnaires,
structured interview scripts, etc.).
x. Show awareness of the limitations of the method

used and the resulting data.
xi. Analyse primary data and integrate it into the

argument of the dissertation.
xii. Derive valid generalisations and conclusions from
both secondary and primary evidence.

xiii. Present material in an effective and structured

manner.
xiv. Communicate clearly their ideas and conclusions.


3. Transferable Skills
Having completed this module successfully, students Taught
will be able to:
xv. ability to use software such as Word, Excel, and

other packages together so as to produce long
and complex documents easily and efficiently

xvi. ability to write a structured report in a clear and
concise manner

Practiced Assessed













Practiced Assessed




Teaching and Learning Experiences


Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:
Undertake real world research
Explore an area of the property market that is of interest to them, so that they can influence
their own learning programme
Will experience an important part of professional practice in the production of
documentation that is used as the basis of strategic company decision-making.
Development of learning and communication skills.
Be able to undertake investigations and write professional reports
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Notional Learning Time


Supervision Sessions
Independent Study

18 hours
282 hours

Assessment
Coursework (100%)
Dissertation

Learning Outcome
i - xvi

100%

The main assessment criteria are:


definition and explanation of objectives.
methods and methodology, both primary and secondary research.
critical review of secondary literature/background to subject matter of dissertation.
conduct of primary research and analysis of data.
validity of conclusions drawn in the dissertation.
Recommended Reading List
Walliman, N. (2001) Your Undergraduate Dissertation. Sage Publications
Bell, J. (1993) Doing Your Research Project: A Guide for First-time Researchers, 2nd
Edition, Open University Press.
Creswell J. W. (1994) Research Design Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches Sage
Publications.
Bryman A. (2001) Social Research Methods Oxford University Press.
Robson C. (1993) Real World Research: A Resource for Social Scientist and
Practitioner-Researchers Blackwell. Oxford
Clegg, F.(2006) Simple Statistics: A course book for the social scientist Cambridge
University Press
Pallant, J. (2007) SPSS Survival Manual McGraw 2007
Validation History
Validated March 2010

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APPENDICES:
Appendix A - Programme Specification
BSc (Hons) in Real Estate Management
Appendix B - Assessment Compact
Appendix C - Undergraduate Programme Assessment, Feedback and Marking
Guidelines
Appendix D - Course Assessment Schedule
Appendix E - Consideration of Mitigating Circumstances
Appendix F - Cheating
Appendix G - Citing Your Sources
Appendix H - Turnitin
Appendix I - Departmental Staff Contact List
Appendix J - Support Services Contact Details
Appendix K - Rooms
Appendix L - Headington Campus Maps
Appendix M - Health and Safety Regulations: Guide for Students
Appendix N - Alumni: Keeping in Touch

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Appendix A - Programme Specification


BSc (Hons) in Real Estate Management
SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION
Awarding body:
Teaching institution and location:
Final award:
Programme title:
Interim exit awards and award titles:
Brookes course code:
UCAS/UKPASS code:
JACS code:
Mode of delivery:
Mode/s of study:
Language of study:
Relevant QAA subject benchmark
statement/s:
External accreditation/recognition:
(applicable to programmes with
professional body approval)
Faculty managing the programme:
Date of production (or most recent
revision) of specification:

Oxford Brookes University


Oxford Brookes University
BSc (Hons)
Real Estate Management
Certificate of Higher Education CertHE
Diploma of Higher Education - DipHE
EM
N230 BSc/EM
N230
Face to Face on campus
Full-Time, Part-Time
English
Construction, Property and Surveying (2008)

The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors


(RICS) - http://www.rics.org/
Technology, Design and Environment
February 2014

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SECTION 2: OVERVIEW AND PROGRAMME AIMS


2.1 Rationale for/distinctiveness of the programme
The BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management is a three year full-time course that provides an
education in real estate management and the disciplines that contribute to it. It is accredited by
the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and is therefore structured and designed for
students that wish to go on and gain membership of this professional body. In particular the
course is structured for the RICS pathways for Commercial Property Practice, Valuation, and
Planning & Development.
The course allows students to combine academic and professional interests in ways that open
up potential career paths and extend their personal development. Although most graduates go
on to work in the property industry, the course also provides a solid foundation for those
intending to take up roles in general management in other industries
The curriculum for the course has the main themes: Management, Economics & Valuation, Law,
and Planning and Development. Each theme comprises a group of related modules whose
inter-relationships and complexity are developed as the course progresses. Additionally, the
themes are prevented from becoming in any way separate entities by the incorporation of
integrative project modules in each year of the course, whose purpose is to equip students with
the understanding and skills to integrate the processes of estate management within a
commercial and professional context.
Through the departmental professional liaison group, the programme has very strong links with
property industry which provide many benefits including internships, visiting speakers, site visits,
professional mentoring, and student sponsorship.
The course also provides the opportunity for some of the syllabus (one semester) to be studied
abroad as part of our international exchange programme. This includes course links with
European, American and Australian Higher Education Institutions.
2.2 Aim/s of the programme
The BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management degree aims to:

Provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to undertake a


career as a property professional, able to respond to a range of client needs in a
competent and responsible way;
Provide programmes of study which encourage and enable the development
of the intellectual and practical skills of the student in the processes underpinning the
finance and management of resources and the appropriate deployment of current
technology within the context of changing social, economic, legal, technological, political
and environmental frameworks;
Provide students with skills for life-long learning, study and enquiry, and to
appreciate the contribution of education and real estate management to help to meet the
needs of society;
Provide students with skills necessary for leadership roles in the global real
estate markets of the 21st Century
Provide graduates with the skills and knowledge to prepare for admission to
an appropriate Real Estate Management professional body and who have the ability to
continue to acquire knowledge and skills after graduation.

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The course is designed specifically to meet the learning outcomes of the QAA Subject
Benchmark Statements and the professional competencies required by the Royal Institution of
Chartered Surveyors.

SECTION 3: PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES


Knowledge, understanding and skills:
3.1

Academic literacy
have a sound understanding in some depth of the core subject areas of real estate management
(investment, planning and management processes and techniques, economics, law and finance,
construction and sustainability)

PLO1

demonstrate an ability to apply the above in the planning and management of real estate
solutions
have a knowledge of the professions and industries allied to real estate management, their
operation and the linkages between them
have an understanding of the power and interests of all those involved in the production and
consumption of real estate

PLO2
PLO3
PLO4
PLO5

apply management principles and practice to the solution of real estate management problems

PLO6

demonstrate a confident familiarity with the process of development and investment in its relation
to the real estate profession

PLO7

understand issues of health & safety within the role of the real estate manager and their place in
the social, operational and economic context of development, investment, occupation and
disposal of built assets

3.2

Research literacy
apply the processes of critical analysis and reflection to research projects in real estate
management

PLO8

3.3

Critical self-awareness and personal literacy

PLO9

apply a logical approach to problem solving

PLO10

be a capable and enthusiastic independent learner throughout her/his life

PLO11

communicate effectively in oral, written and graphic media

PLO12

be self-aware and competent in self-management

3.4

Digital and information literacy

PLO13

competently use communication and information technology

PLO14

apply software to the solution of problems in real estate management

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3.5

Global citizenship

PLO15

show an understanding of the practice of real estate management in the development and
maintenance of both the physical and the financial assets in their social economic and
environmental context

PLO16

have a understanding of professional ethics, their impact on the operation of the real estate
profession and their influence on society; conflict avoidance/dispute resolution; communities
and the stakeholders with whom they have contact

PLO17

have an awareness of real estate management in its national and international contexts

SECTION 4: PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND CURRICULUM


4.1 Programme structure and requirements:
The following tables provide the list of modules at each level, showing their credit value and
status (compulsory/acceptable/etc.).
LEVEL 4 Year 1
Module
Code
U35001
U35008
U35009
U35010
U35011
U35012
U35013
U35014

Module Title

Credits

Economics of Built Environment


Introduction to Spatial Planning
Introduction to Valuation
Foundation Real Estate Law 1
Foundation Real Estate Law 2
Integrative Project 1
Introduction to Property, Management and Professional
Practice
Introduction to Building Design and Construction

Status

15
15
15
15
15
15

Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory

Semester
of delivery
2
1
2
1
2
1

15

Compulsory

15

Compulsory

1&2

LEVEL 5 Year 2
Module
Code
U35020
U35024
U35025
U35026
U35028
U35029
U35030
U35034

Module Title

Credits

The Construction and Appraisal of Real Estate


Town Planning Practice
Integrative Project II
Real Estate Economics and Finance
Research Methods
Statutory Valuation
Land Law
Landlord and Tenant Law

Status

15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15

Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory

15

Alternative
Acceptable

Semester
of delivery
1&2
1
2
1
1
2
1
2

Language Modules (maximum of 2 modules normally


taken in years 2 and/or 3)
U6****

U615** French: A1, A2, B1(1), B1(2), 4A, 4B


U620** German: A1, A2
U635** Spanish: A1, A2, B1(1), B1(2), 4A, 4B
U627** Mandarin Chinese: 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B
U630** Japanese: 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B
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LEVEL 6 Year 3
Module
Code
U35071
U35072
U35073
U35074
U35094
U35097
U35099

Module Title

Credits

Commercial and Residential Development


Advanced Valuation
Property Management
Management of Corporate Real Estate
Integrative Project III - PPT
Real Estate Investment
Dissertation

15
15
15
15
15
15
30

Status
Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory
Compulsory

Semester
of delivery
1&2
1
1
2
2
2
1&2

Progression onto Level 5 and 6 modules normally require pre-requisite modules in Level 4 and
5 to be passed. For full details of pre-requisite links between modules see the subject diagrams
provided in the appendices of the programme handbook.
For the standard requirements for progression and awards on the course refer to the
Undergraduate Modular Programme Regulations at:
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/uniregulations/current/acadregulations/specific/undergraduatemodular-programme-regulations
4.2 Professional requirements
Professional accreditation from the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the
Chartered is achieved through the successful completion of the BSc (Hons) degree as set out in
the University Undergraduate Modular Programme Regulations.

SECTION 5: PROGRAMME DELIVERY


5.1

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Teaching and Learning


A wide range of teaching and learning methods are used to achieve programme objectives,
including lectures, seminars, workshops, computer classes, site visits, fieldwork, case studies,
simulations and group work. Smaller group sessions, such as seminars and workshops, foster
discussion, analysis and the development of interpersonal and problem-solving skills.
Independent learning is developed and nurtured through student-led seminars, individual and
group project work, and the dissertation. The dissertation is supported by a structured
programme aimed at leading students through the key stages in its development, focusing on
the importance of research and research methods, as well as individual supervision.
Every module of study is designed with specific learning outcomes that enable students to
develop in the five key graduate attributes of academic literacy, research literacy, critical selfawareness and personal literacy, digital and information literacy, and global citizenship.
Various learning resources have been developed to support independent learning. Module
guides, reading lists and assignment briefings underpin independent learning. They outline the
aims and objectives of the module, its structure, week-by-week content and the timetabled
assessment tasks that students must undertake. They enable students to make informed
choices and to exercise self-direction in pursuing aspects that are of interest to them within the
framework of the module as a whole.
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Academic staff in the department make significant use of electronic resources. This can take the
form of online module descriptions and handbooks, links to relevant web-sites, seminar
materials, lecture slides and electronic testing. The department is fully committed to the use of
online resources and is engaged in the utilisation of Brookes Virtual Learning Environment
software for resource-based learning. Students are also encouraged to attend Library and IT
training sessions, and draw upon appropriate software and networked facilities for presentations
by making use of Media Workshop resources and expertise. Full details of the Universities ELearning strategy can be found at: http://www.brookes.ac.uk/virtual/strategy/.
Office hours and tutorials allow individual and small group consultations with lecturers around
matters of course content, coursework and the practical demands of learning.
Assessment and Feedback
Assessment encompasses all judgements made about the work of a student and/or their skills,
abilities and progress, and the associated provision of feedback. The Brookes Assessment
Compact sets out the aims and responsibilities for assessment for both the University and
students.
The course provides an appropriate balance of assessment methods throughout its duration
and on a semester by semester basis. It is intended that the assessment method employed in
each individual module will examine the general educational aims and assess the learning
outcomes as detailed in the syllabus of that particular subject area, whilst complementing the
teaching and learning methods and the variety of the student learning and experience.
Assessment in form other than in unseen exam may be new to students and they may
experience novel situations of peer assessment and self-assessment. The intention is to
provide an appropriate balance between the following forms of assessment




diagnostic: that which provides information about the individual


formative: that which helps students in their learning
summative: that which gives a final and total measure of students attainment.

All module handbooks contain a description of the assessment types and methods, and provide
the specific assessment criteria used by staff in the awarding of grades. An assessment
schedule is also provided with dates for submission and feedback. Group work that is assessed
is closely monitored in line with University policy to ensure equity in the provision of marks
awarded to a group. Where appropriate, students enter into a contract with each other over the
conduct of group work, providing the module leader with a consensual basis for assessing those
not contributing to the group effort.
On modules with a coursework component the aim is to give individual written feedback within
two weeks from the coursework submission deadline. All dissertation and Independent Study
Modules are double marked. A percentage of other assessed work is double marked within the
Department to ensure that the standard and profile of marking is appropriate. A sample of
examination and coursework is passed to the External Examiner. The sample sent will normally
include all A-grades; all fails, borderline cases and some examples of middle-grade marks. The
Real Estate Management Subject Examination Committee meets on a semester basis to
discuss student progression and performance with the External Examiner present. These
meetings are followed by meetings of the full Modular Examinations Committee where awards
are made.
Feedback can be about individual assignments, group work, a draft assignment or even ideas
about a future project (independent study or dissertation).

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Feedback can help students to self-assess their work against assessment criteria as well as
understanding what they have done wrong in an assignment. It will help students to improve
their future assignments and to approach work in further modules.
Feedback comes in many different forms including: written comments, verbal comments about
individual or group work, or comments made during class discussions.
Typical contact for each module is 2-3 hours a week and can involve lectures, seminars,
practicals, workshops, tutorials, etc. In addition, each student is expected to carry out 100-120
hours of independent study and research on the subject.
The programme modules are either coursework only or coursework and exam, with a typical
split of 40% - 60% respectively.
5.2 Assessment regulations
The programme conforms to the University Undergraduate Modular Programme Regulations:
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/uniregulations/current

SECTION 6: ADMISSIONS
6.1 Entry criteria
Typical Offer:
A-level: grades ABB-BBB or equivalent
IB Diploma: 32-33 points
Advanced Diploma: grade B, including A-level at grade A
Other typical offers include:
2 A-levels plus 2 AS-levels (A/AS-levels must be different subjects and taken in Year 13)
BTEC national diploma DDM to DMM
All to include GCSE: Mathematics grade C or above
Interview
Applicants are required to attend an interview (usually between December and mid-March)
before an offer is made. Offers and the level of offers are dependent on performance at
interview.
6.2 CRB checks
Not applicable

SECTION 7: STUDENT SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE


Sources of help and advice for students are provided in the many ways including:

Induction Session
Handbooks
Student Support Coordinators, Subject Coordinators, Academic Advisors, Programme
Leads, Placement Tutors.
Academic Management Office
Student Support Services
Careers Centre
Students Union

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Induction
New students will follow an induction programme to orientate them and help them settle in
quickly within their new learning environment (HE and Brookes). They will have introductory
meetings with their subject coordinators and meet their academic advisor.
Programme Information
All students will be provided, by the subject coordinator, with the following contextual
information to enable them to familiarise themselves with the programme/s:
Programme specification
Programme handbook
Module descriptions/handbooks
Regulations and policies governing the programme
Much of this information can be accessed via the Personal Information Portal (PIP) or on the
University web pages. They will also be provided with assignment deadlines and examination
dates at the start of each semester.
Support for students
It is recognised that students need support and advice throughout their studies so that they can
make the best of their time at Oxford Brookes.
Thus there is a range of support mechanisms for students, such as academic advisers and
subject coordinators, who will facilitate the students academic development, and student
support coordinators, who provide a drop-in service for questions about any aspect of student
life, covering both academic and personal welfare.
Central Support Services for students
The universitys support services include Upgrade, which provides advice on study skills such
as planning and writing essays, assignments and dissertations, research, or preparing for an
exam. They also give advice on statistics and mathematics.
There is a dedicated Student Disability and Dyslexia Service, which provides support for
students with disabilities including sensory and mobility impairments, dyslexia and other specific
learning difficulties, mental health problems and medical conditions. Here, staff offer advice and
support on a range of issues, including physical access, funding, alternative assessment
arrangements and liaison with teaching staff to ensure that they are aware of your requirements.
Careers
The Department has good links with the profession and runs an annual careers fair where
students can meet with leading property companies and seek graduate and summer internship
opportunities. Students are provided with advice and guidance on applications, CV writing, and
interview preparation.
Oxford Brookes students and graduates can expect the Careers Centre to provide support
during and for three years after graduation in the form of:
individual confidential drop-in slots
help with locating relevant and up-to-date information on occupations, further study
opportunities, vacation work, voluntary work, employers and graduate vacancies
help with applications, interviews and aptitude testing, and with the development of
transferable skills, often through workshops
a user-friendly website which delivers information and relevant links effectively.
a range of careers education workshops which may be delivered directly by the Careers
and Employment Centre or via academic Departments.

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SECTION 8: GRADUATE EMPLOYABILITY


The Real Estate Management programme offers good graduate employability. First destination
surveys annually show a high percentage of students in full-time employment within 6 months of
graduating. The majority of students are employed as graduate property and real estate
managers in the areas of commercial property practice, planning and development and
valuation, as befitting the course.

SECTION 9: LINKS WITH EMPLOYERS


The main link with employers is through the departmental Real Estate Professional Liaison
Group as well as the established links with graduate employers. There is also support from the
Oxford Brookes Real Estate Management Alumni Society (OBREMS). These links provide the
following benefits to students and the course:

Visiting speakers from industry and professional bodies


Internship opportunities for work-based learning
Site visits to development projects
Course development advice and feedback
Student mentoring
Research collaboration
Sponsorship of student prizes and scholarships

SECTION 10: QUALITY MANAGEMENT


Indicators of quality/methods for evaluating the quality of provision
The internal indicators of quality for the programme come from many sources. The primary
ones are those based on regular student feedback via focus groups and surveys on specific
issues, annual module evaluation surveys, student representation at Subject Committee and
Annual Programme Review meetings. The Programme Team also seeks advice and guidance
from the Department's Professional Liaison Group for real estate. The External Examiners for
the programme are present at Exam Committee meetings and see samples of students
coursework and feedback. Their annual report on the standards of the assessment and learning
materials is considered at the Annual Review Meeting. Every five years, the programme
undergoes a rigorous Periodic Review, where it is tested against the quality framework set by
the University, again with feedback from students and external sources.
The external indicators of quality for the programme come primarily from the Quality Assurance
Agency (QAA) and the accrediting professional body. The course is designed specifically to
meet the learning outcomes of the QAA Subject Benchmark Statements (Construction, Property
and Surveying (2008)), and the professional competencies required by the Royal Institution of
Chartered Surveyors.
The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) accreditation is achieved through the
approved mapping of programme modules against the professional competences set out in the
RICS Assessment of Professional Competences (2006). This accreditation is reviewed and
renewed each year at the RICS/Brookes Partnership meeting.

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Programme Specification - BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management


Matrix of RICS Competences mapped against Programme Modules

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Appendix B Brookes Assessment Compact


Assessment encompasses all judgements made about the work of a student and/or their skills,
abilities and progress, and the associated provision of feedback
1. There are five fundamental tenets behind this compact, namely that:
1.1

Effective assessment is central to learning

1.2

To be effective the relational nature of the assessment and feedback process


needs to be emphasised, particularly in terms of the need for active dialogue
between students and staff

1.3

To be effective, assessment must be recognised as a joint responsibility between


staff and students

1.4

The ability to assess, the work of both self and others, is an essential skill for all
graduates

1.5

For the above tenets to be met in full, students and staff need to be assessment
literate and actively participate in disciplinary communities of assessment
practice.

2. The University will therefore ensure that:


2.1

Assessment is central to the curriculum, and there should be no distinct


boundary between assessment, teaching and learning. All academic staff will
therefore be encouraged to regard assessment as a fundamental and integral
part of programme design, and one that is intended to shape and develop
learning, as much as to judge and measure it.

2.2

Assessment is designed at programme level, to integrate module assessment


and ensure that assessment shapes learning in a coherent and holistic fashion,
consistent with the aims and learning outcomes of the programme so that
identified knowledge, skills and qualities ('graduate attributes') can be developed
and recognised, and validly assessed, whilst recognising progressive levels of
attainment and different modes of study.

2.3

The relationship between learning outcomes and assessment tasks is made


explicit. In addition, clear assessment criteria should be provided whenever
possible, and always when the assessment contributes to marks, grades, or
decisions about progression. Assessment judgements must focus on the
achievement of the learning outcomes against the assessment criteria, and this
achievement authenticated as the students own.

2.4

Every effort is taken to ensure that there is no bias in the type of assessment
task, or method chosen, or the criteria applied, that would unfairly disadvantage
any student.

2.5

Students are given supportive, constructive and timely feedback as an essential


part of their learning. Such feedback will enable students to build on their positive
achievements and have a clear sense of what they need to do to improve, with
subsequent opportunities provided to act on the feedback and to put the advice
given into practice.
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2.6

Programmes include activities (e.g. marking exercises, self and peerassessment, etc.) specifically designed to involve students in assessment, to
encourage dialogue between students and their tutors, and students and their
peers, and to develop their abilities to make their own informed judgements
(assessment literacy).

2.7

Programmes produce assessment schedules of summative assessment, and


make every effort to avoid the concentration of assessment deadlines.

2.8

Academic staff are provided with staff development in assessment literacy, and
awareness of new ideas and techniques

2.9

Disciplinary communities of assessment practice are developed through, for


example, regular peer discussion and student involvement.

2.10

Institutional values and policies consistently support this compact, and adequate
resources are provided.

3. Students will be expected to take responsibility for their own learning through:
3.1

Actively engaging with assessment tasks, including carefully reading the


guidance provided, spending sufficient time on the task, ensuring their work is
authentic and their own (whether individual or groupwork), and by handing work
in on time.

3.2

Actively engaging in activities designed to develop assessment literacy, including


taking the initiative when appropriate (e.g. asking for clarification or advice).

3.3

Actively engaging with, and acting on, feedback provided.

3.4

Actively engaging in the development of assessment policy at course and


programme level through the established processes and student representative
system.

13/5/09

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Appendix C Undergraduate Programme Assessment, Feedback and Marking


Guidelines
Assessment and feedback are crucial elements in the learning cycle. We learn by appraising and
evaluating our own performance and achievements; we also learn from the informed critical
evaluations, experience and assessment of others. This helps to direct our knowledge and
understanding and enhance our capabilities.
For these reasons the Department of Real Estate and Construction places great importance on
assessment of, and feedback on student work - essays, projects, oral presentations. Assessment
is both summative and formative. Summative assessment provides you with an overall mark for
your work. We all look for this mark first of all - inevitably. This is the summary of our
performance. But it is only a summary, a proxy for an evaluation of many variables in your work.
This is formative assessment: an indication of the strengths and weaknesses of your work, its
organisation, depth of understanding, critical and independent judgement. To reach both a
summative and a formative assessment of your work we use two sets of criteria.
1.

Learning Outcomes. Each module/unit has a series of learning outcomes. These are
described in the module/unit outline in your course handbook and should also be in your
module/unit handbook as well. The assessment requirements usually indicate which
learning outcomes are being assessed for each piece of coursework. The mark and
feedback indicate how well you have understood the learning outcomes.

2.

Marking Guidelines. In contrast the marking guidelines provide benchmarks for your
achievement against a set of generic academic indicators - quality of analysis, referencing,
critical awareness and so on. These benchmarks contrast with the outcomes assessment
in that they apply to broad academic capabilities not your understanding of the specific
content of a piece of coursework for a module/unit.

The following guidelines and the feedback on your work will assist you in understanding what your
marks mean so you can enhance your performance. You should realise that these guidelines
cannot cover all types of assignments; nor can all the points be apposite to all your
assignments.
Grades A/A+, mark 70% or more
(Equivalent to First Class honours at the end of the course). In addition to the B+ criteria listed below:

Examples of creativity/ originality/ imagination/ insight.


Offers analytical comment, critical evaluation and independent discussion
Comprehensive coverage of content/ theory within the constraints of word limits
Rigorous handling of evidence
Own ideas developed and justified from theoretical frameworks
Realistic evaluation of work, with appropriate rationale
Critical apparatus (i.e. bibliography, references, notes) full and accurate
Communicative skills of a very high order

Grades B/B+, mark 60-69%


(Equivalent to Upper Second at the end of the course)

Information reasonably full and accurate


Well presented
Logical, coherent and lucid
Appropriate selection of content/ theory/ style in key areas
Clear identification of the issues
Evidence of wide and relevant reading
Appropriate application of theory
Evidence of evaluation/ justification/ critical thought

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Referencing relevant and accurate


Clear evidence of understanding
Grammar, spelling and punctuation accurate
Good focus on module's aims and themes
Conclusions well-argued and substantiated

Grade C/C+, mark 50-59%


(Equivalent to Lower Second at the end of the course)

Generally competent thinking and presentation


Thought given to selection of content
Identification of main issues of the subject
Evidence of reading around the subject
Some application of theory
Evidence of evaluation/ justification/ critical thought
Mostly accurate referencing
Reasonable level of understanding of the topic area
Some focus on module's aims and themes
Grammar, spelling and punctuation largely accurate
Conclusions largely well argued and substantiated

Grade D/D+, mark 40-49%


(Equivalent to Third class honours at the end of the course)

Shows an attempt to be logical, coherent and organised


Appropriate selection of content/ theory but some key aspects may be missed
Evidence of reading
Superficial evaluation
Referencing present
General understanding of concepts
Critical thought and rationale for work adequately demonstrated
Written work is mainly focused on modules aim and themes
Meaning apparent, but language not always fluent
Some inadequacies in grammar, spelling and punctuation
Conclusions present

Grade Refer (RC, RE, RB), mark 30-39% and Fail (F) 29% or less

Question asked is not addressed


Thinking confused/ illogical
Content/ theory inaccurate or inappropriate or disorganised
Meaning unclear
Significantly under/ over/ required length as specified in module handbook
Absence of references
Critical thought/ analysis/ theory lacking
Value judgements/ generalisations unsupported
Appropriate reading not very evident
Written work does not address modules aims and themes
Not sufficiently literate
Conclusions insubstantial/ invalid
R grade indicates that these weaknesses can be corrected by further independent work and revision
and a re-sit will be awarded
F grade indicates that the weaknesses are so serious that they may not be remedied by further
independent work and no re-sit will be awarded; the module must be retaken if a pass grade is to be
achieved

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Appendix D Course Assessment Schedule


Assessment Submission/Feedback Week by Module Number
TO BE CONFIRMED - please refer to the respective Module Handbook or Moodle for latest revision
Module No

Yr1

U35001
U35008
U35009
U35010
U35011
U35012
U35013
U35014
U35020

Yr2

U35024
U35025
U35026
U35028
U35029
U35030
U35034
U35071

Yr3

U35072
U35073
U35074
U35094
U35097
U35099

Semester

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Week 5

Week 6

2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
2

SB Assessment Submission
FB Assessment Feedback

117

Week 7

Week 8

Week 9

Week 10

Week 11

Week 12

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Appendix E Consideration of Mitigating Circumstances


There may be occasions during your studies, where you feel circumstances outside of your
control have affected or have the potential to affect your studies . The University has policies
and processes in place to support you and further detail is given below:
Introduction to the Regulations for the Consideration of Mitigating Circumstances
What are mitigating circumstances?
Mitigating circumstances are circumstances which were beyond your control and which could
not be reasonably accommodated by you and which seriously impaired your performance in
assessment. All three parts of this definition must be met for the University to agree you were
affected by mitigating circumstances. For example, these circumstances could be medical or
personal. In all cases you will be required to provide satisfactory documentary evidence to
support your claim if you fail to supply satisfactory documentary evidence your request will
be turned down. The only exception is for very short extensions to an assessment deadline
(up to one week), where you may be allowed to self-certify yourself.
When should I submit my evidence of mitigating circumstances?
In all cases, you should submit your claim and your evidence as soon as possible and in any
case always before an assessment deadline or exam. If you miss a deadline you will not only
need to demonstrate that you were affected by mitigating circumstances but you will need to
provide evidence that you were unable to submit your claim by the deadline. So dont delay if
you wish to claim mitigating circumstances!
How should I submit my claim for mitigating circumstances?
There is a specific form you should use - you will find the link for guidance and the form on
your PIP Page.
What if I miss a deadline without mitigating circumstances?
If you miss an assessment deadline or an exam without approval for valid mitigating
circumstances you will receive zero for that assessment. You must not miss deadlines!
How is my claim for mitigating circumstances considered?
If you are requesting an extension up to one week, it is considered by the Module Leader(s).
Otherwise, within your Faculty, a cross-department panel meets frequently to review
individual applications. Decisions are returned to students usually within 48 hours of each
panel meeting. We recognise that at times of stress you may need help and advice. It is
always useful to speak to your Module Leader or Subject Coordinator who can give you
guidance on what form of compensation / re-assessment arrangements may be practically
possible to organise, subject to the panel agreeing that you have legitimate and proven
mitigating circumstances. In addition, your Student Support Coordinator will also help you to
manage the application process.
If mitigating circumstances are approved, what will happen?
If your claim for mitigating circumstances is approved then you can be granted an extension
to your submission deadline of up to five weeks or be allowed to re-sit your examination (or,
in certain situations only, re-take an entire module). The University does not increase marks
on the basis of mitigating circumstances. This is because the University wants you to
demonstrate your full potential in assessments if it is agreed you were affected by
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mitigating circumstances then we will give you an extension or a re-sit so you can
demonstrate your potential unaffected by such circumstances.
Where can I find out more?
Formal Regulations:
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/regulations/current/core/a3/a3-5/
A Student Guide can be found at: http://www.brookes.ac.uk/students/your-studies/mitigatingcircumstances/
FOR FURTHER DETAILS ABOUT HOW TO SUBMIT A CLAIM FOR MITIGATING
CIRCUMSTANCES PLEASE CONTACT THE FACULTY STUDENT SUPPORT
COORDINATORS

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Appendix F Cheating
The University has strict rules to ensure that students' work for assessment is actually the result
of their individual effort, skills and knowledge and has not been produced by means that will
give an unfair advantage over other students. Full details of the regulations together with a
definition of Cheating are in the following link
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/uniregulations/current/core/assessment/cheating
Students suspected of breaking the University regulations regarding plagiarism and collusion
will be referred to a Faculty Academic Conduct Officer who will investigate the case thoroughly
before deciding on the most appropriate way to resolve the situation within the University
regulations.
The University defines a number of different forms of cheating, although any form of cheating is
strictly forbidden not only those listed below. These are:

Submitting other people's work as your own either with or without their knowledge.
This includes copying in examinations; using notes or unauthorised materials in
examinations; submitting work you have paid for as your own; impersonation taking an
assessment on behalf of or pretending to be another student, or allowing another person
to take an assessment on your behalf or pretend to be you.

Plagiarism taking or using another person's thoughts, writings or inventions as your


own. To avoid plagiarism you must make sure that quotations from whatever source are
clearly identified and attributed at the point where they occur in the text of your work by
using one of the standard conventions for referencing. The Library has a leaflet about
how to reference your work correctly and your tutor can also help you. It is not enough
just to list sources in a bibliography at the end of your essay or dissertation if you do not
acknowledge the actual quotations in the text. Neither is it acceptable to change some of
the words or the order of sentences if, by failing to acknowledge the source properly, you
give the impression that it is your own work.

Collusion except where written instructions specify that work for assessment may be
produced jointly and submitted as the work of more than one student, you must not
collude with others to produce a piece of work jointly, copy or share another student's
work or lend your work to another student in the reasonable knowledge that some or all of
it will be copied.

Duplication submitting work for assessment that is the same as, or broadly similar to,
work submitted earlier for academic credit, without acknowledgement of the previous
submission.

Falsification the invention of data, its alteration, its copying from any other source, or
otherwise obtaining it by unfair means, or inventing quotations and/or references.

Custom Writing Services this includes the use of any service which produces custom
materials for a fee or other benefit. The University may consider any request placed with
any form of custom writing service to be a form of cheating, whatever use is then made of
the material produced, and therefore to be an offence under the Student Conduct
Regulations. This extends to include any request for any piece of work (either formative
or summative assessment or work which is not linked to any form of assessment or creditbearing element of your programme) including, but not limited to, essays and
dissertations (including outlines and guides), reports, exam notes, proposals, posters,
presentations, the editing or improvement of existing work, statistical services and
computing services including programme and code development.

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Appendix G Citing Your Sources


The reference of sources is an essential aspect of academic writing. You should reference your
sources for information for the following reasons:


Arguments must be supported by evidence from reliable and credible sources. Without
evidence from either primary or secondary sources (backed up by reference) your assertions
will carry little or no weight;
Credit must be given for other people's work; if there is no reference you are in effect claiming
the work is your own. If it isn't, you will be guilty of plagiarism (intellectual theft) for which there
are severe penalties.

Remember that assessors are looking for evidence of a wide and thorough literature search.
Your references and bibliography will be evidence of this, and therefore it is in your interest to
provide full and complete references. You will gain no credit for making things up, or using
anecdotal or impressionistic evidence.
There are a number of referencing conventions, which vary across subject disciplines and from
publication to publication. You will, for example, notice considerable differences in the way
quotations and references are presented in different books and journals.
Harvard Referencing System
The Department recommends the Harvard Referencing System.
Referencing in the text
Cited documents are referred to by inserting the author's surname and the year of publication in the
text at the point of reference. Initials are not used except where two authors with the same
surname are cited. For example:
"It has been shown that (Brown 2001)"
"Brown (2001) has shown that"
Where a specific reference is made to a particular piece of work, or when using a direct quotation,
the page number or numbers should be included. For example:
(Brown 2001: 27)
(Brown 2001: 27-32)
When there are more than two authors, the first entry should list all the authors, but subsequent
references may be abbreviated. For example:
(Smith et al. 1992)
When referencing more than one work by the same author in the same year, you should
distinguish between them as follows:
(Brown 2001a)
(Brown 2001b)
This system must be consistent with entries in the bibliography.
Bibliography
With the Harvard system it is not necessary to provide a list of references and a bibliography; only
a bibliography should be included. This bibliography should list all the relevant sources used, both
generally and specifically referenced in the text. Entries should be included in alphabetical order by
surname. If there is more than one entry for the author they are listed in chronological order. Where
authors have the same surname, they are listed in alphabetical order of their first name.

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Book entries
An entry for a book should include the following:
Author, Initials (Year) Title of book, Place of publication: Publisher.
For Example:

Waltz, K. (1979) Theory of International Politics, Reading, MA.: Addison-Wesley.


For a particular chapter in an edited book the entry should be as follows:
Smith, H. (1994) Marxism and International Relations, in A. J. R. Groom and M. Light (eds),
Contemporary International Relations: A Guide to Theory, London: Pinter.
Where several different chapters from the same edited book are referenced, it is only necessary to
write out the full details of the book once for its main entry. Other references to the book then use
the abbreviation op. cit. (opere citato meaning 'in the work cited') as shown below:
Hoffman, M. (1994), Normative International Theory: approaches and issues, in A. J. R. Groom
and M. Light, op. cit..
Periodicals
For a paper or article from a periodical (journal, trade press, magazine) the entry should be as
follows:
Author, Initials (Year) Title of paper/article, Title of periodical, Volume number: Page numbers.
For example:
Strange, S. (1994) Wake up Krasner! The World Has Changed, Review of International
Political Economy, 1: 209-219.
Conference Proceedings
The proceedings of a conference should be referred to as for a book:
Hataley, T. and K. Nossal (2003) Putting People at Risk: The Crisis in East Timor and Canadas
Human Security Agenda, paper presented to the annual meeting of the Canadian Political
Science Association, Halifax, NS, 31 May.
Newspaper Articles
A newspaper article where the author is identified should be entered as follows, but where no
author is identified, the article should be attributed to the newspaper:
Elliott, L. (2004) Brain drain must stop if poor countries are to be helped, The Guardian, 6
December.
The Guardian (2004) Brain drain must stop if poor countries are to be helped, 6 December.
Other Items
Items of personal communication or interviews:
Spence, J. (1996) Personal Communication, 15 May.

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You should remember, however, that unpublished material is less likely to be available for others to
research, and tends to be viewed as less authoritative than published work.
Web References
Smith, A. (2003) Open statement on steps to democratize the World Bank and IMF, retrieved
on 10 June 2004 from http://www.brettonwooodsproject.org
Please list an author for websites wherever possible. If this is not available then think carefully
about whether the source is valid and authoritative.
Quotations
When actually quoting material and the quotation is two lines or shorter it can be placed within the
text as follows:
Writing on the cusp on the new millennium, Bayart correctly noted that, More than ever, the
discourse on Africas marginality is a nonsense (2000: 267).
Quotations that are more than two lines long should be indented and spaced as following:
According to one analysis, these networks can be understood as part of a broader phenomenon of
transboundary formations that
link global, regional, national, and local forces through structures, networks, and
discourses that have wide-ranging impact, both benign and malign, on Africa, as well as
on the international community itself. Above all, they play a major role in creating,
transforming, and destroying forms of order and authority. (Latham et al. 2001: 5)

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Appendix H Turnitin
During your programme you will be asked to use the TURNITIN System.
Turnitin is a web-based tool that supports students in the development of good academic
practice when preparing written work for assessment. This text-matching tool allows academic
staff to check students' work for improper use of sources or potential plagiarism by comparing it
against continuously up-dated databases (including web-pages and student work). Turnitin
produces an 'Originality Report' for each submitted piece of work which indicates all the
matches in the student assignment to the web-based sources on its database, and thus can
provide academic staff with the opportunity to help students develop proper citation methods as
well as to safeguard students' academic integrity.
At Oxford Brookes University, all students on the undergraduate modular programme will
normally use Turnitin on a minimum of three compulsory occasions: once during a compulsory
module in Stage I, once again in a compulsory module in Stage II and finally during the
dissertation or project module.
In addition, Turnitin may be used optionally on other modules for one or all pieces of
assessment in that module as decided by the Module Leader. Turnitin may be used as part of
an investigation into an alleged case of plagiarism but its primary use is to support students'
academic development and enhance good academic practice.
In addition to the use of Turnitin in some module formative assessments, we encourage you to
access resources to support and develop your academic writing skills to help you to avoid
plagiarism. You might find it beneficial to sign up for an online tutorial on PLATO, a Brookes
Virtual self-registration course that helps you learn how to develop these skills. Instructions on
how to access this online tutorial can be found at:
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/library/skill/plagiarism.html

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Appendix I Departmental Staff Contact List


Department of Real Estate and Construction Academic (FT and PT) and Admin Staff
ABANDA, Henry (Dr)

AB1.13

3475

Lecturer in Real Estate and


Construction

fabanda@brookes.ac.uk

AUSTIN, Mark (Dr)

AB1.08

3369

Principal Lecturer in CM, Subject


Co-ordinator for CPM and PG
Programme Lead

maustin@brookes.ac.uk

BLUMBERG, George (Dr)


BROWNING, Charlotte
(Miss)
CAO, Albert (Dr)

AB1.09

AB1.08

3473

Senior Lecturer in CM/REM


Programme Administrator (PG
PMBE)
Senior Lecturer in Valuation

gblumberg@brookes.ac.uk

AB2.21

3454
3342

CHEUNG, Franco (Dr)

AB1.12

3356

Senior Lecturer in CM

kcheung@brookes.ac.uk

CHO, Youngha (Dr)

AB1.12

3941

Senior Lecturer in REM

ycho@brookes.ac.uk

COLLINS, Ruth (Ms)

AB2.02

4310

Programme Portfolio Manager

ruthcollins@brookes.ac.uk

DALTON, Gina (Ms)

AB1.07

4142

gdalton@brookes.ac.uk

DENT, Peter (Mr)

AB1.10

3481

Principal Lecturer for Quality and


Validations
Principal Lecturer in REM (PT)

DIXON, Rachel (Mrs)

AB1.10

3396

rdixon@brookes.ac.uk

DUDLEY, Suzie (Miss)

AB1.20

3315

FRENCH, Nick (Prof)

AB1.05

3486

GEE, Rebecca (Mrs)

AB1.04

4090

GROVER, Richard (Mr)

AB1.10

3488

HILL, Michael (Mr)

AB1.07

3351

JACOBS, Michelle (Ms)

AB3.16

3357

Programme Administrator (Special


Projects)
Executive Office Administrator for
Departments of Planning and
Real Estate & Construction
Prof in REM & SC for REM PG
Studies (REM/IRE)
Senior Lecturer in REM and
Subject Coordinator for UG REM
Principal Lecturer in Economics
and Investment Appraisal (PT)
Programme Lead UG & SC for UG
QM/QS
Student Support Co-Ordinator

KEIVANI, Ramin (Dr)

B2.18

3409

Reader & Research Manager

rkeivani@brookes.ac.uk

KURUL, Esra (Dr)

AB1.12

4322

ekurul@brookes.ac.uk

KENTH, Suki (Ms)

AB2.21

3904

Senior Lecturer in CM, Subject


Coordinator for PMBE
Programme Administrator (PG RE)

NASE, Ilir (Dr)

AB1.13

cbrowning@brookes.ac.uk
jcao@brookes.ac.uk

prdent@brookes.ac.uk

s.dudley@brookes.ac.uk

nick.french@brookes.ac.uk
rgee@brookes.ac.uk
rgrover@brookes.ac.uk
mnhill@brookes.ac.uk
mjacobs@brookes.ac.uk

Early Career Research Fellow

sukikenth@brookes.ac.uk
inase@brookes.ac.uk

OTI, Henry (Mr)

AB1.13

2822

Post-Doctoral Research Assistant

aoti@brookes.a.cuk

PATRICK, Mike (Mr)

AB1.10

3275

Senior Lecturer in REM

mpatrick@brookes.ac.uk

ROBERTS, Claire (Dr)


(returning Jan 2015)
SALTER, Ray (Mr)

AB1.11

3852

Senior Lecturer in Real Estate


Valuation And/Or Investment

croberts@brookes.ac.uk

JPG.05

3364

Lab Manager

rsalter@brookes.ac.uk

AB2.02

3202

Programme Portfolio Manager

dsames@brookes.ac.uk

SAMES, Dan (Mr)


SHIERS, David (Mr)

AB1.04

3962

Reader in Sustainable Property

davidshiers@brookes.ac.uk

SIMS, Sally (Dr)

AB1.04

3459

Senior Lecturer in REM

ssims@brookes.ac.uk

SOLSONA, MARTA (MS)

AB3.16

3531

Student Support Co-Ordinator

msolsona@brookes.ac.uk

STRINGER, Joanne (Miss)

AB1.09

2834

Senior Lecturer in Real Estate and


Property Law

jstringer@brookes.ac.uk

STUBBS, Michael (Dr)

AB1.10

3487

Senior Lecturer in REM (PT)

mdstubbs@brookes.ac.uk

TAH, Joe (Prof)

AB1.06

3919

Head of Department of Real


Estate and Construction

jtah@brookes.ac.uk

TURNER, Philip (Mr)

AB1.11

3917

Senior Lecturer in REM

pjturner@brookes.ac.uk

VICARS, DANIEL (MR)

AB2.21

3909

Programme Administrator (UG


REM & QM/QS)

dvicars@brookes.ac.uk

VIDALAKIS, Christos (DR)

AB1.08

3359

Senior Lecturer in CM

christos.vidalakis@brookes.ac.uk

XU, Ye (Dr)

AB1.11

3534

Senior Lecturer in REM

yexu@brookes.ac.uk

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Appendix J Support Services Contact Details

Accommodation
Office

First Floor
Helena Kennedy
Student Centre

Tel: (01865) 484660


accomm@brookes.ac.uk
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/students/accommodation

Careers Services

Ground Floor
John Henry
Brookes Building

Tel: (01865) 484670


careers@brookes.ac.uk
http://www.brookescareerscentre.co.uk

Chaplaincy

Ground Floor
Helena Kennedy
Student Centre

Tel: (01865) 484690


chaplaincy@brookes.ac.uk or chaplain@brookes.ac.uk
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/student/services/chaplaincy/

Counselling

First Floor
Helena Kennedy
Student Centre

Tel: (01865) 484650


wellbeing-recpt@brookes.ac.uk
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/student/services/counselling/

First Floor
Helena Kennedy
Student Centre

Tel: (01865) 484651 disabilitysupport@brookes.ac.uk


Tel: (01865) 484653 dyslex.sup@brookes.ac.uk
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/student/services/disability

Student Central
Ground Floor
John Henry
Brookes Building

Tel: (01865) 483850


finaid@brookes.ac.uk

First Floor
Helena Kennedy
Student Centre

Tel: (01865) 484686


http://www.brookes.ac.uk/new-students/

Student Central
Ground Floor
John Henry
Brookes Building

Tel: (01865) 484681


isat@brookes.ac.uk
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/student/services/isas/

First Floor
Helena Kennedy
Student Centre

Tel: (01865) 484652


dldean@brookes.ac.uk
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/student-life/maturestudents-guide/

Services
Student Disability
and Dyslexia Service
Financial Aid Office

Induction
Programme
International
Students Advisory
Service
Mature Students
Advisory Service

http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/finance/hardship
funding/

John Henry
Brookes Building

Tel: (01865) 484770


suadvice@brookes.ac.uk
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/student-life/

Upgrade

Ground Floor
John Henry
Brookes Building

Tel: (01865) 873653


upgrade@brookes.ac.uk
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/upgrade/

Academic English

ICELS reception

Enquiries and advice:


http://www.brookes.ac.uk/international/support-and-advice/englishlanguage-support/
For undergraduates
AcademicEnglishUG@brookes.ac.uk
For postgraduates
AcademicEnglishPG@brookes.ac.uk

Students Union
Advice Centre
(SUAC)

For International
Students

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Appendix K - Rooms
The University room numbering system might at first sight appear to be confusing heres how
it works:
The University room numbering system might at first sight appear to be confusing here is the
key to the buildings that you are likely to will be using during your course:
AB
BU
C
F
G
HKSC
IC
JHB

JPG
MC
MH
RO
S
SC
TO
WB

Abercrombie Building: Department of Real Estate and Construction


Buckley Building
Clerici Building: Blackwell Bookshop; Board Rooms; Enquiry Centre, Main
Lecture Theatre MLT); Student Finance
Fuller Building: Brookes Restaurant
Gibbs Building (Social Sciences)
Helena Kennedy Student Centre
ICELS Building: International Centre for English Language Studies
John Henry Brookes Building: Student Union, Caf Central, Careers
Centre, IT Services, JHB Lecture Theatre, Library, Main Reception, Student
Central
John Payne Building Ground Floor: Technology Laboratory
Media Centre: Creative Services, Graphics Workshop, Media Workshop,
Public Relations, Reprographics Unit (print room)
Main Hall
Red Oak: Teaching Rooms
Sinclair Building: Biological & Molecular Sciences, Examination &
Conferment Unit; Postgraduate Research Centre
Sports Centre
Tonge Building: (Humanities)
Willow Building: Teaching Rooms

Full details of the services in each building are provided on the campus maps in Appendix L.

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Appendix L Headington Campus Maps

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Appendix M Health and Safety Regulations: Guide for Students


The Faculty of Technology, Design & Environment is committed to ensuring the health,
safety and welfare of the Facultys staff, students and visitors. This is achieved through the
co-operation of all personnel within the Faculty in implementing the University Health and
Safety Policy, this is detailed in the Oxford Brookes University Safety Manual.
This leaflet is provided to help guide you towards the relevant information, regarding your
responsibilities, and advise you on where to get help and assistance.
STUDENT SAFETY ((http://www.brookes.ac.uk/uniregulations/current/other)
This web-page contains information posted by the University and should be read by all
students and gives a basic overview of safety within the University.
FACULTY SAFETY POLICY (currently on the Faculty share drive N. Students who would like
a copy should e-mail School Safety Advisor who will provide an electronic copy
acglass@brookes.ac.uk) This is the Facultys Health and Safety Policy, it contains school
policy, structure and reporting details as well as a brief overview of safety information
available for both staff and students.
HEALTH & SAFETY - Directorate of Human Resources
(http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/hr/health_safety/)
This provides useful on-line information for all members of the University, including the
University Safety Manual and the Smoking Policy.
UNIVERSITY SAFETY MANUAL
(http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/hr/health_safety/docs/index.html)
This is made up of detailed Safety Notes on specific topics, the index also makes clear the
contents and sections which should be read by staff and students.

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Contacts
Location
Gipsy Lane
Site
Headington
Hill Site

Name
Andy Glass
Faculty Safety
Advisor
Elaine Le Corre

Reason
Safety Advisor for Faculty Departments based at
Gipsy Lane and First point of contact for Safety
Advice within the Faculty.
Safety Advisor for School of Arts

Wheatley
Site

Ashley Rowles

Safety Advisor for Department of Computing &


Communication Technologies and Department
of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematical
Sciences

Faculty

Paul Inman
PVC/Dean of Faculty

Responsible for Health and Safety within the


Faculty.

Programme Lead

Tim McGill

Your Programme Lead will be able to help you


with guidance regarding health and safety
requirements for various activities and projects
University Safety Officer

Christie Rainbird

Senior Occupational Health Nurse

Angela Pullinger

Occupational Health Nurse

Alison Porat

Occupational Health Administrator

Security Control
Office

Staffed 24 hrs ever day

University

Contact
x3343
GIP - AB120
X4956
HDH
RHG.05a
X3512
WHE R2.27a

x3350
GIP - AB120

x5744
WHE - A1.06
X5531
WHE-A1.03
x5773
WHE - A1.02
x5772
WHE - A1.01
x3060
GIP CG.19

Accidents
ALL accidents, incidents or near misses are reportable thus you must read and understand
University procedure, this is detailed in Safety Note No. 11 of the University Safety Manual.
Following an accident:
Seek assistance from person(s) present at the scene.
If present inform a member of staff.
If necessary call emergency services 222 during working hours, 999 at other times.
Inform Security internal x3060 external 01865 483060.
If a person is injured and sent to hospital the Safety Officer must be informed immediately, do this
via the Security Office.
ALL accidents/incidents occurring OFF-SITE must be reported to Security Office immediately.
Complete an Accident report form, send this to the Faculty Safety Advisor Andy Glass.

Fire
Fire and Evacuation Procedures are detailed in Safety Note No. 9 you must read and
understand this notice.

On discovering a fire:
Sound the alarm at the nearest fire alarm point.
Telephone Security Control Office, x222 from an internal phone or 999/112 from a public line.
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When the alarm bell rings you must:


Evacuate the building, Fire Notices posted in rooms detail safe routes and assembly points.
DO NOT use lifts.
WALK, DO NOT run.
GET WELL CLEAR OF BUILDINGS AND ACCESS ROUTES.
Inform a member of staff or Fire Fighter of any disabled personnel or anyone who may be
trapped.
Do not attempt to leave by any vehicle.
Do not re-enter the building until instructed to do so by a responsible member of staff.
Please note NO naked lights are permitted in any building without permission from the University
Safety Officer.

Projects - Risk Assessments ON-SITE


All activities, projects, etc. where there may be a potential hazard must be the subject of a Risk
Assessment before materials are brought on site or work begins.
A HAZARD is the potential to cause harm and present in every work activity.
A RISK is the likelihood of that potential being realised.
A standard form is available in Departmental Offices, Safety Note No. 36 details the assessment
required. If you require help please contact the Faculty Safety Advisor Andy Glass.
NOTE: A Risk Assessment is a mandatory for any activity that may be hazardous, i.e. building a
structure, performing a test.
When a potentially hazardous activity, structure etc. is discovered without a previously agreed
risk assessment work will be stopped immediately and if necessary action will be taken to
reduce risks.

Off-Site
All off-site activities, fieldwork, etc. are also the subject of Risk Assessments. Please contact the
Faculty Safety Advisor Andy Glass for assistance.
COSHH is the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health.
The University is required, under the H&SWA 1974, to carry out an assessment for both
substance and activity where the substance is deemed to be hazardous.
If you want to use hazardous substance or embark on a process using a hazardous substance
you first need to complete a COSHH Assessment. Please contact the Faculty Safety Advisor
Andy Glass for assistance.
NOTE: Most hazardous substances are labelled as such and detailed handling and user
information is available. If in doubt ask, do not expose yourself or others to hazards, this
includes activities such as spray painting, activities which create dust, etc.

First Aid
In the event that you require a first aider you should find a list of your nearest qualified person,
with phone number, displayed in the corridors or on the internal phone book available on
networked PCs.
If none are available and the injury is serious either call emergency services or take the person
to the Casualty Department at the JR hospital.

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Other
If you need help, advice, see anything you consider dangerous etc. please contact one of the
staff listed at the beginning of this Appendix under Contacts.
Please remember our safety, each and every one of us, relies upon the commitment from all
staff, students and visitors who surround us.
This information will also be sent to you via e-mail, please would you reply to acknowledge
receipt and confirmation you have read it.
Andy Glass
Faculty Safety Advisor
5/9/2012

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Appendix N Alumni: Keeping in Touch


After you have left the University, we hope you will keep in touch with us, and tell us your
news. We will certainly be pleased to tell you OUR news! When you leave the University your
name and current address will be entered on our database of past students in the Alumni Office.
At least once a year you will receive a copy of the Alumni Magazine, which will give you news of
other alumni, the University, its staff and students. This is edited by the Alumni Officer
(alumni@brookes.ac.uk), who would welcome contributions of news articles about your career or
any unusual activities you undertake. Please keep us up to date with your address: or, if you are
moving about frequently, give us a forwarding address such as your parents' or relatives' home
address. With the alumni magazine once a year you will receive an "alumni up-date" form that will
show you the data we hold about you on the computer. We will ask you to correct or update this
as necessary. Please keep in touch with the Alumni Office by returning this postage paid
form each year.
The Alumni Relations Programme involves arranging events and reunions each year, which we
hope will be of interest to particular groups of past students. Many of these will take place on the
campus, such as Reunion Dinners or Open Days when you will be welcome to return to Oxford,
but others will be planned in London and, hopefully, some events in regions of the UK and even in
overseas countries. If enough alumni express an interest in getting together in a particular region,
then we will do our best to put them in touch with each other and help them arrange a suitable
meeting or event.
As a past student of the University you become an Associate Member of Oxford Brookes
University Alumni Association, and become eligible for certain benefits which we have
negotiated on your behalf, such as applying for our VISA card, which has no annual fee and offers
a very competitive rate of interest. Other financial services will also be available to Oxford Brookes
alumni, and you will be kept fully informed through the alumni magazine. The Alumni Association (a
registered charity) offers certain additional benefits to those who wish to join as full members:
Members can continue to use facilities on campus, and enjoy certain discounts on meals, weekend
breaks, theatre tickets, Outward Bound courses, and so on. For further details of Oxford Brookes
University Alumni Association please write to the Alumni Officer.
Remember too that the University runs many short courses that may be useful to you in
updating your own knowledge in certain areas. You may also develop your own expertise in
areas that we would be pleased to make use of in planning our courses. Communication is a
two-way process, and we will be delighted if you continue to make the most of your links with
Oxford Brookes University. If you are interested, please visit the website:
http://www.brookes.ac.uk/alumni
At the time of enrolment you completed a card giving both home address and your address in
Oxford. It is particularly important that if either of these changes during your time at Oxford, that
Student Central are notified immediately. It also helps to let your Academic Adviser know as
well.
The Alumni Relations Service at Brookes allows graduates to:

Look for an old classmate through the Find a Friend service.


Sign up to be a mentor to a Brookes Student.
Tell others about happenings in your life with our message board.
Send a virtual postcard.
Keep us up to date with your contact and career details.
Hear whats going on at Oxford Brookes.

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