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ECUR 991 - Scholarship in Teaching Instructor: Dr.

Tim Molnar
Office: 3035 Education Building
Phone: 966-7572
Email: tim.molnar@usask.ca
Face to Face Meeting Days
(optional Saturday Jan 16th, 10:00 am to 1:00 pm, to help in orientation)
Class 9:00 am - 11:50 am S Jan ______, 2010 (30th?)
Class 9:00 am - 11:50 am S Feb ______, 2010 (13th or 20th?)
Class 9:00 am - 11:50 am S Mar ______, 2010 (13th or 20th?)
Class 9:00 am - 11:50 am S Apr ______, 2010 (3rd?)
Room 1020 ( but may vary as our needs evolve)
Purpose of the Course:
This course is the culmination of Graduate Studies colleagues' research into professional
knowledge and identity undertaken throughout the MEd degree within a transformative and
reflective learning culture. Graduate level colleagues will demonstrate their scholarship in
teaching through developing a collection of academic and professional work. The work may be
represented through a variety of media, such as portfolios (including electronic portfolios),
multi-media presentations, and professional development initiatives. If possible we will
participate in the graduate studies seminar at the end of term.
Learning Outcomes:
• To reflect on teaching and learning philosophy.
• To demonstrate awareness of the ethical nature and practice of professional work and
research.
• To analyze, synthesize and evaluate teaching scholarship through growth in
understanding educational theory.
• To demonstrate academic and professional competence in their chosen field of
curriculum studies or educational communication and technology.
Technical Requirements:
• Browser enabled computer for online discussion (minimum)
• Ability to run and function in programs such as "Elluminate", "Mahara" and "Moodle"
(suggested not compulsory)
Specific Course Activities and Topics
As you build your portfolio, presentation, performance etc...you may:
• Identify major trends in curriculum theory, and major trends in their own specific
areas of interest, then identify how their understanding of curriculum has evolved
through participation in their MEd courses.
• Decide on the final form of your Scholarship in Teaching portfolio, presentation or
performance.
• Reflect on teaching practice. Through examples from your own and others’
experiences, you will describe ways in which educators influence practice in different
educational settings, as well as identify ways in which educators can best represent
their skills, challenges and changes.
• Take a problem-solving approach to evaluating practice and to curriculum
implementation.
• Reflect on issues of diversity, including Aboriginal issues, teaching and learning in
multicultural contexts, and working with the full range of student needs.
• Create and make a presentation of your understanding of your academic and
professional growth during the MEd program to the class or to another academic/
professional group.
• Carry out a final interview with a faculty member, based on your presentation
• Construct an annotated personal curriculum vitae that demonstrates leadership in
curriculum or educational technology.
Format and Flow of Class:
There are basically three areas of activity in this course. One, participation in online
discussion providing feedback concerning particular professional and scholarly topics, and
colleagues work. Two, preparing a summary, closing or final representation of your scholarly
experience as a teacher. Three, attending and participating in face-to-face discussions and
presentations.
Evaluation:
• Online discussions and/or in-class presentations: 30%
• Final interview/oral examination 25%
• Portfolio, Presentation, Performance 45%

Topics:
Topic 1-Jan 10th
What are your plans for developing your final portfolio, presentation or performance?
Describe your initial ideas, what you may focus on as meaningful from your M.Ed experience
and perhaps a hint of why.
1 To create and maintain a learning environment that encourages and supports the
growth of the whole student.
2 To demonstrate a professional level of knowledge about the curriculum and the skills
and judgment required to apply this knowledge effectively.
3 To demonstrate and support a repertoire of instructional strategies and methods that
are applied in teaching activities.
4 To carry out professional responsibilities for student assessment and evaluation.
5 To reflect upon the goals and experience of professional practice, and adapt oneʼs
teaching accordingly.
6 To work with colleagues in mutually supportive ways and develop effective
professional relationships with members of the educational community.
7 To conduct all professional relationships in ways that are consistent with principles of
equity, fairness and respect for others.
ECUR 801.6 - Principles and Practices of Curriculum Construction
ERES 800.3 - Research Methods: Introductory Level
ECUR 990.0 - Seminar in Curriculum Research
ECUR 992.6 - Project or
ECUR 991.3 – Portfolio
ECUR 994 - Thesis
ECUR 805.3 - Trends and Issues in Educational Research and Development
ECUR 809.3 - Models and Methods for the Evaluation of Educational Programs
ECUR 810.3 - Design and Practice of the Evaluation of Educational Programs
ECUR 819.3 Trends and Issues in Mathematics Education
ECUR 820.3 Introduction to Graduate Studies in Science Education
ECUR 830.3 Research in Teaching and Learning
ECUR 832.3 Practicum in Professional Development
ECUR 843.3 Reading Process and Practice
ECUR 870.3 Literacy Education and Curriculum
ECUR 872.3 Trends and Issues in the Study of Writing
ECUR 888.3 Trends and Issues in Social Studies
ECUR 898.3 or ECUR 899.6 Individual Reading Courses in Curriculum
ERES 845.3 Qualitative Research
ERES 840.3 Quantitative Research
_________
Required courses for the MEd degree in Educational Technology and Communication:
ECMM 802.6 - Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Educational Technology
ERES 800.3 - Research Methods: Introductory Level
ECUR 990.0 - Seminar in Curriculum Research
Elective courses for the MEd degree in Educational Technology and Communication:
ECMM 803.3 - Principles and Practices of Designing Multimedia Resources
ECMM 804.3 - Distance Education
ECMM 873.3 - Principles and Practices of Instructional Design
ECMM 874.3 - Advanced Approaches to Instructional Design
ECMM 876.3 - Organization and Administration in Educational Technology
ECMM 877.3 - Advanced Video Production in Education
ECMM 879.6 - Television in Education

ECUR 991 Molnar


Session No. 1 Getting Started
Goals of our first group discussion:
1. To understand the general purpose and intended outcomes of the ECUR 991 course
as a capstone experience of your M.Ed experience.
2. To become familiar with some possible organizing frameworks for demonstrating
your meaning making (learning) as a scholarly teacher or educator.
3. To become become familiar with various technologies and formats you might
employ in virtually and physically presenting your learning as a scholarly teacher or
educator.
4. To begin planning and outlining how you will integrate the goals 1, 2 and 3.
Some Ideas for discussion concerning the final final form of your electronic portfolio:
Electronic portfolios (Mahara, Moodle personal web site etc.)
Overview of Mahara
Paper portfolios (i.e. indexed folder collection, binder etc...)
Presentations (i.e. posterboard/panels, powerpoint/keynote, slideshow, movie etc...)
Performance or artistic display (i.e. Found poems, prose, drama, poetic, visual art) or
other.
Possible frames or structures for the development of portfolios, electronic
portfolios, presentations etc...
Sample A:
Using the STF Code as a guide for reflection in building your portfolio. The Code
includes the following core principles of competent teaching practice, each of which
teachers may demonstrate in various ways and which you can integrate with your
scholarly knowledge and understanding.
1. To create and maintain a learning environment that encourages and supports the
growth of the whole student.
2. To demonstrate a professional level of knowledge about the curriculum and the
skills and judgment required to apply this knowledge effectively.
3. To demonstrate and support a repertoire of instructional strategies and methods
that are applied in teaching activities.
4. To carry out professional responsibilities for student assessment and evaluation.
5. To reflect upon the goals and experience of professional practice, and adapt one’s
teaching accordingly.
6. To work with colleagues in mutually supportive ways and develop effective
professional relationships with members of the educational community.
7. To conduct all professional relationships in ways that are consistent with principles
of equity, fairness and respect for others.

Sample B:
Using the STARR technique with your portfolio or presentation etc.
For each artefact (story, paper, image etc...) you include in your portfolio include a
‘STARR’ story.
STARR is a technique which assists you to place your experiences, behaviours,
knowledge, skills and
abilities in a context. You can use class work, assignments, fieldwork experiences,
volunteer work, family life - anything really - as examples of how your understanding as
a scholar teacher has developed during your M.Ed experience.
The acronym STARR relates to:
Situation: Describe the specific situation. Set up your story.
Task: What was the task you were trying to accomplish? Tell who, what, when, where,
and why (include only relevant details)
Action: What did you do to solve the problem or meet the task?
Result: Specify results. What happened?
Reflection: Link the capability you were demonstrating in this example to broader goal
of becoming a teacher.
Such reflection may include: in-depth insight and self-knowledge; an explanation of
how do you understand yourself in relation to the capability; what the selected
artefacts reveal your understanding; what does each artefact says about your growing
capability; your personal knowing and transformation, values ; the development of your
identity as a scholarly teacher and involvement in the teaching community.

Sample C:
Schwab's Common places. A Matrix Analysis for considering the development of your
understanding during your M. Ed experience (using a modification of Schwab's Commonplaces
and Nine Cultural Universals). Using selected areas that prompt or resonate with what you have
learned.
Cultural
Universals
The Scholar-Teacher (how instruction is delivered)
The Student (who is being taught)
What is Taught (the content)
The Milieu (of teaching learning)
Value system of school/ schools

Guiding ideas for meaning making: What is or was.


What changed in my understanding and what I understand now.

i.e. Whitehead's criticism of the "banking" system of education provoked me and began a change
in my thinking about curriculum.....

Cosmology i.e. the Western values implicit in current education carry with it the force of
colonialization that continue to be deaf to the "voice" of more marginalized people.

Through Battiste's discourse and my own observation I began to change my... Social
Organization i.e. Through my
readings and discussions on leadership I began to realize that power existed throughout the
school system and tha twith colleagues I could...

Technology i.e As I began to consider how technological innovation was being used in schools I
began to wonder if much of it was truly needed. I began to research the utility of technology in
relation to cognition that allowed me to more clearly see....

Economic system i.e. Reading I grew to understand better the nature of intergenerational poverty
and its effect on students and their families I realized there were necessary duties that I as an
educator needed to address. With this knowledge....

Political system i.e. Reading Foucault's work left me with a new understanding of how power is
shared across the domains of schooling…

Language i.e. Todd's work began to reveal to me that the peer to peer language I overheard gave
me new insight into what the students' valued and this began to change my way of...
Aesthetic system i.e. while the need for structure remains as I read Eisner's work on
connoisseurship I realized that learning was not always orderly , that the beauty of learning
resided equally....

Socialization Process i.e. Constructivist pedagogy allowed me to realize the social nature of
learning and that children were often reliant upon peers to create meaning. With this
understanding I started to think about my classroom and began changes that.....
Portfolio Work: Some Ideas, Cautions and Aids
Considerations of Portfolios (especially electronic one's)
Creating a Portfolio
Presented
By
Mary Sue Baldwin
Director
Center for Teaching, Learning & Scholarship
August 2006

A portfolio is. . .
–a structured documentary history
– contains a carefully selected set of coached or
entered accomplishments
– contains samples of student work
– is supplemented by reflections
(Schulman, 1991)
Rationale
• To demonstrate teaching/career effectiveness
• To reflect upon learning/managing/leading/teaching
• To provide evidence of static/dynamic learning
• To apply for positions/internships/awards
• To share knowledge/expertise
• To foster discussions on leading, teaching, and learning

Portfolios can be a . . . A Sonnet, Map, Mirror


Diez, 1994

Portfolio Development
Define the portfolio context and goals
– Audience, purpose, goals, standards, resources
– Types
• Working portfolio (Digital packrat)
• Reflective portfolio (Formative)
• Connected portfolio (Hyperlink)
• Presentation portfolio (Networking)
Portfolio Structure
Portfolio
Samples Reflective Commentary
What was learned,
by whom,
and under what conditions
Context of Meaning

Electronic Portfolios
• Allows portfolio developer to:
– Collect and organize portfolio artifacts
– Use a variety of media types
– Aid reflection on these artifacts
• Organizes portfolio around:
– Standards
– Learning goals
– Learner’s reflection

Process
• Review
• Plan
• Collect
• Select
• Arrange
• Reflect
• Edit
• Submit

Format & Items


• Format
– Table of Contents
– Curriculum
Vitae/Resume´
– Goals
– Philosophies
– Projects
– Assessments
– Awards & Recognitions
– Reflections
– Appendices
• Items
– Program of Study
– Written Work
– Clinical Plan
– Skills Assessment
– Letters
– Emails
– Newsletters
– Award Programs
– Presentations
– Photos
– CEUs

Timelines
8 – 10 pages plus supporting evidence
• 12 – 15 hours over several days

Recommendations
• Limit page numbers.
• Obtain support from other portfolio authors
and evaluators.
• Have a unified construct.
• Develop standard evaluative criteria.
• Emphasize evidence over glitz

Assessment
• Current
• Balanced
• Coherent
• Valid
• Diverse
• Evidence-Based
• Contribution
• Products
• Context
• Format
• Feedback

Portfolio Mentor
A mentor can assist in:
– Reviewing areas of the teaching-learning process to be examined.
– Determining what kinds of information you collect.
– Determining how the information is analyzed and presented.
– Outlining the purpose and audience for the portfolio.

Maintenance
• Use the appendix as a filing system.
• Don’t reinvent the wheel.
• Focus on selected areas.
• Keep revisions detailed and specific.
• Take advantage of continuing education opportunities.
• Use your mentor.
Examples
• Carolyn Austin (English)
– www.ags.uci.edu/~cfaustin/
• Kathleen Fischer (Teaching)
– durak.org/kathy/portfolio/
• Michael Barnett (Education)
– Inkdo.indiana.edu/mikeb/portfolio/portfolio.html
• Katherine Conrad (Nursing)
– Helium.vancouver.wsu.edu/~conradk/frame.html
• John Zubizaretta (Program Director)
–www.columbiacollegesc.edu/faculty/johnz/admn_excerpt.html
• Jay Rumsey (OD)
– www.nova.edu/~rumsey/cv/Portadmin.html
Source:
Creating a Portfolio
Presented
By
Mary Sue Baldwin
Director
Center for Teaching, Learning & Scholarship
August 2006
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