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2015

Black Male Achievement

MLK Mentoring Day


Organizing Guide

Inspired, Directed and Encouraged by

The Black Star Project


3509 South King Drive, Suite 2B
Chicago, IL 60653
Phone: 773-285-9600
Email: info@blackstarproject.org
www.blackstarproject.org

Table of Contents
Introduction to the Black Male Achievement Initiative- MLK Mentoring Day ............................................. 3
Goals and Objectives................................................................................................................................. 4
How to use this guide ............................................................................................................................... 5
Establishing Effective Mentoring Programs .................................................................................................. 5
What type of Mentoring model? .............................................................................................................. 5
Setting up your long-term mentoring program ........................................................................................ 6
Recruiting Mentees ....................................................................................................................................... 8
Recruiting Mentors ....................................................................................................................................... 8
Profile of a Mentor.................................................................................................................................... 8
How to engage mentees ........................................................................................................................... 9
Mentor Training ............................................................................................................................................ 9
Logistics and Other Mentor Training Preparation .................................................................................. 10
Tips for Preparing and Delivering Training Sessions ............................................................................... 11
Mentor Do's and Donts .......................................................................................................................... 12
New Mentor Orientation Checklist ......................................................................................................... 14
Planning Mentoring Sessions ...................................................................................................................... 15
Mentoring Activities................................................................................................................................ 15
Sample Agenda for MLK Mentoring Day..................................................................................................... 17
Evaluating your program............................................................................................................................. 18
Organization Evaluation .......................................................................................................................... 18
Mentor Program Evaluation Form .......................................................................................................... 19
Mentee Program Evaluation ................................................................................................................... 20
FAQ.............................................................................................................................................................. 21
Forms .......................................................................................................................................................... 22
Parent Consent Form .............................................................................................................................. 23
Mentor Registration Form ...................................................................................................................... 25
Contact Information.................................................................................................................................... 27

Introduction to the Black Male


Achievement Initiative - MLK Mentoring
Day
The Black Male Achievement Initiative - MLK Mentoring Day is part of a nationwide
movement (during January 2015 National Mentoring Month) designed to ensure that the
mentoring needs of young Black men and boys are effectively addressed at the scale needed for
this brilliant population to heal, develop and thrive.
This effort is designed to re-energize and re-launch The Black Male Achievement Mentoring
Initiative with strong commitments and structured actions to fulfill its intention for full-scale,
efficacious mentoring support that meet the growing needs of young Black men and boys
nationwide.
In this spirit, we must connect young Black men and boys with positive Black men who will:

Inspire and motivate them to do well in life and in school.


Expose them to various college and career options.
Encourage them towards healthy habits and positive life styles.
Help them create viable life plans and make good choices.
Mentor youth of all ethnic, racial and faith backgrounds, with special emphasis on young
Black men and boys.

The Black Male Achievement Initiative - MLK Mentoring Day effort will work with
individuals, non-profit organizations, faith institutions, government agencies, schools, fraternities
and social service agencies to make mentoring a national priority.
Mentors talk with youth about their jobs, the preparation necessary for their jobs including
college or other post-secondary training and development, and most importantly, their attitudes
and actions (how youth need to be and what youth need to do in and out of school to prepare for
a successful life in the world of work). Additionally, mentors offer advice on how to make good
basic life choices. When young people see examples of what they can become, they are more
likely to take school seriously, to excel in school academically and to graduate from elementary
and high school with college aspirations.
We have declared January 19, 2015 as Black Male Achievement MLK Mentoring Day and
January through February as Black Male Achievement Mentoring Months. While we
certainly encourage all of our participating organizations and individuals to continue doing what
they already know works best for their communities, we also urge participants to plan and carry
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out a mentoring event on Monday January 19, 2015 to demonstrate the commitment that Black
Men all over this country are making to build positive futures for their communities.
Although we cannot perceive every situation that may arise, the start-up information presented in
this organizing guide includes the basic information you need to set up your own mentoring
system, recruit and prepare mentors, facilitate good-quality experiences for mentees, and
continuously evaluate, learn and improve your efforts. The Black Male Achievement
Mentoring Initiative (TBMAMI) will provide all of the assistance you need to make your
mentoring program the most effective your city has seen.

Goals and Objectives


What are the short-term goals and objectives of the 2015 Black Male Achievement MLK
Mentoring Day and The Black Male Achievement Mentoring Months?
Short-term goals:
1. Re-energize the Black Male Achievement Initiative to meet young Black men and boys
vast mentoring needs.
2. Partner with mentoring efforts in 200 cities in the United States (and worldwide) in
January and February 2015.
Short-term objectives:
Establish criteria for effective mentoring efforts by potential participants.
Identify, recruit and support prospective mentor participating organizations and
individuals.
Offer and facilitate support to ensure good-quality mentoring experiences for 50,000
young Black men and boys on Monday January 19, 2015 and during Mentoring Months
in January and February 2015.
Widely promote the initiative to recruit and train upwards of 5,000 new Black male
mentors.
What is the long-term goal of the 2015 Black Male Achievement MLK Mentoring Day and
The Black Male Achievement Mentoring Months?
Long-term goal:
Build a strong, effective national infrastructure to the scale of need for mentoring young
Black men and boys.
.
Long-term objectives:
Create a national directory of 1,000 effective mentoring organizations and mentoring
programs that exist for young Black men and boys in the United States.
Develop and promote uniform training standards and background-check protocols for use
by all participating organizations and programs nationwide.
Design and implement an information/referral/feedback mechanism to connect families
and communitiesthat request or need effective mentoring serviceswith organizations
and mentoring programs that meet good-quality criteria.
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Recruit, train, and manage 50,000 Black male mentors in America.

How to use this guide


This guide serves two primary purposes.

Outlines how to organize MLK Mentoring Day and (Jan./Feb.) Mentoring Months.
Guides participants on elements of how to set up and sustain a long-term mentoring
program.

Please use this guide as a tool rather than as a strict handbook.


(Specific lesson plans will be available to participants as addenda to this guide.)

Establishing Effective Mentoring


Programs
What type of Mentoring model?

One-on-One Mentoring:
Mentees benefit from the individualized attention available in one-on-one
mentoring sessions during which individual mentors also work closely with the
mentees parents to support and strengthen his academic success.

Small-Group Mentoring:
TBMAMI favors small-group mentoring, which makes efficient use of the
mentors time while enabling some individualized mentee attention by pulling a
student aside as needed. Students in this model interact with various mentors and
mentees during each activity.

Large-Group Mentoring:
Large Group Mentoring is best facilitated in a classroom-style setting that features
one mentor speaking with an entire group of 20-35 students. Limited dialogue is
facilitated using raised-hand question/answer format. Over time, students in this
model are exposed to a variety of mentors, one-at-a-time.

Venus for Mentoring:


Mentor youth in schools
Mentor youth in community centers
Mentor youth in faith-based organizations
Mentor youth living in foster care
Mentor youth of incarcerated parents
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Mentor youth on the streets and blocks of their communities


Mentor youth in the juvenile justice system
Mentor youth in their homes with their parents present
E-mentor with computers over the internet
Advantages of Small- and Large-Group Mentoring (over one-on-one mentoring)
1. Larger mentor-mentee ratio maximizes use of qualified mentor pool.
2. Opportunities exist for mentees to bond and network.
3. Repeated exposure to the same basic themes from multiple mentors, (in the whole classroom
model and through small-group sessions), can powerfully reinforce essential messages.
4. Promoting group mentoring to organizations is a recruitment tool that can be marketed as
participants contributions to community development.
Disadvantages of Small- and Large-Group Mentoring (over 1-on-1 mentoring)
1. Confidentiality can be an issue. Even though the group agrees to keep all exchanges within its
confines, information and gossip can slip out.
2. Introverted young people may feel uncomfortable and shy away from participating, i.e.,
speaking up about setting goals, sharing their progress, or even asking questions.
Many organizations offer both small- and large-group mentoring opportunities as well as one-onone mentoring pairs. Mentees can benefit greatly from approaches that combine models, for
example, small-group mentoring before, after, or during one-on-one mentor sessions, with
occasional, large-group classroom-style mentoring sessions.

Setting up your long-term mentoring program


Preliminary Steps for all Mentoring Models

Conduct outreach to recruit male mentors and mentees.


Collect the name, address, phone numbers and personal references for all interested,
potential mentors.
Perform a background check on all mentors before they begin any work with children.
Background check procedures and fees vary by city and state.
Design and facilitate mentor orientation and training sessions. Inform participants about
the goals and objectives of your program, establish and convey clear expectations for
involvement (verbally and with take-home written handouts). Training topics to consider
include, but are not limited to: how to establish rapport with mentees; how to maintain
positive mentor/mentee communications; Mentoring Dos and Donts; Introduce the
specific mentoring model(s) used by your organization [one-on-one, small group, whole
classroom, or combination(s)].
Develop, schedule and facilitate mandatory follow-up session(s) for mentors on how to
useand help mentees develop and practiceeffective conflict-resolution skills and any
other such essential skill building. [Support prospective mentors to understand the
multiple ways such training sessions constitute powerful value-added opportunities in
their own lives!]

Develop, collect (from mentees) and file signed parental/guardian consent forms from
mentees before mentoring begins.
Design individual mentee needs assessment, intake forms, and support mentees (or
parents of young boys) to timely complete the assessment forms so mentors can better
understand how to effectively serve these young Black men and boys.
Confirm that all new mentors complete a one-on-one orientation with an assigned, vetted
mentor to review: overall expectations, recommended activities, establish time
commitments, and understand and agree to all written program rules and guidelines,
especially for any contact with mentees and for home visits.

Additional Steps for Specific Mentoring Models


One-on-One Mentoring
.
Match mentors with mentees who have similar interests or backgrounds to the extent
possible.
Small-Group Mentoring

Identify and secure a space to convene small-group mentoring events (such as a church or
community center).
Schedule a weekly or monthly small-group mentoring session.
Assign mentors to small clusters of mentees by matching mentor/mentee experiences,
interests, or backgroundsto the extent possible.
Generate and distribute a mentoring program activity schedule for group outings to
movies, plays, museums, college fairs, cultural events, goal-planning meetings, and
follow-up discussions. Be sure to include (on the schedule) a significant doing
component that actively engages mentees. (This can help mentees develop fully
participate and even help develop their critical thinking skills rather than simply and
passively consuming information.)
Keep track of students achievements and acknowledge them for those achievements.
Ask mentors to follow up with mentees in-between sessions, especially to remind them of
the next scheduled session.
NOTE: Mentors should NOT follow up with mentees in-between sessions unless the signed
parent/guardian consent document is on file. Without written consent, only the mentor
organization staff should coordinate any follow up/notification with mentee.
Large-Group Mentoring Sessions

Connect with schools, faith-based organizations, social services organizations, or juvenile


corrections facilities that have groups of students with whom mentors could conduct
hour to 1 hour sessions.
Collect availability times from all mentors and generate a mentor availability schedule.
Perform an orientation with the mentors outlining what their classroom-style topic should
be about. Highlight ways mentors can actively engage students in a lecture-style
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discussion. Outline expectations and boundaries for mentors. (Mentors must not give
students their contact information and must not contact students.)
Dispatch available mentors to mentoring opportunities.
Conduct follow-up feedback (calls or forms) with the organization about its experience
with and impressions of the large group mentoring session and what about it could be
improved.

Recruiting Mentees
Reach out to the following and provide some incentive for prospective participants, such as food:

Local schools
Faith-based institutions
Youth that already come to your organization

Recruiting Mentors
Profile of a Mentor
Any man can be a mentor if he is willing to make a commitment of his time and patience to
impart his years of knowledge and experience to one or more mentees. Above all he must want
to help his mentee(s) identify and work toward his goal(s).
A mentor is a man who:

Facilitates learning through conversation rather than lecture.


Is flexible and open with youth about their feelings.
Shares information about his life experience(s) with the real world of work.
Listens actively and is not negatively judgmental of mentees points of view.
Emphasizes the value of doing ones best academically, socially, emotionally, and in all
aspects of life.
Inspires and motivates by facilitating small groups or presenting/interacting with a large
group, or through individual consultation(s).
Imparts information and counsel on choice-making, career opportunities, starting or
managing a business, personal finance, healthy lifestyle habits, etc.
Encourages mentees to do and be their best and offers alternatives to drugs and violence.
Brings creativity and initiative to mentor activities.
Keeps all mentor commitments, keeps his word, and is honest.
Builds success into each session and interaction with every mentee.
Understands that some improvements come slowly.
Offers reliable, relevant and timely information or advice.
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Aspires to develop youths leadership skills, and rouse their interest, understanding and
civic pride about the value of community service.

How to engage mentees


Suggestions for how to engage mentees:
Be yourself; be natural
Open with a splash
Use energizers and icebreakers humor, tempo change, and reinforcements
Stick to the point
Avoid jargon and archaic slogans
Employ a variety of delivery styles e.g. audio, visual, kinesthetic for the broadest impact
Show interest and enthusiasm
Be aware of and use appropriate communication zones:
20ft public
5-10ft social
2-5ft personal
1-2ft intimate
peer relationships
resiliency
integrity
images in the media
lessons from history
choosing your personal values
making priorities
the importance of attitudes

Mentor Training
Effective mentor preparation, training and support are essential to preparing good-quality
mentors and outcomes. The most effective trainers (skilled facilitators) can quickly establish
rapport and engage prospective mentors in a spirit of collaboration. Make sure your trainers are
experts in best practices for mentors.
In addition to protocols, forms and general program expectations, successful mentor/mentee
relationships depend on 3 vitally important skills. Mentors must understand:

how to actively listen and powerfully hear mentees concerns


how to effectively (compassionately/respectfully) speak with mentees; and
More than anything, these young Black men and boys need great examples of men with
integrity to emulate.
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Principles of learning and behavior change:


Most people need compelling reasons to be open enough to assimilate new learning and grow.
People are largely practical and goal oriented and will, for the most part, tend to focus on parts of
training sessions that seem most useful to them. Many people are better able to incorporate new
learning when understood in a work-related or other responsibility context. Some people
successfully incorporate lessons more easily in the context of a potential solution to a current or
future problem.
Effective teaching must relate to the learners experiences. An individuals prior knowledge and
experience are a useful foundation for sharing information and building new concepts. However,
effectively speaking to peoples listening requires a great deal beyond lecture format (which
only gets through to audio learners). Successful teaching and learning must incorporate all three
major learning stylesaudio, visual and kinestheticor risk not reaching some participants.
People learn best in a supportive environment. No one likes to feel like they are being tested or
put on the spot. Take the approach of a guide rather than instructor.
Design mentor training to address the specific needs of your prospective mentors and the young
Black men and boys they will mentor.

Logistics and Other Mentor Training Preparation


Space
Churches, community colleges, and nonprofit community-based organizations are ideal places to
request donated space. Be sure to secure a large enough room (at least two weeks ahead of time)
to accommodate small break-out group work or with additional access to other nearby available
rooms.
For Novice Facilitators
If you cannot afford a skilled facilitator, consider doing the following one or two weeks before
the training session:
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1)
2)
3)
4)

Align on training content


Develop an outline
Select or develop material handouts
Develop a one-page, post-session qualitative evaluation/feedback form for participants.

Remember to prepare a simple ice-breaker/introductory opening exercise for the session and to
use a script and a watch to guide the training and prevent digression. Recruit someone to take
notes to permit the facilitator to focus on content and process during the mentor training session.
Day Before the Training
Copy all materials (sign-in forms, evaluation forms, training handouts) and prepare name tags;
gather extra pens and notepaper for participants; bring felt pen and tape for signs; and purchase
any refreshments (coffee, tea, bottled water, etc.).
Day of Training
Arrive at least one hour before training is scheduled to begin to 1) Post signs that point to the
training room(s) and rest room(s). 2) Set up the training session space by arranging tables and
chairs so that participants can all see and hear one another (Circle or square arrangement is
suggested over standard classroom set up.). 3) Lay out pens and note paper around the table.
Remember to greet trainees as they arrive.

Tips for Preparing and Delivering Training Sessions


Training sessions are often one of your first opportunities to demonstrate the qualities required
from mentors. Use active listening, feedback, and problem solving. Listen to and keep eye
contact with anyone who is speaking.
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Keep in mind that people remember 20% of what they hear, 40% of what they hear and see, and
80% of what they discover for themselves. Structure the activities so that trainees end with a
sense of accomplishment or discovery.
Keep the environment and discussion comfortable. Allow trainees to be taken seriously when
they speak, but make room for a little humor. When people feel like they can laugh they also feel
like they can present ideas without fear of making a mistake or incurring a rebuke.
Maintain appropriate pace. Balance your training to make time for sufficient discussion and
understanding, and cover all of your topics without digressing. Plan time for questions, while
being mindful of which ones require discussion and which are best answered quickly.
Be yourself and acknowledge when you dont know an answer. People will respect you if you
tell them you dont know the answer to their question that you will get back to them when you
find it. Perhaps someone else in the room knows.
Keeping notes throughout the session is a good way to keep track of information you need to
gather and of any parts of the training that seemed ineffective perhaps because trainees appeared
to be bored, distracted, etc. (However, designating one non-trainee note taker is even better
because it permits the facilitator to fully focus on content and process.)
Pass out evaluation forms and request participants support to help you improve future training
sessions by filling out and turning in their evaluative feedback forms before leaving the session.
This will help you assess the strengths and weaknesses of your training program. Remember that
what works well is great, while knowing what to improve is essential information.
Always thank your trainees for their commitment and for contributing their time to participate.

Mentor Do's and Donts


Some of the following suggestions apply to large group or other institutional mentoring although
many are simply useful tips for mentoring generally.

Do
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Do be Punctual. Early is on time and on time is late!


Do check in with the office or administrator first when mentoring in an institutional
setting.
Do keep your distance from the private sphere of students (3 feet).
Do share your resources with the class if you wish (i.e. Invite the class to visit your
worksite or show them your tools or equipment).
Do speak audibly.
Do dress in a professional manner.
Do remember that whenever your mentees can see you, you are mentoring. Set an
example at all times.
Do focus on the positive.
Do acknowledge and congratulate youth when they are right or add value.
Do treat all youth fairly and respectfully.
Do lead the youth into the future.
Do let youth know that they can change; they can control changes in their attitudes and
behavior; their changes can produce positive results.
Do let youth know that you have made mistakes; everyone has, and that mistakes can be
corrected.
Do teach youth about personal responsibility.
Do communicate to youth with compassion.

Dont

Dont mentor without a signed parental consent form.


Dont contact any student personally by phone, email, text, etc. without parental consent.
Don't raise your voice excessively.
Dont touch or enter any students private sphere.
Dont make promises to the group that you may not keep.
Dont contradict your own advice. If you tell your mentors you value responsibility, show
it and dont let them see you blow off your duties.
Dont make promises to any individual youth or ask any of the youth to make promises to
you.
Dont raise your voice in anger or frustration or threaten youth.
Dont put down mentees communities or environments.
Don't pretend that you are perfect; no one is.

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New Mentor Orientation Checklist


Use this checklist when reviewing your mentoring techniques with new mentors!
Mentor has completed and turned in the Mentor Registration form.
The mentoring organization has a resume on file for the prospective mentor.
Mentor has been vetted through professional and personal reference checks.
Mentor has completed and passed a criminal background check.
Staff from the organization has reviewed its organization-specific policies and procedures
with prospective mentor.
Mentor has reviewed the approved mentoring activities.
Mentor has reviewed and signed agreement to comply with all Mentor Training Manual
requirements.
Staff has explicitly reviewed, discussed and aligned with prospective mentor on:
All elements of the MLKMD Policy Page and Dos and Donts.
List of discussion topics (for large-group mentors).
Staff answered mentors questions about the MLKMD and January-February Mentoring
Months.
Mentor was assigned to a mentee or group of mentees.
Staff reviewed time commitment with the mentor.

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Planning Mentoring Sessions


Mentoring Activities
One-on-One Sample Mentoring Activities
Activities a single mentor can facilitate with one mentee:

Recreational outings: ice skate, bike, fish, play catch, attend sporting events and movies.
Educational or cultural outings: visit museums, go on a nature hike, attend a cultural
presentation or a musical performance, and explore your city on an architectural or
historical tour.
Homework or tutoring activities: visit a library, share and discuss a short story or article,
play educational games (Scrabble, etc.)
Share your hobbies or interests: car maintenance, playing a musical instrument, drawing,
painting, writing, dancing, martial arts, woodworking, recycling, etc.

Small-Group Mentoring Sample Activities


Activities a group of mentors can facilitate with 5-8 mentees each.

Any of the 1-on-1 activities can also be used with small groups.
Host a film and follow-up discussion: Show the mentees a film or documentary and then
discuss it in small or large groups. (Teaching guides to facilitate discussion exist for some
documentary-style films.)
Conduct a life planning session: Talk with mentees about their future life visions and
goals and their plans to achieve them. Ask mentees to share their visions, goals and plan
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with the group. Throughout the year, revisit this exercise to determine and note any
changes or progress.
Facilitate a group discussion: Ask mentees to vote on topics to discuss from a prepared
list of themes relevant to lessons or habits you want to emphasize or re-enforce.

Large-Group Mentoring Sample Discussion Topics


Discussion topics for use by a single mentor with a group of 15 or more students. (Be sure to
elicit ideas, questions and responses from students to avoid lecture format.)

Your career, the education it required, and obstacles you overcame


Your hobbies and any education or skills needed to enjoy them
Money management and the importance of financial literacy
Cultural pride
Hard work and dedication
Goal-setting
Decision-making skills
Overcoming barriers
Time management and study skills

Sample Outline for a Group Mentoring Event


1. Introduce yourself and your topic: name, title, occupation, background info.
2. Conduct a brief ice breaker: Inspire enthusiasm while helping students
understand why you want to engage them; what they need to learn and how.
3. Begin discussion of your topic: Share a bit about yourself or tell a brief story
that incorporates your education, training, special skills, experience, pay,
lessons learned, benefits, inspirations, opportunities, etc.
4. Group interaction: Ask open-ended questions to involve mentees (rather
than close-ended questions that only elicit yes and no responses), and ask
them write down their answers.
5. Questions and Answers (Q&A): Help all students take a turn to speak and
sensitively support shy youth to find their voice.
6. Review: Who am I, what am I, how I am, and why am I here. Repeat some
information to reinforce important messages.
7. Incentive: announce additional visits by your team or others; distribute any
gifts you've bought, and give final words of inspiration.
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Sample Discussion Topics:

stay in school
study daily
work smart
fortitude
patience
setting goals
staying focused
self-reliance
family unity
cultural pride
dignity
helping others
respect for girls, women and elders
health, nutrition and exercise
college and vocational training
friends
getting organized
work and play
relating to elders
overcoming barriers
getting a job
money management
conflict resolution

Sample Agenda for MLK Mentoring Day


(3-hour session) Feel free to revise and change this sample agenda to fit your needs. Specific
lesson plans and curriculum materials will be available to participants as addenda to this guide.

Pre-registration for 30 minutes before the session begins.


10 minutes Make quick Mentor/Mentee Introductions
5 minutes Open with a ritual or a short video clip
15 minutes What Is the Black Male Achievement Movement?
30 minutes 100 Black Male Achievers
30 minutes Guest speaker, discussion and Q&A

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15 minutes Lunch or Snack break


30 minutes How to Survive a Police Stop
20 minutes Increasing Black Male Achievement in your community
10 minutes Final Remarks
5 minutes Read Black Male Achievement Creed or close with a Ritual
1 minute Request that all mentors and mentees fill out and hand in evaluation forms before
leaving.

Evaluating your program


The Black Male Achievement Mentoring Initiative requests your cooperation in making this
national day of mentoring even better.
After MLK Mentoring Day, the contact person for your organization will receive an email link to
a survey to fill out, which will support ongoing program improvements. The questions are listed
below. Please keep these questions in mind as your plan your day of mentoring.
Please collect, tabulate and consolidate the data from the Mentor and Mentee Evaluation survey
forms and return the results as soon as possible by fax or email to The Black Male Achievement
Mentoring Initiative.

Organization Evaluation
1.
2.
3.

4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

How many youth participated in MLK Mentoring Day? _________


How many mentors took part in MLK Mentoring Day? ________
What topics were covered during your mentoring session?
Black Male Achievement
100 Black Male Achievers
How to Survive a Police Stop
Other (Please detail) _______________________
What ages and grade levels of youth did you serve on this day?
What were the results or outcomes of this effort?
Did the mentor program turn out as you planned? (Please explain.)
What are the strengths of your program?
What areas of your program need improvement?
How could your school/business/community partner further assist you to coordinate the
mentor program?
10. Did you have an established mentoring program before MLK Mentoring Day?
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11. Were you mentoring young Black men and boys before MLK Mentoring Day?
12. Will you continue to mentor young Black men and boys after MLK Mentoring Day?
13. How has this guide helped you to establish a long-term mentoring program?
NOTE: Please use the back of this form and any additional pages to fully respond to the
questions above, and feel free to include any additional comments, questions or concerns.

Mentor Program Evaluation Form


Your feedback matters. Please help us improve initiative by sharing your best thoughts in
response to the following questions. After completing your responses to the questions below
please return this survey to the program coordinator. (Please circle your response)
1. How would you rate the mentor program?
excellent
very good

good

fair

poor

2. How would you describe the quality of your experience as a participant in the program?
excellent
very good
good
fair
poor
3. Would you volunteer to serve as a mentor again next year or in the future?
yes
possibly
not sure
no
4. Did the mentor training help you prepare for your mentoring experience?
yes
somewhat
not sure
no
5. Would you have liked additional training (or other topics covered) for mentors?
yes
maybe
probably not
no
6. How clearly defined were your mentor responsibilities?
very clear
moderately clear
a little unclear

very unclear

7. The mentor program coordinators were accessible and easy to talk with and seek timely
advice from.
always
somewhat
not much
never
8. Was the time allotted for the mentoring session sufficient?
yes
almost
not really
no

too long/too much time

9. Do you think that the time you spent together was helpful for your mentee?
yes
somewhat
not really
no
10. Did you gain personally from this mentoring day?
yes
somewhat
not much
11. Have you mentored in the past?
yes
no
12. Will you continue to serve as a mentor in the future?
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no

yes
no
13. What was most satisfying about the mentor program?

14. What was least satisfying about the mentor program?

15. What would you suggest to improve the mentor program?

Mentee Program Evaluation


Your feedback matters. Please help us improve initiative by answering the following questions.
After completing your responses, please return this survey to the program coordinator. (Please
circle your response)
1. How would you rate the mentor program?
excellent
very good

good

2. Did you enjoy being part of this program?


yes
somewhat

not much

no

3. Would you like to participate next year?


yes
probably

not really

no

4. Did you like the mentors?


yes
somewhat

not much

no

5. Did you have fun?


yes

not really

no

somewhat

fair

poor

6. How useful was the information that was presented on MLK Mentoring Monday?
Extremely
Very useful Somewhat Useful
Not very useful
Not at all
7. What was your favorite activity?

8. What did you like best about MLK Mentoring Monday?

9. How many Black Male achievers could you name before this day?
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10. What did you not like about MLK Mentoring Monday?

11. How will this affect how you conduct yourself in the future?

12. What did you learn today?

13. What do you think we should change or do differently next year?

FAQ
What is mentoring?
In African and African American communities, mentoring has risen to the level of critical social
infrastructure. Mentoring is a structured system of personal and social development that can be
described as the systematic transmission of knowledge, skills, values, culture and history through
direct interpersonal communication and association from a more knowledgeable person to a less
knowledgeable person. The person providing the guidance is a mentor. The person receiving
the guidance is a mentee. This guidance happens organically in successful cultures worldwide.
What is the 2015 Black Male Achievement MLK Mentoring Day?
The Martin Luther King Mentoring Day (MLKMD) works to ensure that Black boys and
young Black men are connected to effective mentoring services. MLKMD trains, coordinates,
and supports partner organizations and connects youth and families that request and need
mentors with good-quality mentoring organizations nationwide. We also help guide and support
cities, communities, faith and community organizations, schools and others who want to create
and maintain effective mentor programs. The MLKMD hosts a mentoring day to promote and
popularize mentoring in Black communities and to encourage mentors and mentoring
organizations in every state to mentor Black boys and young Black men.
What about Black girls and youth of other races?
All children and youth deserve great mentors. While our initiative focuses on young Black men
and boys between 5 and 18 years old, Black girls and children of all races should also be
mentored on this day. Please use Dr. Martin Luther Kings birthday and the same principals as
MLKMD to set up mentoring programs for Hispanic, White, Asian and Native American
children of all genders.
How often does a mentor need to contact his mentee?
Although this is a one-day initiative, we encourage continued mentoring interactions between
mentors and mentees. This guide provides tools and guidance for establishing and organizing
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long-term mentoring programs to achieve optimal impact and produce the best outcomes.
During Mentoring Months (January and February 2015), we are asking you to contact your
mentee at least once each month. We recommend that mentors seek out their mentees at least
once a month for at least one year. That is a minimum of 12 contacts per year for at least two
hours per contact. Best practices show that weekly or even daily mentor/mentee contact nets
optimal results. Although not practical for some, well-structured monthly efforts can also make
a significant impact.
Can someone who has not passed the criminal background check still mentor?
That depends on the nature of the crime. Any infractions related to child abuse, pedophilia,
sexual assault, or other youth harm-related crimes are absolutely unacceptable. However, many
ex-offenders can offer potentially valuable, unique insight and perspective to benefit young
Black men and boys.

Forms
Please adapt the following forms for your use.

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2015 Black Male Achievement


MLK Mentoring Day
Parent Consent Form
Mentoring organization: ______________________________ Date of intake: ___________________
1. Student Name________________________________________
2. Date of Birth____________________
3. Gender______________________
4. Grade level_______________
5. Name of parent/guardian _________________________________________________________
6. Address _______________________________________________________________________
7. Phone___________________________
8. Email address_________________________________________________
9. Emergency contacts:
Name ___________________________________ Relationship ____________________________
Address____________________________________________________
Phone____________________________

Name ___________________________________ Relationship ____________________________


Address____________________________________________________
Phone____________________________

BRIEF MENTEE HISTORY


10. Is your child currently taking any medication? ______ yes ______ no
If so, list specific medication(s): _________________________________________________
How often is medication taken?_________________________
Does your child have any food or medical allergies or sensitivities? ______ yes ______no
If so, what are they? ______________________________________________________

PARENT QUESTIONAIRE
11. What are your major academic, social, or other concerns about your child?

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12. What is your vision for your child/what do you wish to happen in your childs future?

13. What are your childs special gifts, talents, strengths or interests?

14. What other information or issues would you like to share with us about your child?

Name of person(s) authorized to pick up child from ________________ mentor program - (Please
carefully provide a detailed and complete response to this question because your child will only be
released to a person whose name is listed below:
1. ____________________________________
2. ____________________________________
3. ____________________________________

Parent Declaration
I, ___________________________________, (print parent or guardians full name) give permission for
my child ____________________________(childs full name) to participate in all BMAMI mentoring
activities.

Parent/Guardian Signature___________________________________________
Date________________________

I agree that The Black Male Achievement Initiative MLK Mentoring Day effort may use any
image, photograph, voice or likeness of my child, in its promotional materials and publicity
without additional compensation. I understand that these photographs, images, video or audio
may be retouched or enhanced and may further be used in publications, print ads, electronic
media (e.g., video, CD-ROM, Internet/WWW), or other media now known or hereafter created,
anywhere in the world. I further understand and release the Black Male Achievement Mentoring
Initiative and its representatives, licensees, employees, photographers, and their designees from
any and all liability for any violation of any privacy or proprietary rights. I understand and agree
that aforementioned materials will become the property of Black Male Achievement Initiative
MLK Mentoring Day.
Parent/Guardian Signature ____________________________________ Date _______________

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2015 Black Male Achievement MLK Mentoring Day


Mentor Registration Form
Mentor Name: ________________________________ Alias, if applicable: _________________
Address: ______________________________________________________________________
City, State Zip: _________________________________________________________________
Phone number: __________________________________________________ Home/Cell/Work
Alternative Phone: _______________________________________________ Home/Cell/Work
E-mail Address: ________________________________________________________________

Emergency Contact
Name: _______________________________________________________________________
Phone number: ___________________________________________________Home/Work/Cell
E-mail Address: ______________________________________________________________
By signing and submitting this application, I affirm that the facts set forth in it are true and
complete. I understand that if I am accepted as a mentor, any false statements, omissions, or
other misrepresentations made by me on this application may result in my immediate dismissal.
I have read and understand the MLKMD Training Information. I am aware that I am expected
to be a positive role model for my mentee(s).
(Initial: _______ )
I agree to engage parents as much as possible throughout the mentoring process.
______ )

(Initial:

I agree to be on time and professional while participating in the MLKMD. (Initial: ____ )
I agree to abide by all rules, policies and protocols and to comport myself in positive manner as a
representative participant of MLKMD (Initial: ____ )
I agree that The Black Male Achievement Initiative MLK Mentoring Day effort may use any
image, photograph, voice or likeness, in its promotional materials and publicity efforts without
additional compensation. I understand that these photographs, images, video or audio may be
retouched or enhanced and may further be used in publications, print ads, electronic media (e.g.,
video, CD-ROM, Internet/WWW), or other media now known or hereafter created, anywhere in
the world. I further understand that by participating in the photography or filming, I release The
Black Male Achievement Mentoring Initiative and its representatives, licensees, employees,
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photographers, and their designees from any and all liability for any violation of any privacy or
proprietary rights.
Signature: ____________________________________

Date: ________________________

Office Use Only


Background Check

Received Resume

References checked

Assigned Mentee (if applicable):

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Copy of ID

Contact Information
Please call The Black Male Achievement Mentoring Initiative with any questions regarding this
guide or MLK Mentoring Day. The Black Star Project will provide technical assistance and
answer any questions you may have.
The Black Star Project
3509 South King Drive, Suite 2B
Chicago, IL 60653
Phone: 773-285-9600
Fax: 773-285-9602
Email: info@blackstarproject.org

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