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Building Blockers

Christopher Gardner

History for Sale: The Agnews hospital building is slated for demolition to make way for a massive R&D campus.

Santa Clara history buffs say the state is preparing to sacrifice an important bit of the past to Sun Microsystems By Chris Torrens
THE BEST WAY to view the Agnews Developmental Center is to enter the grounds via the palm-lined road off Santa Clara's Lafayette Street and proceed toward the stately clock tower. The approach affords a view of the center's Spanish-style buildings, largely unchanged for more than 80 years. It's a view that is likely to change dramatically in coming months. On a recent Saturday afternoon, Liz Holmes and Jacob van Heeckeren walked down the aptly named Palm Road admiring the historic sites. Stopping at the foot of the clock tower, Van Heeckeren pointed out that most of the buildings date back to soon after the great quake of

1906. The quake leveled an older hospital built in the 1880s, he says, and that necessitated construction of the "new" facility for the care of the disabled, which was considered progressive for its time. On a tour of the nearly 90-acre property, we stopped to admire the grand ballroom, as well as a series of residences and support facilities which once allowed Agnews to function like a miniature self-sustaining town. But the pair didn't arrange the visit just to show off the center's past. They have a vision for its future. Holmes and Van Heeckeren are fighting the California Department of General Services--the current owner of the land--in the hope that Agnews someday will become a historic district for public use. If the state has its way, it will sell Agnews to the Mountain View-based Sun Microsystems Inc., and Sun will develop the land for a massive research and development campus. Holmes and Van Heeckeren say the proposed sale is a poor use of public resources. And they suggest that it was accelerated because it was a done deal from the start.

Accidental
SOMETIMES ACTIVISM comes from unlikely sources. Holmes and Van Heeckeren are the first to admit that their initial interest in Agnews was as unlikely as it gets. Van Heeckeren, 58, leads a big band, and Holmes, 34, is the band's singer. They went in search of the Agnews Ballroom in 1995 because they were on the lookout for venues where they could practice and perform. It wasn't until August 1996 that the pair learned the state intended to sell Agnews. Their interest in the place immediately became more than musical. "When we heard that the ballroom was going to be sold and possibly destroyed, we went to a City Council meeting just to see what was going to happen," Holmes says. "At the meeting, we couldn't believe what we were hearing. That's when we got involved." They began by filing an application with the state's Historical Preservation Office to register Agnews as a national historic district and to try to preserve the buildings for public use. Their application pointed out that the state had already found a prospective buyer for the property, and mentioned that Sun intended to destroy most of the buildings. "In other words, Historical Agnews will be gutted," Van Heeckeren's cover letter concluded. More recently, Holmes and Van Heeckeren tried to derail the state's efforts to rezone the land. In early April, the two preservationists sought and gained a recommendation from Santa Clara's Historic Landmarks Commission that the state approve the historic designation. They also resubmitted a substantially beefed-up 200-page application to the state office. Even though the state owns Agnews, the city of Santa Clara must approve the zoning changes needed for the development to proceed. Holmes and Van Heeckeren believe the city would be less likely to grant such a zoning change if the land were deemed historically significant.

"It's more a thorn-in-the-side kind of protection than a cast-in-stone kind of protection," Van Heeckeren says, while admitting that the city could rezone Agnews regardless of its historic status. "But somebody would have to sign on a piece of paper that they approved the bulldozing of a historic district. And an elected official is not likely to be very anxious to have that on his résumé." Officials at the state Historical Preservation Office confirm that they have examined the application, and they say it probably will be approved for National Historic Register consideration by the end of May. The City Council's vote on whether to rezone the land is tentatively scheduled for Sept. 9.

Vision Thing
AT THE HEART of the dispute over Agnews are conflicting perspectives. "What we are proposing for the Agnews site is a one-million-square-foot development," William Agnello, Sun's vice president of real estate and the workplace, told a Dec. 10 meeting of the Santa Clara City Council. At that point the state had already entered into exclusive negotiations with Sun. Agnello went on to describe in general terms what Sun's plans would look like. He promised that some of the features of Agnews' historic core--including the auditorium, the governor's mansion, Palm Road and the facade of the clock tower--would remain virtually unchanged. He also promised that the proposed development would not be used for any form of manufacturing, and that none of the new buildings would exceed the height of existing structures. Public access to the grounds would be maintained and the majority of the mature trees would be saved. But in the same introductory comments, Agnello also acknowledged that Sun was not likely to preserve structures beyond the ones he listed. "We expect to keep many of the historical structures that we believe are at the core visual center of the campus," he said, "but obviously there are many buildings that we will propose not to keep." In April, Agnello confirmed that Sun's current plans are essentially the same as they were in December. He also explained why the company proposed to save only four of the 51 buildings: "The other buildings are simply inefficient or not cost-effective to use for office or R and D space," he said, adding that he didn't think there was any economically viable way to use those buildings.

Fast-track Process
IF THERE IS little agreement on what the future of Agnews should be, there is even less on how the decision should be made. Holmes, Van Heeckeren and other concerned community members--including former Santa Clara Mayor Eddie Souza--allege that the process by which the land was put up for bid resulted in a sweetheart deal between the state and Sun.

Sun flatly denies the accusations. No one from the Department of General Services was available for comment at press time. The process got under way in June of 1993, when the state's Department of Developmental Services moved all of the patients housed in Agnews' west campus to its east campus. The move paved the way for the eventual sale of the west campus, and was vigorously opposed by groups representing Agnews patients. In April of 1996, representatives from a consortium of community colleges made the first official offer for the property: one dollar. They offered the nominal sum because they believed their status as a public entity would allow the state to transfer the property to them for little or no money. The state turned the offer down cold. In July of 1996, the Assembly passed SB 1770, which designated Agnews' west campus as surplus property and put it on the block for sale. A public offering was made a couple of months later and the state entered into exclusive negotiations with Sun in November. "The whole thing was a done deal right from the beginning," Van Heeckeren says. Holmes and Souza concur. The preservationists claim the state used faulty criteria to decide what to do with the land. They say the state should have considered the college consortium's offer. State officials say they could not do so legally, pointing to a law which, they believe, required them to get some serious money for the property. "It's the law," says Anne Richards, a spokesperson for the Department of General Services. "The statute says [Agnews] must be sold at fair market value." Not so, counter Holmes and Van Heeckeren. They assert that the law is written in a way that leaves the General Services director with the option to offer the land for whatever he wants. They quote a phrase from the statute stating that the director may sell Agnews for fair market "or upon terms and conditions as [he] determines are in the best interest of the state." Souza bases his suspicion on what he believes to be the secrecy of the decision to surplus the land, and the speed with which the legislation was pushed through the Assembly. The former mayor complains that there were no public hearings at the state level and suggests that the sale was kept quiet on purpose. "It passed through the state Legislature and was signed by the governor before any of us even knew about it," Souza says. "I mean, this is a process that was unheard of." The details of the negotiations between the state and Sun are, in fact, next to impossible to unlock.

When asked for the dollar figure of Sun's offer or for a list of the bidders, representatives from General Services decline to provide such details, citing ongoing negotiations. Sun is similarly tight-lipped but promises that at some point after the sale all of the relevant documents will be made public. Souza, for one, is disheartened by the state's and Sun's reticence. "Do you know the saying 'Show me the money'?" he asks rhetorically. "Well, that's what I'm saying: 'Show me the money!' " The 90-acre spread, at current market value, has to be worth at least $50 million--maybe much more. The city of Santa Clara estimates that Sun's investment into the project, including the land, demolition, new construction and equipment, would total $230 million. Santa Clara stands to make $4.5 million in permit fees, and the state would earn upward of a million and a half from sales tax alone.

Full Circle
AFTER WALKING AROUND the campus for about an hour, Holmes and Van Heeckeren have come back to the point where they started their tour. As they get ready to leave, they seem optimistic that the flurry of activity surrounding their efforts bodes well for their cause. But even if the city decides to deny the state's zoning request in September, it would be far from an unambiguous vote for the preservationists' vision of the property as a historic district. Holmes doesn't let such thoughts weigh her down as she drives along Palm Road. "The tide is starting to turn big-time," she says as she guides her car out the front entrance. "What seemed like a done deal now seems to be turning our way."
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From the April 24-30, 1997 issue of Metro This page was designed and created by the Boulevards team. Copyright © 1997 Metro Publishing, Inc.

A Citizens Group for Adaptive Re-Use of Agnews

Agnews Preservation Coalition

Legal
The Agnews Preservation Coalition has filed suit against the City of Santa Clara, as parties in real interest, against the State of California and Sun Microsystems, on behalf of the effort to preserve the Agnews Historical District from Sun's wrecking ball. Because the litigation is ongoing, we are, for the time being, not able to provide you with detailed information about the lawsuit. Pending legal approval, we hope to be more informative shortly. In the meanwhile, if you would like, you may contact the Agnews Preservation Coalition by dropping a line by Email. Just press the button.

The column "Fear and Loathing with Skinny DuBaud" (www.news.com - Rumor Mill - Fear and

Loathing) referenced the election version of the Agnewes web site. Because the election is over it had been removed. Since quite a few requests have been received to make it available again, we hereby provide you with a link to the web site referenced by Skinny DuBaud. Press This Link

Law suits are expensive. The Agnews Preservation Coalition is in need of funds to sustain the litigation. Any contributions you wish to make will be greatly appreciated, not just by the Agnews Preservation Coalition, but by every Santa Clara and California citizen who believes that some of our heritage is worth remembering. Make checks payable to:

Agnews Preservation Coalition Legal Fund P.O. Box 1241 Santa Clara, CA 95052

Save Agnews Vote NO on "D"
June 2, 1998 Election Ballot Measure D City of Santa Clara

| What Is Measure D | Visions For Agnews | Debate | Legal | Vote June 2 | Sun's Propaganda |

Sun Microsystems Publicity Blitz
Sun Microsystems has acknowledged spending more than two million dollars since the first of the year to defeat the various groups that wish to retain Agnews for adaptive re-use. Santa Clara voters have received six separate mailings from Sun Microsystems in an effort to win the vote on the referendum, and now the voters are being contacted by telemarketers. Testimonials were mailed and paid for by Sun. The Agnews Preservation Coalition and the other groups together cannot begin to match the blatant and seemingly unlimited - dollar expenditures Sun Microsystems is using in their campaign to muster votes to win. Let's face it - Sun has more money that you and I do collectively. They have a whole battery of employees, consultants, lawyers, etc. on their payroll in an effort to beat us. They even paid their employees to load the Santa Clara Council Chambers during the more heated Council sessions. Sun Microsystems is playing "hardball". If there ever was a "David and Goliath" battle raging, this is it. Between now and the election, Santa Clara voters can expect to be bombarded by Sun's advertising and promotional materials. Don't be surprised if this material is disguised in the form of letters from your "friends and neighbors", and phoney endorsements by usually considered reputable organizations. Let me dissect the last flyer which Sun sent to the Santa Clara voter list. Sun made some interesting statements, and they are outright misleading.
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What Sun Microsystems promotes
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The Reality

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An 82.5-acre research and development center providing 3,600 high quality, high paying jobs.

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Initially the number was 4,500 such jobs, and the number changes each time the subject comes up relative to the audience.
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The majority of these jobs are transfer jobs, not new jobs. The new jobs are expected to be in Phase II which is scheduled to happen 5 years after this project begins. Entry level jobs have never been guaranteed. Almost all of these employees will be commuters. The Environmental Impact Report (EIR) guarantees gridlock. Period. No mitigations.

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Preservation of Agnews' campus setting, heritage landscape and four key historic buildings -with two available for community use such as theater productions, receptions and parties.
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Approximately 1,000 trees of the approximately 1,400 trees are scheduled for removal (see the EIR). The existing horticultural environment will be gutted. Is that preservation? The four buildings which are to be preserved are not necessarily the most historic. The main hospital buildings will be destroyed, as will the main residence buildings. That doesn't leave much. The history of Agnews revolves about the hospital, not the administration building. Of the buildings that will be retained:
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The Administration building is certainly not particularly historic, outside of the context of the whole historical district. It is not clear at this time that the building will be preserved. There is talk about retaining only the facade. Is that preservation? The Governor's Mansion will have its second floor gutted. The Governor's room will no longer exist. Is that preservation? The Clock Tower Building will be destroyed.
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The main wings will be removed. Is that preservation? One of the minor wings will be removed. Is that preservation? Right now Sun is negotiating to remove the back wall of the center structure of the Clock Tower building to replace it with glass for the "see through effect" from inside their lobby. Is that preservation? Guided tours were promised during the approval process with the city. There is no mention of public access, let alone guided tours. Sun

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is not living up to its promises.
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The Auditorium will be preserved. This is the one building which the City Council will not let be destroyed, no matter who own Agnews

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Access to the buildings is practically speaking not available
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Initially Sun proclaimed that the city would basically be given the scheduling book. Now the contract with the city states that the public may use the mansion (ground floor only) and auditorium on three of four weekends per month, and only if Sun has no use for the facilities. The facilities must be scheduled 6 months prior to the event, and are then still subject to cancellation by Sun. Is that public use? For how long do you think this arrangement will survive?

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A park-like Northside oasis with 14+ acres of well-maintained open space, lawns, and heritage trees accessible to area residents on a daily basis
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This "park" is basically Sun's driveway. There are no park facilities, and access is at the discretion of Sun. While initially there was going to be no perimiter fence, and Sun's security came from the design of their actual structures, now there will be a perimiter fence around Agnews, with only a gap at Palm Drive (the driveway) where one can easily install a gate. Is this a park?

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New tax revenues to support police and fire services, and economic, cultural and infrastructure improvements throughout Santa Clara
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Sun has blatantly misrepresented tax revenues. In reality, no credible studies have been conducted
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Initially Sun proclaimed that approximately $4,000,000 in sales tax revenues would derive to the city from their employees spending in Santa Clara.
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That implied that the average Sun employee would make over $88,000 of taxable purchases in Santa Clara. These are after income tax dollars, so the average salary of a Sun employee would then handily exceed $160,000 anually. Since, by Sun's own figures, only 300 of their Agnews employees would actually live in Santa Clara, nobody, not even Sun's most fervent supporters believed this figure

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This number was clearly designed to mislead

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The number has now been reduced from $4,000,000 to $800,000, or to 20% of the original claim.
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This means that Sun's average Agnews employee will spend more than $22,000 in Santa Clara on taxable goods. That is a lot of gas Remember that only 300 of these employees actually reside in Santa Clara, and that the remaining 3,300 employees commute to and from Santa Clara

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Does this mean that all of Sun's claims and promises are only good for 20%?

You may contact the Agnews Preservation Coalition by Email. Just press the button.

Telephone 408-243-6363 See the other links for more info.

| What Is Measure D | Visions For Agnews | Debate | Legal | Vote June 2 | Sun's Propaganda |

A Citizens Group for Adaptive Re-Use of Agnews

Agnews Preservation Coalition

Save Agnews Vote "NO on D"
June 2, 1998 Election Ballot Measure D City of Santa Clara

Call 408-243-6363 if you would like a "No on D" lawn sign

The debate was televised live on May 18, 1998 The Debate will be re-broadcast on Santa Clara cable Channel 6:
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Debate

Friday May 22, 1998 - 5:00 pm Wednesday May 27, 1998 - 3:00 pm Saturday May 30, 1998 - 1:00 pm Monday June 1, 1998 - 7:00 pm

Click Here for Details and some observations

| What Is Measure D | Visions For Agnews | Debate | Legal | Vote June 2 | Sun's Propaganda |

Why Vote No on "Measure D"
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We, The People own Agnews. Voting No on Measure D provides the opportunity: r To master plan the whole Agnews area r To force a full review of the sale process, including a financial analysis r To perform the process out in the open r To let historical developers bid to preserve historical Agnews r To let the people be represented By voting "NO on D", the citizens of Santa Clara will finally have the opportunity to determine the future of our public asset, Agnews. There has never been a comprehensive study of the place of Agnews in the community, and its best utilization and contribution to life in Santa Clara. "No on D" will trigger a comprehensive re-evaluation of the whole Agnews complex. Comprehensive planning needs to be performed - before - it is determined who the buyer should be. The sale of Agnews to Sun Microsystems was a pre-determined deal between the State of California and Sun Microsystems. The process which the State employed to sell this property was not proper. Property must first be offered to other state agencies, Parks & Rec, local agencies, etc. This was not done. The deal Sun has with the State specifically stops any other interested party from being considered And stops the sale of property for the much overdue shopping center too! There are at least four known (and many more not publicly known) companies which have come forward to develop Agnews. These companies were Not Heard, nor given the chance to be considered. They weren't even allowed to tour the Agnews property to formulate a proposal.
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Historic Resources Group - Union Station and The Bunker Hill (L.A.) John Stewart Co. - adaptive reuse of St. Agnews Hospital in San Francisco to Senior Housing. Grudzen Development Co. - an investment group that has historical rehab projects back east that are much larger than Agnews.

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Cattellas in San Francisco - submitted an elaborate prospectus and proposal to the state and got a complete runaround from Sacramanto. They considered it the biggest wate of of their time ever.

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The price Sun is paying for Agnews is $34 million for 82.5 acres. That is $412,000 per acre. Land recently sold in the area for $2.2 million per acre. (Intel - Informix transaction) Sun should be paying $181.5 million if the same "market value" was applied. Sun is buying Agnews for about 20 cents on the dollar. We, the tax payers, are giving Sun at least $161.5 million to take Agnews away from us, and destroy it. Remember that other developers were: r not informed of the opportunity to bid on the property r not permitted to be considered r required to pay full value (in sharp contrast to the sweetheart deal specific to Sun) The Agnews facilities consist of almost 1 million square foot of useable floor space, and this floor space is being destroyed. Agnews Was Not Surplus: The developmentally disabled were removed to artificially reduce resident numbers so it would appear that Agnews could be considered "surplus". The death rate of the mental patients, who are now outplaced, has increased by over 70%, to bring it to a death rate of more than 84%. The state has spent over $8.5 million to build replacement facilities at the Agnews East Campus for the patients who were displaced from Agnews West. And the costs continue to grow. The East Agnews Campus is also on the closure list by the state, and is expected to be closed within 5 years.

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Remember
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Voting No on Measure D provides the opportunity r To master plan the whole Agnews area r To force a full review of the sale process r To perform the process out in the open r To let historical developers bid to preserve historical Agnews r To let the people be represented

Vote No On "Measure D"

| What Is Measure D | Visions For Agnews | Debate | Legal | Vote June 2 | Sun's Propaganda |

You may contact the Agnews Preservation Coalition by dropping a line via Email. Just press the button.

Telephone 408-243-6363 See the other links for more info.

Law suits are expensive. The Agnews Preservation Coalition is in need of funds to sustain the litigation. Any contributions you wish to make will be greatly appreciated, not just by the Agnews Preservation Coalition, but by every Santa Clara and California citizen who believes that some of our heritage is worth remembering. Make checks payable to:

Agnews Preservation Coalition Legal Fund P.O. Box 1241 Santa Clara, CA 95052

| What Is Measure D | Visions For Agnews | Debate | Legal | Vote June 2 | Sun's Propaganda |

Save Agnews Vote NO on "D"
June 2, 1998 Election Ballot Measure D City of Santa Clara

| What Is Measure D | Visions For Agnews | Debate | Legal | Vote June 2 | Sun's Propaganda |

Visions For Agnews
The present Agnews facilities are structurally sound, and extremely well suited for adaptive re-use and re-habilitation. There are so many possibilities that the following is merely a seed for further thought and exploration. Child Care Center Community Center Agnews was home for the Martinson Child Care Center, until they were evicted by the State. Agnews was built to be a community for the metally challenged. There are many facilities present which a community center requires. these facilities are waiting to be incorporated into a community center. The Safety Training Consortium, a state agency, has been using Agnews for their training program until they were evicted by the State. The consortium had asked to take over Agnews for a dedicated training facility, but they were turned down. Affordable facilites are required for the entrepreneurs who start new high tech enterprises. Agnews could provide Santa Clara with a superb high tech center which is populated by entrepreneurs starting their enterprises. This facility could be the starting point for the next Bill Hewlett, David Packard, and Gary Jobs. Agnews is a nationally registered Historical District. The only one in Santa Clara. The district consists of a number of buildings (56 to 80, depending on how one counts) and landscaping. The landscaping, designed by John MacLaren - who also did golden Gate Park, the Presidio, and Central Park in New York City - constitutes a beautiful park. Let's make it available to the public. The Smithsonian Institution - the national museum - has been looking to establish a space museum on the West Coast. Agnews would serve very well for that. NASA has been interested in creating a space college. A higher level of education facility for the furthereance of space science. At present the space educational facilities are quite fragmented throughout the country. Agnews would be an ideal setting for the space college.

Safety Training Center

High Tech Startup Center

Historical District

Park

Smithsonian West NASA Space College

There are many, many more possibilities. The possibilities are limited only by one's imagination.

Qualified developers for adaptive reuse know how to take facilities like Agnews, and convert them into economically viable units. It is done all over the country, and some of the developers who have come forward - but who have not been welcomed - have developed districts far larger than Agnews. These developers have stated bluntly that given the opportunity to do so, they can transform Agnews into a thriving economic community.

To contact the Agnews Preservation Coalition by Email. Just press the button.

Or call (telephone) 408-243-6363 for more information. See the other links for more info.

Law suits are expensive. The Agnews Preservation Coalition is in need of funds to sustain the litigation. Any contributions you wish to make will be greatly appreciated, not just by the Agnews Preservation Coalition, but by every Santa Clara and California citizen who believes that some of our heritage is worth remembering. Make checks payable to:

Agnews Preservation Coalition Legal Fund P.O. Box 1241 Santa Clara, CA 95052

| What Is Measure D | Visions For Agnews | Debate | Legal | Vote June 2 | Sun's Propaganda |

Save Agnews Vote NO on "D"
June 2, 1998 Election Ballot Measure D City of Santa Clara

Debate
Debate was held on Monday, May 18, at 7:00 pm, on Santa Clara cable Channel 6. Debate will be re-broadcast on Santa Clara cable Channel 6:
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Friday May 22, 1998 - 5:00 pm Wednesday May 27, 1998 - 3:00 pm Saturday May 30, 1998 - 1:00 pm Monday June 1, 1998 - 7:00 pm

| What Is Measure D | Visions For Agnews | Debate | Legal | Vote June 2 | Sun's Propaganda |

The debate was competently moderated, and a broad range of topics were addressed. Those in attendance were loyal to their side of the issue, and the only persons likely to have been swayed were in the TV audience. That is as expected. For this reason it is unfortunate that on occasion the Sun contingent resorted to rowdiness to voice their disapproval of positions taken by the representatives of the people. A few blatant items of misinformation were presented by Sun's VP of Real Estate. Among these the following statements:
1. Sun claims that at the Santa Clara city council meeting on January 14, 1997 there was a

unanimous vote by the council to approve the concept of Sun's plan.
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This is patently untrue, and designed to be misleading. After much debate the council voted unanimously to permit the EIR process to commence, but this was only after at least three council members (Lisa Gilmor, Jim Arno, Patty Mahan) were assured that approving the commencement of the EIR in no way indicated approving the concept of Sun's project, and that it in no way constituted a precedent or pre-approval of Sun's project. It was merely an expedient so that if (and only if) the project were approved, there would then be less time delay

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to complete the EIR, as it would already be underway. An unusual means of "doing business" for sure, but that is what the council decided by that unanimous vote.
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Specifically, council member Mahan stated her great reluctance to commence the EIR process fearing that it might be construed as a tacit pre-approval of the project. It was only after she was assured that the vote on the commencement of the EIR had no bearing on the debate of the Sun project that she agreed to go along with it. It was after this discussion that the other reluctant council members agreed to commence the EIR process. When Sun uses this council vote as an example of the city council unanimously approving their plan in principle, Sun is actively misleading you.

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2. Sun claims that the judge fully and completely and unequivocally validated the EIR

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Not so. That is entirely false. The judge did not validate the EIR unequivocally. The judge merely decided not to issue a Writ of Mandate. The judge did not decide that the Sun project is in full compliance with the EIR. The finding of the court in no way suggests that. In fact, there were NO comments made by the Judge. The judge specifically Did Not Certify the text which Sun had provided the court which would have validated Sun's statement. Repeat: The text which Sun provided to the court and which Sun wanted entered into the decision was specifically Not Acceptable to the court. The decision by the judge is a standoff. Neither side won, neither side lost. The decision leaves the matter open to appeal.

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3. Sun claims that the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO, pronounced shippo) backs Sun's

proposal.
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This is false. SHPO considers Agnews a historical treasure, and as such does not believe it should be destroyed. At the Santa Clara planning commission meeting where the Agnews matter was discussed, it was brought to the commissioners attention that SHPO had been conspicuously silent on the Agnews matter. It is almost unprecedented for SHPO to be silent on the possible destruction of a major historical district. It is SHPO's charter to be involved in these matters.

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It turns out that Cherlyn Widell, the head of SHPO (an office appointed by the governor) was threatened with dismissal if she involved herself with the preservation of Agnews. It is the threat of dismissal of the head of SHPO, that caused SHPO to remain silent on the Agnews matter. It had nothing to do with indifference towards Agnews. It was simply a matter of blackmail. The status of Historical District was nevertheless confirmed, unanimously, by SHPO, as well as by the National Register of Historic Places. It should be noted that the Santa Clara city council voted unanimously to support the registration of Agnews in the National Register of Historic Places. Any suggestion that offices or officials charged with the preservation of our national heritage favor the Sun project, is completely and utterly false.

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To contact the Agnews Preservation Coalition by Email. Just press the button.

Or call (telephone) 408-243-6363 for more information. See the other links for more info.

Law suits are expensive. The Agnews Preservation Coalition is in need of funds to sustain the litigation. Any contributions you wish to make will be greatly appreciated, not just by the Agnews Preservation Coalition, but by every Santa Clara and California citizen who believes that some of our heritage is worth remembering. Make checks payable to:

Agnews Preservation Coalition Legal Fund P.O. Box 1241 Santa Clara, CA 95052

| What Is Measure D | Visions For Agnews | Debate | Legal | Vote June 2 | Sun's Propaganda |

A Citizens Group for Adaptive Re-Use of Agnews

Agnews Preservation Coalition

Legal
The Agnews Preservation Coalition has filed suit against the City of Santa Clara, as parties in real interest, against the State of California and Sun Microsystems, on behalf of the effort to preserve the Agnews Historical District from Sun's wrecking ball. Because the litigation is ongoing, we are, for the time being, not able to provide you with detailed information about the lawsuit. Pending legal approval, we hope to be more informative shortly. In the meanwhile, if you would like, you may contact the Agnews Preservation Coalition by dropping a line by Email. Just press the button.

Law suits are expensive. The Agnews Preservation Coalition is in need of funds to sustain the

litigation. Any contributions you wish to make will be greatly appreciated, not just by the Agnews Preservation Coalition, but by every Santa Clara and California citizen who believes that some of our heritage is worth remembering. Make checks payable to:

Agnews Preservation Coalition Legal Fund P.O. Box 1241 Santa Clara, CA 95052

| What Is Measure D | Visions For Agnews | Debate | Legal | Vote June 2 | Sun's Propaganda |

Save Agnews Vote NO on "D"
June 2, 1998 Election Ballot Measure D City of Santa Clara

| What Is Measure D | Visions For Agnews | Debate | Legal | Vote June 2 | Sun's Propaganda |

Voter Referendum
Measure "D" on the June 2, 1998 ballot for the City of Santa Clara will let the citizens decide whether the city's planned development with Sun Microsystems should proceed. The Santa Clara City Council ignored their own Planning Commission, and Historical Landmarks Commissions' recommendations - both of which voted against the Sun project, as did CalTrans and others. In other words, the Santa Clara City Council voted by the smallest simple majority (4 votes for Sun, and 3 votes for Agnews) to affect a major quality of life issue, contrary to the advise of their own advisory boards. An issue of this magnitude is more appropriately decided by a two-thirds majority vote, or, is more rightly submitted to the voters to decide. (which the City Council voted against) Citizen input was allowed, but not really heard. The four yes voters had already made up their minds. Essentially public input was kept to a minimum, and in reality ignored. This project was a done deal even before any public input was allowed. For example, why was there no fiscal analysis on this project? That is not a small oversight! Projects incur costs as well as generaste revenue. The Santa Clara City Council has not provided what one might consider a stellar example of the democratic process. It is more appropriately referred to as a subversion of it. Let's stop this boondogle, go back, and Do Things Right. The Agnews issue has been controversial and divisive. "Measure D" provides the vehicle for letting the voters decide the matter. As a voter in the City of Santa Clara, you should let your voice be heard. Make sure your vote is counted. Please be a caring and responsible citizen, make the democratic process work, and vote

No on Measure D
on the June 2nd election.

You may contact the Agnews Preservation Coalition by Email. Just press the button.

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Agnews Developmental Center Agnews History "More Than an E-Mail Discussion Group"

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THE COMMUNITY IMPERATIVE A REFUTATION OF ALL ARGUMENTS IN SUPPORT OF INSTITUTIONALIZING ANYBODY BECAUSE OF MENTAL RETARDATION

Federal Influence In Agnews' Poor Rating San Francisco Chronicle March 10, 1999 Agnews Developmental Center Could Be Decertified San Francisco Chronicle, March 9, 1999 Agnews May Lose Funding San Jose Mercury March 9, 1999 Embattled Agnews chief steps down San Jose Mercury February 3, 1999

Historic Agnews buildings coming down San Jose Mercury October 26, 1998 Old Agnews Hospital Site Sold to Developers San Francisco Chronicle Oct 10, 1998 State to Begin Negotiations with Development Consortium For Sale of Former Agnews Land in Santa Clara Agnews gets hit hard by state licensing CAPT Outreach Magazine September 1998 Critical Understaffing At Disabled Center San Francisco Chronicle Sept. 08,1998 Inspectors slam Agnews' San Jose Mercury Sept. 04, 1998 Quality Improvement into a Behavioral Psychology Unit Use of Restraint in the Treatment of the Developmentally Disabled Metro, the Silicon Valley's Weekly newspaper Mission: Santa Claus Agnew s in the Way Richell e Lewis Willia m Le Plante Judy Lynn Hansen and Diane Siemons Larry Morgan Pictures Agnews Developmental Center pictures Agnews Power Plant

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Agnews in the Way
Tim and Judy Haller share an embrace. Tim has lived at Agnews since nearly drowning at the age of 2.

When the buildings are razed, the land is cleared and the R&D parks occupy a perfect slice of the Golden Triangle, few will remember Agnews' residents. Photographs and text by Christopher Gardner
TIM HALLER EXEMPLIFIES the most fragile and vulnerable residents at Agnews Developmental Center. After nearly drowning when he was 2 years old, Haller lost most of his basic faculties. In the 12 years Tim has lived at the north San Jose facility under close medical attention, he has led a peaceful and safe existence. His mother, Judy, visits daily and takes Tim home on the weekends. A single mom who works full time as a research biologist for a biotechnology company in Palo Alto, she survived a round of layoffs a few years back and sees irony in her son's present

situation. "I survived the downsizing; now, my son is not." AFTER 107 YEARS of service, the Agnews Developmental Center where Haller lives is under immense pressure to close. And people like Haller will face difficult options: to move five hours away to a similar facility in Porterville or transfer into a privately operated community home. On one side of the fight are the 585 residents who are mentally retarded and medically fragile, along with their families. On the other side, the state of California, Pete Wilson and captains of industry. Across California, officials are closing developmental centers and sending patients to cheaper, privately operated community homes. Agnews, which sits in the middle of Silicon Valley's high-tech Golden Triangle, is worth hundreds of millions of dollars--but only if it is empty. Cisco Systems and Sun Microsystems are eager to buy the property where Agnews rests. Developmental centers are the refuge of the state's most vulnerable citizens. The people who live in California's five such institutional settings are wholly unable to care for themselves. Agnews and similar institutions provide these people with the means to survive. Centers like Agnews, however, are expensive to operate. The staff outnumbers the residents by a ratio of 2-to-1. Nurses and doctors must be on the premises 24 hours a day. Therapists, psychiatric technicians, groundskeepers and the building maintenance crew all add up to a considerable sum. Because of these costs, and because of some families' desires to have options other than developmental centers, community care facilities have become the main service provider to the developmentally disabled. Community care units take many forms, but are typified by the group halfway house. Here the mentally disabled receive support, but they are supposed to achieve of level of independence. For some this transition is smooth; for others it is a death sentence. The government downsizing has been marked by an increased mortality rate within the transferred population. A UC-Riverside study performed by Dr. David Strauss, using the state's own numbers, has found a 72 percent greater risk of premature death in the community care homes. "Mortality is an excellent measure of quality of care," Strauss said in an interview with KQED. "Where you find an excess of mortality, you're going to find an excess of hospitalization, illness and medical problems of all sorts." Dennis Amundson, director of the state Department of Developmental Services, has known about these figures since July 1995, but is just now acknowledging the merits of Strauss' study. Until recently he attacked the study: In an interview with the Riverside Press-Enterprise newspaper, he accused the doctor of biased and skewed findings. Last month, after years of dispute, the California Medical Association entered the fray, demanding a stop to care-home placements until a review can be completed. Amundson has questioned the constitutionality of stopping the transfers, but the 38,000-member AMA's call

has given new hope to families of people who live in state-run developmental centers.

Meet a few of Agnews' residents: William Le Plante Larry Morgan Judy Lynn Hansen and Diane Siemons Richelle Lewis

AGNEWS, HOWEVER, faces a second and more daunting threat to survival: the pressure to develop its land. Its east campus contains 425 acres, 124 of which were recently sold to Cisco. The west campus contains 300 acres, 90 of which are slated for purchase by Sun Microsystems. The land is also home to the Police Athletic League, a BMX bicycle motorcross track, a child-care center and a coalition for the homeless. Additionally, all of Agnews' residents have been moved to the east campus in a consolidation effort that critics charge is an attempt to create the appearance that the west campus is surplus property. As evidence, they point to the fact that Agnews will soon lease 50,000 square feet of private property in Santa Clara for storage, maintenance and some work programs that could be housed in the property it already owns. Agnews also will need to add eight classrooms and a multipurpose room to the east campus. Meanwhile, on the west campus, administrators will be tearing down historic buildings and sacrificing open space. Gov. Pete Wilson, who discussed the closure of the west campus in a televised interview, describes these properties as surplus, having "no clear or present need." Cisco and Sun see these properties as ideal for their companies. But Agnews parent Mick Morgan calls it corporate welfare. Alan Alexander, president of Save Agnews Now and also an Agnews parent, uses stronger language. "They are stealing the land," he says. "It's prime land." He pulls out a recent Mercury News interview with Sun Microsystems CEO Scott McNealy, who, when asked if Silicon Valley's business leaders have a responsibility to give back to the community, answered, "I don't know that I have a responsibility or an obligation that's written down. ... I make my own personal choices." Alexander is furious over this answer. "They are on such a goddamned ego trip," he says. "Their responsibility is to get the hell out of there. ... Why are they in there in the first place? They are destroying something that has a valid reason for being, which has been there a hundred years." When given another opportunity to respond to criticisms about displacement of the Agnews

residents, William Agnello, Sun Microsystems vice president of real estate and the workplace, said, "That is a state issue, so we really have no comment." When pressed further, he responded, "We think it is obvious that it is a sensitive issue. But we are here because the state has already decided by law to sell the facility." THERE ARE FIVE developmental centers in California to serve the state's most needy patients--the profoundly retarded and autistic, the medically fragile, people with severe behavioral problems and others who have suffered brain damage from accidents such as neardrownings. More than 4,000 people remain in these centers, and these individuals are those who were considered unsuitable for community centers during the institutional closures that began under the leadership of then-governor Ronald Reagan. Agnews houses 590, although at its peak it handled 4,600. Some parents allege that the effort to close down these centers has been too aggressive. "The Regional Center in Orange County three months ago pressured me to place Billy," mother Jackie Le Plante says. "The department continually contacts parents and conservators with possible placements into the community. You have to be hard-nosed in telling these CC [community care] homes no." There also have been many allegations and one lawsuit charging the state-run centers with "client shopping." This is the practice of allowing privately run community care businesses to tour developmental centers and look for prospective clients--ones without strong family ties or who exhibit docile behavior. It is alleged that this activity is done without the knowledge of the families or conservators--a charge that Agnews' executive director, Kay Haralson, does not deny outright. "I've never observed one myself. ... I've had people tell me that they think it's occurring, and I know that people believe that it occurs, but I haven't actually seen it," Haralson says. Haralson is the director who closed the historic Stockton Developmental Center in 1995. Although proud of her staff and facility, she would not choose to have her own child in Agnews. When Haralson was asked where she would place a child of her own, if her child were in the condition of near-drowning victim Tim Haller, she has a one-word response: "Home." Later she said, "I wouldn't leave my kid to the state." Haller's mother, Judy, angrily brands as "bullshit" the notion that someone is not a good parent if he or she chooses not to keep a child at home. "I have him here at Agnews, and I go see him every day, but I also know that he needs the services that he has. If I had him at home, being a single parent, I don't think that I could keep my job and wake up every hour or two hours to turn him at night like I do when I bring him home on the weekend. Will society think any less of me? They won't, and I don't care what they think of me because he has what he needs." Asked about Tim's future, Judy Haller chokes back tears and says, "When I'm gone, I just hope that he is happy, that people still hold him and touch him."

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From the April 24-30, 1997 issue of Metro This page was designed and created by the Boulevards team. Copyright © 1997 Metro Publishing, Inc.

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Richelle Lewis

Richelle Lewis listens to music therapist Tom Dalton sing her favorite tunes. Music therapy is one of the many programs that enrich the lives of Agnews residents.

Richelle is 43 years old and profoundly retarded. A bike helmet protects her head because she is prone to grand mal seizures. Ricki, as she is called, is nonverbal and relatively sedate-except when music plays. Then she comes alive, touching the guitar to feel the vibrations and moving her fingers rapidly in reaction to the tune. Sometimes she will even get up and move about the room, as if dancing. The daughter of Betty and Jack Lewis, Richelle resides at Agnews Developmental Center. It is here where, as far as Ricki is concerned, the music lives. Agnews' music man is Tom Dalton. A registered music therapist, Dalton sees Ricki three times a week in sessions where she can listen and participate. He sings and plays guitar, drums and keyboard, and he teaches Ricki and other Agnews residents to do the same.

Dalton says music therapy is a creative outlet for the people who live there. "It's really about quality of life," Dalton adds. Ricki has lived at Agnews for 20 years, and her parents hope she can remain there. "We always thought Ricki would be at Agnews forever," Mrs. Lewis says.
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From the April 24-30, 1997 issue of Metro This page was designed and created by the Boulevards team. Copyright © 1997 Metro Publishing, Inc.

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William Le Plante

William Le Plante wheels himself around in an upright wheelchair as part of the MOVE program. Seeing the world from a greater height is a new experience for him.

Stern and focused, Billy Le Plante slowly wheels himself around the room. Rather than sitting in a chair, however, he's standing upright. Wheelchair-bound and mentally retarded since birth, the 40-year-old Billy has seen the world only from seated or prone positions--until now. This higher vantage point is a new experience Billy has found in the Mobility Opportunity Via Education program (MOVE) at Agnews. "Bill looks forward to class because it gives him the freedom of movement," says Paul Hasselbach, a teacher for the program. "He is much more alert since MOVE ... he is very active." Mentally retarded and suffering from cerebral palsy, Billy has been at Agnews since 1979. Billy's mom, Jackie Le Plante, says that community-care workers often approach her about possible homes for Billy, but she is content to keep her son at Agnews. After their children are 18, parents can get legal conservatorship and have a say in their children's placements. "The

system did what it wanted until we became conservators," Le Plante says. "You worry about your own. ... All that I can hope for Bill is that he's well taken care of, ... which he is in this facility. ... The quality of life here is better than at any community-care housing. The staff are enlightened, compassionate and well-trained." Billy is silent, but his eyes are alert and purposeful as he checks out the room. After a while, Hasselbach takes him to the administration building so he can exercise on a different style of upright walker--one that lets him use his legs. The administration hall floors are perfect for this device. Although he is tired, he still inches up the hall. Administrative staff come and go about their business, hurriedly scurrying down the halls, a blur of motion compared to Bill.
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From the April 24-30, 1997 issue of Metro This page was designed and created by the Boulevards team. Copyright © 1997 Metro Publishing, Inc.

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Judy Lynn Hansen and Diane Siemons

Diane Siemons and Judy Lynn Hansen exchange hugs. The closing of Agnews would force an end to their companionship.

"Wherever you are, it is your friends who make your world." --William James
Diane slowly wheels Judy down the wheelchair ramp toward the covered patio. The weather is glorious, and the two of them aim to enjoy it a bit. Theirs is a wonderful friendship based on love, companionship and total acceptance. Neither cares that the other has physical and mental problems. Diane is a slender 36-year-old. Doctors don't really understand why, but they have determined that she operates at the level of a 4-year-old. She has a curved spine and is prone to grand mal seizures. None of this dampens her infectious smile and talkative, lively manner. Judy has more severe disabilities. She was born with the birth defect meningeocyle, which is

similar to spina bifida. Part of her brain was exposed at birth. Surgery was needed to cover the open areas, and afterward it was clear that she had suffered brain damage. Despite all of her troubles, Judy is smiling and vibrant. The 31-year-old has resided at Agnews since 1989. After three years on a waiting list, it took a court order to obtain a spot for Judy at Agnews, and Judy's mom is reluctant to give it up. Five months ago the administration wanted Judy to try a community home, but her mother was concerned about disrupting the friendship Judy has with Diane. Once outside, Diane cajoles Judy to smile for a picture. They laugh and tickle each other like kids in line for their school portraits. To outsiders, Judy's speech is hard to understand, yet Diane knows exactly what Judy wants or needs. During a brief separation for a picture with her mom, Diane watches Judy out of the corner of her eye to make sure she is fine. "They understand each other. ... They miss each other when one goes home for the weekend. ... They need to stay together, or it would break the other's heart," Mrs. Hansen says.
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From the April 24-30, 1997 issue of Metro This page was designed and created by the Boulevards team. Copyright © 1997 Metro Publishing, Inc.

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Larry Morgan

Larry Morgan enjoys his work as part of the Agnews landscaping team. The extra money he earns often results in gifts for his mother.

The grating sound of a rake on asphalt tells of Larry Morgan's efforts. Slowly, he battles the stray leaves and paper that whirl around his ankles in the Agnews parking lot. Unknown to Larry, another battle is raging over his fate and future. His home for the past 20 years has been Agnews. His loving parents, Mick and Marilyn Morgan, raised Larry, their third son, until he turned 14. At this point his size and aggressive behavior made him too hard for them to control. "You never knew what was going to happen. ... Nobody could handle him," Mrs. Morgan says. Living at Agnews has given Larry stability. The staff of doctors and psychiatric technicians keep him on an even keel. Mrs. Morgan admires and respects the staff: "I could not be a better mother than his unit leader." Larry has less severe developmental disabilities than most Agnews residents. The Morgans

would consider trying him on the outside, except that they fear if it didn't work out and Larry had to return to a developmental center, the administration might not allow him back into Agnews. Legally, Agnews doesn't have to. Larry could be sent to one of the other four developmental centers in the state, the likely one being Porterville, which is five hours to the south. Because they live close by, Larry's parents are able to see him almost every day and bring him home on the weekends, which they would be unable to do if he moved. The Morgans also worry that if Larry's medication were not properly monitored, he could become violent and get in trouble with the law. They fear that the police might not know how to deal with their 6-foot, 2-inch, 200-pound son. At worst, they point out, a confrontation could turn violent, as in the case of Joseph Leitner, a developmentally disabled adult who went off his medication while living in a community-care residence. Police picked up Leitner for acting strangely, and when in custody Leitner was smothered while restrained underneath a blanket. He is still in a coma. "It all comes back to a parent's love and concern for their child," Mrs. Morgan says. "Larry always introduces me as 'This is my beautiful mother.' " Holding up a studio portrait of Larry, his proud mom relates one of the lessons she learned from her son. "Larry has taught us patience and acceptance of other people. He has taught me to be more compassionate, and he has taught me about unconditional love."
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From the April 24-30, 1997 issue of Metro This page was designed and created by the Boulevards team. Copyright © 1997 Metro Publishing, Inc.

Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal - September 15, 1997 http://sanjose.bizjournals.com/sanjose/stories/1997/09/15/editorial3.html

OPINION

Preserving this piece of San Jose history comes with too high a price
The old Montgomery Hotel again finds itself in the limelight.

It has been the source of some controversy since spring, when the San Jose Redevelopment Agency proposed razing the now-shuttered structure to make room for a 300-room addition to the Fairmont Hotel.

Preservationists argue that the hotel, built in the period immediately after the earthquake of 1906, should be restored. They said it represents construction techniques and a design unique to the period, and thus should not fall victim to the wrecking ball.

Now an environmental impact report prepared by the city seems to back that point of view, claiming rehabilitation is feasible. However, the report did not spell out the costs involved, which could run into the tens of millions of dollars.

For that reason alone we believe the City Council should proceed with plans to tear down the building and construct a 15-story addition to the Fairmont.

Preservationists forget that the continued success of downtown redevelopment revolves around the continued success of the Fairmont.

It has become a prime gathering place for various activities and events.

We must help strengthen that important role by allowing the Fairmont to grow so that it can hold its own in a competitive marketplace.

Despite its seeming importance, the 86-year-old Montgomery is architecturally insignificant, and not worthy of a costly restoration.

In this particular case, we should be trying to ensure the future, not hang on to the past.

© 1997 American City Business Journals Inc. Web reprint information

All contents of this site © American City Business Journals Inc. All rights reserved.

Sun Microsystems
Santa Clara Campus Phase I & II Santa Clara, CA Architect: Hellmuth Obata Kassabaum View photos of the project Sun Microsystems' Santa Clara Campus was built on the site of the old Agnews Developmental Center. During the first phase of construction Rudolph and Sletten built five new two and three-story buildings surrounding Agnews' four core historic buildings near the campus' main entrance. The four buildings -- including Agnews' landmark clock tower -- were refurbished and are used by Sun as part of the company's new research and development campus at Lafayette Street and Montague Expressway. Sun is adding over 600,000 square feet of office space for research and development - mostly large computer labs for software and hardware design -and 3,600 high-tech jobs.

Bayer Corporation Microsoft Corporation California Institute of Technology Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute Genencor Stanford University Copia: The American Center for Wine, Food and the Arts Apple Computer, Inc. Stanford University 3Com Corporation Stanford University University of San Diego Chiron Corporation Stanford University Monterey Bay Aquarium Genentech Sun Microsystems - Menlo Park Sweetwater Union High School District Sun Microsystems - Santa Clara Stonestown Development Corporation Childrens Hospital Los Angeles The Scripps Research Institute The Money Store Shaklee Corporation

Related Hooked on Construction articles: Sun Microsystems Restores and Recycles at Agnews The Rewards of Recycling

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Sun Microsystems
Santa Clara Campus Phase I & II Santa Clara, CA

Bayer Corporation Microsoft Corporation California Institute of Technology Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute Genencor Stanford University Copia: The American Center for Wine, Food and the Arts Apple Computer, Inc. Stanford University 3Com Corporation Stanford University University of San Diego Chiron Corporation Stanford University Monterey Bay Aquarium Genentech Sun Microsystems - Menlo Park Sweetwater Union High School District Sun Microsystems - Santa Clara Stonestown Development Corporation Childrens Hospital Los Angeles The Scripps Research Institute The Money Store Shaklee Corporation

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Andy's Infrared Website
Agnews Development Center
April, 1999

SUPERINTENDENT'S RESIDENCE AGNEWS DEVELOPMENT CENTER First opened in 1889, Agnews State Hospital (designed by local architect Jacob Lenzen) was the third California state hospital established to treat the mentally ill. In 1996, the land was sold to a local computer company and most of the buildings were demolished, much to the disappointment of local historical enthusiasts. When I took these photographs in early 1998, most of the buildings were abandoned and the ground was overgrown. It was great! This building, formerly the Superintendent's Residence, was hidden from the north entrance to the Agnews Center. I had to slog through waist-deep weeds, overgrown trees and man-eating spiderwebs to get this shot. Today, this is one of the four historic Agnews buildings that was restored by Sun Microsystems and is available for public rental. through the City of Santa Clara Parks and Recreation Department.

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Agnews Development Center
April, 1999

AGNEWS CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER

The Child Development Center was the most recognizable structure at Agnews because it was visible to everyone who drove by along Montague Expressway. This building was demolished in December, 1998.

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Agnews Development Center
April, 1999

SECOND STREET AGNEWS DEVELOPMENT CENTER During the 1906 earthquake, many of the wards at the Agnews Development Campus collapsed, killing over 100 patients. Most of the buildings were soon rebuilt, but eventually torn down again in 1998. This building was located on the former Second Street. I'm not sure what the building was used for, but it appears to be either a chapel or an auditorium. This building was demolished in December, 1998.

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Agnews Hospital

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Today known as the world famous Sun Microsystems/Agnews Developmental Center, the campus-like setting of the former Agnews Insane Asylum consists of a grouping of numerous reinforced concrete, brick, stucco and tile buildings. They are constructed in large rectangular-shaped plans and designed in a Mediterranean Revival style. The buildings are formally placed within a landscaped garden of palms, pepper trees and vast lawns. The treatment of the insane in California dates from the earliest days of the Gold Rush. The first provisions for the insane were to lock them up with criminals in the ship Ephemia, purchased in 1849 by the City of San Francisco, and later to house them at the San Francisco marine hospital in 1850, used primarily for ailing seamen. In 1885 the Agnews Residential Facility was established by the California State Legislature as a neuropsychiatric institution for the care and treatment of the mentally ill. Agnews, opened in 1889, was the third institution Treatment Building of the Agnews Insane Asylum, now known as in the state established for the mentally ill. Twenty-one years later, the greatest the Clock Tower Photograph by Judith Silva, courtesy of the City of Santa Clara tragedy of the 1906 earthquake in Santa Clara County took place at the old Agnews State Hospital. The multistoried, unreinforced masonry building crumbled, killing over 100 patients. The Institution was then redesigned in, what was then, a revolutionary cottage plan spreading the low-rise buildings along tree-lined streets in a manner that resembled a college campus. The Mediterranean Revival style buildings were constructed of concrete with tile roofs, decorative tile patterns, rustic wooden balconies, porch columns and bannisters. Bands of decorative tile patterns reflect the Hispanic influence on the buildings. Now at the center of the Sun Microsystems/Agnews complex is the Clock Tower Building (formerly the Treatment Building) with its massive symmetrical clock tower. The auditorium is an outstanding building, which seems as beautiful today as it was in 1913. Agnews State Hospital was significant as the first modern mental hospital in California, and subsequently other State facilities, followed the example of Agnews. It embodied the distinctive characteristics of a progressive mental hospital in the early 20th century as it was intended to be a "cheerful" place with its decentralized specialized buildings for different treatment purposes and different types of patients. Its small, low-scale buildings were designed to bring light and air to patients. After World War II, new approaches to treatment had an effect on hospital operations and facilities. Among the most important new approaches were the establishment of community clinics, treatment outside of hospitals, and treatment of the developmentally disabled at State Hospitals formerly intended for the mentally ill. A watershed event was the passage of the 1971 Laterman Act, which resulted in closing of several State hospitals and restructuring of the State system. Since that time there has been an increasing move toward closing hospitals and reliance on community treatment programs. In 1996, the State of California put up for sale 90 acres of the surplus State land (the former site of Agnews Developmental Center). Intense community interest in the future of the site made decisions about the development of the land a challenge. To foster the site's preservation, Agnews Hospital was listed in the National Register of Historic Places for its historic and architectural significance. Sun Microsystems invested $10 million in the restoration of key historic buildings on the property where it built its corporate headquarters, office/research and

development space for more than 3,000 employees. This project was a first of its kind; in which a city, community and corporation share, in an interactive way, a work environment and a public environment. Two of the restored historic buildings, the auditorium and the mansion, are available for cultural and social events by community groups on evenings and weekends. Most of the major stands of heritage trees around the historic buildings were preserved and the park-like grounds beautified and maintained for the use of local residents. Local historical groups worked with Sun to refurbish a small local history museum inside the auditorium, the historic Agnews cemetery and a monument to victims of the 1906 earthquake. Smaller residential buildings from the original Agnews Hospital complex are being relocated and will become part of an affordable housing project on another portion of the State surplus land. The site also includes 100+ year-old trees, historically a habitat for the protected species of burrowing owls. Worries about this owl population were overcome when the State agreed to purchase a suitable habitat for the owls and deed it to Images of the Auditorium, Executive Mansion, and Administration Building, today used by Sun Microsystems the California Deparment of Fish and Game for perpetual management. Both Photograph by Judith Silva, courtesy of the City of Santa Clara Sun and the City helped to finance the acquisition of this new home for burrowing owls. The auditorium and mansion have been used for many public events since their restoration was completed including performances by the community ballet, chorale, symphony and drum and bugle corps. Located on Lafayette St. at Agnew Rd., Santa Clara. Park and grounds are open to the public. For rental of the auditorium and mansion, contact the City of Santa Clara's Parks and Recreation Department at 408-615-2261.

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Publication Date: Friday Jan 7, 2000

Down to the doorknobs
Demolition sales give old homes new life, new homes old charm by Elizabeth Lorenz Palo Alto architect Monty Anderson was looking for just the right kind of slate for the roof of a home he was working on in Los Altos Hills. When he heard that crews were in the midst of replacing the 100-year-old slate roof on the Carolands mansion in Hillsborough, he saw his opportunity. The century-old slate, he said, is aged to a "beautiful patina" which will be used both for the roof of the new home and the fireplace. Anderson had similar good timing with the renovation of a Birge Clark building in the historic Ramona Street area. For the new portion of the building, architects were hoping to duplicate the red Spanish tile roof and thought they might have to use new. Instead, they were able to use tile from buildings being torn down at the former Agnews State Hospital in Santa Clara. Salvaging items from demolitions "is becoming a bigger and bigger deal," Anderson said. Rather than using all new materials, many contractors and architects seek materials from older homes to enhance the character of new ones, or homes being restored. To Paul Gardner, a former carpenter and contractor, they are becoming a way of life. He runs Whole House Building Supply and Warehouse in East Palo Alto, holding demolition sales for homeowners who are planning to tear down their homes to build new ones. But before the wrecking ball does its work, Gardner steps in to sell the contents of the home, down to the framing sometimes, to others who can reuse it. Palo Alto builder Tamara Riley has been on both sides, at times tearing homes down and at other times building them. Recently, she prepared to tear down a home on Tennyson Avenue in Palo Alto, and had Gardner sell its fixtures for her. "It's just amazing to see what people will actually buy--door knockers off doors, baseboards, (and) light switchplates," she said. She also enjoys buying previously used fixtures for her clients. She recently bought a hood for a stove, paying about a quarter what it would cost new. She also bought a $20 Victorian light fixture which fit perfectly in a restored old Victorian home. To many Midpeninsulans, a demolition is a very different thing than it is in the rest of the United States. "We're taking so many good buildings down," Gardner said. "To most of the rest of the country, (a

demolition) is a house in bad shape." Here, he said, "a teardown is a house that was remodeled a year ago, or a smaller, older house." For example, Gardner recently hosted a demolition sale at a 5,000-square-foot Atherton home which had been remodeled just two years earlier. But the new owners wanted to tear the home down and start fresh. So, out went the granite countertops and cherry cabinets to new owners. "Ninety-five percent of the homes here that are being torn down are in good shape," he notes. Many older homes were built with old-growth redwood, lumber which is hard to find today. Gardner's company, which is for-profit, hosts demolition sales frequently, advertising them through a newsletter and Web site (www.driftwoodsalvage.com). To allow clients to deduct their donations from their taxes, Whole House Building Supply contracts with the East Palo Alto Council of Tenants, a nonprofit organization. Clients donate items to EPACT and get a tax write-off letter. In return, EPACT gets a portion of the proceeds of the demolition sales. Gardner often takes his digital camera to a home and photographs siding, mirrors, marble, granite, windows and other fixtures and posts them on the company's Web site. Everything that is salvageable is priced and labeled, including doors, windows, cabinets, and hardware. Then, do-it-yourselfers, contractors, architects and others are invited to tour the homes, and buy and take away what they wish to purchase. Prices are based on the buyers removing the stuff themselves with hand tools. Only contractors are allowed to use power tools. At a recent sale on Tennyson Avenue in Palo Alto, two women wanted a door, which had been priced at $400. By the time they were done, the door was was bid up to $1,200. Normally, the company doesn't auction merchandise, but does give buyers a chance to bid on something if they don't like the posted price. Buyers can come upon amazing finds. Glazed steel doors that were custom-made in Germany went up for sale in a house in Palo Alto after the new buyers decided they didn't like them. The doors originally cost $3,000. Three-quarter-inch oak hardwood floors, doorknobs, old maple kitchen cabinets, antique light fixtures, small panes of window glass, and ornate crown molding are among the items in demand. Even newer, Eichler homes have valuable assets, like tongue-in-groove ceilings and mahogany walls. Old patio bricks are in high demand, Gardner said, and even those old-fashioned fold-down built-in ironing boards in the kitchens of some older homes. Homeowners are able to donate, and thus write off the materials from their old homes, while Gardner is able to make a small profit off of the sale of the materials. Things that are not sold are taken to Whole House Building Supply's warehouse on Pulgas in East Palo Alto. "It's a great place to shop for values if you know what things cost," Riley said. "It's a great way to get rid of things without just letting it come down with the house, and environmentally (you're) trying to do something more correct."

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Stalking Joan Baez
Written by a mental health consumer

Prologue The sobs coming from the gurney next to mine, from which I was separated by a cloth hospital curtain, were heartrending, demanding immediate attention, but I could do nothing to help that poor girl. I was strapped firmly down and couldn’t move. “You’re all right, Essie”, I heard a woman’s voice saying over and over again. “You’re all right. You’re all right. You’re all right.” I believed the voice as if it were speaking directly to me, as I had only felt such euphoria 5 times in my life before. This was my sixth and final electro-shock therapy session, and the grueling depression I had been living under for close to a year was gone. So was all memory of that year, and slightly more; I didn’t care. I was cured, and ready to go out and do what all other 19 year olds do: live my life. My greatest challenge now was to get away from my repressive family in the tiny Northwestern town I had always called “home”, go to New York City or California, and I would be, for the first time in my life, free. Free. Free. Free from sordid and unhappy love affairs and suicide attempts and averted eyes of relatives who were thinking “It’s a shame about _______ and his nervous condition, just like his Uncles, Aunts, Cousins etc. He’ll have to go to the huge State Hospital in Warren to live for the rest of his life. And such a bright lad, too. Shame. He always did read too much.”

The Fall I have always loved music. That may be a stupid statement, because everyone loves music of one sort or another. Shakespeare said “The man who hath no music in his soul nor is not moved by the concord of sweet sounds is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils. The motions of his spirit are dull as night, and his affections dark as Erebus; let no such man be trusted.” Or words to that effect. Of course, the whole subject of “music” is, if I may say so, “subjective”: what I like you hate, and vice versa. While I loathe Country Western Music, viewing it as racist twangy garbage; literally millions of other folks fervently maintain, “If it ain’t country it ain’t music.” I’ve even heard there are people who don’t adore Mozart, although I don’t believe I’ve ever met any. At least I hope not. And to me, there is a big difference between what I call “serious” or, to the uninitiated, “classical” music, and “pop” or “popular” music. The former requires study and contains a depth and breadth not found in the latter, but both greatly effect the emotions. I love them both, and it would be difficult to say which I enjoyed more. Having been raised in a home where “serious” music was appreciated, and having gone the rounds of piano lessons, marching band, chorus,

concert band, music camp in the summer in school, and having taken a few voice lessons from a refined and cultured elderly rich lady when I was in my teens, I rather fancy myself as educated when it comes to that “concord of sweet sounds”. When The Beatles came along I jumped on that bandwagon and grew up with them; I dabbled in Motown, learned to do the Twist and the Jerk, wept along with The Righteous Brothers. I was probably a bit snobby about my musical tastes because I went to sleep each night listening to Beethoven’s 6th all the way through high school. When Janis Joplin came along she was an instant Goddess; Barbra Streisand was mostly a secret passion because if you listened to here you were weird, and nothing in the world is worse to a teenager than being “weird”. But I usually have some sort of music playing inside my head, and this music is very often is “serious” music, or what most people call “classical” music. I had heard and enjoyed the voice of Joan Baez long before I met her one day on the campus of Stanford University in Palo Alto California in the early spring if 1969. She lived nearby, and was present to speak and sing and give her support a rally protesting the incarceration of 27 military fellows who were being prosecuted for some sort of civil disobedience. I was there to protest the military establishment. At that point in my youth (I would turn 21 a scant few months later) I was ready to protest anything (a matter of hormones, I suppose) and here was this celebrity with the clearest purest untrained soprano voice in the world talking with me and interacting with me and others and generally behaving as if she and I were peers. Heady stuff for a suicide attempt survivor who had undergone electroshock therapy and probably should have been on medication to treat my bipolar affective disorder. I was also a homeless Hippy, hitch hiking around the country, craving attention, affection, a good meal and a place to sleep, (preferably not alone.) The anti-war movement was a natural “scene” towards which I could gravitate, a generally safer place than ghetto streets and the druggies that proliferated ubiquitously. A word about drugs: I had dabbled a bit in alcohol while in High School, but found, after several bouts with intense nausea, that I was allergic to marijuana. Also, knowing and understanding my mental instability, I avoided the hallucinogens like LSD—I needed nothing to “push me over the edge”. I once spoke to a group of older folks at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Santa Barbara, and was asked about drugs. I replied that “I like my senses the way they are, and don’t wish to distort them”, a statement for which for which I received an ovation. Sometimes I can be easily led, especially by people with charisma, but I think that my marijuana allergy kept me away from falling into the peer-pressure trap of drug abuse. Having spent some time with heroin abusers, which I believe the whole drug scene tends to lead one to be, I’m certain that my marijuana allergy saved my life. I was at an age where I could identify with and be identified as a “Student”, spending time in suburbs interacting with middle class folks who were against “The War”. And here was Joan Baez herself, allowing me to walk her to the restroom, allowing me to carry her guitar, allowing me to be myself and making me feel charming and valuable. She sang an a capella version of “Swing Low Sweet Chariot”, probably the most thrilling aesthetic moment in my life up till then. I became an instant fan, and if it weren’t for a protective entourage of ministers, students, and anti-war workers surrounding her, I probably would have followed her home. I asked someone close to her for her phone number, and the fellow said: “Joanie’s home phone number is the most closely guarded secret in the free world.” In other words, “stay away.” I can take a hint. Despite the title of this piece, I am not, nor have I ever been, a stalker. Being a stalker requires an arrogance and self- esteem, nay, selfimportance, which I have never, even in my craziest states, ever possessed. In order to stalk someone, you must believe that you are the most important person in the world to your victim, and I’d never felt very important to anyone. The sort of stalking I am talking about is almost the reverse: Joan was stalking me, by getting inside my head with the force of her own delightful personality, taking over a large part of my consciousness. Once having met her, I could listen to her recorded music and follow the news about her and truthfully say, “Joanie said this, Joanie did that” and make others believe that we actually interacted much more than our one encounter would indicate. And I came to believe, over time, that Joan and I were friends. I wrote to her frequently, and I believed that I was a friend to her, that she would be actually a friend to me if I were worthy of taking time from her busy life. So it wasn’t really a delusion on my part, just a bit of harmless and comforting hyperbole, in which I believed, and which later, when I was gainfully employed for a living, gave my poor hardworking foundry life some meaning that it never previously had. I know that Joan was very aware of me over the next couple of years after the Stanford encounter. And there is one song that she wrote and recorded which I believe is about me, “The Last, Lonely And Wretched”, even though I did read later that the song was written about someone who actually visited her home, a visit which I never had the courage nor the audacity to make. But I’m getting ahead of the story, a personal and difficult to tell story, about my own fight with the demons of mental illness and my endless journey along the road to recovery. The Arrest

I was sitting at the counter in a coffee shop on U.S. 101 in California in June of 1969 when two policemen came in and arrested me for hitchhiking on the freeway. The stretch of U.S. 101 where the coffee shop was located was not freeway, and I obviously was not hitchhiking if I was sitting inside, but I believe that the officers were justified in picking me up because I probably was displaying bizarre behavior resembling that of someone guilty of illegal drug use. I say “probably” because I don’t remember too much about that day other than that it was hot and dry, and I thought I had been magically transferred to the Holy Land (same climate) and that I was to do some type of penance for my sins. I could be realistically described as one of the Homeless Mentally Ill by then, with many delusions (though no hallucinations) and was traveling from Santa Barbara north to Los Altos Hills in the San Francisco Bay area to be with some dear friends, hoping also to hook up with Joan Baez and her followers. I have vague memories of walking off the highway and along a sandy dry streambed, and leaving my backpack, which contained all of my possessions, lying on the ground. I also remember going for a nude swim in a different stream alongside a different road, and the police stopping after I has gotten dressed again and interrogating me, then leaving me alone. I had spent some time on the campus of Stanford University close to Los Altos Hills and marveled at the intellectual superiority of the many students and a few of the faculty I had met. It somewhat resembled the environment around which I had spent much of my youth and adolescence, Allegheny College, a small Liberal Arts School, very old and much venerated, located in my hometown in the hills of Northwestern Pennsylvania. Many of my childhood friends’ parents were on its faculty. I had grown up in that academic environment, and when it came time for me to go to college I assumed that the small inexpensive State school I chose would be much the same. I discovered instead that The State School was actually a step down from my High School advanced placement classes, and didn’t last long there. Stanford was a giant step up from Allegheny, and I loved the liberal atmosphere as well as the generosity of the people, both students and faculty, who shared their minds, their food, their homes (and some), and their beds with me. I “hung out” at Stanford for several months, read and wrote in the Undergraduate Library, prayed and meditated in the magnificent chapel, panhandled in the Student Union, slept in dorms and in a fraternity house, and later met an extremely nice intelligent student who took me into his home, a 6 by 9 foot cabin in Los Altos Hills, right in Joan Baez’s neighborhood. In my previous wanderings I had spent some time at NYU and the University of California at Santa Barbara, both arguably better than Allegheny. NYU had everything New York City had to offer, and UCSB was a perfect setting for a “hippy”, being right on a beach and close to a large community of students. But at Stanford I found my heaven. I wanted very badly to enroll as a student there, but had neither the money nor the brains to get in. Some professors allowed me to sit in on classes, and I participated in many discussions with them and with students; I felt like I was getting a real education by osmosis, a better education than I could have ever gotten in my old “State School” back in Pennsylvania. Leaving Stanford on a whim, and desiring to go back home for a visit, I hitchhiked to my hometown, had a series of awful encounters with various friends and members of my family there due to a manic episode; I then hitchhiked and flew back to the West Coast via San Antonio Texas. There are 1000 stories in that last sentence, very stressful experiences involving being anally raped, going hungry for days, getting caught in a Nevada desert sandstorm, being shot at from a speeding pickup truck in rural Texas and that sort of thing, but these stories are for another time. As I made my slow journey back West, I descended into complete madness. In a frenzied manic state, I visited Isla Vista again, the community adjoining UCSB, frightening friends and strangers alike with wild behavior: shouting, trying to force my way into a movie theater because I didn’t have the price of admission but felt that I had the right to see the film, running madly along the beach. There are off-shore oil drilling and pumping platforms visible from the shore, and I, in my psychosis, believed that these giant rigs miles out in the Santa Barbara Channel were actually huge pumps under my direction, and through a telekinetic link, I could control the waves and the tides. I would walk the streets singing Joan Baez, Barbra Streisand and Janis Joplin songs at full volume, and most people I encountered probably thought I was under the influence of some illegal drug and ignored me. I tried to hitchhike at the airport for a plane ride out, eating and drinking little. I began to thumb rides north on US 101, ending up in the coffee shop in San Luis Obispo County. It was only then, dirty, penniless and possessionless, that two fellows arrested me and took me in their cruiser to the San Luis Obispo County Hospital. I was admitted to the Mental Ward. Lying in the back seat of a cruiser with lights flashing, I toyed with the idea that these policemen were aliens, and that their cruiser was a flying saucer taking me to other planets. Such speculation was popular among many of the folks with whom I’d been spending time over the past two years of the hippy revolution, but I soon dropped that idea as too crazy. I still didn’t understand that I was being committed to a mental hospital against my will. In the admissions process to San Louis Obispo County General Hospital, everyone kept questioning me about my mental health treatment.

As my hometown hospital had no mental health unit, and as I didn’t remember much about my own treatment due to electroshock treatments, all of this was very confusing to me. At that time I hadn’t a clue that I was incarcerated; when they asked me about mental hospitals back home, I told them that there was one Warren State Hospital, about sixty miles from where I lived. I was surprised to learn later that it had been recorded that I had been a patient in that hospital, which I had never even seen, but where several of my relatives had been patients. The Treatment I remember little about that particular hospitalization, probably because for the first time in my life I was being pumped full of Thorazine, the catchall psychiatric drug of the day. Thorazine has what I would describe as a nightmarish effect upon the body and mind—I felt tightness in my head, and a slowness of my body that made expressing anything or feeling any meaningful emotion impossible. It is a major tranquilizer that I will admit can have therapeutic benefit, but I think that it mostly makes unruly people very easy to manage, and so is popular where there are groups of mental patients and a minimum of staff to help take care of them. . I was feeling lost without the star sapphire ring which the staff had taken away from me on the first night of my incarceration because I was using it to scratch the walls of my cell, a tiny concrete-block room with a bare plastic mattress on the floor. The ring had been purchased while I was in high school, and the star went well with the Star of David tattooed on the back of my left hand: they both had the same number of points. It was a great part of my identity at the time, and my confusion coupled with the Thorazine made me feel like I was becoming someone else. This was not necessarily a bad prospect, given my low self esteem, but a bit frightening never the less. Later on the second day in the hospital I was moved to a nice clean ward with large windows overlooking mountain scenery, and with a kind staff. In particular there was a social worker that obtained funds somehow from my family to buy an outfit for me at J. C. Penny's so I would not have to go to my Court Commitment hearing in torn blue jeans and an old t -shirt. I also have some vague memories of touchy feely group therapy sessions where we lay around a darkened room on pillows and talked about our inner selves. For the most part I hadn’t a clue as to what was going on all about me, except that I felt I should try to please these pleasant strangers, who would not allow me to go outside so I could hitch-hike away. Running through my mind all of this time was the songs of Joan Baez, that heavenly soprano voice, the folk and protest songs. I felt certain that if I could reach her she would save me and my soul, free me from my self perceived role of Judas, enfold me in the wings of her goodness and kindness and stunning beauty and take me away to peace. I sang along with Joan’s songs playing in my head and hoped for freedom. I also remember little of my Court appearance when I was formally committed to a Mental Hospital, except that it was in a room in the Hospital, there was an American Flag beside a desk, and I was told I was being given a three month commitment to a State Mental Hospital like the one where I’d been treated in Pennsylvania. I could not convince anyone that I’d never been in a State Mental Hospital before; the hospital where I had gotten my shock treatments was a small community hospital with a tiny psychiatric unit. I soon found myself in a Police car being whisked down U.S.101, a major North South Highway running through California, to a huge and beautifully landscaped Camarilla State Hospital between Santa Barbara and Los Angeles. The flowers were brilliant and spectacular all over the Hospital grounds, and I was taken to a two-story building with a very busy room: lots of people running around, patients as well as staff, all doing errands as if their very lives depended on it. Everyone was smiling at me and being very friendly, and I soon found myself in a room with an oriental psychiatrist whose English wasn’t very good. During his examination of me he asked if I heard voices, and I responded “yes” since I assumed he was asking me about the people in the hallway and the acuity of my hearing. That is how “Audio Hallucinations” got into my file. At this point I do not know what medications were being prescribed to me or what my diagnosis was, but I do remember the words “Acute Schizophrenia” being bandied about—that would probably be it. Much later I was finally diagnosed with the more prosaic and more easily treated “Bi-Polar Disorder”, or “Manic Depressive”, and it should be noted that my mother and 4 of her 5 children would later be treated for this disorder. Camarillo State Hospital grounds were beautifully landscaped, with large green irrigated lawns and many exotic flowers carefully tended by the patients. That’s about all I remember about that place, except that I stayed there for one week, and at least one point I wanted to leave but was not permitted: I was held down by two aids and shot in the buttocks with thorazine, all the while I was screaming “Help! Rape!” Much to my surprise, there were no recriminations from that episode, and it was never mentioned to me again. The seventh day there I was given “grounds” privileges: that is I was permitted to walk around outside of the locked ward where I was being

held. This being the first opportunity I had, I walked out of the gates of the Hospital to a highway and simply hitch hiked away. I really thought at the time, in my psychosis, that it was expected of me, and I didn’t fully understand that I was to stay in this hospital. My escape was easy and simple, not so much an escape, but just walking away from an uncomfortable situation, a practice I’d been following all of my life. Not that I minded being there much, it was just not as much fun as lying on the beach or having sex in an unrestricted setting. I again went to Isla Vista for a short time, and I’m certain that I acted out even more, due to withdrawal symptoms from whatever medication they had me on at the time as well as symptoms of my illness. I had some very wonderful and interesting friends there, a couple with a young child who owned a coffee house just off the UCSB Campus. They were very much involved in the theatre, and were doing an outdoor production of Thornton Wilder’s “Skin Of Our Teeth” which I disrupted by telling the wife that her child was crying while she was in the middle of a performance. She was understandably upset, and shouted at me and may have justifiably struck me. I can’t remember too much more of this time, but I recall being out on US 101 hitch-hiking again, going further north to try to find my Stanford friends. I was picked up by a very kind young man driving a fancy Corvette Sting-Ray north in the middle of the night, and he took me miles out of his way and delivered me to the place where I had stayed with some Stanford Students in Los Altos Hills south of San Francisco. I arrived before dawn. The house stood on a washed out road turned into a gully, and you had to walk up a few yards to reach it. Next to it was a commune of anti-Viet Nam War draft resisters who were affiliated with Joan Baez’s husband, David Harris. The Fire This is where things get truly fuzzy in my memory, because by this time I was in a state of full-blown psychosis. I believed that I was “King David”, a person chosen by God to cure all evil in the world, and that all I had been through in the past months was a sort of “trial by fire” in the selection process of this “messiah-like” personage into whom I was being transformed. Radios that I heard (in people’s cars that were kind enough to give me a lift) were speaking directly to me, encouraging me to save the world. The billboards I read along the highways were put up for me to read secret messages meant only for my eyes, and everywhere were hidden movie and television cameras filming my experiences for the historical record. I was very happy, euphoric even, yet very frightened by the isolation that such notoriety was pushing upon me. Joan Baez would understand—she understood everything. If I could reach her I would be safe. So finally, after hours of hitchhiking and one long ride in the Corvette Sting Ray, I was at the dear friend’s home in Los Altos, arriving, as I said, sometime in the wee small hours of the morning. There were several Stanford students, both graduate and undergraduate, living in an old house, and my special friend lived in a six by nine foot cabin down a path from the house. A fellow I only peripherally knew was the only one at home when I arrived, and he was just leaving to go deliver newspapers. He told me that my best friend there had left to go back to the East Coast for the summer; I could almost taste my disappointment that there was no one close to greet me and take me to Miss Baez, and it was then that I finally broke down. They told me later that I started a fire—I vaguely remember matches, and paper burning on a bulletin board, and a roaring sound with lots of heat, smoke, a dog that would not come to me. I had no fascination with fire, since I had burned the family’s trash from a tender age, and had been drilled as to fire safety. Did I do it? I cannot remember doing it. The trauma of committing such a destructive act was so out of character for me that I guess that I have blocked the memory, if I did commit such a deed. And like so many other bad situations I had been in in the past, I simply walked away. Down the road I found a pay phone, called the Police, and in a rare moment of lucidity, told them I was a patient at Camarillo State Hospital, and would they please take me back there. I felt no anger, no rage, no happiness at vindication for being deserted by my friend, nothing that a myriad of psychologists and psychiatrists told me later that I should have been feeling. The only emotion I recall is relief when the Police arrived, because I assumed that they would take me back to the beautiful flowers and known environment of Camarillo State Hospital 400 miles to the south. I also had a small burn on my right index finger from striking matches, but since I was a smoker, that wasn’t unusual. Burn down a house? No. Impossible. Especially the house of people whom I loved and who had shown me such great kindness. I was “non-violent”, as was my heroine, Joan Baez. I would never do such a thing. I was certainly no arsonist. It was also impossible that the Police would not take me back to Camarillo, but they did not. Instead they took me to another State Hospital nearby, Agnew State Hospital in San Jose. It was as beautifully landscaped as Camarillo, but the two-story Mission-style architecture of the individual Wards seemed more like Military barracks than a place where I could become “well”. Had I known at the time that I would spend more than a year of my short life there I would have panicked, and probably fought and tried to run away, but I docilely accepted my fate and was admitted.

Agnew State Hospital It is only like a hazy dream, the first few weeks of my tenure as a mental patient. I hadn’t taken care of my teeth during my previous wanderings, and so they ached constantly, especially when I ate something sweet. After repeated complaints, I was taken to a large building on the hospital grounds for examination, and later treatment, by a dentist. That was an improvement in my general well being, as was a steady diet of nourishing food and a regular schedule including plenty of safe sleep. I gradually became accustomed to living intimately in a small space with 60 or so other men, and this confined space was gradually transformed into home. I was taking all sorts of medications several times a day; I have no real idea what. At first I was put in a small isolation cell where I could be observed, and after not too long I was allowed to mix with the general population. Drifting in and out of madness, as one drifts in and out of sleep on a lazy Saturday, I alternatively believed that I was in my “palace” where I was being prepared by the hospital staff and inmates to step up onto my rightful throne as “King Of The World”, and flashes of insight where I understood that I was very sick and was being treated for this illness. I sometimes believed that my incarceration was political, that I was being held prisoner by all of these “conservatives” who backed the Viet Nam War and were trying to indoctrinate me into their evil beliefs. And I also remember constantly asking for Joan Baez, believing fervently that she was interested in my life and would come to visit me soon. But mainly, there was tedium, hours and hours of watching television, trying to interact with very sick people, weeks of staring out of windows at no particular view, eating in a large room with dozens of other men, looking foreword to nothing and remembering little of how I had come to be there. Endless boredom, an occasional fight, a less occasional but not unusual masturbatory self- seduction in the shower became my life. Days piled upon days, hours passed slowly; conversely, the weeks flew by. During much of my time at Agnew’s, I suffered crushing depression, and only wanted to sleep the hours away, but this was not permitted. I worked in the hospital kitchen, and later outside on the landscaping crew tending those magnificent flowering plants I had so admired. Most of my fellow patients could be considered “interesting”, as the psychotic people tend to be. Many were in denial that they were there because they were sick and needed treatment. Some were there voluntarily to avoid jail or to hide from people or creditors. Others, mostly young men, would claim that they were only there for a “rest”, and would thereby refuse to divulge anything pertinent about their lives. Still others would admit that they were sick, and needed help. But no matter how involved I became in the web of other’s lives, there was the tedium, the endless staring at the same four walls most of the day, the same commercials and tired game shows and soap operas. Nothing. No reading material worth anything. Besides, when I am ill, my concentration is such that I cannot read anyway. And of course, during that year I could not listen nor keep up with my Holy Trinity of Joan Baez, Janis Joplin and Barbra Streisand. There were some records available to patients, but these three artists weren’t among them. As my “condition”, or rather “psychosis” subsided, I asked for Joan Baez less and less. I came to realize that she was an artist, and I was an obscure mental patient, and that was that. After I’d been at Agnew for a while, I got a visit from a police arson investigator, who returned some property to me, namely a briefcase I’d carried for several years with an old girlfriend’s pictures in it. Soon thereafter I was served with papers that said that the “People of the State Of California” were against me: I was charged with arson, a serious offense, and I faced very serious jail time. I was in a panic, and was told that I probably would be taken to Atascadero State Hospital for the criminally insane. Surely this was a step down from “King Of The World”. I lived in terror. The staff at Agnew didn’t really know what to do with me. The State of California regarded me as someone from “out of State”, and would really have rathered to send me back to Pennsylvania for mental health treatment, but then there was this indictment hanging over my head for which I must be held for trial when I was well enough. Meanwhile my stay at Agnew’s was costing them a whole lot of money, but everyone agreed that from a humanitarian standpoint I was better off in the Hospital than in jail. Someone along the hierarchy decided that I was to have intense therapy to get me moved through the system an fast as possible, and so I was granted a private individual therapist, and sent for treatment in psychodrama therapy. The individual therapist was a Nun with a PHD in psychology, a dear sweet woman with whom I became friends after my discharge. She helped my immensely to see the world as it was, and not to try to express myself only through song lyrics, which I had been wont to do. The psychodrama was less conventional, a new treatment plan still in the experimental stage whereby patients acted out scenes in their lives, using other members of the group to play the roles of family, friends, enemies, etc. This was supposed to give one insight into how to deal

with difficult situations and people in our lives. Most of the time I felt that it was “silly” and not very relevant to my situation. We started each session with Esalen-type “touchy-feely” exercises designed to get one in touch with one’s feelings, and to learn to trust other members of the group. Since most of the “touching” I had had in my life was sexual in nature, it was difficult for me to relax and follow the rest of the group into the spirit of the exercises. There were several Doctor and Master-level staff members of the group, and the group was fairly large, some sessions with up to 30 people in them. The groups were held on the stage of a large Auditorium on the grounds of the Hospital, and I was disappointed that at no time was I able to “perform” some Streisand or Baez or Joplin songs for the group. My individual therapist, the Nun, was a very kindly older woman who had done her Doctorate on homosexuality among collage girls. She always insisted that I should not engage in any extramarital sex at all. This was not surprising to me, as she was a Roman Catholic Nun, but I discovered later, many years later, that she was correct about sex “fragmenting” me: I mostly engaged in sex for physical pleasure and allowed many people to touch me because deep down I believed that I did not matter at all, and was not worthy of real love. A public defender finally visited me, but did not seem too interested in my case. He said that we would plead not guilty by reason of insanity, and months went by without my hearing another word from him. Then I was transported, with very little notice, shacked by the legs and hands to other Agnew patients, to the Santa Clara County Courthouse where I was asked how I pled. I became confused, so the Public Defender entered my plea for me, not guilty by reason of insanity, and back I went to Agnew’s. Months went by, nothing was done with my case, until in pure frustration the Doctor I had on my Ward re-contacted the Public Defenders Office, and a new Attorney was sent out to interview me. He, at least, took my case seriously, much more seriously than the previous Public Defender. When it came time for him to enter my plea, it was changed to just “not guilty”. Around this time, the Court decided to take me to jail to observe me to see if I were really “crazy”. One afternoon, without warning, I was suddenly taken from my familiar surroundings in the hospital and thrust into a tiny glass-enclosed cell in the center of a large room in Santa Clara County Jail where I could be watched 24 hours a day, not only by jail staff but by many inmates as well. Every day was exactly the same. I was constantly observed eating, sleeping, using the toilet, everything I said and did was written down. There was no TV, no radio, and I was not permitted to communicate with the other inmates or even the guards. The lights were only dimmed at night, never turned off. After about 5 days of this, one guard felt sorry for me and gave me a well-worn copy of a Reader’s Digest Magazine, which I devoured rapidly as one who was starving to death might eat a meal. And during the 11 days I spent in this glass cage, only once, on the 7th day, was I permitted to shower. I and another inmate were stripped naked and forced to parade down long cell-blocks past cheering and jeering prison inmates to a small shower where we had about 5 minutes to get clean before given fresh uniforms and marched back. On the 11th day, I was surprised by a visit from my Hospital Psychiatrist and my Nun therapist. They were appalled by the conditions under which I was being kept, and the next thing I knew I was back on my old familiar ward at Agnews State Hospital The Trial Having dreaded it for so very long, and even acted it out in psychodrama with familiar friends playing the roles of Judge, prosecutor, and public defender, my trial date arrived. I was terrified that I was going to be sent to prison, or to a hospital for the criminally insane, two possibilities that were even, perhaps, more probabilities than possibilities. I felt that I was falling down a steep tunnel from a great height, and there was absolutely nothing I could do to stop the fall. Surely this whole situation was just a long nightmare, and I would soon awaken safe in my bed at my parent’s house surrounded by the green hills of Pennsylvania. But I did not awaken: just kept falling and falling, surrounded by familiar faces of hospital staff and other patients who seemed to be smiling in gratitude that this was not happening to them. Not even my beloved Joan Baez could save me. A sheriff’s car arrived; I was shackled and handcuffed, and again taken from the safe haven of Agnew’s State Hospital to the gray concrete insides of the Santa Clara County Jail. The actual trial was brief. It was before just a Judge, no Jury, and there were no spectators in the courtroom that I could discern. The fellow that I had seen at the house the morning of the fire was there, holding a can of Bugler Tobacco, the kind I smoked because I could not afford “tailor made” cigarettes. After the trial got going, he testified that he had seen me at the house on the morning in question, but had not seen me set a fire. The only odd thing about this was that he took his can of tobacco to the witness stand with him and set it in the rail in front of him. I remember wondering if the can was to be a gift to me, but as soon as his testimony was over he left, and I’ve never seen nor heard from him since.

I also took the stand, very briefly, and I don’t remember very much about that except every time the DA asked me a question I didn’t want to answer, my Public Defender objected, and the objection was sustained. Suddenly, without warning, or movie music or a drum roll or anything, the Judge said “Not Guilty”, banged his gavel, and rapidly left the bench slamming a door behind him. I was stunned, confused, relieved, frightened, happy, apprehensive, all at the same time. My Attorney turned to me and said: “Wow! That’s the first case I ever won.” I may have fainted. The next thing I remember is being transported back to Agnews. The Deputy had shackled and handcuffed me again, and as we wheeled out into traffic he asked me how the trial had gone. “I was found ‘Not Guilty’” I replied, and he immediately stopped, took off the chains and handcuffs and invited me to sit in the front seat with him. Ever since that little gesture, I’ve been left with a good feeling about most cops and the job they do serving and protecting the public. My next project was to get myself discharged from the hospital. The psychiatrist was loath to just turn me out into the streets again, as he saw many issues with my psyche that needed to be addressed, but I promised that if he released me I would go back to Pennsylvania, seek help there, and never again return to the State of California. Funds were available for a flight to Pittsburgh because I had been put on Social Security Disability during my Agnews tenure, and so a few weeks later a nice psychiatric technician took me to the San Francisco Airport and put me on a plane home. I was met by my father, mother and younger brother, and they took me home, to the home I’d been dreaming of for so long, the tiny green brick-streeted town where nothing ever happened, where relatives, friends and strangers gossiped, where cable television and movies seemed to be the only escape. My Dad made an appointment with a psychiatrist, the same one who had given me the electro-shock treatments. All he wanted to talk to me about was my “hippy” appearance and my long hair, which were normal in the California environment I’d been living in, but to his eyes were a symptom of grave mental illness. I ran away again. I broke my promise to the psychiatrist about never returning to California again, and went to Santa Barbara where the forgiving friends who owned the Coffee House connected me with the Mental Health Establishment there and got me enrolled in an excellent program, a Day Treatment Facility with intensive group and individual therapy. This program did not suck me into the trap of the “professionally disabled”, seeking more and more services and entitlements until I was completely dependent upon the system for my living. Rather, these extremely competent staff members taught me the necessary skills to accept myself for what I really was, and to hold to a regular schedule necessary if I were ever to hold down a real job. After more than a year of difficult work in therapy, I was ready to return to my hometown and find a niche that included a good paying job, family, friends, and an appreciation for small town life and for the deep family roots I had there. The job I found was in an iron foundry, dangerous, brutally difficult work making large and small castings out of molten iron. It paid well, and I met and made friends with some wonderful, if mostly uneducated, people, and I found that I could fit in. I worked hard, played harder, traveled extensively during yearly vacations, abused alcohol on a regular basis, got depressed sometimes. I found a very good psychiatrist who, after many tries and several years of trial and error, found a regimen of drugs that kept my serious illness at bay. This is what set me free from the bonds of my sickness. During this time I also had many sexual encounters, dirty, sordid, awful to remember (often drunken) experiences in filth, lying on floors and mattresses, orgies in fields and cars and bedrooms and inside and outside of bars. And Joan Baez? As I mentioned before, I believed we were friends, bought all of her albums, read her autobiography, wrote to her often about any and all of my troubles. I always wrote to her at The Institute For The Study Of Non-Violence, an organization that she had founded. I literally begged her to write back to me, but nothing was forthcoming. I bought an Autoharp, memorized all of Joan’s songs, both the ones she’d written and the ones she recorded, and performed them for anyone who would listen. I had fantasies about going back out to California to visit her, or even getting phone calls from her, but I got nothing, not even a print-out or a flier about concert dates or anything. Nothing. She did give a concert in Erie, Pa, a scant 40 miles from my home, which I attended. It was wonderful, funny, uplifting, sad, thoughtful and thought-provoking, everything a Joan Baez Concert always is. I wisely decided not to go backstage to try to see her. I was sensitive to the

real dangers posed to celebrities by serious stalkers, especially celebrities with Joan’s political and social views. I did not wish to make her uncomfortable, or to get myself into trouble. I am, after all, what the media loves to refer to as a “former mental patient”. And then one day, God touched me: a letter arrived, a hand written letter on fine onion skin stationery, in a matching envelope with no return address. It had a California postmark, and it said: May 27/ 75 Dear _____: Here we go again. And I’m sorry it’s not Joan’s hand. I know you’d appreciate that so much. Joan’s new record, “Diamonds & Rust” (a song for Bob Dylan) is out. You may have seen it. Joan was back East last week, but I was never clued in as to whether she gave concerts—or if so, where, so….? She’s out here now. So I believe—no concerts in Philadelphia at present. I hope you’re well & that some of your troubled days have changed to understanding ones & have let the sun shine in, often. Joan doesn’t write, but she sends her love and good wishes. Very Sincerely Joan Bridge VS Joan Baez Senior (Had to use another name while working at the Institute) So it was true. Joan Baez had noticed me, and her Mother had felt strongly enough to write back to me. I loved Joan Baez more than ever after that, but in a realistic way, the way a fan loves a performer. (Although Joan has said that she refuses to be just a performer, but rather a sort of crusader raising the consciousness of the public for her causes, be they Non-Violence, Prison Reform, Gay Liberation, or whatever ) I was finally set free from the “friend of Joan Baez” fantasy that had imprisoned me. I became active in a church, and later in a Jewish Temple where I studied with three Rabbis. I worked as a Volunteer on the local Mental Health Mental Retardation Board, became friends with a diverse lot of people from Judges to Physicians to developmentally disabled folk and, of course, the persistently and chronically mentally ill. I gained respect in my small town, stopped my habit of regularly abusing alcohol, quit smoking cigarettes, stopped sleeping around, and ever so slowly developed a self esteem which freed me from the need to identify with a celebrity like Joan Baez in order to find worth in myself. I found a partner with whom I could share my life. I was even elected President of the Human Services Board, a body of the movers and shakers in my home County who oversee the Mental Health, Mental Retardation, and Children and Youth Services here, and have tirelessly advocated for consumers of these services. I am proud of cleaning up my life. My road continues to be rocky and difficult, however: I lost my good foundry job due to a physical injury, and have been working at various low-paying unskilled labor positions for more than 10 years now. And I must monitor myself carefully, to make certain I do not slip into Mania or Depression, and with the help of my doctor, I titrate my medication dosages appropriately. I cannot help but believe that had I

finished my degree at Edinboro, I would be making a great deal more money now, and so mental illness has very much negatively impacted my life. While still in Santa Barbara, back in the early 70’s, I made friends with an authentic Gypsy fortune- teller, who read Tarot Cards and Palms. During a reading, for which he insisted I pay (as that was his policy even though I was a good friend) I asked him if he thought I’d ever go crazy and lose control of myself and of my grip on reality again. His answer was amazingly insightful, and looking back over the past 30 years or so since that reading, it has remained, so far, to be true. He said: “ No, David. There will be many times in your future that the pain of living will be so great that you will wish that you could escape back into madness, but it will never happen. You will live a long and productive life, and will die a wealthy man.” If you count friends, family, love, and interesting experiences as wealth, as I do, then all of his predictions have come true. And Miss Baez? I am no longer stalking her in my mind. I love the way her voice has matured over the past 30 years, and still am as thrilled to hear her sing as I was that first time on the Stanford University campus so many eons ago. I have heard little about her current political opinions, but I’m certain that she is as sincere an advocate for the non-violent resolution of human conflict that she always was. By the same accounting of wealth that I apply to myself, (friends, family love, experience) if Joan lost every cent she owns tomorrow, she would still be wealthy beyond the wildest dreams of even King Croesus. Or at least of Bill Gates.

CAPT Outreach magazine September 1998

Agnews gets hit hard by state licensing
By Carol Wiesmann Managing Editor Each year state licensing officials conduct surveys of care provided at California's developmental centers. This year for the first time, the U.S. Health Care Financing Administration teamed up with state licensing to survey all five DCs -- Agnews, Fairview, Lanterman, Porterville and Sonoma. So far, all facilities except Sonoma have been surveyed and all have been found with some deficiencies. However, Agnews has become the focus of much recent attention because of a large number of deficiencies. Investigators found seven out of eight licensing conditions to be deficient in the intermediate care units. These problems must be resolved for the facility to continue to receive Medi-Cal matching funds. About 95 percent of Agnews' 530 residents rely on Medi-Cal coverage. The nursing and acute-care sections were approved. The report cited three cases where clients were found to be in "immediate jeopardy." Former staff members said this stemmed from the staff's failure to intervene when clients abused themselves or other clients. In one case, a resident diagnosed with pica -- a desire to eat inedible and sometimes dangerous objects -- was seen putting beads, puzzle pieces and other things into his mouth. Inspectors also found erratic water temperatures ranging as high as 129 and as low as 65 degrees. To prevent scalding, the maximum water temperature allowed in the facility is 110 degrees. Some water temperature alarms were broken or hidden by plants. Long-standing plumbing problems also caused sewage to well up onto floors, the report said. One spill wasn't cleaned up for several hours. A major problem was inadequate staffing and supervision that contributed to dozens of assaults on clients, staff and even visitors. During a one-week period, inspectors reported 43 client-on-client assaults, 12 client assaults on staff or visitors, 23 self-inflicted injuries by clients, and seven verbal threats or derogatory remarks by staff. In one incident, three staffers had been in charge of 13 residents when two staffers had to leave to deal with individual client problems. That left one employee responsible for 11 clients. One client began exposing himself, two became agitated and two others began to hit themselves. Staff members were observed several times shoving, pushing and pulling clients, and one was seen slapping a client on the back of the head. But mostly, staffers seemed to be overwhelmed by trying to care for too many residents at one time, the report said. DDS Chief of Quality Assurance Bonnie Banks said a number of incidences could not be directly verified by staff. "It wasn't clear which clients the report was talking about," Banks said. "And the mention of clients being pushed and shoved was either not consistent with our information or staff were not there at the time to witness it. Even before the Department of Health Services had finished reviewing the plans of correction, Agnews had corrected its situations identified as posing immediate jeopardy. According to Banks, DDS is taking every precaution to fix the remaining deficiencies as quickly as possible.

"Until we can get all the water valves replaced, we have instituted an hour-by-hour monitoring of the water temperature on the faucets in question," Banks said. "If on any one of the monitorings, the water temperature is out of the acceptable range, clients are not bathed or showered in that water." DDS submitted plans of correction. But Banks told Outreach that on September 9, the Department of Health Services decided not to accept the plans because "they want more detail -- and in some cases they want less detail. "In some instances there was insufficient information available to identify who the guilty employee might have been in order to take any action. It was difficult to develop plans of correction without more information from licensing," Banks said. "So we went ahead and did the best we could with what information we had." Banks says the department does not deny the survey's findings, but cites the lack of staff and an increasingly tough interpretation of the regulations for the deficiencies. "This isn't so much a reflection of deteriorating conditions in the DCs as much as it is that we are being measured by a new yardstick -- and a rubber one at that," Banks said. "I don't think the care has gotten worse in the past year," said Doug Van Meter, deputy director in charge of the state's five developmental centers. "(But) staffing has been a concern." Van Meter estimated that Agnews currently has about 100 vacant staff positions. "The serious allegations in the state report are upsetting to all of us. However, we believe in the great value of our facilities and we cherish the efforts of many truly dedicated staff," said Barbara Turner, president of the DC parents' association. "The continuity, stability and reliability we have known at all our centers is important to our families." The Department has filed an appeal of the survey findings, which carry the threat to decertify the program on Oct. 31. Banks said that licensing will probably schedule a resurvey in October.

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