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4-Volume Set

Intelligence
CRITICAL CONCEPTS IN MILITARY, STRATEGIC,
AND SECURITY STUDIES
Edited by Loch K. Johnson, University of Georgia, USA
Many experts on security intelligence distinguish mysteries from secrets.
Mysteries (e.g. can Pakistan survive the threat it faces from the presence of
insurgents in its western provinces?) are worldly phenomena that
governments may wish to understand, but which are difficult to fathom
given the foibles of human beings, not least their inability accurately to
foretell the future. Secrets (e.g. the number of nuclear submarines in the
Chinese navy), however, are more susceptible to understanding. Indeed, with
the right spy in place, with surveillance satellites in their proper orbit, or
with reconnaissance aircraft well-positioned in enemy airspace, secrets can be
deduced, but governments are largely limited to thoughtful speculation
about the planets deeper mysteries. Either way, prudent states will seek to
establish intelligence-gathering agencies to ferret out secrets and help
productively to ponder mysteries.
Serious academic work focusing on issues in and around this kind of activity
flourishes as never before, and this new four-volume collection from
Routledges Critical Concepts in Military, Strategic, and Security Studies series
addresses the need for an authoritative reference work to make sense of a
rapidly growing and ever more complex corpus of scholarly literature.
Intelligence is fully indexed and includes a comprehensive introduction,
newly written by the editor, which places the collected materials in its
historical and intellectual context. It is destined to be valued by scholars and
students as a vital one-stop research and pedagogic resource.
Routledge
October 2010
234x156: 1,600pp
Set Hb: 978-0-415-56971-2

Routledge Major Works

Intelligence CRITICAL CONCEPTS IN MILITARY, STRATEGIC, AN


18.

VOLUME I
The Collection and Analysis of
National Security Intelligence

Intelligence and Decisions


19.

Paul Pillar, Intelligence, Policy, and the War in Iraq, Foreign Affairs, 2006, 85, 2,
1528.

20.

James P. Pfiffner, Did President Bush Mislead the Country in his Arguments for
War with Iraq?, in James P. Pfiffner and Mark Phythian (eds.), Intelligence and
National Security Policymaking on Iraq: British and American Perspectives
(Manchester University Press, 2008), pp. 5984.

21.

Mark Phythian, The British Road to War: Decisionmaking, Intelligence, and the
Case for War in Iraq, in James P. Pfiffner and Mark Phythian (eds.), Intelligence
and National Security Policymaking on Iraq: British and American Perspectives
(Manchester University Press, 2008), pp. 85105.

Legal Foundations
1.

National Security Act of 1947: Central Intelligence Agency, Compilation of


Intelligence Laws and Related Laws and Executive Orders of Interest to the National
Intelligence Community, Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, US House
of Representatives, Committee Print, 98th Cong., 1st Sess., Apr. 1983, pp. 68.

History
2.

Phyllis Provost McNeil, The Evolution of the US Intelligence CommunityAn


Historical Perspective, Preparing for the 21st Century: An Appraisal of US
Intelligence, Appendix A, Report of the Commission on the Roles and
Capabilities of the United States Intelligence Community (Aspin-Brown
Commission), 1 Mar. 1996, pp. A1A25.

3.

Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, The Rise and Fall of the CIA, in Loch K. Johnson (ed.),
The Oxford Handbook of National Security Intelligence (Oxford, 2010).

4.

Michael S. Goodman, Spying on the Nuclear Bear: Anglo-American Intelligence and


the Soviet Bomb (Stanford University Press, 2007), pp. 20516.

5.

Wolfgang Krieger, US Patronage of German Postwar Intelligence, in Loch K.


Johnson (ed.), Handbook of Intelligence Studies (Routledge, 2007), pp. 91104.

Theory and Method


6.

Peter Gill and Mark Phythian, What is Intelligence?, Intelligence in an Insecure


World (Polity, 2006), pp. 119.

7.

Loch K. Johnson, Sketches for a Theory of Strategic Intelligence, in Peter Gill,


Stephen Marrin, and Mark Phythian (eds.), Intelligence Theory: Key Questions and
Debates (Routledge, 2009), pp. 3354.

8.

Len Scott, Sources and Methods in the Study of Intelligence: A British View, in
Loch K. Johnson (ed.), Strategic Intelligence, Vol. 1 (Praeger, 2007), pp. 89108.

9.

James J. Wirtz, The American Approach to Intelligence Studies, in Loch K.


Johnson (ed.), Handbook of Intelligence Studies (Routledge, 2007), pp. 2838.

10.

Amy B. Zegart, Cloaks, Daggers, and Ivory Towers: Why Academics Dont Study
US Intelligence, in Loch K. Johnson (ed.), Strategic Intelligence, Vol. 1 (Praeger,
2007), pp. 2134.

James B. Bruce, The Missing Link: The Analyst-Collector Relationship, in Roger


Z. George and James B. Bruce (eds.), Analyzing Intelligence: Origins, Obstacles, and
Innovations (Georgetown University Press, 2008), pp. 191212.

VOLUME II
Covert Action: The Aggressive Arm of
National Security Intelligence
An Overview
22.

Loch K. Johnson, On Drawing a Bright Line for Covert Operations, American


Journal of International Law, 1992, 86, 284309.

23.

Frank Church, Covert Action: Swampland of American Foreign Policy, Bulletin


of the Atomic Scientists, 1976, 32, 711.

24.

James A. Barry, Covert Action Can Be Just, Orbis, 1993, 37, 37590.

History
25.

William E. Colby, Skis and Daggers, Studies in Intelligence, Winter 19992000,


5360.

26.

Anne Karalekas, A History of Covert Action, in Supplementary Detailed Staff


Reports on Foreign and Military Intelligence, Book IV, Final Report of the Select
Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence
Activities (the Church Committee), Report No. 94-755, US Senate, 94th Cong.,
2d Sess, 23 Apr. 1974, pp. 2531, 4855, 6670, 923.

27.

The CIA Assassination Plot in the Congo, 196061, Alleged Assassination Plots
Involving Foreign Leaders: An Interim Report, Select Committee to Study
Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities (the Church
Committee), US Senate, 94th Cong., 2d Sess., 1975, pp. 1370.

Intelligence Collection
11.

Arthur S. Hulnick, Whats Wrong with the Intelligence Cycle, Intelligence and
National Security, 2006, 21, 6, 95979.

28.

12.

Jeffrey T. Richelson, The Technical Collection of Intelligence, in Loch K.


Johnson (ed.), Handbook of Intelligence Studies (Routledge, 2007), pp. 10517.

John Prados, The Bay of Pigs: Failure at Playa Girn, Safe for Democracy: The
Secret Wars of the CIA (Ivan R. Dee, 2006), pp. 23672.

29.

13.

Frederick P. Hitz, The Importance and Future of Espionage, in Loch K. Johnson


(ed.), Strategic Intelligence, Vol. II (Praeger, 2007), pp. 7594.

Richard L. Holm, Recollections of a Case Officer in Laos, 19621964, Studies in


Intelligence, 2003, 47, 1, 117.

30.

14.

Stephen C. Mercado, Sailing the Sea of OSINT in the Information Age, Studies
in Intelligence, 2004, 48, 3, 4556.

Michael Grow, Chile, 1970, US Presidents and Latin American Interventions:


Pursuing Regime Change in the Cold War (University Press of Kansas, 2008), pp.
93113.

31.

Steve Coll, Were Keeping These Stingers, Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the
CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, From the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001
(Penguin, 2004), pp. 33651.

Intelligence Analysis
15.

Jack Davis, A Policymakers Perspective on Intelligence Analysis, Studies in


Intelligence, 1995, 38, 715.

16.

Richard L. Russell, Blundering in the War on Terrorism, Sharpening Strategic


Intelligence (Cambridge University Press, 2007), pp. 6994.

32.

William J. Dougherty, The Role of Covert Action, in Loch K. Johnson (ed.),


Handbook of Intelligence Studies (Routledge, 2007), pp. 27988.

17.

Richard K. Betts, War and Decision: Why Intelligence Failures are Inevitable,
World Politics, 1978, 31, 1, 6189.

33.

Gregory F. Treverton, Covert Action and Unintended Results, Covert Action: The
Limits of Intervention in the Postwar World (Basic Books, 1987), pp. 14878.

34.

John D. Stempel, Covert Action and Diplomacy, in Loch K. Johnson (ed.),


Strategic Intelligence, Vol. 3 (Praeger, 2007), pp. 14556.

35.

Jennifer D. Kibbe, Covert Action and the Pentagon, in Loch K. Johnson (ed.),
Strategic Intelligence, Vol. 3 (Praeger, 2007), pp. 13144.

Implications

Controlling Covert Action

Routledge Major Works

Intended Contents

36.

Witness Testimony, The Iran-Contra Affair, Hearings, Select Committee on


Secret Military Assistance to Iran and the Nicaraguan Opposition, the InouyeHamilton Joint Committee, 100th Cong., 1st Sess. (July/Aug. 1987).

37.

Report of the Presidents Special Review Board (Tower Commission), Washington,


DC (26 Feb. 1987), pp. iv, 113.

38.

W. Michael Reisman and James E. Baker, Covert Operations in the Future:


Projections and Some Modest Guidelines, Regulating Covert Action: Practices,
Contexts, and Policies of Covert Coercion Abroad in International and American Law
(Yale University Press, 1992), pp. 13643.

ND SECURITY STUDIES
39.

Robert M. Gates, Remarks, Legislative Oversight of Intelligence Activities: The US


Experience, Report, S. Prt. 103-88, Select Committee on Intelligence, US Senate,
103d Cong, 2d Sess. (Oct. 1994), Appendix 10.

61.

A Comparative Perspective
40.

Kevin A. OBrien, Interfering with Civil Society: CIA and KGB Covert Political
Action During the Cold War, International Journal of Intelligence and
Counterintelligence, 1995, 8, 43156.

41.

Ephraim Kahana, Covert Action: The Israeli Experience, in Loch K. Johnson


(ed.), Strategic Intelligence, Vol. 2 (Praeger, 2007), pp. 6182.

VOLUME III
Counterintelligence: Shield for
National Security Intelligence

VOLUME IV
Holding National Security
Intelligence Accountable
An Overview
62.

Lee H. Hamilton with Jordan Tama, A Creative Tension: The Foreign Policy
Roles of the President and Congress, Continuities in the Making of Foreign Policy
(Woodrow Wilson Center, 2002), pp. 4171.

63.

Harry How Ransom, Surveillance by Congress, The Intelligence Establishment


(Harvard University Press, 1970), pp. 15979.

64.

Loch K. Johnson, Accountability and Americas Secret Foreign Policy: Keeping a


Legislative Eye on the Central Intelligence Agency, Foreign Policy Analysis, 2005,
1, 1, 99120.

An Overview
42.

Paul Redman, The Challenges of Counterintelligence, in Loch K. Johnson (ed.),


Oxford Handbook of National Security Intelligence (Oxford University Press, 2010).

43.

Robert Jervis, Intelligence, Counterintelligence, Perception, and Deception, in


Jennifer E. Sims and Burton Gerber (eds.), Vaults, Mirrors, and Masks:
Rediscovering US Counterintelligence (Georgetown University Press, 2009), pp.
6979.

Louis Fisher, Guantnamo, The Constitution and 9/11: Recurring Threats to


Americas Freedoms (University Press of Kansas, 2008), pp. 21144.

History
65.

Legislative Oversight of Intelligence Activities: The US Experience, Report, S. Prt.


103-88, Select Committee on Intelligence, US Senate, 103d Cong., 2d Sess. (Oct.
1994), pp. 226.

66.

David M. Barrett, Congressional Oversight of the CIA in the Early Cold War,
194763, in Loch K. Johnson (ed.), Strategic Intelligence, Vol. 5 (Praeger, 2007),
pp. 118.

History
44.

Hayden B. Peake, OSS and the Verona Decrypts, Intelligence and National
Security, 1997, 12, 1434.

67.

CIA Oral History Archives, Reflections of DCIs Colby and Helms on the CIAs
Time of Troubles, Studies in Intelligence, 2007, 51, 3, 1128.

45.

Cynthia M. Grabo, Soviet Deception in the Czechoslovak Crisis, Studies in


Intelligence, Fall 2000, 7186.

68.

Marvin C. Ott, Partisanship and the Decline of Intelligence Oversight,


International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, 2003, 16, 6994.

46.

James H. Hansen, Soviet Deception in the Cuban Missile Crisis, Studies in


Intelligence, 2002, 46, 1, 4958.

69.

47.

Stan A. Taylor and Daniel Snow, Cold War Spies: Why They Spied and How
They Got Caught, Intelligence and National Security, 1997, 12, 10125.

Loch K. Johnson, Congressional Supervision of Americas Secret Agencies: The


Experience and Legacy of the Church Committee, Public Administration Review,
2004, 64, 314.

Implications
Personalities
48.

Robin W. Wink, The Theorist: James Jesus Angleton, Cloak & Gown: Scholars in
the Secret War, 19391961 (William Morrow, 1987), pp. 32272.

49.

Barry G. Royden, Tolkaschev, a Worthy Success to Penkovsky, Studies in


Intelligence, 2003, 47, 3, 533.

70.

Gregory F. Treverton, Intelligence: Welcome to the American Government, in


Thomas E. Mann (ed.), A Question of Balance: The President, the Congress, and
Foreign Policy (The Brookings Institute, 1990), pp. 70108.

71.

Frederick A. O. Schwarz, Jr. and Aziz Z. Huq, Reform and Resistance:


Consequences of the Church Committee, Unchecked and Unbalanced: Presidential
Power in a Time of Terror (The New Press, 2007), pp. 5062.

72.

Frederick P. Hitz, Unleashing the Rogue Elephant: September 11 and Letting the
CIA be the CIA, Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, 2002, 25, 75681.

73.

Frederic F. Manget, Another System of Oversight: Intelligence and the Rise of


Judicial Intervention, Studies in Intelligence, 1966, 39, 4350.

74.

L. Britt Snider, The Relationship, 19762004, The Agency and the Hill: CIAs
Relationship with Congress, 19462004 (Central Intelligence Agency, 2008), pp.
7591.

75.

9/11 Commission Conclusions on Intelligence Oversight, The 9/11 Report, The


National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (Kean
Commission), Washington, DC (2004), pp. 41923.

Tradecraft
50.

51.

An Assessment of the Aldrich H. Ames Espionage Case and its Implications for
US Intelligence, Staff Report, Select Committee on Intelligence, US Senate, 103d
Cong., 2d. Sess (1 Nov. 1994), pp. 5372.
Athan Theoharis, The Successes and Failures of FBI Counterintelligence, in Loch
K. Johnson (ed.), Strategic Intelligence, Vol. 4 (Praeger, 2007), pp. 5372.

52.

Frederick L. Wettering, Counterintelligence: The Broken Triad, International


Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, 2000, 13, 26599.

53.

James M. Olson, The Ten Commandments of Counterintelligence, Studies in


Intelligence, 2001, 11, 817.

76.

Road Map for National Security: Imperative for Change, Report, US


Commission on National Security/21st Century (Hart-Rudman Commission),
Washington, DC (15 Mar. 2001), pp. 3659.

Harry Howe Ransom, A Half Century of Spy Watching, in Loch K. Johnson


(ed.), Strategic Intelligence, Vol. 5 (Praeger, 2007), pp. 18393.

77.

Glenn Hastedt, Washington Politics, Intelligence, and the Struggle Against


Global Terrorism, in Loch K. Johnson (ed.), Strategic Intelligence, Vol. 4 (Praeger,
2007), pp. 99126.

Loch K. Johnson, A Shock Theory of Congressional Accountability for


Intelligence, in Loch K. Johnson (ed.), Handbook of Intelligence Studies
(Routledge, 2007), pp. 34360.

78.

Michael Herman, Ethics and Intelligence after September 2001, in L. V. Scott


and P. D. Jackson (eds.), Understanding Intelligence in the Twenty-First Century:
Journeys into Shadows (Routledge, 2004), pp. 18094.

Counterterrorism
54.

55.

56.

Richard L. Russell, The Intelligence War Against Global Terrorism, in Loch K.


Johnson (ed.), Strategic Intelligence, Vol. 4 (Praeger, 2007), pp. 12738.

57.

9/11 Commission, Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks


Against the United States, Washington, DC (2004), pp. 361428, 5627.

Counterintelligence and Civil Liberties


58.

Kathryn S. Olmsted, Linus Pauling: A Case Study in Counterintelligence Run


Amok, in Loch K. Johnson (ed.), Handbook of Intelligence Studies (Routledge,
2007), pp. 26978.

59.

Loch K. Johnson, The Huston Plan, Americas Secret Power: The CIA in a
Democratic Society (Oxford University Press, 1989), pp. 13356.

60.

Symposium on Warrantless Wiretaps, Opening Argument, Yale University School


of Law (Feb. 2006), pp. 18.

A Comparative Perspective
79.

Mark Phythian, Intelligence Oversight in the UK: The Case of Iraq, in Loch K.
Johnson (ed.), Handbook of Intelligence Studies (Routledge, 2007), pp. 30114.

80.

Ian Leigh, More Closely Watching the Spies: Three Decades of Experiences, in
Hans Born, Loch K. Johnson, and Ian Leigh, Whos Watching the Spies?
Establishing Intelligence Service Accountability (Potomac Books, 2005), pp. 311.

81.

Stuart Farson, Canadas Long Road from Model Law to Effective Oversight of
Security and Intelligence, in Hans Born, Loch K. Johnson, and Ian Leigh, Whos
Watching the Spies? Establishing Intelligence Service Accountability (Potomac Books,
2005), pp. 99118.

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