You are on page 1of 185

OMAN SALINITY STRATEGY (OSS

)

www.maf.gov.om

Oman Salinity Strategy
ANNEX 1

ASSESSMENT OF SALINITY PROBLEM

2012

Oman Salinity Strategy

Annex 1

Assessment of Salinity Problem

Prepared by

Ministry Of Agriculture And Fisheries (Maf), Sultanate Of Oman
International Center For Biosaline Agriculture (Icba) Dubai, UAE

2012

His Majesty Sultan Qaboos Bin Said

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman

CONTRIBUTORS 
 
International Center for Biosaline Agriculture (ICBA) 
International
Center for Biosaline Agriculture (ICBA)
 

Dr
Khalil Ammar (Leader)
Dr Khalil Ammar (Leader) 

 

 

Dr Shabbir Shahid 

Dr
Shabbir Shahid
Dr Adla Khalaf 

 

Dr Adla Khalaf

Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries (MAF) 
MinistryEng. Saud Al Farsi (Co‐leader) 
of Agriculture and Fisheries (MAF)

 

Eng. Saud Al Farsi (Co-leader)
Eng. Khadir Al Farsi 
Eng. Khadir Al Farsi
Eng. Hamid Al Dhuhli   
Eng. Hamid Al Dhuhli

Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) 
Sultan Qaboos University (SQU)
Dr Ali Al Maktoumi 
Dr Ali Al Maktoumi
 
 
 
Dr Malik Ben Mohamed Al Wardi 
Dr Malik Ben Mohamed Al Wardi
 

 

 

Ministry of Environment and Climate Affairs (MECA) 
Ministry of Environment and Climate Affairs (MECA)
Eng. Saleh Al Soukri  
Eng.
Saleh Al Soukri
 
Other Organizations 
Other
Organizations
Mr Said Al‐Muselhi (Oman Wastewater Services Company‐Haya) 
Mr
Said Al-Muselhi (Oman Wastewater Services Company-Haya)
Mr Ahmed Al Shaqsi (Public Authority for Electricity and Water) 
Mr
Ahmed Al Shaqsi (Public Authority for Electricity and Water)
Eng.
Amer Al Mamari (Public Authority for Electricity and Water)
Eng. Amer Al Mamari (Public Authority for Electricity and Water)  

 
International
Consultant
International Consultant 

Dr
Abdulazim Ibraheem
Dr Abdulazim Ibraheem 

 

 


 

 

.

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS  Al  Aluminum   As   Arsenic  B  Boron  Ba  Barium  BAU  Business As Usual  Be  Beryllium  CA  Conservation Agriculture   Ca  Calcium  CaCO3  Calcium carbonates  Cd  Cadmium  CO32‐  Carbonates  Co  Cobalt  Cr   Chromium   Cu  Copper  CWR  Crop Water Requirements  dS/m  deci Siemens per meter  ECe  Electrical Conductivity of soil saturation extract  ECw  Electrical Conductivity of water  F  Fluoride  FAO  Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations   Fe  Iron  GIS  Geographical Information System   GRC  Geo‐Resources Consultancy  HCO3‐  Bicarbonates  Hg  Mercury  ICBA  International Center for Biosaline Agriculture  K   Potassium   km2  Kilometer square  MAF  Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries  MAR  Mean Annual Rainfall  Meq/L  milliequivant per liter  Mg  Magnesium  Mg/L  Milligrams per liter  ii    .

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Mm3  Million cubic meter  Mn  Manganese  Mo  Molybdenum   MRMWR  Ministry of Regional Municipalities. and Water Resources  Na  Sodium   Ni  Nickel   NO3‐  Nitrate  NO2  Nitrite  NWIP  National Well Inventory Project  OSS  Oman Salinity Strategy  P  Phosphorous   Pb  Lead  RSC  Residual Sodium Carbonates  S  Sulfur  SAR  Sodium Adsorption Ratio  Se  Selenium  Si  Silicon  SO42‐  Sulfates  SQU  Sultan Qaboos University  TDS  Total Dissolved Solids  µS/cm  micro Siemens per centimeter  USDA  United States Department of Agriculture  V   Vanadium  VAM  Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhizae  Zn  Zinc    iii    .

2 Soil resources in Oman 1. WATER RESOURCES IN AL BATINAH   7 8 2.6 Geology 12 13 2. GROUNDWATER RESERVES IN AL BATINAH   36  37 4.4 Rainfall 11 11 2.2 Suitability of water for agricultural use 28 27 4.3 Al Batinah landcover classification 89 2.4 Water balance 52 53 v    . WATER QUALITY IN AL BATINAH   3.1 Water resources in Oman 56 1.7 Hydrogeological setting and aquifer properties 13 14 2.3 Land suitability for large‐scale irrigated farming 56 67 2.5 Balance 46 47 5. GROUNDWATER MODELING  51 50  5.2 Topography 89 2.3 Groundwater throughflow (Jabal inflow) 42 43 4.1 Study area characteristics 78 2.5 Wadi flow 11 11 2.1 Groundwater balance 32 37 4. OVERVIEW OF THE PHYSICAL RESOURCES IN OMAN  5 6 1.4 Groundwater use 43 44 4.8 Groundwater level 13 18 20 15  3.2 Groundwater recharge 40 41 4.  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman CONTENTS  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  1 1 1.2.1 Water salinity 20 15 3.2 Model limitation 50 51 5.1 Model code selection 50 51 5.3 Conceptual flow model for Al Batinah coastal plain 51 52 5.1 Soils of the Sultanate of Oman 56 1.

3 Indirect recharge 7. MANAGEMENT OPTIONS IN AL BATINAH COASTAL PLAIN  6.2.6 Strategies to overcome soil pH.1 Study area 61 62 7.6.1 Water salinity 69 70 8.3 Adoption of conservation agriculture technologies 53 58 6.6.2 Change cropping pattern to less water consuming crops 6.1 Use water saving techniques 6.  SOIL RESOURCES IN AL BATINAH  70  75 9.1 Level of salinization 70 75 9.6.10 Water balance 68 63 62 67 8.3 Salalah main catchment system 61 62 7.1 Groundwater inflow 7.8 Groundwater reserve 67 62 7.7 Future options for expansion of irrigated agriculture 61 60 7.7 Groundwater outflow to sea 62 67 7.6 Recharge 7.1 Reduce water demand 6.2 Recharge over the plain 7.4 Recharge dam 7.6.5 Groundwater levels 64 63 7.  WATER QUALITY IN SALALAH  70 65  8.1.2 Salinity monitoring 70 75 vi    53  54 .4 Root zone salinity management and leaching fraction 59 54 6.9 Groundwater use 62 67 7.2.2 Other water quality constituents 70 71 9.6. CaCO3 affect on nutrient availability 60 61 6.5 Reclaimed water 60 65 61 66 61 66 66 61 67 62 7.2 Increase water supply 6.1.4 Hydrogeology 63 62 7.1 Increase groundwater recharge 6.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 6. WATER RESOURCES IN SALALAH COASTAL PLAIN  59 54 61  62 7.2 Land cover 61 62 7.5 Soil salinity in irrigated fields and relative yield prediction 59 54 6.2 Reuse treated wastewater for irrigation 53 54 50 55 56 51 56 51 56 51 6.

5 Flow model calibration 12.3 Soil pH and nutrient availability 82 83 11. GROUNDWATER NUMERICAL MODEL FOR NORTHERN BATINAH  11.5 Solute transport model 11. 2011 survey 7378 9.2 Transient state calibration 85 86 86 85 11.1 Model domain 83 84 11.5.1 Steady state calibration 11.3 Boundary conditions 84 85 11.4.5.1 Steady state calibration 12.7.2 Data handling and unification of EC1:5 to ECe 79 74 9.6 Flow model prediction 102 107 vii    84 83  103 104 102 107 .4 Soil quality of Al Batinah agriculture region and management issues.5.4 Flow model calibration 11.1 Root‐zone soil salinity 81 82 10.3 Sensitivity analysis 11.4.1 Limitations of 1993‐1997 datasets 9.2 Model grid 101 100 12.2 Assessment of soil texture in Al Batinah 79 74 80 75 75 80 75 80 80 81 10.2 Calibration performance 11.3 Initial conditions 102 101 12.2 Model grid 83 84 11.6. GROUNDWATER NUMERICAL MODEL FOR SOUTHERN BATINAH  89 88 96 95 96 91 99 94 99 94 100 95 101 100  12.5.3 Transient model calibration performance 102 103 102 103 12.4 Boundary conditions 102 101 12.5.2 Soil texture 82 81 10.4 Salinity prediction 12.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 9.7.7 Assessment of soil pH in Al Batinah region 9.5 Assessment of root zone salinity management efforts 78 73 9.1 Model domain 101 100 12.5.6 Assessment of soil salinity trend in Al Batinah from 1993‐97 to 2011 9.3 Soils and their potential uses 70 75 9.1 Consequences of high soil pH 9.1 Transport boundary conditions 11.2 Transient state calibration 12.6.5. SOIL RESOURCES IN SALALAH  82 81  10.

....... ................................................ ..... Groundwater reserve ‐ Doubtful to unsuitable quality irrigation water....................................................... Mean direct recharge estimates in Salalah plain ........ 61 66 Table 12... 63 68 Table 15....................... 67 Table  2......... Groundwater reserve in the coastal plain........................................................... 85 90 92 Table 19................................................. 55 60 Table 11: Groundwater inflow from Jabal..................................................... .................... ......... Groundwater salinity classes for management levels......................................... 62 67 Table 14........ Steady state water balance....  Salt tolerance of crops...... Mean groundwater balance for Alluvium and Upper Fars aquifers........................... 38 39 42 Table 6............... 41 49 Table 7................ Simulated variations of inland salt encroachment with time...... ................. Pre‐development groundwater balance (Mm3)................ 44 Table 8...... .. Current groundwater balance for Salalah plain (Mm3)................. ... Design capacity of proposed recharge dams... ..............  Landcover  classes  considered  in  IKONOS  supervised  classification  and  change  detection....................... ........................ 52 57 Table 10.................................................................................... 90 Table 22.................... 63 68 Table 16.................. .........10 9 Table 3................................................................................ 52 53 Table 9....... 37 38 Table 5... ................ . 102 107 viii    .............. Groundwater reserve – Good to suitable quality iIrrigation water...... Transient Jabal inflow............... ............. 64 69 Table 17.....................  Main recharge dams and their storage capacity in Al Batinah coastal plain area.. 93 95 Table 21............. Transient recharge distribution in recharge zones (Mm3/year)....................... Groundwater balance for Northern Batinah under (BAU scenario)(Mm3/year)... . 21 22 Table 4.............................................. Estimated future water demand for Salalah plain area (Mm3)................... 83 88 Table 18............ Estimated current groundwater use in Salalah plain (Mm3)................... 91 94 Table 20.............................. .Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman BIBLIOGRAPHY  104  109 APPENDIX  108 113   List of Tables  Table 1: Soil great groups of Oman............................... ...... Current groundwater balance in Al Batinah coastal plain....................... .......... ........ 61 66 Table 13.........

. Al Batinah main topographic map............................ Main catchments and catchment areas in Al Batinah governorates (km2)....................... Geological cross-section of the northern Batinah Alluvium and Upper Fars aquifers...........................................26 Figure 25...................................15 Figure 11........................... Water table trends in some selected catchments...11 Figure 8...........10 Figure 7..............12 Figure 10........................16 Figure 12.................. The growth of total land area with saline groundwater.......... Growth of seawater encroachment 1995-2010.........29 .......................................... Current seawater intrusion (Mm3) varies among the catchments................................................................................................................................................8 Figure 4....17 Figure 13............................................000 mg/l) (Feddans).....23 Figure 22..... Mean annual water surface inflow and outflow in the main catchments in Al Batinah governorates.................................... Current total land areas of high water salinity (TDS > 10................. Average annual rainfall distribution in Al Batinah coastal plain.. Observed groundwater salinity in Al Batinah Governorates for the years 1995-2010 (mg/l). Projection of groundwater salinity growth (in mg/l) over land area under Business as Usual Scenario for the years 2015 (top) to 2030 (bottom).......................................... Location map of study area (Al Batinah governorates)..........21 Figure 17.....20 Figure 16....7 Figure 2............23 Figure 19...................................................................................23 Figure 20................................................................22 Figure 18.19 Figure 15............................. Agricultural areas in Al Batinah coastal plain..... The historic and project growth of groundwater salinity in Al Batinah Alluvium aquifer.... Examples of water salinity trends in some selected catchments (Source: ICBA...........................................................................................25 Figure 24...................................................... Water sampling sites in Al Batinah Governorates.... Example of landcover map for Sohar......27 Figure 27.................................................... Diagram for relating SAR and conductivity.......9 Figure 5...................................................... The growth of cultivated zones affected by the increase of seawater intrusion (Feddan)...........................26 Figure 26..........................28 Figure 28..... The main catchment system in Al Batinah governorates...................... Geological map of Al Batinah governorates........... Land suitability classes for irrigated agriculture in the Sultanate of Oman.......................................................8 Figure 3............. Location of Alluvium and Upper Fars aquifers in the study area..17 Figure 14. Geological cross-section of Alluvium aquifer in Wadi Al Maáwil of the Southern Batinah....................................9 Figure 6.............24 Figure 23.................................. 2011)....................List of Figures Figure 1...........................................23 Figure 21...................................000 mg/l) (Feddans)...... 1995-2010 (Feddan).......................................................... Water salinity (mg/l) for water (left) and Sodium Adsorption Ratio (SAR) (right) for the year 2010................11 Figure 9........................................................ Current total agricultural areas of high water salinity (TDS > 10.................................... (a) Current percentage of increase and (b) decrease in groundwater salinity levels in MRMWR surveyed wells compared to the year 2005 salinity levels.....

Figure 29..... Overall water pH classes in Al Batinah governorates and individual wilayat (2011)...............................................65 Figure 59...................34 Figure 37...... Salalah measured average water table levels (1984-2003)...............45 Figure 43.......56 Figure 50: The most water-consuming crops (Mm3)..43 Figure 41............. Location of existing wells and their designated use.............. Water level model prediction 2003-2030........ Water EC (a) and SAR (b) in Al Batinah (2011)..................... Water pH classes in Al Batinah (2011). and operational status in Al Batinah Governorates............... Increase of saltwater intrusion over time in response to over-pumping.....................................58 Figure 53........................................... Overall water salinity classes in the Al Batinah governorates (2011)........................................................ Land cover map for Salalah...................31 Figure 33............................ Geology map for Salalah coastal plain................... Agricultural water demand using different irrigation techniques....................55 Figure 48.............62 Figure 55..........................47 Figure 47.............................................................................................30 Figure 31................................................31 Figure 32........................ 46 Figure 45............................................................................................. Estimated annual infiltration volumes from main recharge dams in the coastal plain area...................62 Figure 56.. Location map of Salalah study area................................... 42 Figure 40...................46 Figure 46.........56 Figure 51: Location of proposed recharge dams in Al Batinah catchment area...................33 Figure 36......................35 Figure 38............................................................. Livestock water demand in main catchments of Al Batinah governorates....................44 Figure 42..........65 ................................................ Agricultural water demand for (a) Al Batinah governorates and (b) Al Batinah coastal area...................................................................36 Figure 39............. The effect of reducing abstraction rate on seawater intrusion.............................................................. Water pH (a) and salinity classes (b) in Al Batinah governorates....................... Estimated groundwater inflow from Jabal in Al Batinah study area......63 Figure 57...................33 Figure 35................................. Estimated mean annual abstraction rate in Al Batinah coastal plain for the period 1982-2010.............57 Figure 52 Current sectoral use of treated wastewater quantities in Al Batinah governorates.....................................................................30 Figure 30.......................... Total agricultural areas of suitable or less suitable irrigation water..64 Figure 58........... Adapted from groundwater quality classes distribution from Al Batinah.. Overall water pH distribution classes in Al Batinah agricultural governorates (2011)....................................................... Suitability of irrigation water quality with respect to land area (left) and agricultural area (right)................58 Figure 54...........32 Figure 34..................... 45 Figure 44..........................................................................................................56 Figure 49: Potential water saving by shifting from flood to better advanced techniques........ Reclaimed water quantities per wilayat in Al Batinah Governorates...................... Water salinity classes in Al Batinah governorates (2011)).............................................................. Main wadis flow in Salalah (Mm3).... Agricultural water demand in (a) Al Batinah governorates and (b) Al Batinah coastal plain........

......................... Land suitability classes for irrigated agriculture in the Sultanate of Oman (MAF....................................................80 Figure 76........89 Figure 88.71 Figure 63..... Al Batinah soil classification map......Figure 60..... Location of wells in aquifer domain.........83 Figure 80.............................................................70 Figure 61................ Soil suitability map for agricultural use in Oman........ Measured groundwater salinity for the year 1997.........74 Figure 67.................................................81 Figure 77............................................................................... (b) Upper Fars aquifer.........73 Figure 66....... (b) the year 2010............ 1995 and 2011)...........................78 Figure 73.........76 Figure 71. Drinking water salinity classes for livestock and poultry (1992.......................................................................................... Main recharge zones in model domain....................................... 1990)........................... Examples of calibration performance: (a) the year 1995................ Calculated steady state head.... calculated head).. Assessment of root zone salinity management efforts in Al Batinah.............................................................74 Figure 68............................................ Modeled salinity cross sections: (a) Initial conditions..................................................... Soil pH classes of Salalah soils....................................................................74 Figure 69............................. Comparative trend of soil salinity in Al Batinah governorates (1993-97 to 2911)................................ Initial head conditions in Alluvium and Upper Fars aquifer...................................75 Figure 70...................................... Water pH (a) and salinity (b) for livestock and poultry (Salalah)...................... Soil suitability for agriculture............................................... Calibrated hydraulic conductivity.................. Overall salinity classes distribution in Al Batinah governorates......84 Figure 82.............................. Northern Batinah Model Domain and Grid System... Soil texture classes from Salalah.............................................................................. Comparison of soil suitability map with groundwater salinity map overlayed by agricultural areas.............................................................. Overall texture classes distribution in Al Batinah governorates............................93 Figure 91.....97 ............................................................................................................82 Figure 79.. Simulated groundwater salinity contours after 6 years of commissioning treated wastewater injection wells.................................85 Figure 83......................................................................................................88 Figure 87. Location of observation wells used in the model.................. Steady State calibration performance (Observed head vs.............................72 Figure 65.......71 Figure 62..............77 Figure 72.................80 Figure 75..................................89 Figure 89.... Root zone salinity classes in Salalah soils............................................................................... Water Salinity (a) and Sodicity (b) in Salalah waters.................. Overall pH classes distribution in Al Batinah governorates..............................................82 Figure 78...93 Figure 90....................79 Figure 74.......................83 Figure 81............................72 Figure 64.......................................86 Figure 84........... Current Water pH classes.......................................................... (b) after 6 years............... Longitudinal dispersivity zones: (a) Alluvium aquifer.......87 Figure 86......................... Ground water quality for Salalah. Boundary condition for northern Batinah Alluvium and Upper Fars aquifer.87 Figure 85..

....................................................... Vertical cross-section of seawater encroachment over time in the coastal zone................. Observed and calibrated hydraulic head in all points of all the eleven observation wells (Year 2010) ..............103 Figure 98................ Scatterplot of observed vs.. Simulated groundwater salinity for several year........................................................................107 Figure 104. Contour map of initial head and simulated groundwater contours...106 Figure 103................................................. Study domain and boundary conditions for southern Batinah....................................... Observed and calculated groundwater contours for year 1985..........................102 Figure 97...............104 Figure 99......................................................Figure 92..................... Observed and Calibrated hydraulic head in well JT-11.......... South Bathina Model grid and location of the recharge dams.................................. Calibrated hydraulic conductivity of the study domain........................................................................................................................................................ Dams recharge efficiency.........................................................99 Figure 94..................................................106 Figure 102...........................................105 Figure 100................ meters with reference to swl....................... Simulated annual recharge (million cubic meters) to the alluvial aquifer in the period 1982 to 2010.........................106 Figure 101..............108 Box 1...43 ..........................101 Figure 95.......... Observed and calculated groundwater contours for year 2000........101 Figure 96.............. calculated salinity concentration for selected years............................ Observed and Calibrated hydraulic head in well DW-3.......................98 Figure 93...............

 boundary condition. etc. various initiatives have been proposed. grid. soil pH was above the optimum pH range.  Four  Landsat  satellite  images  covering  the  Al  Batinah  and  Salalah  areas  are used as the source data for this exercise. Supervised classification is performed.  Omani  soils  have  significant  potential  to  capitalize  on  nutrient  availability  through  increasing  fertilizer  use  efficiency  by  proper soil management techniques.  building  recharge dams (30 Mm3).  It  is  recommended to use the leaching fraction properly to manage root zone salinity below the  threshold level of crops in question. this can only be achieved through a  detailed  soil  inventory  in  the  area  of  interest. including but not limited to. such as the  aquifers’  properties  and  thickness. Variable soil and groundwater salinities in agricultural farms both from Al Batinah  and Salalah have been observed.  The  review  of  soil  and  water  datasets  (Al  Batinah  and  Salalah)  revealed. soil policy issues. Various ways have been suggested to manage soil and  water salinity. where most  of  the  plant  nutrients  are  not  readily  available  to  plants.   In addition to soil and water salinities. In waters where the Sodium Adsorption Ratio (SAR) is  more than 10. and used total spare water of  104  Mm3  which  consists  of:  using  treated  wastewater  in  agriculture  (37  Mm3).  aquifer  recharge.   Finally.  over  years. however.000 to 30.000 ppm) in the monitoring wells.  the  salinity  increase  is  more  extensive  in  Al  Batinah  governorates  than  Salalah. The numerical model defines its domain.  describe  the  possible  causes  of  salinity  and  11    .  delineate  its  spatial  and  temporal  extent.  reducing the  abstraction rate to mitigate the current unsustainable environmental impacts  which have accounted for 42% of total abstraction (250 Mm3).  suggesting  salinity  is  poorly  managed  in  Al  Batinah  compared  with  Salalah  governorate.   Landcover  classes  are  determined  using  the  Landsat  classification  to  delineate  the  agricultural  areas. calibration  performance. and improving irrigation systems by shifting from flood irrigation  to drip and sprinkler irrigation (41 Mm3). It has also been  found that there is a deficit between the total recharge and abstraction resulting in seawater  intrusion.   The examination of groundwater datasets clearly revealed a decline in the water level and  an increase in water salinities (1.   To  understand  the  groundwater  availability  in  the  Al  Batinah  governorates  a  conceptual  model was prepared for the study area using a number of important variables.  The  review  of  the  general  soil  map  shows  potential  map  units  in  the  Al  Batinah  where  suitable soils for agriculture can be delineated.  increasing  trend  of  soil  and  water  salinity.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  This  annex  provides  background  information  about  salinity  assessment  of  soil  and  water  analyses  of  the  datasets.  and  scenarios  run  for  different  evaluations  to  establish  a  comprehensive strategy to mitigate salinity problems in Oman.  Objectives  The main objectives of the study are to assess the soil and water salinity problem in Oman. including the adoption of conservation agriculture technologies.  water  abstraction  and  general  flow  direction. where  categorization is supervised by specifying training sites of spectral characteristics of known  areas. efforts should be made to amend water quality through using gypsum in soil. solute and transport boundary condition.

   Identify the geographic distribution and trends of groundwater salinity (GIS  mapping).  Review previous modeling efforts and case studies and highlight the spatial impacts  of several management scenarios implemented to solve the salinity problem. uses and distribution  in the study area.  Assess water data for drinking for livestock and poultry and for agricultural uses.   To formulate recommendations for the management of soil and water resources.  Assess the salinity level and its extent in ground and surface water resources.   Recommendations  1.  To assess current soil salinity status in Al Batinah and Salalah regions.  This  monitoring  network  should  be  expanded  to  cover:  the  underlying  aquifers  22    .  Assess aquifer stresses: groundwater abstraction.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman develop a strategy to tackle these issues for better services from soil and water resources.  Soil salinity assessment     Assess soil and water salinity.   Scope of work   Water resources assessment  The scope of work for the water resources assessment component includes the following:             Review and update information on available water resources.  Assess future water demand in the study area.  To develop a groundwater model for Al Batinah region. pH datasets to develop trend of increase or decrease  over a period of time.  This  is  particularly  important  in  areas  of  new  development  that  has  affected  groundwater  availability  and  quality.   Assess hydrological characteristics and changes in salt‐affected regions.  Update the water balance for the study area. Evaluate the adequacy of groundwater and soil monitoring networks   The  monitoring  network  needs  to  be  evaluated  in  terms  of  the  information  it  conveys  on  understanding  the  groundwater  system.  from recharge dams. and outflow to the coast (sea  interface).  To assess water quality for drinking water for livestock and poultry and for  agricultural uses.  Assess the main water inflow to the aquifer system: natural recharge from rainfall.  such  as  in  areas  of  intensive  irrigation.  Give recommendations for sustainable use and management of soil and water  resources. and return flow from irrigation.  To use the developed groundwater model to evaluate the proposed management  options to mitigate the salinity problem in the most affected regions.  To quantify brackish water resources according to different water quality classes.  and  where  there  are  consequences  of  over‐drafting  and  saltwater  intrusion.  Identify water suitability for agricultural purposes.  The specific objectives are:         To provide an update of available water resources and water use.  Identify potential areas for future agricultural extension.

  engineering.  geology.  Three‐dimensional  numerical  groundwater  models  of  variable‐density  flow  and  solute  transport  should  be  constructed  to  better  understand  the  saltwater  intrusion  mechanisms  and evaluate the effectiveness of different remediation strategies.  land  management  decisions  support.  and isotope studies (age of water to identify the source of salinity).  environment  monitoring. Improve estimates of groundwater use  Groundwater  use  data  were  the  least  available  in  the  study  area.  Classification  has  been  approached  through applying the conventional classification of satellite imagery. A few older studies covered the coastal plain.  It  is  recommended  to  implement  a  regular  soil  monitoring  program to better understand resource capacity.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman such  as  the  Upper  Fars  Aquifer.  industry.  These  data  are  vital  for  understanding the human impact on water and ecological resources.  education  and  environment.  water. Collect data and develop integrated databases  Access to information is essential for wise and comprehensive planning.  environment.   Soil monitoring should be considered an important part of overall environmental monitoring  program.  research. Undertake remote sensing  At  the  most  basic  level. Therefore.  and  per  depth  (vertical  profiles).  b. and assessing the gap  in meeting future water needs. Improve understanding of freshwater‐saltwater interaction  In order to improve the understanding of the saltwater mechanisms:  a. but these studies  need regular updating and expansion to cover new areas. to  3  3   .  5. degradation leading to better management  to achieve higher benefits and environmental services. However.    more pumping tests to delineate the aquifer hydraulic properties.  Additional  functionality in the system should allow potential users to retrieve information according to  their  information  priorities.    2.  agriculture. and  o geochemical  investigations  such  as  chemical  composition  of  groundwater. changes and  shifts on the vegetation cover have not yet been detected and/or quantified. This should include:    drilling exploration wells.  etc.  The  proposed  system  could  be  available  through the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries (MAF) official website.  so  that  threats  to  soil  degradation.  biodiversity  decline  and  pollution  can  be  identified  on  time  and  actions  taken  to  save  the  resources. There is a need to  build  an  integrated  and  comprehensive  database  on  the  national  level  that  covers  inter‐ connected  fields  and  connects  different  departments  and  institutions:  hydrology.   detecting the extent of salinity in the aquifer through   o geophysical methods such as resistivity method.  The  database  will  be  useful  for  decision  makers  for  strategic  agriculture  planning.  economics.  More  in‐depth  geological  and  hydrological  studies  are  needed  to  better  understand  the  coastal groundwater system. Appropriate measurements of the abstraction (like metering)  should  be  applied  regularly  to  better  estimate  the  groundwater  pumped  quantities.  soil.  remote  sensing  work  has  identified  and  mapped  the  spatial  land  cover  distribution  in  Al  Batinah  and  Salalah  areas.  health.  A  web‐based  front  end  should  be  developed  that  links  to  the  comprehensive  database.  This  can  be  achieved  through  using Remote Sensing images over a period of time and through integration with Geographic  Information  Systems  (GIS).    4.  An  updated well inventory and agricultural farms project is urgently needed.  better  salinity  sampling  over  time.  3.

   8. Soil policy should be perceived as one of the  key elements of environmental policy.  as  well  as  monitoring  systems.  The way we use our soils. This means  that restoration of natural conditions needs:       To  reduce  the  present  extraction  rate  between  20%  to  40%.  restoring  the  productive  capacity  of  degraded  soils. Improve water conservation measures and enhance groundwater availability  The current extraction rate (2010 rate) is 46% more than the average recharge. it is essential to understand  soil properties that would be best suited to such artificial ponds. Soil salinity sapping of agricultural farms in Al Batinah and Salalah  Initiate salinity mapping to know the current full status of soil and water salinity in Al Batinah  and Salalah agriculture areas.  legislation  fully  geared  to  soil  protection.  This  requires  a  significant  and  long‐term  commitment.  well  implemented  approach  based  on  coherent  soil  policy  that  oversee  research. Soil policy  Many countries have included soils in their policies as a natural resource of vital importance.  It is recommended to use  integrated farming system (crops‐livestock‐aquaculture) for better use of farm resources and  to earn high income.g.  An  interesting  alternative  to  plant  production  systems in addressing shallow water tables could be the development of artificial ponds for  aquaculture (e.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman improve  understanding  of  trends  in  salinity  change.  regulation  and  enforcement.  development.  It  should  also  include  integration  of  soil  information  into  the  development  and  implementation of future policies and projects. will have important and  far‐reaching impact on the quality of our lives and environment. To achieve this. High resolution images and  analytical approaches should be used to enhance the reliability of the prediction process. in the context of sustainable uses.  thermal  temperature.  The  challenge  is  to  develop  more  sustainable  ways  of  managing  soils  in  the  face  of  environment  change  and  increasing  demands  upon  soil  resources.  and  ameliorating  associated  salinity.  land  cover  data  should  be  coupled  with  topography.  education. and field observations to analyze the alterations in vegetation cover and  provide evidence to locate possible future changes due to soil salinity.  it  is  recommended  that  land  cover  dynamics and changes over a span of several years are analyzed. and the influence of our activities on it.  and  remediation  programs  and  public  awareness.  vegetation indices. The vision of such policies is  underpinned  by  the  aim  to  manage  the  land  for  current  and  future  generations. Managing shallow saline water table through farm aquaculture  There  is  an  opportunity  for  evaluating  efficient  methods  of  withdrawing  from  the  water  table.  6.  To construct new recharge dams where feasible and applicable.  44    .  rational  and  sustainable  uses.  The  best  management  of  the  Omani  soils  will  result  from  a  planned.  7.  identification  of  risk  areas.  and  putting in place robust and resilient systems that land use and management prevent further  degradation of the soils and landscapes. for brine shrimp or prawns). In  addition.  and    within  an  acceptable economic level.  The  policy  should  tackle  full  range  of  uses  and  threats  to  soil  in  a  comprehensive  way  and  create  a  common  framework  for  rational  uses  and  protection. The data should be entered into a national database for ease  of  access  and  analysis  to  better  inform  policy  and  decision‐making  for  sustainable  use  of  resources.    Soil salinity mapping of agricultural farms in Al Batinah and Salalah 9.

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 10.  develop  newly‐required  capacities. The team. The unit should be responsible for all salinity related issues.  and  to  assess  soil  quality  to  identify  limitations for a specific use prior to implementation of new projects of any kind.  At  present  soil  map  units  (MAF. etc.  thus  requires  further  elaboration  through on‐site investigations.).  education  and  extension  (RDEE)  should  be  developed  and  implemented  by  a  dedicated  professional  team  from  existing  manpower  at  the  MAF  to  perform  such  important  role.   13. population. climate  change.  where  appropriate  an  integrated  soil  reclamation  program  (physical.  hydrological.  o forecasting models for future planning (water demand.  chemical.  research  implementation.  developing  national  policies. and  o training on quality assurance / quality control of available data.  Farmer’s training in:  o improving farmers skills in modern and conservation irrigation techniques.  it  is  recommended  to  create  a  Soil  Salinity Unit including a soil and water testing laboratory within the Ministry of Agriculture  and Fisheries of Oman.  o vulnerability mapping and risk assessment.  and contract management.  policy  development.  Unfortunately  this  level  of  detail  does  not  enable  the  precise  location  of  soil  types.   12.  Once the potential sites are identified for the expansion of  agriculture. 55    .  extension  and  education  services  etc.  analytical  soil  and  water  testing  services  at  national  level. and  o soil testing ‐ salinity and fertility diagnostics and management.  thus  improving the technical level of researchers.   11.  biological methods) at farm level to capitalize farm resources for better production.  This  team  should  include  expertise  in  soil  science. and on‐farm partial desalination.  The  unit  should  also  be  responsible  to  implement. Integrated soil program   An  integrated  soil  program  including  research. including  but  not  limited  to.  public  education.  development. in addition to other responsibilities. there is a need  to undertake:    Staff training in:  o remote sensing and GIS. Establish soil salinity unit  To  address  salinity  related  issues  at  the  national  level. Expansion of irrigated agriculture   Further  expansion  of  irrigated  agriculture  into  new  areas  requires  review  of  existing  soil  maps  to  find  map  units  having  high  potential  for  irrigated  agriculture. extension staff and the farmers.  1990)  provide  weighted  average  suitability  based  on  the  soil  types  included  in  these  units  (some  are  suitable  and  others  may  be  unsuitable).  implementation  of  salinity  monitoring  program. should also assess  suitability of new sites for their use for agriculture and other projects at national and farm  level.  community. It is recommended to implement a RDEE program to maximize benefits from natural  resources  and  improve  national  human  capacity.   o on‐farm water management.  o vadose zone and groundwater modeling. Undertake capacity building  To  strengthen  the  available  human  resources.  it  is  highly  recommended  to  conduct  on‐site  investigations  to  find  sub‐areas  suitable for agriculture.

 there is little rain.   Al Batinah is the main agricultural region of Oman.  This  is  due  to  the  hot  climatic  conditions  and  land  degradation  that  has  reduced the resource capacity for agriculture production.2.  "producing  more  from  the  existing  agricultural  area  in  Oman  while  reducing  negative  impacts  on  soil  services".  contain  other  minor  soils.  There  has  been  significant  growth  in  agriculture  over  the  last  twenty  to  thirty  years.7% of rock outcrop.260  million  cubic  meters  (Mm3).2 Soil resources in Oman  1.  To  address  these  issues.  To  achieve  this  paradigm  shift. Calciorthids  and Torripsamments cumulatively cover 69% area of Oman. Future challenges associated with climate  change will further affect agricultural production and aggravate resource degradation.  causing  soil  and  water salinization in Al Batinah agricultural region.   In view of the soil and water constraints and the expected impacts of climate change on agriculture  in Oman.  that  is.  The  net  annual  natural  recharge  is  estimated  to  be  around  1.  Excessive  pumping  from  groundwater  wells  has  resulted  in  seawater  intrusion. 1990) is divided into seven soil great groups  and  five  miscellaneous  units  (Table  1).    66    .15 ha  arable land per person.  It  is  an  arid  country  whose  mean annual rainfall is less than 100 mm per annum. As of 2003.  The soil survey of Oman (MAF. 1990) identified that 7% of soils are suitable for large‐scale irrigated  farming. which cannot be separated at the scale of mapping (1:250. jointly with ICBA.  of  which  90%  is  used for agriculture.650  Mm3. MAF has initiated a project to develop the Oman Salinity Strategy (OSS). and 18.  there  is  a  need  to  develop  a  new  agricultural  paradigm  of  sustainable  crop  production  that  is.  'Gulf  States')  have  been  declining  since  1961. Groundwater is the  main  water  resource  in  the  country. It is therefore  imperative to improve soil resource capacity for better crop production and to avoid abandonment  of  farms. accounting for 50% of the country's agricultural  production. The Gypsiorthids.  One of the important components of OSS is to compile past and present information on physical (soil  and water) resources to serve as a baseline of information on which to found the strategy.1 Soils of the Sultanate of Oman  The General Soil Map of the Sultanate of Oman (MAF. that is. A historical record of agriculture in Oman has clearly revealed that the soil and water  resources in the Al Batinah agricultural region are affected by anthropogenic and natural ‘sea water  intrusion soil salinization.  These  map  units  are  not  pure.000). This jeopardizes the potential for future agricultural production to bridge  the gap between local food production and food imports.  The  total  water  demand  is  around  1.1 Water resources in Oman  Oman  is  located  in  the  southeastern  corner  of  the  Arabian  Peninsula.  innovative  approaches must be put in place to improve the conditions of Omani agriculture.  In  general  the  arable  soils  in  the  GCC  countries  (henceforth  GS.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 1. OVERVIEW OF THE PHYSICAL RESOURCES IN OMAN  1.   1. the GS have less than 0.   Groundwater  over‐pumping  of  limited  renewable  quantities  has  increased  the  salinity  of  groundwater.

 based on MAF.  If  sufficient  water  is  0.    Figure  1.409 ha) 92.406 ha) 4.651  ha)  Sub‐total (A)  2.00  consequently  reduce  productivity  or  benefits. It should be  (Source: MAF.52%  B. 2011.36  severely  sustained  application  of  a  given  use  and  Sub‐total (B)  100.  Land  suitability  classes  for  irrigated  agriculture  in  the  Sultanate of Oman (Source: ICBA. that is. 1990):  Salorthids  2.26  actual  suitable  area  cannot  be  delineated  at  the  Torripsamments   16. 1990). The land suitability classes are  Ustropepts  0.  Because  these  areas  also  contain  Calciorthids  16.  Rock outcrop     Wadi beds    S2 ‐ Marginally suitable (1. the limitations are so severe as to preclude  successful sustained irrigated agriculture.50  79.  equaling  to  2.07%.93%  Land having limitations which may be surmountable in time but which cannot be corrected with  existing knowledge at currently acceptable cost. Soil great groups of Oman   land of Oman (31.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 1. Miscellaneous      Land having no significant limitations or limitations  Coastal dunes  which  in  total  are  moderately  severe  for  sustained  Tidal flats    irrigated agriculture.07%  of  the  soils  are  suitable  for  agriculture.02  soils  which  are  not  suitable  for  agriculture.  N ‐ Not suitable (29.55%    Land  having  limitations  in  total  which  affect   Urban   20.  noted  that  the  actual  area  of  suitable  soils  will  be  A.22  x  106  ha  of  the  total  Table 1.64  S1  ‐  Highly  to  moderately  suitable  (791. 1990).86  scale  of  mapping  (1:250.70  defined below (MAF.  the  Gypsiorthids  36.  food  importation  would  Torriorthents  be considerably less.000).93  available  and  all  the  available  suitable  land  was  Torrifluvents  6.431.37  exploited  for  agriculture.  or  Grand total  alternatively  require  increased  inputs  to  the  point  that    this  expenditure  will  be  only  marginally  justified. Soil Great Groups    less  than  7.  77    .3 Land suitability for large‐scale irrigated farming  The  land  resources  suitable  for  agriculture  are  limited  as  only  7.4 x 106 ha) (Figure 1).203.

  this  portion  of  whicch  is  within  Al  Batinah  governorates g s  has  an  areea  of  just  24 4  km2  (Figure e  4).000 0 km . follo owed by Waadi Bani Ghaafer. with  2 an  areass  of  1.. TThe total  2 area of tthe catchmeents is 15.Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman 2.  The  smaallest  catchm ment  within  Al  Batinah  governorates g s  is  Wadi  Manumah. Al K Khaburah. Figure 3). 2010. WA ATER REESOURC CES IN A AL BATIN NAH REG GION  2. The maain catchmen nt system in Al  Batin (Source:: ICBA.  e This  region ccomprises 25 5 surface catchments (main wadis) th hat drain thee western mountainous sslopes of  Jabal Al Akhdar and the coastal p plain (Figure 2. Liwaa. Al Musanaah. Saaham. Ass Suwayq.     Figure 2 2.3 387 km2. The laargest catchment within Al Batinah ggovernoratess is Wadi  Mayhah h‐Mabrah‐Haajir system.  The  main tow wns include:: Shinas. Location m map of study area (Al Batiinah)  Figure 3. 2011)). It extends ab bout 270  km  alon ng  the  Gulf  of  o Oman. and Barka.  These caatchments are bounded by Jabal in the south and d by the Gulf of Oman in n the north.1 Sttudy area characteristics  Al Batinaah region is located in th he northwesttern part of the Sultanatte of Oman.252  km .  nah (Source: ICBA. w which has an n area of 1. based on  inforrmation obtaained from M MRMWR). Sohar.  8  8   .  fro om  the  Shinaas  wilayat  in n  the  west  to o  Barka  wilaayat  in  the  east.

 Main catchm ments and caatchment areas in Al Batin nah  governorrates (km2) (SSource: ICBA.  The  Jabal.  c thu us  enabling  the  projectio on of furtherr land degrad dation.  Landsat  images  aree  acquired  under  clear  c heric  condiitions  and  geo‐referen nced  to  UTM  U atmosph coordinaate system.000 800 894 755 6 693 660 594 600 400 406 393 386 366 365 274 200 211 184 163 162 155 15 54 61 32 24 0   Figure 4.    .600 1. Ground trruth  information  –  required  for  valid dating  the  cllassification  –  is  absent.   2.000  m  near  the  Jabel  Al  Akhdar  on  o the  south hern  boundarry  of  Al  Batiinah  governo orates.  Whille  the  elevation  in the co oastal plain  ranges from 100 m to 0  m (sea level) at  the coasst (Figure 5).700 m m near the Jabal front in  the south to o sea level allong  the  coast.   Four Lan ndsat satellitte images co overing the A Al Batinah arreas  are used d as the source data for  this exercise.2 To opograph hy  The  top pography  of  Al  Batinah  governorates  ranges  from  1. ZZone 40 North.400 1 1. 2011). 2.387 1..252 1.  and  upstream m  catchments  exten nd  beyond d  Al  Batiinah  governo orates (studyy boundary) w where the elevation reacches  up  to  3.200 1169 1145 5 1096 1.   99    Figurre 5..  There  iss  a  steeper  surface  graadient  near  the  a a  flatteer  surface  gradient  g in  the  plain.3 Al Batinah landcover classificaation   Some off Al Batinah ccoastal catch hment areass are affected d by  soil salin nity conditions that led tto environmeental and so ocio‐ economic  problemss. Al Batin nah main  topographic map p (Source: ICB BA.  Monitorin ng  the  land  cover  patte erns  with rem mote sensingg and GIS prrovides base information n on  crop  waater  use  an nd  salinity  changes.  2011 1).Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman Km2 1. The geo‐referenced d data  is  classiffied  using  ERDAS  Imagin ne  and  then n  clipped  to  the  two stud dy areas usin ng ArcGIS too ols.

 (b) the expected degree of accuracy of the image classification.  overlapping  of  pixel  classification  takes place. Supervised classification is then carried out using ERDAS Imagine 2011 software based  on a one‐level classification scheme with six classes.  Table  2. Figure 6 shows landcover for Sohar.  categorization  is  supervised  by  specifying  numerical  descriptors  that  represent  homogeneous  examples  of  the  known  land  cover  types  in  each  Landsat  image.  The  figure  shows  the  agricultural  areas  specified  as  trees  to  account  for  fruit  trees  such  as  date  palm. and vegetation with large leaf areas  Level‐terraced agricultural areas near the coast  Land covered by small‐leaf vegetation areas  Areas without vegetation cover and sandy soil  Ploughed/wet areas  Bare soil and urban expansion areas  Level‐terraced agricultural areas near the coast  Land covered by small‐leaf vegetation areas  Areas without vegetation cover and sandy soil  Ploughed/wet areas  Bare soil and urban expansion areas  Post‐classification  includes  the  conversion  of  each  Landsat  classified  image  to  polygon  features  to  calculate areas and produce maps. Example of landcover map for Sohar (Source: ICBA.  10  10   .  Landcover  classes  considered  in  IKONOS  supervised  classification  and  change  detection  (Source: ICBA.  These areas are known as training  sites.  The  land  cover  classification  is  presented  in  Figure  7. etc. The identification and location of the land  cover types is then determined based on the features combination of digital numbers manifested by  spectral  reflectance  and  emittance  properties.  Pixels  within  and  outside  these  training  sites  are  evaluated  using  the  statistical  parameters  and  assigned  to  the  class  of  which  it  has  the  highest  likelihood. and (c) the  ease of identifying classes given the low spectral resolution of the data. The area of each polygon and each single class within every single  segment  is  calculated.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Supervised classification is performed.. 2011).  etc. vegetables. The choice of these classes is guided by: (a) the  objective of the exercise.  resembles  and  that  no  2011).  Landcover class  Trees/high density vegetation  Agriculture  Growing/natural vegetation  Bare soil  Moist/plough soil  Other  Agriculture  Growing/natural vegetation  Bare soil  Moist/plough soil  Other  Brief description  Trees.  Spectral  separability  of  training  samples within each feature class  is  then  evaluated  to  ensure  both    that each pixel is categorized into  the  landcover  type  it  mostly  Figure 6. healthy crops. A brief description of each  land cover class is given in Table 2.  since  the  spectral  characteristics  of  these  known  areas  are  used  to  train  the  classification  algorithm.  In  other  words. where a combination of spectral and infrared bands are used  to display the raw images for better visual interpretation.  while  vegetation represents field crops.

  .7% %  of  MAR.  2.  2008).5 Wadi flow  W  The  tottal  wadi  inflo ow  from  Jab bal  to  the  All  Batinah  coastal  plain waas estimated d as a percen ntage of meaan annual rainfall  (MAR).  This  percenttage  ranged d  between  4.  Acco ording  to  MRMWR R.  The  temp poral  rainfall  distribution  d shows  that  many  years  were  dry  years.. The spatiaal rainfall disstribution revveals  that  thee  upper  cattchments  haave  higher  rainfall  r than n  the  lower  catchments  c and  the  co oastal  areass.  Th his  rainfall  varies  over spaace and timee.  2011).4% in Upper  Hatta catchmentt (Figure 9. The averagge number o of rainy dayss per  year is 9 9. Figu ure 8  shows  continuous  c d years  forr  the  period dry  d  1999  up  to o  the  year  20 010.2%  4 in  Uppe er  Al  (m mm) 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 19821984198619881 199019921994199619982000200220 004200620082010 0 Rainfall Average Rainfall   8 Average  annual  a rainfaall  distributio on  in  Al  Batinah  Figure  8..  Feb bruary  and  March  reco ord  the  higghest  rainfall aaccounting ffor 35 to 42% % of the ann nual rainfall.  Rainfall  data  for  some  s d  raingages  in  the  study  area  weree  obtained  from  f selected MRMWR database.  the  average  an nnual  rainfall  is  about  113 3  mm  in  thee  northern  Batinah  B and  158  mm  in  southern  s Battinah.  based  on  rainfall  data  d from MR RMWR).  Haw wasnih wadi u up to 18.  The  highest recorded average was in n the year 19 997 of 330 m mm in  northern n Batinah an nd 608 mm in southern B Batinah.  20 011.  with  rainfall  lower  than  t averagee. tthe main rainfall season occurs betw ween  Decemb ber  and  Apriil  which  accounts  for  58 8  to  83%  off  the  annual  rainfall.  the  catch hment  areass  were  delineated  as  uppeer  and  loweer  catchments  based  on  the  rainfall  distributiion  and  streaam flow tribu utaries. Agriculltural areas in Al  Batinah coastal plain (Source e: ICBA.  coastal  plain  (Sourcce:  ICBA.  11  11     Figu ure 7.  The  tottal  wadi  mated as  outfllow to the sea was estim 0. TTable A19  in  the  appendiix).  and  about  100  mm  in  the  coastal  plain neear the coastt.  These  waadi  flow  quan ntities  were  estimated  based  b on  prevvious  stud dy  (GRC.1 for Al Battinah coastal plain and 1 13 rainy dayss per  year  forr  the  northern  Oman  mountains.  In  Al  Batinah  governo orates.Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman 2. The  number  of  days  of  light  rainfaall  (<10  mm  per  day)  iss  the  dominan nt and accou unts for 66 to o 95% of thee rain (Kwartteng.  as  shown  in  Figure  8.  except  the  year  20 007.  2006).4 Raainfall  In north hern Oman.

 Mean annual water surface inflow and outflow in the main catchments in Al Batinah governorates (Source: ICBA.12 Surface Inflow from Jabal Catchments Surface out Flow to the Coast   7  Figure 9. 2011).  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Mm3 Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   .

  The  thinnest  section  of  alluvium  (8  m. The formation  thickness is about 90 m. 2006):   The Upper Fars Formation (Upper Conglomeritic Fars)  The  Neogene‐aged  Upper  Fars  formation  contains  dolomites.  This  group  only  outcrops in the southeastern part of the study area. Fars Group  The  Fars  Group  underlies  the  Alluvium  formation  in  Al  Batinah  governorates.  It  is  generally  poorly‐sorted. These  rocks outcrop at surface in the piedmont of all catchments between WaidSakhin and Wadi Fara. Recent Alluvium   Recent  alluvium  is  a  Quaternary‐aged  alluvium.  A  brief  discussion of the main lithological characteristics of the northern Batinah is given below:    1.    13 8 .6 Geology  The  main  geological  formations  of  Al  Batinah  governorates  are  presented  in  Figure  10.  as  will  be  discussed  next. These sediments were  deposited in shallow marine conditions. The thickness of the Quaternary‐aged alluvium ranges between 8 m and 147  m.  3.   Lower Fars Formation   This formation comprised calcareous shale interbedded with silty limestone.  cemented  conglomerates  and  chalky  limestone with interbedding of thin siltstones towards the base. Hadhramaut Group   The Hadhramaut Group sedimentary rocks lie beneath the coastal plain within the study area.  The formation thickness reaches 300 m.  Upper Umm Er Radhuma (UER) (Lower Eocene to Palaeocene)  The Upper UER formation comprises silty shale interbedded with dolomitic limestone.  loose  gravels  interbedded with clay.  Lower UER (Lower Eocene to Palaeocene)   The  Lower  UER  comprises  varying  strengths  of  limestone  with  interbedded  varying  colored  shale. The formation thickness is about 60 m.  These  two  geological  units  are  significant  for  groundwater  availability  because  all  the  wells  in  the  coastal  plain  mostly  tap  from  the  Alluvium  aquifer. The thickness of these formation ranges between 8 m and  133 m.   The Middle Fars Formation (Fars Group Evaporates)  This  formation  comprises  claystone  interbedded  with  thin  cemented  gravels.  while  the  thickest  sections  of  alluvium  were  located  between  Wadi  Jizi  and  Wadi  Al  Fara  (Geo‐Resources  Consulting.  2. near Seeb.  The  thickness  of  Middle Fars formation reaches up to 146 m.  overlaying  Upper  Fars)  was  in  Wadi  Mashin. The Fars Group can be divided into  three main formations (Geo‐Resources Consulting. 2006).Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 2.  The  Quaternary‐aged  Alluvium  and  Neogene‐aged  Upper  Fars  Group  are  the  main  geological  units  in  the  study  area. The  main stratigraphy and age of the Hadhramaut group is as follows:  Dammam (Middle to Lower Eocene)  This formation comprises moderately strong limestone interbedded with weak to moderately weak  silty shale. The thickness ranges between 114  m and 582 m.  These  geological  formations  are  simplified  into  following  nine  geological  formation  groups.

  7.  One  cross  section  is  presented  in  Figure  12. regional synclines. and conglomerates. This  basin  occurred  due to the deformation of the Hadhramaut rocks. The major structural features are shown  in  Figure  10.7 Hydrogeological setting and aquifer properties   Aquifer occurrences  The  Batinah  coastal  plain  is  discussed  in  two  parts:  the  northern  Batinah  coastal  plain  and  the  southern  Batinah  coastal  plain.  Haima  and  Haushi  Groups.  Rock  types  include  limestone. calcarenite and chert. Thick quaternary alluvial sediments. beige shale. Hawasinah Nappes   Hawasinah Nappes are Permian to Cretaceous‐aged sedimentary and volcanic rocks. minor gravel and mudstone. These rocks  comprise weak to moderately strong mudstone interbedded with shale.  sandstone.  fine‐grained  grey  calcarenite and calcirudite.  basalt. or in a northeast to southwest direction. These features are aligned in a northwest to southeast direction. These  geological cross‐sections extend along and are perpendicular to the coastline within the study area.  This  cross section  shows  that  the  Upper  Fars  thickens  and  widens  from  the  northwest  to  the  southeast  of  the  study  area.  In  the  northern  Batinah  coastal  plain. gabbro and mafic dykes.  groundwater  occurs  in  the    14 9 . Hajar Super Group   The Hajar Super Group rocks vary in age from Late Permian to Lower Cretaceous.    5. Haushi to Huqf Groups  The  Haushi  Huqf  Group  varies  in  age  from  Cambrian  to  Early  Permian  and  is  represented  by  the  Huqf. and  anticlines. up  to 150 m thick form above the Upper Fars (Figure 12).  They  outcrop  in  Wadi  Hawasinah and in the piedmont between Wadi Rajma and Wadi Mayhah‐Mabrah‐Hajir.  evaporate.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 4.  In  Wadi  Ahin  the  Upper  Fars  Formation is about 12 km wide and is 300 m to 450 m thick. This basin was subsequently filled with Fars Group  and Quaternary Alluvium sediments.  The  main  regional  syncline  occurs  between  Wadi  Hilti  down  to  Wadi  Al  Fara. parallel to the axis of the  Oman mountains. These rocks  outcrop in all of the northern Batinah catchments.  2.  8.  Geological structure  The main structural geological features in the study area include main faults. These rocks exist in the southern parts of  wadi Bani Ghafir and Wadi Al Fara and close to Jabal Al Akhdar. and pillow basalt. siltstones and sandstones. Sumeini Nappes   The  Sumeini  Nappes  formation  comprises  Permian  to  Cretaceous‐aged  sedimentary  rocks. These formations underlie the Hadhramaut Group and outcrop in Wadi   Sakhin and up to Wadi Fara and in the piedmont between Wadi Sakhin and Wadi Bid’ah.  6.  Four geological cross‐sections are available from the Geo‐Resources Consultancy study (2006). It comprises shale interbedded with thin layers of  yellow calcareous mudstone. Ophiolitic Samail Nappes  The ophiolite sequence comprises peridotite.  shallow  marine  limestones  and  chert.  dolomites.  They  over‐thrust  the  Hajar  Super  Group. These nappes  consist  of  shales. They outcrop in Wadi Hawasinah.  siltstone.  These  nappes  consist  of  thinly‐bedded.  This  syncline or  elongated  basin is located  in  wadis to the  southeast  of  Wadi  Suq.  9. These rocks consist  of massively bedded dolomite.  calcarenite. Aruma Group   The Aruma Group formation is Late Cretaceous.

  Geological  map  of  Al  Batinah    governorates  (Source:  ICBA.  2011.  Figure  10.    15 10 . groundwater occurs in the Alluvium  aquifer.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Alluvium and Upper Fars aquifers.  based  on  information  from MRMWR). while in the southern Batinah.

 These gravvels vary in ssize both spatially and in depth.  the  Alluvium  aquifer  onlly  overlies  th he  bedrock  between  W Wadi  Bani  Khaarus  and  Wadi Taaww.  and  caan  be  regaarded  as  an  a unconfin ned  aquifer.  In  the  southern n  Batinah.  the  Alluvium  aquifer  overlies  the  bedrockk  between  W Wadi  Al  Haw wrim  and  Wadi  Su uq.  This  alluvium m trough wass formed alo ong the axis o of  Wadi  Maáwil.  and  oveerlies  the  Up pper  Fars  aquifer  betw ween  Wadi  Jezzi  J and  W Wadi  Al  Farraa.  Upper FFars Aquifer  The Upp per Fars aquiifer consists  of dolomites.   The  miiddle  Fars  formation  is  generally  impermeable  and  iss  considered d  an  aquitarrd  ms the base of the Uppeer Fars aquifeer  that form located between Waadi Jizi and A Al Farra.  Th he  Upper Fars ranges between 114 m and 582 m m  in  thicckness.   In  the  northern  n Battinah.  perpeendicular  to  the  coastlin ne  ween  Wadi  Maáwil  an nd  that  exxtends  betw Wadi Fara’h (Figure 13).  This  aquifer  co onsists  of  we eathered  limeston ne and Ophiolite gravelss.  The  Alluvium  aquifer  constitu utes  a  single  hydrogeeological  un nit  under  water  table  conditio ons. an nd  between n the foothills and the co oast.    16 11 .  It  underlies  the  Allu uvium  aquifeer  in  the  northern  Batinah  coastal  c plaiin  between n  Wadi  Jezzi  and  Wadi  Al  Farra.  The Alluvvium aquiferr is delineate ed based  consolid on the ggeological maap and cross sections. the thickneess reaches aa maximum o of  300  m  at  the  “Alluvium  “ trough”.  In  the  southerrn  Batinah.  Aquifer properties   Figure  11. 20 011). Graavels are  coarser  near  the  mountain  m and  finer  nearr  the  coast.    The pum mping tests rresults obtaiined from th he MRMWR are presentted in  Table  A1 and  Tab ble A2 (in  the  tables  and  figu ures  in  the  Appendix)  for  the  northern  Batin nah  and  thee  southern  Batinah. th he  Alluvium m layer and the Upper Fars layer.  and  uncon nsolidated  neear  the  surfface  and  dated toward ds the base  of the aquifeer (Figure 11 1).  The  Allu uvium  and  Upper  Fars  aquifers  arre  modeled d as one aqu uifer with tw wo layers.  Theese  sedimeents  thickeen  between n Wadi Suq aand Wadi Bani Ghafir.Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman m Aquifer  Alluvium The  Allu uvium  aquifeer  is  the  prin ncipal  aquifeer  in  the  stu udy  area. byy following th he extent of the alluvium m outcrop are ea..  except  where  locaal  confinem ment exists.  cementeed  conglo omerates  and  chalkky  limeston ne.   The thicckness of thee Alluvium aaquifer rangees  from  8  m  between  Wadi  Hawrrim  and  Wad di  Rijma  to  143  m  at  a Wadi  Hilti  and  startts  thinningg  after  thaat  along  the  northerrn  Batinah  coast  (Figu ure  12).  Locatio on  of  Alluviu um  and  Upper  Fars  aquiferrs in the stud dy area (Sourrce: ICBA.

 Geolo ogical cross‐ssection of the northern B Batinah Alluvvium and Up pper Fars aqu uifers  (Sou urce: Geo‐ressources Conssultancy. 200 06).Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman p datta  are  limite ed  in  some  places.      Figure 13. and  the location with resspect to the wadi beds.  propertyy  data  weree  interpolateed  using  GISS  techniquess  to  generaliize  the  main based on well location and deptth. This variatiion dependss on the size of gravels aand sands. Figure 12. As can bee inferred fro om the pumping results  and the GIS maps of  the  aqu uifer  hydrau ulic  propertties  (namelyy  transmissivity.  and  storage  coefficieent).    17 12 .  the  aquifer  hydrau ulic  propertiies  are  significantly  varriable  in  botth  the  Alluvvium  and  Upper FFars aquifers. G Geological cross‐section o of Alluvium aaquifer in W Wadi Al Maáw wil of the Sou uthern  Batinah (Sou urce: CACE. th he cementattion.  Thee  available  hydraulic  h respectively. 2 2004).  These  hydraulic  property  n  aquifer  properties.  hydraaulic  conducctivity.

  Storage coefficient values ranged from 1.   Well hydrographs (water table versus time) have been prepared for most of the wells located in the  coastal  strip  (those  nearest  to  the  coast  with  a  water  table  below  sea  level).  This  natural  behavior  is  very  important  for  stopping or flushing saline water out to the sea. the main properties of the Alluvium aquifer include the following:      Hydraulic conductivity ranged from 0.3  m/day  to  449  m/day.9 m2/day to 16.32  m  below  the  ground  (as  in  well  DB876605AA  in  Wadi  As  Sarami  in  Saham  wilayats) to a deep water level of 60.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman In the northern Batinah. the pumping test results are very limited (readings from only four wells).  Storage coefficient values ranged from 1 x 10‐5 to 1 x 10‐2. uncemented sands and gravels.  This  hydraulic  gradient  follows  the  topography  gradient  and  shows  that  the  general  flow  direction  is  from  the  foothills  towards  the  coast.8 Groundwater level  The  historical  water  level  data  for  the  period  1982  to  2010  were  obtained  from  the  MRMWR  database.9 m/day to 13 m/day.       18 13 .4 m/day to 241 m/day.36  m  below  ground  level)  at  well  DB481873AA in Wadi Suq in Sohar. The  highest  declining  rate  of  4.1 l/sec to 41 l/sec.3 m below ground level) at  well  DM870960AA  in  Wadi  Ahin  in  Sohar  to  230  m  (amsl)  (9.  The current water table elevation ranges from 24 m below sea level (33.  Transmissivity ranged from 1 m2/day to 7560 m2/day. while the highest rising rate of 5.900 m2/day.  Aquifer yield ranged from 5 l/sec to 32 l/sec.  Examples  of  these  hydrographs  are  presented  in  Figure  14.7  m/year  occurred  in  Wadi  Al  Mayha‐Mabrah‐Al  Hajir  System  in  As  Suwayq at well EM147067AA (HTW‐1).  In the southern Batinah.  Table  A3  in  the  Appendix  summarizes the water table decline and rise values for some selected wells in these catchments.  The transmissivity ranged from 0.   The current hydraulic gradient is 6m/km.  Transmissivity ranged from 17 m2/day to 468 m2/day.  For the Upper Fars.  Aquifer yield ranged from 0.  These  water  level  data  were  analyzed  to  obtain  spatial  and  temporal  trends  using  Excel  and GIS interpolation techniques. with the hydraulic gradient near the foothills steeper than  at  the  coast.  while  the  highest  values  were  associated with uncemented sands and gravels.  The  lowest  hydraulic  conductivity  was  associated  with  cemented.  2. The highest values were found within  the unconfined. the main characteristics of the Alluvium aquifer are as follows:      The  hydraulic  conductivity  ranged  from  0.  Storage coefficient values ranged from 1 x 10‐4 to 1 x 10‐3.6 m/year occurred in Wadi  Sakhin in Saham.  clayey  sands. The results of analysis showed that the water level ranged from a  shallow  level  of  0.  some  catchments  showed  a  rising  trend.6 m below ground level (as at well EB416443AA in Wadi Bani  Ghafir in Al Musanaah wilayat).  Aquifer yield ranged from 1 l/sec to 515 l/sec.7 x 10‐4 to 2 x 10‐2. but the  main characteristics are the following:      Hydraulic conductivity ranged from 0.  Although  these  hydrographs  showed  a  declining  trend  in  most  of  the  catchments.

0 1982 201 40.0 20.0 ‐12.0 ‐6.0 ‐10.0 15.0 ‐15.0 25.0 ‐10.0 0.0 25.0 ‐20.0 ‐5.0 ‐8.0 5.0 5.0 ‐15.0 ‐5.0 ‐15.0 ‐10.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Well (HTW‐1)   Well (HA‐10) 30.0 10.0 ‐15.0 ‐5.0 0.0 5.0 10.0 ‐5.0 10.0 25.0 15.0 10.0 Well (DM696761AA (NJ‐9))‐ Sohar (Wadi Al Jizi)  Water Level  (mamsl) ‐2.0 0.0 15.0 30.0 0.0 1991 1992 1993 2001 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 0.0 1982 1986 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 201   2001 2002 2003 2005 2007 2008 2009 2010   Figure 14.0 1982 1986 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 201   Well (JT‐10) 30. (Source: ICBA.0 20.0 0.0 ‐20.0 5.0 ‐10.        19 14 .0 ‐20.0 15.0 20.0 ‐20.0 ‐16.0 ‐4.0 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 201   Well (DN339973AA (PZ‐6))‐ Shinas (Wadi Hatta)  35.0 25. 2011.0 20.0 20.0 ‐18.0 30.0 25.0 15.0 ‐10.0 10.0 ‐20. Water table trends in some selected catchments.0 ‐14. based on  information from MRMWR).0 1982 1986 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006   1986 Water Level  (mamsl) Well (HA‐13)  30.0 5.0 ‐5.

150  wells waas in the yeaars 2005 and d 2010. 1997.  annual  waterr  salinity  datta  were  colleected  from  MRMWR  M monitorring wells. Th he highest nu umber of weells surveyed of 1. an nd another 40 sampling ssites for soil  salinity dataa.  1984. while the number of surveyyed wells waas very limite ed in the  years  19 982.    Field d soil texturee was measu ured.  and  a 1984. The  MRMWR co onducted  regular  surveys  eveery  three  to  five  years  for  f Al  Batinaah  governorrates  to  mon nitor  the  inccrease  in  seawateer encroachm ment since th he year 1982 2 up to the yyear 2010.  This  surveyy  included  220  2 selected d  farms in n Al Batinah  coastal plain n to collect w water salinityy  data. 2 2000. 1983. with morre than one rreading per yyear.  Samples  were  w preservved  at  field d  moisture level to o determine moisture qu uantity.    Soil samples were analyzed for ECe.   Correlattion  analysis  was  conduccted  betweeen  water  and d  soil  salinity  from  benchmark  b farm  sites  representingg  different  water  salinity  (irrigatiion  water  used  in  these e  a soil  texture  levels  (ssee  soil  section  for  more e  farms)  and  details). Water sampling sites in Al  Batinah  governorattes (Source: IICBA. and mostly after the year 2 2000. 19 986.  2011).  B. 1993.      mples of wateer used for iirrigating thee crops were e  Sam colleected. aand 2010. This relationship was used for defin ning the soil‐ water  salinity  s relattionship  in  different  textured  soilss.1 Water salin W nity  Data so ources  A.  The  locaation  of  thee  surveyed  farm  f sites  are  a shown  in n  Figure 15. but  the num mber of samp pling sites aree limited. WA ATER QU UALITY IN AL B BATINAH H REGIO ON  3. an nd field moissture conten nt. 2005.  Sampless  from  the  selected  s sitees  included  the  t followingg  characteeristics:   Soil  samples  weere  collected d  from  the  root  zone  of  o existting  crops.  1983.Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman 3.  but some w water salinity  samples  are colleected and meeasured as EEC (dS/m) fro om these wells. 1991. Th hese wells are used for m monitoring w water level.  In  addition.  The  name  was  recorded  for  each h  sam mpled  crop.  15 . ICBA’s field surve ey   onducted  a  farm  surveyy  to  assess  the  salinityy  ICBA  co problem m  and  its  efffect  on  yield d  reduction  (see  ( annex  II  I for  morre  details). volu ume of water  d  to  prepare  saturated  soil  paste  from  known n  used weigght of soil. These years in ncluded: 198 82.    Data lim mitation to co onvey accurate informattion  The  watter  salinity  data  incorp porated  high h  uncertaintyy  due to the followingg reasons:    20 Figure 1 15. MRM MWR surveyss and regularr monitoringg data  The watter salinity daata for Al Baatinah region n were obtained from MRMWR.

 This limits the information on the  different aquifer layers and affects the modeling results.U. For this study. Al Gharbi Fizh Badiah Faydah Hatta Hawarim Al Qawr Malahah 400% 350% 300% 250% 200% 150% 100% 50% 0%   (b)  Figure 16. Water salinity wass measured as EC (dS/m) rather than as TDS (mg/l).  Taww Maawil Al Fara B. but the  over‐pumping was high.Kharus Bani Ghafir Hajer Mashin Mashin Al Hawasinah Shafan Shafan Sakhin Sarami Ahin Hilti Ahin Al Jizi Suq Fizh B. Since the year 1999. No differentiation was made between  salinity levels per aquifer depth.  Salinity  data  were  collected  every  three  to  five  years  mostly  through  surveys.   4.U.  3. Al Batinah faced ten continuous dry years with increase  in  well  pumpage  which  dramatically  caused  severe  drop  in  water  level  and  caused  seawater  intrusion.  These  data  contains  some  errors  and  gaps  (the  years  that  are  not  covered  by  surveys). Figure 16 shows the percentage of increase and improvement in groundwater salinity as  observed in the MRMWR monitoring wells.        21 16 .    The  water  salinity  data  in  MRMWR  monitoring  wells  showed  that  there  was  an  increase  in  groundwater  salinity  in  many  wells  along  the  coast  due  to  saltwater  intrusion  in  response  to  overpumping.  wet  or  dry  years  and  the  salinity trends. Water samples were taken from unspecified vertical locations. the EC data  were converted into TDS using a conversion factor of 700.Kharus Al Fara Bani Ghafir Hajer Mashin Mashin Al Hawasinah Shafan Shafan Sakhin Sarami Ahin Ahin Hilti Al Jizi Suq B. (a) Current percentage of increase and (b) decrease in groundwater salinity levels in  MRMWR surveyed wells compared to the year 2005 salinity levels (Source: ICBA 2011). despite the very wet year in the year 1997 which caused raise in water level.  This  limits  the  correlation  between  important  hydrological  events  like  cyclones. Al Gharbi Badiah Hatta Faydah Al Qawr Hawarim Malahah 400% 350% 300% 250% 200% 150% 100% 50% 0%   (a)  Taww Maawil B. Different  data  sources  as  mentioned  above  which  make  the  quality  of  the  collected  data  questionable.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 1.  2.

 Seawater encroachment varies among the catchments with the highest encroachment in  Wadi Al Hajir system of 41 Mm3. The contour of highest salinity class (Class 6 >10.  Since  that  time.0 0.5 15 10 5 4.5 0. The six water salinity levels are presented in Table 3.2 2.  (Source: ICBA.5 0. as can be seen in the trends of increasing salinity near the coastline (Figure 22).    the  beginning  of  the  groundwater  development  phase  (in  the  1980s).  the  land  area  of  water  salinity  contours  was calculated for the six defined classes.1 2. 2011).  The  spatial  salinity  extent  and pattern was interpreted using ArcGIS.  Table 3.000 – 5.  causing  decline  in  water  levels  to  alarming levels.500 1.2 0.3  4.000 7.0 40 35 30.500‐3.000 – 10. Groundwater  salinity levels were classified into six classes with different colors reflecting salinity levels.3 0. from low  to high salinity. using the Inverse Distance Weight  (IDW) method to estimate salinity in areas that were not covered by monitoring wells.  This  uncontrolled  pumping  has  exploited  the  aquifer  in  many  places. It has also caused seawater intrusion in places where the water table was below sea  level.000 mg/l) represented the    22 17 .   To  show  the  effect  of  seawater  encroachment  over  time. Figures 18‐25 show that groundwater salinity levels were lower at  45 41.7 15.  agricultural  activities  that  used  groundwater  wells  for  irrigation  have  increased  in  Al  Batinah  region.9 3. Groundwater salinity classes for management levels.000 3.1 0   3 Figure 17.000 Water Salinity  (dS/m)  2. While the salinity Class 5 (7.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Water salinity analysis  Groundwater  salinity  data  were  analyzed  both  spatially  and  temporally.2 3.14  2.000 – 7. Data were interpolated. Current seawater intrusion (Mm ) varies among the catchments (Source: ICBA.1 3.0 2. 2011)  Salinity Level  Classification  Class 1  Class 2  Class 3  Class 4  Class 5  Class 6  Fresh water  Low salinity  Moderate salinity  Moderately high salinity High salinity  Very high salinity  Water Salinity  (mg/l)  < 1.000 mg/l)  represented the extreme salinity condition. as shown in  Figure 17.000 > 10.000 5.3 ‐ 7  7 ‐ 10  10 ‐ 15  > 15    The  results  of  the  water  salinity  mapping  showed  that  there  is  an  increase  of  saltwater  encroachment over time in most of the catchments in the areas close to the coastline.2 30 25 20 16.3 3.14‐4.

 As it moves west and southwestwards. but the rate of increase varied among  the catchments.  This  is  due  to  over‐pumping  as  mentioned  and  some  readings  might  be  due  to  readings  error  as  there are no actual abstraction data that can support the reasons to be due to over‐pumping. The growth of total land area with  saline groundwater.  The  trends  analysis showed increase of groundwater salinity over time. 1995‐2010 (Feddan)   (Source: ICBA.   The total land area affected grew from 2.900 feddans. Current total agricultural areas of high  water salinity (TDS > 10. gradual increase of seawater encroachment occurred in response  to over‐pumping. The growth of cultivated zones  affected by the increase of seawater intrusion  (Feddan) (Source: ICBA.000  feddans).000 200 2.500 feddans in 2010. 2011). If the same abstraction rate will continue in the future (Business as usual scenario). causing more damage to the land and agricultural  areas. 2011).000 100 1.  followed  by  Saham  (3.000 feddans in 1995 to 16.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman saltwater interface.  Feddan Feddan 500 5. 2011).  Figures 23 and 24 shows the growth of groundwater salinity levels and seawater encroachment over  time.000 300 3. the seawater will increasingly contaminate fresh water    23 18 .000 400 4.000 mg/l) (Feddans) (Source:  ICBA.    Figure 21.300  feddans) and Shinas (3200 feddans).  1995 2000 2005 2010 1995 5000 500 4000 400 3000 300 2000 200 1000 100 0 0 2000 2005 2010     Figure 18. As shown from the figures.  Historical  salinity  data  were  used  in  analyzing  the  salinity  trends  over  time  (Figure  22). particularly the year 2005 were noticed as shown in Figure 22.  Barka  was  the  most  affected  by  seawater  intrusion  (4.000 0 0   Figure 20.  then the seawater intrusion problem will increase. In many monitoring wells. The current total land areas and agricultural areas of extreme salinity (Class 6)  are presented in Figures 20 and 21.000 mg/l) (Feddans)   (Source: ICBA. Over the same period. the cultivated area affected by seawater  intrusion grew from 233 feddans to 1. Current total land areas of high water  salinity (TDS > 10.  Figure 19. 2011). In 2010. sharp increase in groundwater salinity levels in the year  2010 compared to the previous years.

 Historically. the Alluvial aquifer area having fresh groundwater has reduced from 30.000 2.000 8.000 2005 2010   Well (R‐10 (F‐11)) ‐ ? (Taww) 18.000 2.000 12.000 4.  The  impact  of  continued  seawater  intrusion  at  the  present  annual  rate  of  230  Mm3  has  been  modeled  assuming  that  future  rainfall  will  follow  the  average  of  the  past  as  an  approximation.000 8.  Well (NCH‐60B) ‐ Liwa (Bani Omar Al Gharbi) 18.000 6.000 14.000 14.000 8.000 12.000 6.000 4.000 14.000 12.000 4.000 6.000 4.000 15.000 6.000 16.000 10.000 16.        24 19 .000 2000 Years 0 0 1995 1997 2000 Years 2005 1993 2010 Well (T‐46) ‐ (Maawil) 1995 1997 2000 Years 2005 2010   Well (NC‐5B)‐ Sohar (Hilti) 18.000 2.000 16.000 10.000  feddans  in  1995  to  19.000 5.000 16.  The  modelling  results  indicate  that  by  2030  the  present  cultivated  area  of  fresh  water  may  be  reduced  to  only  4.000 4.000 20.000 10. 2011).000 0 2. brackish and saline areas expand as is clearly indicated in Figures 25 and 26.000 10.000 10.000 6.000 25.000 1995 1997 16.000 2.000 30.700  feddans.000  feddans  in  2010.000 8.  While  fresh  water  areas  contract.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman resources.000 14.000 10.000 Well (NK‐33B) ‐ Shinas (Badiah) 20. Examples of water salinity trends in some selected catchments (Source: ICBA.000 8.000 12.000 18.000 1995 1997 2000 Years 2005 0 2010   Well (NB‐62) ‐ Saham (Shafan) 18.000 14.000 0 0 1993 1995 1997 Years 2000 2005 1995 2010 1997 2000 2005 2010 Years   Figure 22.000 12.

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Figure 23. 2011).          25 20 . Observed groundwater salinity in Al Batinah governorates for the years 1995‐2010 (mg/l)  (Source: ICBA.

    80. The historic and project growth of groundwater salinity in Al Batinah Alluvium  aquifer (Source: ICBA.000 1501-3000 10. 2010).000 30. Growth of seawater encroachment 1995‐2010 (Source: ICBA.000 3001-5000 20.000 > 10000 60.000 7001-10000 50.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Figure 24.000 Salinity mg/l  Feddans 70.000 5001-7000 40.        26 21 . 2011).000 < 1500 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030   Figure 25.

 2011).Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 2015    2020    2025    2030  Figure 26. Projection of groundwater salinity growth (in mg/l) over land area under Business as Usual  Scenario for the years 2015 (top) to 2030 (bottom) (Source: ICBA.      27 22 .

 Diagram for relating SAR and conductivity (Source: Richards.  based on the information received from different institutions. Residual Sodium Carbonates (RSC).      Figure 27.  High  sodium  water  (S3)  >18  and  <26:  may  be  harmful  to  most  soils. Boron.  Medium  sodium  water  (S2)  >10  and  <18:  hazardous  for  use  on  fine‐textured  soils  (high  cation‐exchange capacity).    The  SAR  data  were  obtained  from  the  MRMWR  for  the  year  2010.  Requires  special  soil  management. using the GIS spatial analyst tool to produce a map  that covers the study area.2 Suitability of water for agricultural use  For irrigation uses. the suitability of water for irrigation  uses  is  assessed  mainly  on  two  water  quality  parameters:  water  salinity  and  SAR. and heavy metals that  have  toxic  effects  on  the  plants  and  cause  a  reduction  in  plant  yield  or  plant  death. adopted from  Richards (1954). other water quality parameters should be considered in addition to salinity.   28 23 .Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 3.       Low sodium water (S1) < 10: can be used on all soils. 1954). such  as Sodium Adsorption Ratio (SAR). This SAR map was classified into four main classes (Figure 28).  In  this  study.  The  SAR  for  irrigation water and water salinity ranges and relationship are shown in the Figure 27.  The  data  were  interpolated  spatially based on well location in the study area.

  Medium saliinity water (C C2) >250 and d <750 µS/cm m: can be ussed where a moderate am mount of  leaching occcurs.  The watter salinity m map was also classified intto four main n classes (leveels) (Figure 2 28):      Low  salinityy  water  (C1))  <  250  µS//cm:  can  be e  used  for  most  m crops  and  soils  with  w little  likelihood th hat soil salinity will develop. 2011.250 µS/cm: cannot be u used on soilss that have restricted  drainage.2 conditions.  250  µS/cm:  is  i not  suitab ble  for  irrigaation  under  ordinary  Very  high  salinity  water  (C4)  >  2. b based on datta received frrom MRMW WR).       29 24 .Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman  Very high so odium water (S4) >26: geenerally unsatisfactory fo or irrigation p purposes.  High salinityy water (C3) >>750 and < 2 2.  2 Water  saalinity  (mg/l))  for  water  (left)  and  Sodium  Adsorp ption  Ratio  ((SAR)  (right)  for  the  year 201 10 (Source: ICBA.        Figure  28.

 2011).  Where SSAR (Figure 3 31b) is less than 10 (mmoles/L)0.  Th he  resultingg  suitability  o  four  main  map  waas  then  reclaassified  into classes:  Good.    Water q quality for iirrigation   Trees Feddan 30000 27708 Vegetation 27412 25000 20000 13432 15000 10000 5000 1217 0 Doubtful Suitable Good Un nsuitable Figure 30 0. 2011).  baseed  on  classificaation  (1986).. waater sodicityy is mostly within safe lim mits (80%    30 25 .  Dou ubtful. Total agricultural areass of suitable or less  suitable irrigation watter (Source: ICBA.5.  Figure  30  shows  the  associatted  agricultu ural  areas  over  each  water qu uality zone.  An  overrall  assessmeent  of  wateer  samples  from  f Al  Batiinah  (Figure  31a)  showss  a  variety  of  water  salinity cclasses.  Suitable.  and  Unsuitab Driscoll's  ble. Suitabilityy of irrigatio on water quaality with resspect to land d area (left) aand agricultu ural area  (right) (SSource: ICBA A.  The  suitab bility  map  is  shown  in  i Figure  29 9.   The  SAR R  map  was  superimpose s ed  over  the  water  salinity  maap  to  pro oduce  the  irrigation  water  suiitability  map p  based  on  sixteen  classes.Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman     Figure 2 29. Nineety two perccent of the w waters are classed as higgh and abovee in terms off salinity.

 Water pH classes in Al Batinah (2011) (Source: ICBA.5 the addition of gypsum at soil surface is recommended to offset the sodicity problem  and thus improve water quality for irrigation.  However.5 in Al  Batinah  Figure 31.  sodicity  levels  behave  differently  at  different  levels  of  water  salinity.  The  use  of  groundwater  from  Al  Batinah  may  add  some  quantities  of  essential  nutrients  like  phosphorous  and  nitrogen.      Water salinity and sodicity management for irrigation  Crops should be carefully selected to suit water salinity levels.        31 26 .  However.      Figure 32. Water EC (a) and SAR (b) in Al Batinah (2011) (Source: ICBA. 2011). 2011).Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman of  water  samples).  the  benefits  should  be  evaluated  carefully.  Water pH classes range from slightly to strongly alkaline range (Figure 32). and appropriate LR/LF should be used  to  free  the  root  zone  from  salinity  above  the  crop  threshold  level.        (a) Distribution of water EC (in dS/m) in Al  Batinah  (b) Water sodicity classes (in mmoles/L)0.  to  assure  water  salinity and sodicity levels are within an acceptable range for irrigating specific crops.  Where  SAR  is  more  than  10  (mmoles/L)0.

 Adapted from groundwater quality classes distribution  from Al Batinah (Source: ICBA. Individually. there are similar trends in the distribution of  samples across the various salinity classes in all wilayat (Figure 36). 2011 Survey  There are three important water parameters that determine water quality for irrigation: EC.  there  are  similar  trends  of  pH  distribution  in  all  wilayats.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Distribution of groundwater quality classes   The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) water classification diagram (Richards. The examination is made on overall water salinity from all wilayats (Figure  34) and for respective wilayat (Figure 36). 1954) allows water  quality  prediction  up  to  5  dS/m.  Most of the waters (94%) are in the high‐to‐very‐high saline range.  in the Appendix).  some  of  the  groundwaters  from  Al  Batinah  region  present  higher  levels  of  EC  (more  than  5  dS/m). 2011.   It  is  likely  that  water  with  SAR  >10  may  affect  the  physical  and  chemical  properties  of  soil  in  a  way  that  has  implications  for  agricultural  crops.  The  recent  survey  dataset  provided  only  water  EC  data  and  this  has  been  reviewed  from  a  water salinity perspective.  It  was  therefore  imperative  to  modify  the  diagram  to  accommodate  various  EC  levels.  Groundwater salinity of Al Batinah. This requires careful water use  and management in irrigated agriculture.  It  is  recommended  to  adjust  water  sodicity  through  using  gypsum  in  the  soil.  Water  pH  is  also  distributed  in  various  classes.  The  EC  and SAR were then plotted  onto  a  new  diagram  showing the distribution of  water  quality  classes  (Figure  33).  Individually.  The  modified  diagram  was  prepared  using  Sigma  plot.  Fifty  six  percent  of  water  samples  show  very  high  salinity  waters  with  variable  sodicity  levels  (Table  A21.  Over  50%  of  the  samples  are  in  the  moderate‐to‐ strong  alkaline  range  (Figure  35).  plant  nutrient  availability  can  be  restricted. The waters are distributed across various salinity classes.  However.  Water  sodicity  can  also  be  reduced  through  blending  with good quality water.     Figure 33.  except  in  Liwa  where more samples are in the slightly alkaline range. USDA diagram is modified to  accommodate groundwater quality from Oman).  With  water  in  this  range. SAR and  RSC.    32 27 .

 2011). Overall water pH distribution classes in Al Batinah  governorates (2011)   (Source: ICBA.        Figure 34.  so  a  further  evaluation cannot be made (Figure 37).Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman The pH of all waters is outside the acceptable range for drinking water for livestock. Information on  other  drinking  water  quality  parameters  is  not  available  from  the  present  dataset.       33 28 . 2011). Water salinity classes in Al Batinah governorates (2011) (Source: ICBA.  Figure 35.

 Overall water salinity classes in the Al Batinah governorates (2011)   (Source: ICBA.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Figure 36. 2011).    34 29 .

Overall water pH classes in Al Batinah governorates and individual wilayat (2011) ICBA.  (Source: ICBA.   35 30 .Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Figure 37. Overall water pH classes in Al Batinah region and individual wilayat (2011) (Source:  Figure 37. 2011). 2011).

  However. Cu. the pH of water in Al Batinah is within a safe pH  limit. Si. Fe.       (a) Water pH classes for Livestock and Poultry  use  (b) Water salinity classes for Livestock and  Poultry use  Figure 38.  Their  use  is  always  restricted  due  to  the  existence of one or more constituents in undesirable quantities. at some sites  where  EC  >8  dS/m. water is safe for livestock use (Tables A21‐A29 in the Appendix).  the  water  is  not  safe  for  livestock  use  (Figure  38b).  NO2  and  Escherichia  coli.    Salinity  Generally.  Al  (>5  mg/L)  and  Pb  (>0. which may cause digestive upsets and diarrhea.     36 31 . There are generally high levels of  phosphates (>1 mg/L) in many waters from Al Batinah (78%). but provide information about Ba. Cr.1  mg/L). F.5). except  one in Barka and one in Saham Wilayat. found across all wilayats.  NO3.  Such  sites  are  found across all wilayats except Aswaq and Sohar.  Overall. Hg. The water analyses lack information  for alkalinity (CO3 + HCO3). Regarding water  use for  poultry.  V. Be.   All water samples in Al Batinah are safe for livestock use in terms of levels of Zn. The SO4 levels  are high (>250 mg/L) in almost two‐third (62%) of the samples. In general.   Escherichia coli is absent from all water samples and coliform levels are safe in all samples.05 mg/L).  Co. assessment  of water  samples  against the  desired  standards given  in  Tables A22‐24  (in  the  Appendix)  confirms  that  all  water  samples  are  unfit  for  drinking  purposes  for  both  livestock  and  poultry. However. Water pH (a) and salinity classes (b) in Al Batinah governorates (Source: ICBA.  all  water  samples  in  Al  Batinah  are  unsafe  for  livestock  use  due  to  higher  levels  of  Na  (>50  mg/L). Only 2% are  above pH 9 (Sohar). Se. Ni.  These  sites  occur  in  all  wilayats.    pH  Ten percent of water (Figure 38) in Al Batinah are outside the desired pH range (>8. Ni. Mn. Mo. the salinity levels of all samples were safe.  water  samples showing  EC  >5  dS/m (46%)  are  unfit  for poultry  use. which are  not normally listed for drinking water quality. In Aswaq and Sohar wilayats. 2011).Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Drinking water for livestock and poultry  None  of  the  water  samples  (Tables  A21‐A29  in  the  Appendix)  from  Al  Batinah  meet  the  desired  levels  of  all  constituents  for  livestock  and  poultry  use. B.  In  water  samples from Barka there is a problem of cadmium (>0. lower feed conversion efficiency  and reduced intake of water and feed.

 A mean value of Sy of 3.  2. but this should be with caution.  and  in  this  study. GROUNDWATER RESERVES IN AL BATINAH   The current volume of groundwater reserves was estimated using water level data for the year 2010  and the Specific Yield (Sy) property of unconfined parts of the aquifer.  The total outflows consist of:  1. The possible future groundwater reserves and their quality and  suitability for agriculture are discussed in the modeling chapters 11 and 12. The total groundwater reserve that can be used by conventional  agriculture is estimated at 675 Mm3. The equation  for the groundwater balance can be written as:  ∑Inflows ‐ ∑outflows = ∆S  Where ∆S is the change in groundwater storage.  It is estimated that the groundwater reserve is equal to 2.  The total inflows consist of:  1.  depending  on  the  Richards  (Wilcox)  diagram  as  described  in  the  previous  section. Groundwater throughflow (lateral groundwater flow) from Jabal. municipal and agricultural).  the  same  Sy  value  of  3. the storage coefficient values were used. For the confined parts.  The  calculated  groundwater  reserve  volume  was  classified  in  terms  of  suitability  of  water  for  irrigation.5 %  was  used  in  calculating  this  volume.  where  the  Geo‐Resource  Consulting  (2006)  used  this  Sy  value  to  estimate  the  groundwater  reserve.   37 32 . Groundwater outflow to the sea. Groundwater abstraction for all uses (that is.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman  4.1 Groundwater balance  Groundwater balance has two components: the total inflows and the total outflows. These reserves can also be used  for livestock water consumption (‘nearly‐potable water’). The water might need treatment to comply with  Omani Drinking Water Standards.   2. It is possible that this water could also be  used for drinking.5%  is  used  for  estimating  groundwater reserve.  4.  This  value  was  based  on  available  lithological  data  and  from  literature. Groundwater recharge:  both natural recharge from direct rainfall over the mountains and  the coastal plain and artificial recharge from existing recharge dams.  A  summary of these water reserve calculations are shown in Tables 4 and 5.880 Mm3 of good water quality that could  be used for agricultural uses without any constraint or treatment.

6 1.1 2.8 2.8 0. Groundwater reserve – good to suitable quality irrigation water.3 5.1 0.1 Total Usable  Groundwater  3 Volume (Mm )  Suitable Suitable Suitable Suitable Suitable Suitable Suitable Suitable Good Suitable Suitable Good Good Suitable Suitable Suitable Suitable Suitable Irrigation Water  Suitability  33 .5 265.6 0.  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 6390 8 13 8 11 0 0 0 0 23 206 0 1333 3895 440 215 106 6 125 Upper Fars Potential  Groundwater  3 Reserve (Mm )  3195 4 7 4 6 0 0 0 0 11 103 0 666 1948 220 108 53 3 62 Upper Fars usable  Groundwater  3 Volume (Mm )  3556.9 29.1 8.2 129.6 0.3 3.2 43.4 53.7 199.9 1.8 107.9 1.3 0.6 Alluvial Usable  Groundwater  3 Volume (Mm )  Table 4.   (Source: ICBA.4 15.4 720.9 1.3 0.9 12.4 14.1 Alluvial Potential  Groundwater  3 Reserve (Mm )  361 1.2 15.5 90.1 2.3 60.1 0.6 7.0 70.8 0.5 0.2 7.0 2147.0 6.3 5.3 399.3 0.9 117.8 2. 2011).1 21.2 0.38     Wadi Mashin  Wadi Bani Ghafir  Al Mayha‐Mabrah‐Al Hajir System Wadi Bani Ghafir  Al Mayha‐Mabrah‐Al Hajir System Wadi Bani Ghafir  Wadi Bani Umar Al Gharbi  Wadi Ahin  Al Khaburah  Al Musanaah Ar Rustaq  Ar Rustaq  As Suwayq  As Suwayq  Liwa  Saham  Wadi Faydh  Wadi Hatta  Wadi Rijma  Wadi Ahin  Wadi Al Hilti  Wadi Al Jizi  Wadi Suq  Shinas  Shinas  Shinas  Sohar  Sohar  Sohar  Sohar    Wadi Al Hawarim  Shinas   Total  Wadi Shafan  Saham    Al Mayha‐Mabrah‐Al Hajir System Catchment Name  Al Khaburah  Wilayat Name  723 3.7 0.7 0.7 45.8 3.5 6.2 0.5 1.

   (Source: ICBA. Groundwater reserve ‐ Doubtful to unsuitable quality irrigation water. 2011).39   Catchment Name  Al Mayha‐Mabrah‐Al Hajir System  Wadi Al Hawasinah  Wadi Mashin  Wadi Shafan  Wadi Al Fara'  Wadi Bani Ghafir  Al Mayha‐Mabrah‐Al Hajir System  Wadi Al Fara'  Wadi Bani Ghafir  Al Mayha‐Mabrah‐Al Hajir System  Wadi Bani Ghafir  Wadi Mashin  Wadi Bani Umar Al Gharbi  Wadi Fizh  Wadi Rijma  Wilayat Name  Al Khaburah  Al Khaburah  Al Khaburah  Al Khaburah  Al Musanaah  Al Musanaah  Ar Rustaq  Ar Rustaq  Ar Rustaq  As Suwayq  As Suwayq  As Suwayq  Liwa  Liwa  Liwa  11  24  212  2  154  261  192  194  5  654  1068  197  182  278  32  Alluvial Potential  Groundwater  Reserve (Mm3)  6  12  106  1  77  131  96  97  3  327  534  98  91  139  16  Alluvial Usable  Groundwater  Reserve (Mm3)  Table 5.  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 0  0  0  0  1970  4123  994  1056  26  4890  5659  1485  1996  1747  293  Upper Fars  Potential  Groundwater  Reserve (Mm3)  0  0  0  0  985  2061  497  528  13  2445  2829  743  998  873  146  Upper Fars  Usable  Groundwater  Reserve (Mm3)  6  12  106  1  1062  2192  593  625  16  2772  3364  841  1089  1013  162  Total Usable  Groundwater  Volume (Mm3)  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Irrigation Water  Suitability  34 .

40   Wadi Suq  Wadi Ahin  Wadi As Sarami  Wadi Sakhin  Wadi Shafan  Wadi Al Hawarim  Wadi Bid'ah  Wadi Faydh  Wadi Fizh  Wadi Hatta  Wadi Malahah  Wadi Qawr  Wadi Rijma  WAdi Al Jizi  Wadi Ahin  Wadi Al Hilti  Wadi Bani Umar Al Gharbi  Wadi Suq    Liwa  Saham  Saham  Saham  Saham  Shinas  Shinas  Shinas  Shinas  Shinas  Shinas  Shinas  Shinas  Sohar  Sohar  Sohar  Sohar  Sohar  Total  6178  222  7  500  232  548  61  42  12  37  3  30  26  67  295  165  192  249  21  3089  111  4  250  116  274  30  21  6  18  1  15  13  34  147  82  96  125  11  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 36043  708  0  2488  1192  2013  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  2301  854  1045  1196  7  18022  354  0  1244  596  1007  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1151  427  523  598  3  21111  465  4  1494  712  1281  30  21  6  18  1  15  13  34  1298  510  618  723  14    Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Unsuitable  Doubtful  Unsuitable  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Doubtful  Unsuitable  35 .

  o Direct rainfall recharge 10.5 mm/year (0.  In  previous  studies. and Horn (1978) estimated the recharge  as 22.  o Return seepage from irrigation water 13.  o Infiltration of dam storage 2.7 Mm3 and 7.  o Direct  rainfall  recharge  in  lower  coastal  plain  3.46  Mm3/year  (based  on  Darcy’s  equation).  respectively  (DGWRA.41 Mm3/year (assumed 25% of rainfall as infiltration rate)  o Infiltration  of  runoff  in  the  wadi  2.9 Mm3/year (assumed 80% of water behind the dam is  percolated and infiltrated and only 20% as evaporative losses).9 Mm3.  o The  recharge  over  the  study  area  was  distributed  into  two  zones:  coastal  zone  of  36.  and  soil  type.2 Groundwater recharge  There has been no clear groundwater recharge assessment research conducted (field studies) for the  study  area.1  Mm3  crosses  through  the  wadi  alluvium and bedrock into the lower catchment and another 16.  3.  A  summary  of  the  main  studies  and  the  recharge  estimates used are described as follows:   Recent  groundwater  modeling  study  on  numerical  simulation  of  groundwater  flow  for  the  northern Batinah area was conducted by MRMWR (2011).14  Mm3/year  (the  difference  between  the  estimated wadi flow and the flow recorded at the dam).0001 m/day).  Previous  studies  estimated  the  recharge  as  a  percentage  of  rainfall  depending  on  the  catchment  land  cover.  Department  of  Groundwater  Resources  Authority  (DGWRA)  estimated  the  recharge  in  the  upper  and  lower  catchment  of  Wadi  Al  Jizzi  to  be  35%. and Wadi Sarami of 21.  Gartner  Lee  (1996)  conducted  a  modeling  study  for  Wadi  Al  Jizzi and showed that lower recharge rates corresponding to about 1% of the annual rainfall  achieved better head match.  slope.2 Mm3 for Wadi Sarami.7  Mm3 and 7.    The  Century  Architects  consultancy  (CACE.    A study conducted by Hydroconsult (1985) for the MAF.1  Mm3.75 Mm3/year.  1995b). and return flow from irrigation.  (Table  26  ofGeo‐Resources report). estimated groundwater recharge for  three wadis: Wadi Ahin.91  Mm3/year.1 Mm3. The report is not published yet.5 Mm3 for Wadi Ahin and 8.  with  no  direct  recharge  from  rainfall  over  the  plain.  and  20%  of  rainfall.  2004)  estimated  the  total  recharge  in  Wadi  Al  Maáwil  catchment  of  mid‐lower  and  coastal  plain  parts  to  be  44. 3. and foothill zone of 146 mm/year (0.  In the OSS study. and no Jabal inflow.  respectively.  The  total  recharge breakdown is as follows:  o Groundwater  inflow  from  upper  catchment  12.4 Mm3 is lost via bedrock. recharge has been estimated as 18% of mean annual rainfall.  They  estimated  a  total  of  19.  Using  these  inflow  quantities.9 Mm3 for the three wadis respectively.25  Mm3/year  (assumed  25%  of  rainfall as infiltration rate).  1995a.   The  Geo‐Resources Consultancy (2006) estimated the recharge  to the  coastal plain of 257  Mm3 which was basically as groundwater throughflow in the Jabal gaps and surface inflow  from  the  Jabal  catchments.  A recharge of 22 mm per year (18% of rainfall) at the coastal plain.0004 m/day).  Cardew  (1980)  estimated  the  recharge  as  21.  41 36 .Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 4.  but a paper of the main findings is published in the “WAST 9th Gulf Water Conference” (El  Bihery et al.  They estimated the recharge in the upper catchment as 35% of rainfall. this rate was used as  preliminary input and adjusted during calibration to achieve the best head match:      A recharge of 36 mm per year (18% of rainfall) at the mountain foothills. 2010):  o The groundwater recharge was estimated to be 329 Mm3 and takes place through  direct recharge from rainfall. Wadi Sakhin.

 The annual  infiltration volumes from these dams are given in Figure 39.55  9063  4.2          Infiltration from the recharge dam pool was taken as 35% of the water behind the dam. Examples from the region on dams’ infiltration efficiency are given in Box 1.   90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 0 Wadi Al Jizi  Wadi Hilti Salahi  Wadi Ahin Wadi Al Hawasinah    Figure 39.  (Source: MRMWR.4  Concrete  1989  Ma'awil  Barka  10  7500  8.8  5640  8  Ghabion  1994  Al Hawasinah  Al Khaburah  3. 2010)  Dam Name  Wilayat  Capacity  (Mm3)  Length (m)  Height(m)  Flow  Type  Construction  Year  Hilti/Salahi  Sohar  0.2  Ghabion  1992  Ahin  Saham  6.1  4500  9.7  5900  6. Estimated annual infiltration volumes from main recharge dams in the coastal plain area  (Source: ICBA.  Main recharge dams and their storage capacity in Al Batinah coastal plain area.4  1234  20.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman The average total recharge was estimated at 90 Mm3/year.  Recharge dams  Seven main recharge dams exist in Al Batinah coastal plain of a total capacity of 32 Mm3.    42 37 . 2011). as listed in  Table 6 below:   Table 6. The reason  for  using  this  low  infiltration  rate  is  due  to  the  lack  of  information  regarding  dams  infiltration  efficiency.5  Ghabion  1985  Al Jizi  Sohar  5.3  Ghabion  1991  Fara'  Ar Rustaq  0.8  Concrete  1995  Total Capacity    32.6  638  12  Earth  1992  Taww  Barka  5.

3 Groundwater throughflow (Jabal inflow)  Groundwater throughflow was  calculated using Darcy’s equation:  Box 1. and Bih Dam is 31%.  and  in  Figure  40  below.  I  is  the  hydraulic  gradient  and  L  is  the  length  of  cross‐ section. Dams’ recharge efficiency  Q=TIL  Where  Q  is  groundwater  throughflow. These projects have been  designed to use isotope hydrology to evaluate groundwater  recharge  in  these  dams  and  to  define  the  flow  direction  of  groundwater.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 4.  These  Jabal  inflow  quantities  were  used  as  a  preliminary  input  in  the  model and adjusted during calibration to  match  the  observed  head  with  the  calculated  head. These projects showed that:    The recharge efficiency for Ham Dam is 47%. MOEW 2005). Estimated groundwater inflow from Jabal in Al Batinah study area   (Source: ICBA. Tween Dam  22%.            43 38 .   The calculated groundwater throughflow  for each catchment is presented in Table  A5  in  the  Appendix.    Total Jabal Inflow 269 Mm3 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0   Figure 40. that is. while the remaining  quantities stagnate in the unsaturated zone and enrich  the soil moisture. The constructed dams have significantly  enhanced the groundwater recharge.      An  assessment  study  on  dam  recharge  efficiency  was  conducted  on  three  main  dams:  Ham.  T  is  transmissivity.  The  calibrated  Jabal  inflow values are presented in Figure 40.  These  values  matched  the  groundwater  throughflow  pattern  and  values  calculated  by  Geo‐Resources  (2006). 2011). these are the  percentages of water storage quantities in the dam lake  that reaches the water table.  and  involved  studying  shallow  and  deep  percolation of groundwater along with an assessment of the  age  and  origin  of  various  groundwater  reserves.  and  the  extent of saline intrusion.  (Source: ICBA.   Recharge efficiency could be improved considerably if the  accumulated silt from wadi floods (10‐15 cm) would be  removed as the geology of the top layer consists of 60%  gravel.  Bih. 2010.  and  Tuween  dams in the United Arab Emirates.   Surface water is intercepted to enhance the groundwater  recharge.

  They  represent  estimates  –  not  the  actual  or  measured  abstraction. based on well inventory data obtained from MRMWR).  The  Hydroconsult reviewed previous studies by Horn (1978) who estimated the total abstraction for the  whole Al Batinah as 190 Mm3/year and Cardew (1980) who estimated the total abstraction for the    44 39 .700  wells)  were  not  operating  (red  dots  in  Figure  41). 2011.  All  these  wells  are  shallow‐dug  borehole  wells  that  are  tapping  the  alluvial aquifer. and operational status in Al Batinah  governorates (Source: ICBA.  Previous  studies  by  Hydroconsult  (1984). The total number of pumping wells is equal to 58.  the  majority  of  the  agricultural  wells  are  located  in  a  thin  strip  of  land  along  the  coast.  The  total  groundwater  abstraction in Al Batinah coastal plain for the year 1995 was 570 Mm3/year.  As  is  clear  from  the  map.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 4. The only available abstraction data were obtained from the MRMWR database. These  abstraction  data  were  collected  by  the  national  well  inventory  project  (NWIP)  for  the  year  1995. since historical well abstraction data  were missing. Location of existing wells and their designated use. of which 400 Mm3 was  in  the  northern  Batinah  and  170  Mm3  in  the  southern  Batinah. The location of the abstraction wells are presented in Figure 41.    Figure 41.132.  About  97%  (550  Mm3)  of  the  groundwater abstraction was used in agriculture and for livestock.  Century  Architects  (CACE.  The  most  likely  reason  is  due  to  salinization  problem (seawater intrusion) as the majority is located in a thin strip along the coast.    Figure  41  presents  a  location  map  of  abstraction  wells  and  their  designated  uses  in  Al  Batinah  governorates.  2004). and the remaining 3% (20 Mm3)  for municipal and industrial uses. of which about 20% (11.  and  Geo‐Resources  Consultancy  (2006)  estimated  groundwater  abstraction  for  Al  Batinah  governorates.4 Groundwater use  Well abstraction data are the most uncertain data in the study.

  the  total  abstraction  rate  used  for  this  study was equal to 235 Mm3/year for the whole Al Batinah governorates for the year 1984.9  Mm3/year  for Wadi Ma’awil in southern Batinah  based on the national well inventory project (NWIP) for the  period 1990 to 1993.  Based  on  this  review.  Agricultural  water  demand  in  (a)  Al  Batinah    governorates  and  (b)  Al  Batinah  coastal  plain (Source: ICBA.  and  an  plain for the period 1982‐2010 (Source: ICBA.  The  CACE  study  estimated the total abstraction  from  2. 2011).      45 40 .  as  mentioned  above)  600 (green  data  in  Figure 42)  400 The  well  inventory  data  for  the  year  200 1995  (green  data  in  Figure 42)  0 The  estimated  net  1982 1986 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 2010 crop  water  demand    as  calculated  from  the  agricultural  Figure 42. and agricultural census as shown in Figure 42 (Table A11  in the Appendix):      The  abstraction  Abstraction (Mm3) estimate of the year  800 1984  (235  Mm3. also as presented in Figure 43).Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman whole  Al  Batinah  as  235  Mm3/year. Estimated mean annual abstraction rate in Al Batinah coastal  census. Al Batinah governorates  b.800  wells  in  the  northern  Batinah  area. Al Batinah coastal plain  Figure  43. 2011.  Based  on  these  studies.  interpolation  was  done  to  assess  annual  abstraction  rate  based  on  earlier  estimates  of  agricultural  demands  available  in  literature.   To  estimate  the  historical  abstraction  data  for  the  period  1982–2010.  added  weighted    average  leaching  factor of 13% (Dark blue dots in Figure 42.  the  Hydroconsult  estimated  the  total  abstraction  for  the  whole  Al  Batinah  to  be  235  Mm3/year  for  the  year  1984.000 800 800 600 600 400 400 200 200 0 0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 19971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010 Agricultural Water Demand Modeled Area (LF) Al Batinah region (Average) Al Batinah model Area (Average) a. based on agricultural statistics reports). data from well inventory survey.  Mm3 Mm3 1000 1. The Geo‐Resources Consultancy drilling and aquifer testing study estimated the  total agricultural abstraction quantities based on net crop water demand of 387 Mm3/year for 4.754 operational dug wells and boreholes at 94.

  Actual  water  use  and  consumption  could  be  20‐40%  larger  than  these  estimates  of  crop  water  demand because the application of irrigation water is not efficient.2 0.  The  total  agricultural  water  demand  was  calculated  based  on  the  cropping  area  and  the  crop  water  requirements  as  shown  in  Figure  44.3 0.401.807.  The  total  cropping  areas.  the  cropping  pattern.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman The net crop water demand was calculated for both the whole Al Batinah  governorates. 9 % Hilti 0 Al Hajir 848. 2011.  The  crop  water  requirements  and  the  cropping  areas  were  estimated  for  several  types  of  crops  classified  into vegetables. The data for  cropping  areas  were  compiled  from  the  statistical  agricultural  census  studies.  and  estimated  agricultural  water  demand  for  each  crop  type  in  Al  Batinah region are summarized in Tables A9‐A10 in the Appendix.05 a. 4% Mm3 0.      46 41 . 2011).1 0. Agricultural water demand for (a) Al Batinah region and (b) Al Batinah coastal area (Mm3)  (Source: ICBA. 3 7% b.435.  1000 1000 875 859 800 800 721 660 600 600 400 400 200 200 700 687 578 528 0 0 1997 Fruit 2000 Forages 2005 Vegetables 1997 2010 Field Crops Fruit   (a) Al Batinah governorates  2000 Forages 2005 Vegetables 2010 Field Crops (b) Coastal plain area  Figure 44. forages. and for  the  coastal  plain  part  (model  study  area). field crops.  Camel Cattle Sheep Goat 73. based on data from census 2005). Livestock water demand in main catchments of Al Batinah  governorates   (Source: ICBA. and fruits groups (Tables A6‐A8 in the Appendix).15 0. Livestock water requirements  Sakhin Hawrim Bidáh Fizh Rajmi Fara Sarami Hawasinah Suq Ahin Mashin Jizi Bani Ghafir 161. 5 0% Shafan 627.926.25 0. Livestock water demand  Figure 45.

 Most of the livestock water is consumed by cattle and goats (Figure 45) (Table A12 and  Table A13 in the Appendix).7  Mm3. Increase of saltwater intrusion over time in response to over‐pumping   (Source: ICBA.  the  highest  share  is  in  Mayhah‐  Mabrah‐Hajir  catchment.  This  over‐ pumping varies among the different catchments. followed by Wadi  Ahin of Saham and Sohar wilayats of the order of 48 Mm3. as shown from the model runs presented in Table  7.  106  Mm3  is  removed  from  aquifer  storage.5 Balance  The  current  total  inflow  of  recharge  and  Jabal  inflow  is  about  305  Mm3/year  in  Al  Batinah  coastal  plain.  4.  assuming  the  reduced  groundwater flow to sea is environmentally acceptable.  Mm3 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1982 1986 1990 1994 1998 Seawater Intrusion 2002 2006 2010 abstraction   Mm3 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1982 1986 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 Seawater Intrusion 2010 2014 2018 2022 2026 abstraction 2030   Figure 46. These results show that the highest deficit is  in Wadi Al Mayha‐Mabrah‐Al Hajir of As Suwayq wilayat of the order of 79 Mm3. 2011).    47 42 . This shows that the current groundwater  extraction  is  over‐pumping  the  available  water  in  Al  Batinah  coastal  aquifers  by  43%.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Livestock water use  The  total  livestock  water  demand  is  1. while the total current abstraction is 578 Mm3/year. The current water balance for Al Batinah shows a water deficit of the order of 250 Mm3 of which  144  Mm3  is  saltwater  intrusion.

 This translates into reduced outflow to the sea and storage.  and  of  groundwater removed from storage. The increased inflow that occurs in response to pumping is  in  fact  the  result  of  saltwater  intrusion  where  the  water  table  is  below  the  sea  level.  the  drawdown  increases  and  water  level  drops causing deeper cone of depression. Figure 46 shows clearly the annual increase in saltwater  intrusion in response to abstraction.  Abstraction  also  causes  that  more  water  is  captured  within  the  well  area  and  reduce the groundwater outflow to the sea.  The aquifer response to pumping starts by first taking water from storage within the vicinity of the  well  where  water  level  instantaneously  drawdown  causing  cone  of  depression  in  response  to  pumping.  When  pumping  continues  with  higher  rates.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman The water must come from somewhere to balance the deficit: either through increased inflow to the  aquifer or decreased outflow to the sea.      48 43 . Then water inflows from the sea to compensate for these  pumped  quantities.

 Current groundwater balance in Al Batinah coastal plain. 2011)  Year  Recharge  Groundwater  Seawater  Removed  Inflow  Intrusion  from  (BAU)  Storage  1982  147  240  0  541  1983  62  211  0  437  1984  23  171  2  440  1985  28  176  8  380  1986  75  274  12  304  1987  134  365  10  271  1988  159  323  10  262  1989  112  307  16  256  1990  110  352  23  247  1991  59  336  39  258  1992  114  256  44  270  1993  67  263  77  261  1994  80  280  93  218  1995  259  349  68  170  1996  168  304  101  194  1997  332  325  101  142  1998  107  231  174  276  1999  87  209  205  246  2000  47  294  244  188  2001  44  288  255  172  2002  79  356  229  147  2003  61  306  223  172  2004  50  270  213  165  2005  76  319  182  114  2006  117  326  136  114  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Abstraction  (BAU)  163  181  201  223  256  285  316  344  390  433  464  516  543  574  620  671  694  697  701  705  698  692  646  604  564  Total In  1573  1300  1117  1025  1206  1508  1465  1369  1464  1383  1232  1179  1185  1497  1385  1583  1303  1177  1269  1250  1433  1320  1197  1232  1246  606  496  410  347  337  378  379  326  302  247  194  141  115  148  124  148  89  67  53  47  50  46  47  57  70  Groundwater  Outflow  118  3  0  0  51  100  42  7  27  1  16  3  5  118  17  74  0  1  16  4  61  19  1  26  57  Storage Loss  1574  1300  1117  1026  1207  1508  1465  1369  1464  1383  1232  1179  1185  1497  1385  1583  1303  1177  1269  1250  1433  1320  1197  1232  1245  Total out  44 .49   Table 7.   (Source: ICBA.

50     2007  2008  2009  2010  2011  2012  2013  2014  2015  2016  2017  2018  2019  2020  2021  2022  2023  2024  2025  2026  2027  2028  2029  2030  162  50  82  111  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  68  316  241  313  294  352  346  346  347  349  352  310  310  311  311  311  312  312  312  312  312  312  312  312  312  111  146  138  144  148  151  155  159  163  182  183  184  185  186  186  187  187  188  188  188  188  189  189  189  110  182  111  106  129  112  101  93  86  90  109  107  106  105  104  103  103  102  102  102  101  101  101  101  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 1290  1068  1174  1207  1385  1380  1376  1372  1369  1357  1371  1370  1369  1369  1369  1368  1368  1368  1368  1368  1367  1367  1367  1367  540  542  544  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  572  99  58  58  63  80  93  95  94  92  82  81  81  81  81  81  81  81  81  81  81  81  81  81  81  56  15  43  18  44  10  3  1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1290  1068  1174  1207  1385  1380  1376  1372  1369  1357  1355  1354  1353  1352  1352  1352  1351  1351  1351  1351  1351  1351  1351  1351  45 .

  MODFLOW.2 Model limitation  Despite the good model capability and prediction performance for both flow and saltwater intrusion  as reflected in evaluating the impact of different management scenarios on water resources.    Hydraulic conductivities or transmissivities.  2.1 Model code selection  The  modeling  code  is  the  computer  program  that  contains  algorithms  to  numerically  solve  the  mathematical  model  (equations  that  represent  the  hydraulic  system).  The  selection  of  the  model  code depends on the modeling objectives.  the  main  objective  is  to  simulate  the  salinity  gradients  and  seawater intrusion in Al Batinah coastal plain.  3D  Saturated  /  Unsaturated  Transport model using variable density). and to quantify groundwater availability.  Usually  well  51 46 .  Contaminant  Transport  and  Thermal  or  Heat  transport  Model).  or  a  combination of both.  wells.  Specified head and specified flux boundaries.  unconfined.  variability  of  parameters with space and time. Public domain code.  Canada. the defined hydrogeological conceptual model and main  physical  processes.    It  has  a  modular  structure  that  allows  it  to  be  easily  modified  to  adapt  the  code  for  a  particular  application.  5.  ZoneBudget.  a  three‐dimensional  finite‐difference  ground‐water  model  developed  by  the  US  Geological  Survey  that  was  first  published  in  1984  meets  the  above  criteria.  areal  recharge. GROUNDWATER MODELING  5. and areal recharge. transient groundwater flow in porous media  that was developed by combining MODFLOW and MT3DMS codes. A three dimensional (3D) multi‐layered flow and solute transport model coupled with density to  account for the density difference between fresh and salt water.  boundary  conditions.  3.  For  this  study.  For  this  case  study. and ground‐water management. Capability to represent vertical gradients between layers.  originally  developed  by  Waterloo  University. Usually.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 5. there  are some data and model constraints:     The  model  was  developed  based  on  groundwater  use  data  that  was  estimated  based  on  well  inventory  survey  data  and  not  on  frequent  actual  measured  abstraction  data.  Visual  MODFLOW. economics. This requires  a model with the following capabilities:  1. variable –density.  WinPEST.  SEAWAT code is a three‐dimensional.  MODPATH.  and  further  developed  by  Schlumberger Company. that is popular and verified in many published case studies.  4. and  friendly  use  play  a  role  on  the  selection  decision.    Flow from external stresses.  There are many commercially available graphical user interface (GUI) packages that can also be used  and  meet  the  above  criteria  like  FEFLOW  (Density‐Dependent  Groundwater  Flow.  MT3D/RT3D. such as flow to wells.  geometry  and  hydraulics  of  multiple  aquifer  and  confining  layers.  a  commercial  GUI  package  is  selected.   Solute transport and saltwater intrusion (SEAWAT). France.  MODFLOW simulates:        Steady  and  non‐steady  flow  in  which  aquifer  layers  can  be  confined.  and  SUTRA  (2D.  and  well  optimization  package.  Visual  MODFLOW  is  a  user  friendly  and  well  known  package. tradeoffs between model accuracy. Capability  to  represent  the  conceptual  model:  3D  flow  system.  combines  MODFLOW. and storage coefficient.

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman

inventory  surveys  estimate  well  abstraction  rather  than  measure  the  actual  abstraction  from 
wells by meters. This is an acknowledged uncertainty that affects the model calibration.  

The  existing  groundwater  monitoring  network  covers  the  study  area,  particularly  the  coastal 
plain close to the coast, with less spatial distribution towards the foothill. There are many spatial 
and  temporal  gaps  and  errors  in  the  water  level  data  that  affects  interpreting  the  information 
from  the  data.  The  water  level  data  needs  thorough  review  and  needs  regular  quality  control 
and quality assurance. 

Salinity  data  are  collected  every  five  years  through  surveys.  These  data  are  not  accurate  and 
contain  many  errors  and  gaps  due  to  the  sampling  approach,  where  the  samples  were  taken 
from  unspecified  vertical  locations,  and  the  salinity  is  measured  based  on  the  EC  rather  than 
laboratory TDS (mg/l) measurements. 

5.3 Conceptual flow model for Al Batinah coastal plain  
The geological and structural features of the study area designate two interconnected aquifers, the 
Alluvium  and  Upper  Fars  aquifers.  In  places  where  the  Alluvium  aquifer  overlies  the  Upper  Fars 
aquifer,  the  two  aquifers  behave  as  one  hydrogeological  unit  under  saturation  conditions,  and 
therefore  are  modeled  as  one  aquifer,  with  two  layers.  The  first  layer  simulates  the  Alluvium 
formation and the second layer simulates the Upper Fars formation. 
The  thickness  of  the  Alluvium  aquifer  ranges  between  8  m  and  143  m,  while  the  thickness  of  the 
Upper  Fars  aquifer  ranges  between  114  m  and  582  m.  The  Upper  Fars  aquifer  is  underlain  by  low 
permeable  Middle  Fars  formation  which  acts  as  the  base  of  the  combined  aquifer  (Alluvium  and 
Upper Fars aquifer). 
Recharge from rainfall occurs over the study area and can be distinguished as follows:  

 

Direct recharge from rainfall occuring over the Alluvium plain. 

Recharge from wadi flow in main wadi channels  

Groundwater throughflow which is recharged from rainfall that occurs over the bedrock at 
the  mountain,  and  enters  the  Alluvium  aquifer  through  the  mountain  gabs  (fractures  and 
faults that act as conduits). Higher recharge rates occurs over the bedrock near the foothills 
than the plain area.  

Recharge  that  infiltrates  from  recharge  dams  which  contributes  significantly  to  the  aquifer 
water balance. 

The  primary  discharge  is  the  abstraction  from  wells  for  agricultural  uses,  and  for  public 
water supply uses. These discharges affect flow direction and cause changes in groundwater 
level. All well abstractions were tapping the Alluvium aquifer, however, no clear abstraction 
was  recorded  for  the  Upper  Fars  Aquifer.  Under  natural  conditions  without  abstraction, 
groundwater discharges at the coastal shoreline. 

The  general  flow  direction  is  from  the  recharge  area  near  the  foothills  towards  the  coast 
except where some faults that are perpendicular to the general flow direction which act as a 
barrier to the groundwater flow and change flow direction towards these local areas. 

The  hydraulic  gradient  is  steeper  near  the  foothills  than  the  coastal  plain.  The  hydraulic 
gradient for the northern Batinah model is about 6 m/km and for southern Batinah model is 
about  8  m/km.  The  difference  in  hydraulic  head  between  the  highest  points  near  the 
foothills  and  the  lowest  point  at  the  coast  is  significant,  and  reaches  170  m  for  northern 

52

47

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman

Batinah  and  200  m  for  southern  Batinah.  This  high  difference  in  head  affects  the 
groundwater  velocity  to  be  faster  and  resists  seawater  intrusion.  The  head  difference 
increases  at  the  pumping  wells  where  the  water  table  drops  below  the  sea  level  at  the 
coastal boundary. This abstraction changes groundwater flow direction, groundwater levels, 
hydraulic  pressure,  groundwater  velocity,  the  hydraulic  gradients,  as  well  as  the  aquifer 
parameters  (storage,  permeability,  etc.).  The  changes  in  these  conditions  and  parameters 
greatly  induce  the  saltwater  to  intrude  the  aquifer  as  the  equivalent  freshwater  pressure 
decreases. 

Transmissivity  varies  widely  across  the  study  area.  Higher  transmissivity  occurs  in 
uncemented,  lose  gravels  and  sands,  while  lower  transmissivity  occurs  in  locations  where 
cemented, and clayey gravels exists.   

Groundwater  salinity  varies  widely  within  the  study  area.  This  water  salinity  is  generally 
lower near the recharge areas (the foothills) and higher closer to the coast. 

Data  regarding  dam  storage,  rainfall,  observation  wells,  aquifer  parameters,  and  well  field 
pumping  were  assembled  and  prepared  in  the  model  input  format.  The  recharge  to  the 
aquifer was assigned through 8 zones corresponding to the recharge from rainfall and from 
the dams storage for the modeling period. 

5.4 Water balance 
The pre‐model development mean groundwater balance includes the following components: 
Table 8: Pre‐development groundwater balance (Mm3). 
(Source: ICBA, 2011)  
   

Flow Component 

Assumptions 

Quantity 
(Mm3/year) 

Inflow 

Recharge from rainfall 

18% of mean annual rainfall (MAR) 

 

Groundwater 
W  x  i  x  T,  where  (w)  is  Catchment 
throughflow from Jabal  width,  (i)  is  Hydraulic  gradient,  (T)  is 
Transmissivity,  for  each  catchment, 
Table 26 of GRC, 2006. 

257 

Total Inflow 

 

 

347 

Outflow 

Abstraction 

 

385 

 

Outflow to the sea 

 

20 

Total Outflow 

 

 

405 

Balance 

 

 

‐58 

90 

 
The numerical flow and transport modeling is explained in details in chapters 11 and 12 for both the 
northern Batinah and the southern Batinah. 
 

 

 

53

48

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman

6. MANAGEMENT OPTIONS IN AL BATINAH COASTAL PLAIN  
The  natural  balance  between  freshwater  and  saltwater  in  Al  Batinah  coastal  plain  aquifers  is 
disturbed by groundwater abstraction, which lowers groundwater levels, reduces fresh groundwater 
flow to the coast, and causes saltwater to intrude in the coastal plain fresh aquifer. Other hydraulic 
stresses  that  reduce  freshwater  flow  in  coastal  aquifers  include  lowered  rates  of  groundwater 
recharge due to urbanization and droughts. Climate change impacts, such as droughts or less rainfall 
in  dry  years,  also  severely  affect  the  natural  balance  in  a  similar  way  to  abstraction,  if  not  more 
severely. 
Saltwater contaminates the freshwater aquifer either by saltwater encroachment (lateral movement 
of saltwater) or by saltwater intrusion (saltwater upconing; i.e vertical movement of saltwater from 
deeper and more saline aquifers) in response to pumping. 
The landward flow of saltwater into freshwater coastal plain aquifers and saltwater contamination 
can have adverse effects on coastal groundwater supplies. Equally important are the seaward flow 
of fresh groundwater to coastal ecosystems and the role of groundwater in delivering nutrients and 
other  dissolved  constituents  to  these  systems.  Dissolved  chemical  constituents  discharged  with 
groundwater  affect  the  salinity  and  geochemical  budgets  of  coastal  ecosystems  and  affect  the 
biological species composition and productivity of these systems.  
Nutrient  contamination  of  coastal  groundwater  occurs  as  a  consequence  of  activities  such  as 
wastewater disposal from septic tanks and agricultural uses of fertilizers. One of the most common 
effects  of  large  inputs  of  nutrients  to  coastal  aquifers  is  acceleration  of  the  process  of 
eutrophication,  which  is  the  enrichment  of  an  ecosystem  by  organic  material  formed  by  primary 
productivity (photosynthetic activity).  
Because groundwater moves slowly, the flushing of contaminated groundwater from an aquifer can 
take  many  years,  even  decades.  Quantifying  groundwater  and  contaminant  discharge  to  coastal 
ecosystems  and  understanding  the  role  of  groundwater  in  maintaining  the  biological  health  and 
geochemical  balances of  these systems increasingly  requires  the  integration of data  collection and 
data‐analysis techniques from diverse scientific fields.  
Based  on  the  behavior  of  the  aquifer  system,  the  present  status  of  the  groundwater  table,  and 
salinity distribution trends, as well as the location and rates of abstractions as discussed in previous 
sections, the following actions are necessary: 

6.1 Reduce water demand  
As  shown  in  the  previous  section,  groundwater  abstraction  is  high  and  should  be  reduced  to 
acceptable environmental and economical levels in such a way as to minimize the decline in water 
levels and sustain groundwater use. For this purpose, different pumping scenarios are proposed: 
1. Base  case  scenario  or  Business  as  Usual  scenario  (BAU):  to  represent  no  change  in 
abstraction  case  (no  actions).  This  is  used  as  a  base  scenario  to  compare  with  alternative 
scenarios. 
2. Reduction of rate of abstraction of 50%: this 50% reduction is equivalent to  the  undesired 
environmental  impact  due  to  BAU  abstraction.  The  undesired  environmental  impacts 
include: seawater encroachment of 144 Mm3, and net removed water from storage of 106 
Mm3. This adds up to 250 Mm3, which is 42% of BAU abstraction (250 Mm3/578 Mm3). While 
removing  the  salt  water  intrusion  alone  is  equivelant  to  25%  (144  Mm3/578  Mm3).  To 
account  for  the  weighted  effect  of  seawater  intrusion  as  it  differs  between  the  northern 
Batinah and  the southern Batinah, a 20% reduction in abstraction is assumed for northern 
Batinah and 50% reduction in abstraction in southern Batinah. 
 

54

49

1 Use water saving techniques    Significant  savings  could  be  made  from  changing  the  irrigation  technology.  which  is  equivalent  to  reducing  abstraction  by  6%  (Table  A14  in  the  Appendix). and higher groundwater outflow (discharge) is expected (the greenline in Figure 47).) was used as the  crop water requirements for the unknown crop water requirements.    It is important to mention that the aim is not to prevent seawater intrusion.  Due  to  only  limited  information  being  available  on  irrigation  technology  and  distribution  in  Al  Batinah.  The  investment  cost  for  shifting  the  irrigation  methods  should  also  be  taken  into  account. fruits.  The  estimated  potential  savings  is  41  Mm3  (Figure  49).  Water  demand  reduction  could  be  achieved through a combination of the following actions:  6.1. etc. The optimal abstraction rate (or abstraction threshold) can be obtained  by  judging  the  economic  and  environmental  impacts  together.   The average share or irrigation technique distribution was used for the unknown crop share.    55 50 .   Mm3 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1982 1986 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 2010 2014 2018 2022 Abstraction (BAU) Seawater Intrusion (BAU) Abstraction (Reduction) Seawater intrusion (Reduction) 2026 2030   Figure 47.  and  tradeoffs between the cost and the saved quantities of water should be applied.  particularly  from  flood  irrigation  to  drip  (Figure  48).  The average crop water requirement for each group (vegetables.  where  remarkable  reduction  in  the  level  of  intruded  saltwater. The effect of reducing abstraction rate on seawater intrusion (Source: ICBA.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman The  results  of  running  these  different  scenarios  in  the  groundwater  model  showed  that  better  environmental  performance  was  obtained.  This  can  be  done  by  drawing  abstraction  versus  economic  and  environmental  damage.  2011). but rather to control or  mitigate seawater intrusion.  the  following  assumptions were used in estimating the possible saving:     The  share  of  irrigation  technology  of  the  year  2005  was  used  as  the  base  to  estimate  the  share of irrigation technology of 2010.

  The  7. 41  MRMWR.  For  example.7 30 25 Groundwater  recharge  could  be  20 increased through capturing the surface  15 runoff  behind  recharge  dams.  accounts  for  77%  of  total  agricultural  water demand (Figure 50) (for more details see Table A6 to Table A10 in the Appendix).  and  do  not  represent  planned  or  approved  dams.1.2 Increase water supply   6.5 10 existing recharge dams proved to be an  5 1. 2011).  assessment  and  approval  from  the  Alfalfa.1 Increase groundwater  recharge   Mm3 35 31.9 important  measure  for  increasing  0 aquifer  recharge  in  Oman. and well‐ 500 trained  workers  who  can  use  the  397 modern  irrigation  system  efficiently  400 should be employed.  6. 2011).  because  on‐farm  management  is  essential to achieve the desired saving.  The  total  water  consumption  of  these  highest  water  Figure  48. 263  locations  in  each  catchment.  Therefore.  Figure  51  presents  the  proposed  Date  recharge  dams  and  their  possible  Rhodes  palm.  the  proposed  (8%) recharge dams used in this study are just  to  show  the  possible  improvements  in  the  groundwater  system.  Agricultural  water  demand  using  different  consumer  crops  is  514  Mm3  which  irrigation techniques (Source: ICBA.3 0. 2011).  Several  Fruits Forages Vegetables Field Crops previous  studies  recommended    constructing  recharge  dams  for  Al  Batinah  region.  Rhodes  Fruits Forages Vegetables Field Crops grass.2.    Figure 50: The most water‐consuming crops (Mm3)  (Source: ICBA.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Caution  should  be  taken  regarding  implementing  this  strategy.  The  total  grass.  and  alfalfa.   276 300 6.  but  the  design  capacity  Figure 49: Potential water saving by shifting from flood  and  location  still  needs  further  to better advanced techniques (Source: ICBA.    56 51 .2 Change cropping pattern to  less water consuming crops  200 100 34 11 The most water consuming crops in Al  0 Batinah  include  date  palm. 210  (51%) design  capacity  of  these  proposed  (41%) 3 recharge  dams  is  about  60  Mm   (Table  9).  losses  in  the  irrigation  Modern Flood  Mm3 system should be minimized.

 w which equalss 21 Mm /year.   nication). Personal commun Dam  Dams Storrage  Capacitty  (Mm3/ye ear)  Bidah  2.  and  the  design  daams  in  Al  Baatinah  catch hment  area  (Source:  capacityy  is  not  thee  only  factor  that  affeccts  the  SQ QU. If the  dams is  estimated aat 35% of thee storage volume behind percentage ccould reach 5 50% of the sstorage volum me.  (Source:: SQU.8    Rijma C      Rijma D    Baani Umar A  8  Saham m  S Sarami C  4.7    F Fayadh B  3.5 Al Aiss A Alternate      59.1    Hatta A  10. increeased ground dwater direcct recharge o over the plain by 22% (e excluding  inflow frrom Jabal).    57 52 .  The  highesst  loss  is  usually  u through evaporation n which can  add up to lo osses of up to 70%.Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman Table 9: Design capaacity of proposed rechargge dams.1   Hatta C      Rijma A  4. or 30 Mm3/year. aand increaseed groundwaater outflow to the sea b by 8% (for more details ssee Table  A15 in th he Appendicces).  rechargee  amount..   Comparing the results of a scenario with reccharge damss to a scenarrio without recharge dam ms (Table  A15  in  the  t Appendix)  shows  that  recharge  dams  reducced  the  undeesired  enviro onmental  im mpacts  of  saltwateer intrusion  by 2%. In this study the  recharge fro om these  3 d the dam.73 Wilaayat  Shinass  Liwa  Musan nnah  Rustaq q  Total    The  efficiency  of  inffiltration  fro om  these  reccharge  Figgure  51:  Lo ocation  of  proposed  recharge  dams  iss  an  imporrtant  factor. Personal communication).  dams arre well mainttained this p This is equivalent to reducing an nnual abstracction by betw ween 4% and d 6%.74   Maabrah DE 2      Maabrah DE 3    Al Ais C  14.79 Khaburah  S Sarami A    Suwayyq  Maabrah DE 1  11.

 Reclaimed water quantities per wilayat in Al Batinah  governorates (Source: ICBA.2.  100% 6.00 0.  3% for aquifer recharge (0.2 0% Irrigation use  Reuse Others    Figure 52 Current sectoral use of treated wastewater quantities in Al Batinah  governorates (Mm3)  Source: ICBA.00 2.50 1.00 Sohar Barka Saham Al  Ar Rustaq Musanaah  Shinas Liwa Awabi As Suwayq Al  Khabourah    Figure 53. 2011.00 3.17 Industrial use  Ground recharge  0. based on data from Ministry of Environment and Climate Affairs).23 Mm3/year).50 0.50 3.2 0.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 6.17 Mm3/year).2 Mm3/year).2 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0.50 2. 3% for industrial use (0. 2011.00 1.  Mm3 4.        58 53 . and 3% for other uses (Figure 52 and Figure 53) (Table A16  in the Appendix). of which 91% is used for irrigation (6.82  Mm3/year  (18708  m3/day).2 Reuse treated wastewater for irrigation   The  current  total  treated  wastewater  quanty  used  in  Al  Batinah  region  is  6.  based on data from the Ministry of Environment and Climate Affairs).

 The  CA is a basket of agricultural practices (low‐ or no tillage.  and  to  increase the water and fertilizer use efficiency.  The  main  objectives  of  salinity  management  are.  to  evaluate/forecast relative crop yield using above equation prior to sowing. farmers choose what is  best for them. predictions of  expected  yield  loss  can  be  made. A detailed table of salt  tolerant  crops  exist  (Maas. vegetables and fruit crops. 2002). permanent soil cover is essential. biodiversity and climate change (Benites  et al. the more salt‐tolerant the crop is. The selected data is sourced from Ayers and Westcot (1976) and  used by many workers worldwide such as Franklin and Follett (1985). The CA holds tremendous potential for all sizes of farms and agro‐ecological systems. crop residue  to remain on soil surface as mulch.   It is recommended to use appropriate CA technologies which are specific to conserve soil moisture.  At  salinity  levels  greater  than  the  threshold.  Yr = 100‐s (ECe‐t)  where Yr = percentage of  the yield of  crop grown in saline conditions relative  to that obtained on  non‐saline conditions.   6. 1983). The CA is a major opportunity that can be exploited for achieving many objectives of  the international conventions on combating desertification.3 Adoption of conservation agriculture technologies  Low‐  and  no‐tillage  and  conservation  agriculture  (CA)  are  experiencing  a  persistent  and  steadying  growth (95 x 106 ha) in the world. crop rotation including leguminous crops).Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 6.  forage.  This  requires  careful  management  of  irrigated  agricultural  fields.  2006). If significant yield decline  is expected then either crop selection matching soil/water salinity is to be made following by use of  LR/LF concept to free root zone from salinity that is above the threshold level.  FAO  is  actively  involved  in  promoting  CA.  while  making  selection  of  salt  tolerant  crops  for  a  specific  saline  farm  site.  1996). As a general rule.  crop  yield  reduces  linearly  as  salinity  increases.   Crops  can  tolerate  salinity  up  to  certain  levels  without  a  measurable  loss  in  yield  (this  is  called  threshold level).  but  its  adoption  is  most  urgently  required  by  smallholder  farmers  (FAO.  especially  in  developing  or  emerging  economies  as  it  has  been  demonstrated that the long‐term gains from widespread conservation to no‐tillage could be greater  than from any other intervention in third world agricultural production (Warren. trench or band only of sufficient width and depth to obtain proper seed coverage". t = threshold salinity level where yield decrease begin. thus resulting in improved livelihood for the farmers.  Using  the salinity values in a salinity/yield model developed by Maas and Hoffman in 1977. the higher the threshold level.    It  is  recommended.  efficient use of nutrients and to reduce salinity affect on the crops.  Maas  and  Hoffman  expressed  salt  tolerance  of  crops  by  the  following relationship. s = percent yield loss  per increase of 1 ECe (dS/m) in excess of t.  Yield  reductions  may  range  from  a  slight  loss  to  complete  crop  failure.  focus on biological soil process.  No‐tillage is "planting crops in previously untilled soil by opening a  narrow slot. burning of mulch is prohibited.4 Root zone salinity management and leaching fraction  It  is  essential  to  keep  the  plant  root  zone  salinity  below  crop  threshold  level  to  get  optimum  production  and  to  maintain  soil  health..  Table  10  shows  the  relative  salt  tolerance  of  important  field. rational site‐oriented soil use.      59 54 .   6.  depending  on  the  particular  crop  and  the  severity of the salinity problem.  to  increase  the  yield  per  unit  area.5 Soil salinity in irrigated fields and relative yield prediction   Excessive  soil  salinity  (salts)  cause  reduced  yields  in  many  agronomic  crop  plants.

3  2.5  19.8  2.8  1.7  1.9  3.1  5.2  2.9  2.3  8.5  7.9  7.3  3.2  1. Forage Crops  Sweet clover  Alfalfa  Corn fodder  Beets  Broccoli  Tomato  Cucumber  Spinach  Cabbage     C.0  5.0  2.2  5.2  2.5  2.5  2.6  2.5  5. Vegetable      Potato         Crops  Pepper  Lettuce  Radish  Onion  0  10  10.8  3.4  6.0  4.0  12.0  4.4  5.5  2.3  4.2  2.8  1.6  1.7  1.5  4.8  2.7  1.5  1.3  7.2  7.0  11.0  6.8  4.6  2.8  10.0  1.9  5.4  9.0  1.1  1.5  2.0  2.1  2. Fruit Crops  50                                                               1  * The values apply only from the late seedling stage through maturity.4  1.5    D.9  13.3  3.3  2.8  3.8  5.2  5.3  3.1  4.8  4.5  1.2  1.6  3.0  8.5  2.5  1.3  4.6  9.4  4.8  2.6  9.1  5.3  2.0  1.2  6.9  2.5  4.2  3.0  8.2  5.5  6.    60 55 .9  8.0  2.0  5.0  1.7  1.3  2.4  3.5  6.8  3.5  2.8  4.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table 10.3  8.6  17.9  2.6  2.0  2.4  13.2  3.1  3.8  3.1  5.9  8.0  5.0  1.8  8.8  5.2  3.3  1.7  1.3  3. 2011)  Crops / Relative yield decrease (%)    Barley  Sugarbeet  Safflower  Sorghum  Soybean  A.1  2.2  6.0  1.6  9.5  6.7  6.8  5.4  8.5  5. Field Crops  Broadbean  Corn  Cowpea   Field bean  Tall wheatgrass  Barley hay  Ryegrass  B.5  2.3  3.3  2.2  5.3  10.4  2.8  4.8  4.5  2.8  4.4  3.9  5.0  4.2  7.7  1.4  5.1  3.6  7.0  18.  Salt tolerance of crops1  (Source: ICBA.2  11.9  10.7  1. Crops in each class are ranked in order of decreasing salt tolerance insofar as possible.1  2.6  2.7  1.0  15  7.1  3.9  Orange  Lemon  Apple  Pear  Plum  Peach  Apricot  Blackberry  Raspberry  Strawberry  1.6  25  ECe (dS/m)  13. during the period of most rapid plant  growth.5  1.3  2.2  3.5  2.6  6.7  6.6  8.7  2.0  1.9  3.3  Carrot  Beans  Datepalm  Fig  Olive  Grape  Grape fruit  1.3  3.7  3.0  1.8  2.7  4.5  3.8  3.

   In  the  likelihood  that  the  Omani  Government  would  want  to  use  more  land  for  agricultural  production.  which  cannot be economically controlled (persistent sea water intrusion.  3.  Appropriate  soil  and  water  management  technologies  can  minimize  these  problems. No water table within upper 2 m. The longer the soil  and added phosphorous are in contact.   Under  calcareous  alkaline  soil  conditions  the  use  of  organic  matter  (compost. Zn).  high  groundwater  salinity. The salorthids.  2. No sea water intrusion. Gravels are not dominant (>35%). this can be managed through leaching  requirement/fraction and drainage.   In  Al  Batinah.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 6.  6.7‐7. Mn.  vesicular  arbuscular  mycorrgizae  (VAM)  and  biofertilizers  (these  have  ultimate  acidic  behavior  in  soil). rate. Cu. hardpan that restricts leaching of  salts  from  root  zone.  6.).  farm  yard  manure). Fe. low in organic matter and clay contents. Inorganic nutrients (e.  these  farms  should  be  abandoned  and  potential sites with the following characteristics are explored:   1. No rock outcrops. use of nitrate fertilizers should be avoided to reduce nutrient losses and  groundwater contamination.  it  is  essential  that  the  location  of  the  ideal  agricultural  land  be  identified. Sufficient water is available to meet crop demand and associated leaching requirements. the higher the chances for phosphorous fixation in soil. N fertilizers are to be incorporated into soils and not  broadcasted. place and timing). and leguminous crops are more mycorrhizal than  cereal crops.  Given  the  general  criteria  (see  below)  for  soils  having  the  potential  for  irrigated  agriculture.  4. as well as the band  placement of phosphatic fertilizer are recommended. playas  should to be avoided due to their agriculture unsuitability.g. and the soil pH is higher  than optimum level (6. No salinity more than 4 dS/m. NO3) leach readily in such conditions (sandy soils) leading to high  costs of fertilizer inputs and high risk of offsite pollution by the outflow of nutrients. Al Batinah governorates is affected by various levels of soil degradation (mainly salinity)..6 Strategies to overcome soil pH.  5.  where  agricultural  farms  are  showing  permanent  threat  of  soil  salinization. tidal flats. In sandy soils.  where appropriate. however.        61 56 . CaCO3 affect on nutrient availability  Soils of Oman are rich in CaCO3. No gypsum layer within upper 1 m.  the  map  units’  needs to be further investigated to find suitable soils.  etc.   7. the combined effect results in soils with low nutrient available  capacity. marine flats.  The  use  of  saline water for irrigation may increase soil salinity.7 Future options for expansion of irrigated agriculture   Currently. To avoid ammonia volatilization.    It is recommended to use an integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) program to improve soil  health and for efficient use of fertilizers for improved yields. The  VAM are known to improve P nutrition to plants. There is a significant potential for Omani soils to  be improved through better fertilizer use efficiency and effectiveness (type. Thus. crop selection and using conservation agriculture technologies. Others are fixed  in soil due to high CaCO3 and pH (P. No hardpan within upper 2 m.3).  8.

  while  agricultural  vegetation  represents  field  crops. The area of these wadis varies    62 57 . etc.  etc. 2011). Land cover map for Salalah (Source: ICBA.3 Salalah main  catchment  system    Most  of  the  wadis  flow  Figure 55.   7.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 7.1 Study area  The study area is located in the Dhofar Governorate on the Arabian Sea.  vegetables. The location map of the  study area is shownin Figure 54.  The  figure  shows  the  agricultural  areas  specified  as  high  density  vegetation  (trees account for fruit trees.    Figure 54. WATER RESOURCES IN SALALAH COASTAL PLAIN  7. Location map of Salalah study area (Source: ICBA.  7.  originate  from  the  Jabal  and  discharge to the Arabian Sea after crossing the Salalah coastal plain.  including  date  palm.).2  Land cover  The  land  cover  classification  is  presented  in  Figure  55. 2011).

  Very high transmissivity that ranges from 1000 to 200. The salinity level ranges from 8 to 25 dS/m.00 2. The aquifer thickness ranges between 200 and  400 m. generally ranging from 60 to 70 m. Lower Umm Er Radhuma:   The aquifer thickness ranges from 100 to 200 m.00 7.00 5. Four main aquifer units are identified within the  Hadhramaut group:  1.  while  the  primary  aquifer  in  the  coastal  plain  occurs  in  the  Adwanib  Formation  of  the  Fars  Group  sediments. The aquifer thickness ranges between 100 to 150 m. Upper Umm Er Radhuma:   The aquifer thickness ranges from 100 to 200 m. The main  characteristics of this aquifer include:       Maximum saturated thickness of about 120 m.  Details  of  these  primary  aquifers  are  described  in  the  following sections:  A.00 3.  High permeability associated with karstic features. Upper Lower Umm Er Radhuma:   The aquifer yield is good. In these wadis. Dammam and Rus Formation:  Consist of marl and gypsum of Rus formation.000 m2/day.00 1. The salinity level  ranges from 5 to 20 dS/m.00 Arzat Darbat Lower Darbat Upper  (Taqah) (Falls) Hamran Sahalnawt Jarsis   3 Figure 56. Main wadis flow in Salalah (Mm ) (Source: ICBA.00 8. Surface water flow in  these wadis is infrequent and of short duration.00 0.  7.  B.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman in size. 2011). Plain area  The primary aquifer in the plain area is the Adawnib aquifer of the Fars Group (Figure 57). the flow occurs in response to high  rainfall during the khareef (autumn) season and remains dry through the year. (Figure 56 and Table A17 in the Appendix).00 6.4 Hydrogeology  The primary aquifer in the Jabal occurs in the karstic Umm Er Radhuma (UER) limestone formation of  the  Hadhramaut  Group.  63 58 .00 4.   10.00 9.  2.  3. Jabal area  The main characteristics of the UER aquifer are: large hydraulic gradients.  4. significant variation in  vertical gradients and good water quality.

 Declines  are small. This is to be expected.  Neither  groundwater  level  data  nor  salinity  data  for  Salalah  plain  were  accessible  for  the  ICBA  team  during  the  study.  A  decline  in  water  level  may  occur  instantaneously  at  a  time  that  most  likely  corresponds  to  the  commissioning  of  a  new  abstraction  well  nearby  to  the  monitoring  point.  the  analyses  are  limited  and  include only the compiled information from previous reports. 2011.  Groundwater level trends showed small declining and rising trends as shown in Figure 59.   Figure 57.     64 59 .  2004).  Flat hydraulic gradient. 2004). compiled from Oman  geological map).  7.5 Groundwater levels  Groundwater  levels  are  generally  very  flat  in  the  plain  area.  ranging  from  10  m  (above  mean  sea  level)  near  the  Jabal  front  to  about  sea  level  near  the  coast  (Figure  58)  (MRMWR.000’s m/day  (MRMWR.  because  unlimited  inflows  from  the  sea  rapidly  compensate  for  any  depletion  in  fresh  water  storage.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Hydraulic conductivity varies between three orders of magnitude from 10’s to 1.  inflows  from  adjacent  highly  permeable  brackish  zones  provide  rapid  replenishment. as high drawdown is unusual in a highly transmissive karstic aquifer  with  direct  hydraulic  connection  to  the  sea. Geology map for Salalah coastal plain (Source: ICBA.  In  addition.  Therefore.

5 0 Days   Figure 59. 2004). more 11‐year prediction case cycles were used to expand  the prediction up to the year 2030. This model was calibrated with acceptable accuracy and used for predicting the  effect of injection wells of treated wastewater on mitigating the salinity problem.  Predicted groundwater level was compiled from a previous modeling study of Salalah coastal plain  for MRMWR. For this study.6 Recharge  Rainfall  is  the  main  source  of  groundwater  recharge. and repeated the 11‐year run to devise a 22‐year prediction base  case up to the year 2013.  Three  types  of  natural  recharge  can  be  distinguished:     65 60 . 2004. The prediction was  based on 11‐year prediction run. 2005).BH10A S WI40 S FBH13A S FBH15A 18 8000 0 18 7500 0 18 7000 0 1570 00 16 200 0 167 000 0 1 720 00 17 700 0 10000 182 000 1 870 00 19 2000 20000 1970 00 30000 2 0200 0 207 000 2 120 00 21 700 0   40000 Figure 58. Water level model prediction 2003‐2030 (Source: Modified after MRMWR. The prediction results are shown in Figure 59.5 2 1.5 1 0.    7.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 19 0000 0 SAHALN AW T ARZAT1X ARZAT Naheez2X 18 9500 0 KHAYSH G arsis1XG ARSIS KHAYS KhH1X aysh2X E BZ BH5 Naheez 1X UH23 BH W SD-03 PW -01 T HIM RIN2 Asheesee UH9F EBZ BH7 E BZBH1 SF BH1A IWR 34 IWR43 G arsaisFa IW R-46 W BZBH2 Asaiqa1-X 18 8500 0 WBZBH12 WadiTheet P AWRUH3 TUBROK E BZBH6 M AFS AH 18 9000 0 HAMRAN S F-BH12A SF.  Water level (m ASL) WSD-03 (Central Freshwater Zone) 5 4. Salalah measured average water table levels (1984‐2003) (Source: MRMWR.5 3 2.5 4 3.

  Quantification  of  this  direct  recharge  is  not  available  from  the  literature.1  Salalah plain.  The  potential  recharge  volumes are assumed to range between 10‐20% of mean annual rainfall (MAR).1  7.2 Mm3/year (2% of MAR).6.    Zone  Saturated thickness  Hydraulic gradient *  (m)  width (m)  Salalah plain. The total estimated recharge  amount is equal to 4. West  Salalah plain. 2004). East  129  113  15  0. hydraulic gradient. Groundwater throughflow which is recharged from rainfall that falls over the Jabal and flows to  the plain aquifer as sub‐flow or throughflow. West  164  135  22  0.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 1.4  6. Groundwater inflow from Jabal (Source: MRMWR.  This  groundwater throughflow is estimated based on Darcy’s law.4  9.8  54. 2004). Table 12:    Table 12. and   3.1  0.1 Groundwater inflow  Jabal  groundwater  throughflow  is  the  main  source  of  recharge  to  the  Salalah  plain  aquifer. and saturated thickness as shown in Table 11. A detail of recharge quantities of each recharge type  is given below:  7.7  Darbat South  70  119  8  0.  artificial  recharge  is  used  through  building  recharge  dams  and  through well–injection using reclaimed water. below:    Table 11. Recharge from the wadi stream beds. East  Darbat South  Total  25  60  25  20    3  10  5  2    Groundwater  throughflow  (Mm3/year)  7. Central  163  124  20  0.3 Indirect recharge   Indirect recharge from the wadi beds occurs in the main stream wadis.2 Recharge over the plain  Direct recharge from rainfall over the plain is likely to occur during high rainfall and cyclonic events.    66 61 .  In  addition  to  natural  recharge.2  1.2  1.6. Central  Salalah plain.    Zone  Area  MAR  Rainfall Volume  Recharge Range (Mm3/year)  2 (km )  (mm/year)  (Mm3/year)    10%  20%  Salalah plain.1  0.0  Salalah plain. Mean direct recharge estimates in Salalah plain (Source: MRMWR. Direct recharge from rainfall over the plain.5  30. using constant hydraulic conductivity  of 100 m/day.6.   2.4  Total      65  1  3  7.

1  60  0.9 Volume  (Mm3)          296    192  149  233  4  874  Groundwater use  The total estimated current groundwater use is about 69 Mm3 (Table 14). About 80% of the city of  Salalah  was  connected  to  the  project.6  70  0. Groundwater reserve in the coastal plain (Source: MRMWR. 2004).001  Total    526.4  60  0. East  Brackish  129.03  Salalah plain.6.  7.  After  increased  agricultural  development.3 Mm3 (20 ML/day).4  Mm3.  Wastewater was treated to a tertiary  level and used to inject the plain aquifer through 40 injection wells distributed 300 m apart along the  coast with an average depth of 35 m.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 7.  the  dam  provides  flood  protection.5 Reclaimed water  The wastewater treatment and re‐injection project was established in 2003.   The total project capacity in 2004 was 7.  groundwater  flows  out  to  the  sea. 2004). and in some places saltwater  intrudes from the sea. The total estimated groundwater outflow is about 1‐2 Mm3/year.03  Salalah plain.  while  the  brackish groundwater estimate was 672 Mm3 (Table 13) (MWR.7 Groundwater outflow to sea  Under  natural  conditions.  the  Awqad  was  connected  to  the  project  in  the  year 2004. MRMWR. assuming that agricultural water demand    67 62 . This estimation was based  on the water use values of the year 2001 (MRMWR. West  Brackish  164.  7.  In  addition.4  60  0. Central          <1400 mg/l  Fresh  91.8 Groundwater reserve  The  fresh  groundwater  reserve  quantity  in  Salalah  plain  is  estimated  to  equal  363  Mm3. 2004)    Zone  Water Quality  Area  Saturated  Sy  (km2)  thickness (m)  Salalah West  Fresh        Salalah Central  Fresh        Rus/Damman  UeR  Salalah East  Fresh        Darbat North  Fresh        Rus/Damman  UeR  Salalah plain.  In  addition  to  recharging  the  aquifer.    Table 13. The dam’s  storage  capacity  is  about  6.4 Recharge dam  The Sahalnawt recharge dam is the only recharge dam that recharges the plain aquifer. 2000.6.03  Darbat South  Fresh/Brackish  70.  7.03  >1400 mg/l  Brackish  71  70  0.5      7. groundwater outflow is reduced because of abstraction.

8  95.0  60.  while  the  municipal  and  commercial quantities will increase annually by 13%.49  51. These estimates are presented in Table 15 below.   Groundwater inflow included groundwater recharge to the aquifer system: natural recharge – both  direct  and  indirect.64  43.  Zone  2001  2010    Municipal  Municipal  and  Agricultural  Total  and  Agricultural  Total  commercial  commercial  Salalah plain West  0.13 7.2  60.50  6. East  0.    Table 15.    Table 14.12  5.62  Darbat South  0.09  5.4  5.   (Source: Modified after MRMWR.7  69.9  Salalah plain.9  1. East  0.4  6.49  46.9  Darbat South  0.15  5.0  5.6  Salalah plain. Central  2.  (Source: ICBA.6  1.59  5.7  63.15  5.10   Water balance  The  current  water  balance  is  estimated  based  on  the  inflow  and  outflow  quantities  defined  in  the  previous sections and summarized in Table 16.68  Salalah plain. 2004).62  0.04  6.27  Total  2.50  6.5  8.5  134.5  70.2  6.59  5.9  7.    Area  2020  2030    Municipal  Municipal  and  Agricultural  Total  and  Agricultural  Total  commercial  commercial  Salalah plain.5  6.6  6.04  5.7  88.4  6.4  91. 2011.7  155.8  60.5  7.  groundwater  throughflow. 2004).03  5.19  0.        68 63 .54  0.4  5.3  60.12  6.  Groundwater  outflow  included:  groundwater  abstraction  and  groundwater  outflow  to  the  sea.93  43. based on MRMWR. The latter is assumed similar to the projections  of the Salalah water resources and management study (MRMWR.3  5. West  0.4  43.0    The  future  water  demand  projections  for  the  years  2020  and  2030  are  estimated  using  the  same  projection assumption of annual increase in municipal and commercial water demand and constant  agricultural water demand.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman will  continue  to  be  equivalent  to  the  2001  abstraction  quantities.9  43.9  1. Central  26.2  5.5  Total  28.  and  well  injection  using  reclaimed  water. Estimated future water demand for Salalah plain area (Mm3). 2004 municipal projections). Estimated current groundwater use in Salalah plain (Mm3).42  Salalah plain.6  5.  recharge  dams.

6  5.   (Source: ICBA.7  69  1‐2  70‐71  ‐2.3 to ‐1.8  67.7‐69. 2004 municipal projections).      Flow component  Estimation Assumption  Inflow  Jabal inflow   Darcy’s Law  Direct recharge  10‐20% of MAR  Indirect recharge  2 % of MAR  Recharge Dams  40 % of storage capacity  Reclaimed water‐Injection  80 % of total storage capacity  Sub‐total inflow    Outflow  Abstraction      Outflow to sea      Sub‐total outflow    Balance        69 Quantity (Mm3/Year)  54. 2011.2  2.3  64 .Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Table 16. Current groundwater balance for Salalah plain (Mm3).1  1‐3  4. based on MRMWR.

25 0.000 mg/l.        70 65 .2 34 32 30 28 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 1 0.  The  MRMWR  model  for  modeling  the  salinity  distribution  on  the  Salalah  plain  showed  that  the  injection of fresh wastewater (1500 mg/l) by the wastewater scheme helped to reduce the influence  of drawdown due to abstraction near the coast. freshwater lenses occur near the Jabal  front and in Wadi Darbat. Figures 60‐62 shows the effect of mitigating the salinity problem after 6 years of  using the treated wastewater injection wells.1   Figure 60.  ranging  from  7.000 to 10.500  mg/l) elongated northsouth in the flow direction.  The treated wastewater injection was effective in decreasing groundwater salinities by about 5000  mg/l  within  one  year  of  the  commissioning  of  the  injection  scheme.5 0.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 8. except where freshwater occurs in the central plain (< 1. 2004). Measured groundwater salinity for the year 1997 (Source: MRMWR.  Other  factors  that  helped  in  mitigating  the  salinity  problem  was  due  to  the  major  freshening  effect  of  the  cyclone  in  1996  (MRMWR.  TDS (kg/m3 or thousands of mg/L) 1900000 NORTHING (m) 1895000 1890000 1885000 1880000 Measured September 1997 1875000 180000 185000 190000 195000 200000 205000 210000 215000 EASTING (m) 35.1 Water salinity  The plain aquifer is generally brackish. WATER QUALITY IN SALALAH  8. and the influence of saline inflows from the coast. In addition.  The  underlying  Mughsayl  Formation  contains  groundwater  of  higher  salinity  levels. 2004).

69  dS/m)  is  not  fit  for  pregnant  and  lactating  animals.2 34 32 30 28 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 1 0.  Ground  water  analyses  made  in  2011  from  30  sites  revealed  86%  samples  under  safe  salinity  category  (EC  <8  dS/m)  for    71 66 .0.   Recent analyses of groundwater datasets from Salalah in 2011 revealed water pH to be between 7. 2004). The water analyses lack information for alkalinity (CO3 + HCO3).5  and 8.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman TDS (kg/m3 or thousands of mg/L) 1890000 NORTHING (m) Location of injection wells 1885000 Prediction after 6 years simulation with wastewater injection 1880000 180000 185000 190000 195000 200000 205000 EASTING (m) 35.  2004). Table A28). This water is thus considered safe from a pH point of view (Figure 63).   Salinity  In Salalah. Si.  Their  use  was  always  restricted  by  the  existence  of  one  or  more  constituents  in  undesirable quantities. Modeled salinity cross sections: (a) Initial conditions. F. (b) after 6 years (Source: MRMWR. as all water  pH is under desirable range (<8. which are normally not required for water quality  assessment. except in a few areas (Figure  63b) where reasonable safety for dairy. Ni. Mo. Se.    8. Fe. beef cattle and sheep is required (see Appendix.1   Figure 61.5 0.  This  water  (EC  10.5). Simulated groundwater salinity contours after 6 years of commissioning treated  wastewater injection wells (Source: MRMWR. most of the waters are safe for livestock use (EC <8 dS/m).2 Other water quality constituents  Livestock and poultry   None of the water samples from Salalah met the desired levels of all constituents for livestock and  poultry  use.    pH  Water quality from Salalah does not present any problem from a water pH point of view.      Figure 62.25 0. Hg. Be.  but provide information about Ba.

05 mg/L) in 20% samples.  The  SO4  levels  are  generally  higher  (>250  mg/L)  in  almost  all  samples.      72 67 . the addition of gypsum as a soil  surface amendment is recommended to offset water sodicity problem (Figure 64). 2011).  Water  salinity  of  most  of  the  waters  is  less  than  EC  5  dS/m.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman livestock  use. NO2 and Ecoli.  and  64%  samples  safe  for  poultry  use  (EC  <5  dS/m). Where SAR is more than 10. Mn. B.        (a) Distribution of water pH  (b) Distribution of water EC  Figure 63.  except  in  20%  samples. V.              a) Water salinity classes  b) Water sodicity classes  Figure 64. 2011). In Salalah water poses a problem of  cadmium (>0.    All water samples in Salalah are safe for livestock use due to desired levels of Zn.   Water quality for agriculture   An overall water salinity from Salalah (Figure 64a) shows relatively less saline water than Al Batinah. Water pH (a) and salinity (b) for livestock and poultry (Salalah) (Source: ICBA.1 mg/L). Al (>5 mg/L) and Pb (>0.  27%  waters  show  sodicity  problem that is SAR >10 (mmoles/L)0. all water samples in Salalah are unsafe for livestock use due to  higher levels of Na (>50 mg/L). NO3.  Co.   The total Escherichia coli in all water samples are in safe limit.5.    About  40%  water  samples  are  unfit for poultry use (EC >5 dS/m).  however. Cr. There is generally high levels of phosphates (>1 mg/L) in all  samples. However.   Overall  assessment  of  water  samples  against  the  desired  standards  given  in  Tables  A21‐A28  of  Appendix confirmed all water samples are unfit for drinking purposes both for livestock and poultry. Ni. however. Cu. Water Salinity (a) and Sodicity (b) in Salalah waters (Source: ICBA. contrary to Batinah coliform  levels are higher than desirable level (<1) in 63% water samples.

  Water  sodicity  can  also  be  reduced  through  blending  with  good quality water.     73 68 .  were  plotted  onto  the  diagram  (Figure  65)  showing  the  distribution of water quality classes.5 to 5 dS/m). 35% (1992). Ground water quality for Salalah.    1995  and  2011.   The  water  analyses  provided  by  MRMWR  are  shown  in  Figure  66  (red  dots). They are all fit as drinking water for both livestock and poultry.  the  water  salinity  is  at  the  lower  end  compared  with  groundwaters  form Al Batinah (SQU analyses.5‐5 and 5‐8 dS/m).  The  water  pH  for  all  samples is within acceptable range (<8.  data  about  other  parameters  is  not  available.5 dS/m) to upper levels (1. 86% (1995) and 83% (2011). 25% (1995) and 38% (2011) were found unfit for poultry use from  water salinity perspective.e.   The  trend  of  water  quality  for  livestock and poultry was evaluated  from  three  data  sets  from  1992.  represents data from Sultan Qaboos University  and  subsequent  increase  was  observed in the next water salinity level (1. Red represents data from MRMWR and blue  (1992).     Trends of water salinity in Salalah over the period of 1992 to 2011  Three water salinity datasets from 1992.5  dS/m)  decreased  from  43%  (Source: ICBA. blue  dots).  EC  and  SAR  from  Salalah  (see  Appendix.  revealing  large  number  of samples in very high salinity class. A small number of  water samples i.  Eighty  three  percent  of  water  samples show very high salinity with  variable  sodicity  levels.  Table  A28).. 83% (1992).  The  data  indicate  that  the  percent  number  of  water  Figure 65.  however. The fitness is based on water salinity basis (see  Appendix. 2011).  27%  (1995)  to  1%  (2011).5) for both poultry and livestock purposes (Figure 65). The data indicate that there is increasing water salinity trend from lower  level (<1. to 47% (1995) and to 61%  (2011) (Figure 65). 1995 and 2011 were evaluated to see the trend of water  salinity over period of time.  Regarding  the  livestock  use  the  percentage  of  water  samples  fit  for  drinking  remain  relatively  unchanged. from 1992 to 2011 (Figure 66).   It is likely that SAR of more than 10  may  affect  soil  physical  and  chemical  properties  that  have  implications  to  agricultural  crops.   samples  in  the  lower  salinity  level  (<1.  Table  A22‐A24). from 22% (1992).Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Distribution of groundwater quality classes   The  Groundwaters.  It  is  recommended  to  amend  water  sodicity  through  using  gypsum  in  soil.

 1995 and 2011 Surveys)  The trend of water quality (EC) from Salalah in the years 1992. 2011).  It clearly shows an increasing water salinity from lower to higher levels especially in the range C2 to  C3 to C4.      74 69 . 1995 and 2011 is shown in Figure 68. Drinking water salinity classes  for  livestock and poultry (1992. classes in Salalah for agricultural use.    Figure  68.  Figure 67.  6. 2011). Water Land  salinity suitability  classes  for  irrigated  agriculture  Figure 68. 1995 and 2011)  (Source: ICBA.  present  various  options  for  crop  selection  and  salinity  management  to  optimize crop production. 2011).  therefore.   The water samples are distributed in various water salinity classes mainly in the high to very strongly  saline  ranges.2.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman    Figure 66. in  the  Sultanate  of  Oman  (MAF. Current Water pH classes   (Source: ICBA.7 Assessment of Water Quality for Agriculture (1992.  1990) (Source: ICBA.

7 to 13.  Ahmad  et  al. Soil suitability map for agricultural use in Oman  Map unit 56 ‐ coastal dune‐  (Source: MRMWR.  then  the  losses  range  between  7.  The  soils  of  South  Batinah  are  mostly  moderately  alkaline  (pH  7.  in  many  farms.  Most  agricultural  activities  occur  in  these  two  regions.3 million OMR.3 Soils and their  potential uses   A  review  of  the  physiographic  regions  of  the  Sultanate  of  Oman  (MAF.   75 70 . 1995)..0  million  OMR  per  annum (Ahmed et al. If the losses from abandoned  date  palm  farms  are  also  included. which has to be  correlated with that of MAF (1990).  Northern  (bordering sea)  coastal  plain  Coastal  plain  consists  of  three  soil  map  units  (56.4).  A  generalized soil map of Al Batinah is  shown in Figure 69.  (2010)  estimated  that  annual  losses in Oman due to soil salinity were from 6.   Map unit 57 ‐ playas‐salorthids. 9.3  and  14.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 9. SOIL RESOURCES IN AL BATINAH  9.  from where the following map units  are derived. 2011).   Map unit 58 ‐ tidal‐flats and dunes.  marine flats.  1990)  identified  two  regions  in  Al  Batinah  (coastal  and  northern  plains).  date  palm  yields  are  declining  or  in  extreme  cases  farms  have  been  abandoned  leading  to  reduced  or  negligible  income. In northern Batinah about 50% of the total cultivated  land is irrigated with water of EC more than 3 dS/m.  b  and  c).  A.  The  average  topsoil  calcium  carbonate  equivalents  are  about  37  percent  in  Barka.  and  26  percent  in  Masanaah and Suwayq areas (Qureshi.  58)  presenting  different  landscape  features  (MAF.  50%  of  the  agricultural  area  in  South  Batinah  is  reported  to  be  affected  from  salinity  (ECe  >4  dS/m)  levels.9‐8.  Organic  carbon  and  nitrogen  contents  are  usually  low  (less  than  1%).  57.   Consequently.1 Level of salinization   According  to  a  study  conducted  by  MAF  (1993a. 2005). and approximately 38% is irrigated with water  of EC >5 dS/m.   9.  The  major  part  of  the  salt‐ affected  soils  are  Gypsiorthids  (gypsiferous).2 Salinity monitoring  The  findings  of  Al‐Mulla  and  Al‐Adawi  (2009)  and  Al‐Mulla  (2010)  from  mapping  changes  in  soil  salinity  in  Al‐Rumais  (near  Barka)  using  remote  sensing  analysis  identified  increased  scope  of  soil  salinity in the area.  1990):       Figure 69.

 The map unit occurs mainly in coastal areas and   is unsuitable for irrigated farming.Sandy.0-5% slope Calciorthids-Torrifluvents-Torriorthents:Loamy Sand & Sandy Skeletal. 0 to 1% slope. strongly saline.  Map Unit 42‐Torriorthents. deep soils.0-30% slope  Figure 70.      Map Unit 41‐Torrifluvents‐salorthids. Al Batinah soil classification map (Source: Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. shallow soils. Loamy-Skeletal to Sandy-Skeletal. drought trends and sand dispersal.shallow & moderately deep soils & rock outcrop.  deep.deep to moderately deep saline soils with gypsum pan on slightly to strongly dissected alluvial terraces & pan.deep to moderately deep soil.deep soils.  ponding  and  poor  drainage  (that  is.  0  to  2  percent slopes.  calcareous  and  slightly  to  moderately saline and deep) and 25% other soils.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman The soils in these units are not suitable for agriculture.   Map Unit 57: Playas‐Salorthids: Playas and clayey to sandy.  The soils in these units are marginally suitable for agriculture.moderately flooded.     76 71 .strongly saline.0-3% slope Torrifluvents-Torriorthents:Sandy & Loamy deep soils.deep soils on young flooded alluvial terraces & fans. The map unit is  unsuitable  for  irrigated  farming  due  to  excess  salts.  Map unit includes 70% sandy soil on dunes.  deep  soils.  0‐10  percent  slope.0-5% slope Torriorthents:extremely gravelly.  The map unit includes 50 percent playas.on plains. Sixty % unit is marginally suitable for large‐scale  and 80% for small‐scale irrigated farming.  0  to  10  percent  slope.deep soils.0-5% slope Coastal dunes & marine flats:deep Sandy soils & tidal flats. Seventy % for large‐scale (marginally suitable) and 80% of the unit is suitable for  small scale irrigation farming.  aspects  which cannot be remediated). The torrifluvents should be used for agriculture and salorthids are to  be avoided.deep & moderately deep soils on young alluvial fans & terraces.  0  to  3  percent  slope.Loamy-Skeletal & Sandy-Skeletal.Sandy & Loamy.       Legend SoilSalClass_Clip Soil_Class Calciorthids-Gypsiorthids:Loamy to Loamy Skeletal.deep to shallow soils & rock outcrop.0-15% slope Torriorthents-Gysiorthids:Sandy to Sandy-Skeletal.0-3% slope Torriorthents & Calciorthids-Rock outcrop:Loamy & Loamy-Skeletal.   Map  Unit  56:  Coastal  dunes  and  marine  flats:  deep  sandy  soils  and  tidal  flats.0-3% slope Torripsamments:Sandy.deep soils.0-100% slope Torrifluvents-Torriorthents-Torripsamments:Sandy.  moderately  flooded.  strongly  saline  soils.0-10% slope Gypsiorthids-Rock outcrop:Loamy to Loamy-Skeletal.0-5% slope Torriorthents:very gravelly.0-35% slope Gypsiorthids:Loamy.  Map  Unit  42  –  Torriorthents:  very  gravelly  sandy.deep soils on sand sheet & dunes fields.  in  coastal  plains.   Map  Unit  41  –  Torrifluvents‐Salorthids:  loamy.slightly to moderately flooded. 20 % Salorthids (strongly saline soils) and  10 % minor soils. The unit is unsuitable  for irrigated agriculture due to high salinity.  Map  Unit  58:  Tidal  flats  and  dunes:  tidal  flats  and  sandy  soils.  The  unit  is  mostly a level area invaded by the sea at high tide. The map unit included 70% Torrifluvents.  The  map  unit  contains  75%  skeletal  Torriorthents  (very  gravelly.0-3% slope Calciorthids:Loamy to Loamy-skeletal. 20% tidal flat and 10% minor soils.deep & moderately deep soils.   B.moderately flooded.0-15% slope Plays-Salorthids: plays & Clayey to Sandy.deep soils. 40 percent salorthids and 10% minor soils.  Oman). Northern coastal plain bordering "A"  The coastal plain consists of two soil map units (41 and 42) presenting different soil types. although it  may have potential for fish farming. 0-1% slope Rock outcrop-Torriorthents:mountains & strongly dissected rocky plateaus.

  Most  of  the  unit  as  in  1990  was  in  irrigated  farming.  0  to  3  percent  slopes  on  plains  (Highly  suitable).Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman C.  38‐mixture  of  Torrifluvents. 1990) for further description  and to find soils having potential for irrigated agriculture for future expansion (Figure 71).  and  85%  is  suitable  for  small‐scale  irrigated  farming.   The  generalized  soil  Figure  71. and advised to use original map (MAF.    Eighty  percent  of  the  unit  is  suitable  for  large‐scale  and  90%  for small‐scale  irrigated farming.  The  map  unit  consists  of  30%  (Torrifluvents).   The soils in this map units are highly to moderately suitable for agriculture.  Figure  70  followed  by    the legend for description. 2011).   Map  Unit  38  –  Torrifluvents‐ Torriorthents‐ Torripsamments:  sandy.  moderately  flooded.  30% (Torriorthents) and  25%  (Torripsamments)  and  15%  other  soils.   Map  Unit  36  –  Torrifluvents:  plains  of  loamy.  1990)  shows  some  discrepancy.  The  unit  consists  of  80%  Torrifluvents  and  20%  other  soils.  the use of this map is cautioned.  therefore.  Comparison  of  soil  suitability  map  with  groundwater  salinity  map  of  Al  Batinah  map overlayed by agricultural areas.  deep  soils.  Torriorthents  and Toripsamments.    region  is  shown  in  (Source: ICBA.  0  to  2  %  slope  (Highly  suitable).  The  map  unit  36‐Torifluvents.   The  northern  plain  consists  mainly  of  soil  map  units  36  and  38  presenting  different  soil  types  and  suitability  for  agriculture.  deep  soils  on  plains.   Comparison  of  this  map  with  the  original  source  (MAF.      77 72 .  About  80%  soils  are  suitable  for  large‐scale  irrigated  farming. Northern plain bordering "B".

 Overall salinity classes distribution in Al Batinah governorates  (Source: ICBA. or leaching fraction was not used properly. The  results of three scenarios are shown in Figure 73. three  scenarios were modeled (Figure 73):   Scenario I  To check the salinity development in the upper 30 cm or 30‐60 cm depth.   Scenario II  To check salinity development in the upper 30 cm (A) in relation to groundwater salinity (C) used for  irrigation. The B/C ratio >1.1 indicates poor salinity management. indicating the occurrence of dense  layer below 60 cm restricting water movement.  2011 survey  The  recent  survey  (year  2011)  provided  large  dataset  from  eight  wilayat  (Al  Batinah  area)  for  soil  salinity  (ECe).4 Soil quality of Al Batinah agriculture region and management issues. texture) of all wilayats collectively and individually for each wilayat.   The  overall  examination  (Figure  72)  of  Al  Batinah  soils  (all  wilayats)  indicated  over  62%  soils  distributed into different salinity classes (> 2 dS m‐1).e. The A/C ratio >1.  textural  classes  and  groundwater  quality  (EC.   Scenario III  To check salinity development in the 30‐60 cm (B) in relation to groundwater salinity (C) used for  irrigation.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 9. leaching fraction was not used  properly.1 indicates poor salinity management.  pH).  pH. pH. i.     78 73 . A/B. indicating proper leaching fraction was not used to reduce root zone  salinity.  The  data  were  examined  for  overall assessment (ECe.. the soil salinity at 0‐30 cm  (A) was divided by soil salinity at 30‐60 cm (B).5 Assessment of root zone salinity management efforts  To check the impact of root‐zone salinity management efforts in each wilayat from Al Batinah. 2011).  9.     Figure 72.1 indicates poor salinity  management at upper 30 cm. The A/B ratio >1. Individually saline soils range from 50% (Sohar)  to maximum 74% in Barka.

  The dataset was available for entire profile regardless of root zone.1  require  particular  attention  to  use  leaching  requirement/leaching  fraction  to  leach  salts  below  actual  root‐zone  of  crop  in  the  field.  9. i. Such a prediction is common from  coarse textured soils (sandy and loamy sand soils).6 Assessment of soil salinity trend in Al Batinah from 1993‐97 to 2011   Two  datasets  were  analyzed  to  assess  the  trend  of  soil  salinity  from  1993‐1997  to  2011.  Achieving  this  is  not  enough.  The  dataset  was  not  representative  of  agricultural  farms.  The results of third scenario are very similar to that of second scenario.      Figure  73. additional efforts are required to maintain root‐zone salinity below the salinity threshold  level of the crop in question.1 Limitations of 1993‐97 datasets       The ECe data was not available from all sites. The second dataset was obtained from the 2011 survey.  as  this  salinity  level  may  be  above  that  of  threshold  salinity  level  of  the  crop.6.  The  first  dataset (1993‐97) was obtained from an Integrated Study of South Batinah (1993) and North Batinah  (1997).  In  other  wilayats.  Therefore.  Assessment  of  root  zone  salinity  management  efforts  in  Al  Batinah  (Source: ICBA.  79 74 .  The  soils  which  show  A/B. 2011).e. subsurface salinity (30‐ 60 cm) is better managed in regard to groundwater salinity.   The  outcome  of  the  second  scenario  shows  the  salinity  in  the  upper  30  cm  in  relation  to  groundwater salinity is better managed (A/C >1.  but  a  general  survey  of  the  Al  Batinah area..1 in <50% soils).  A/C.1 in <50% soils).  presenting  more  than  50%  soils  giving  A/B  >1.  9.  B/C  >1.  followed  by  Aswaq  and  Barka.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Scenario  1  clearly  indicates  poor  management  of  root  zone  (0‐30  cm)  salinity  in  Sohar  and  Liwa  wilayats. salinity was relatively better managed (A/B >1.1.

  Such  soils  in  individual  wilayat  range from 94.   Figure  75.2 Data handling and unification of EC1:5 to ECe     The soil depth of 0‐30 cm or nearest one was selected to get ECe or EC1:5.   Figure  74  presents  comparison  Figure  74. Mn.0.3. Fe.  Saham.  The  optimum  pH  range  where  most  of  the  nutrients  are  available  to  plants  is  between 6.  and  Sohar).  The  calcareous  agricultural  soils  coupled  with  high  pH.  it  was  converted  to  ECe  by  multiplying with a factor  of  7.  Comparative  trend  of  soil  salinity  in  Al  Batinah  of  overall  soil  salinity  governorates (1993‐97 to 2911) (Source: ICBA.7‐7. The exceptions are for molybdenum (Mo) and calcium (Ca).  Overall  pH  classes  distribution  in  Al  Batinah   governorates (Source: ICBA.7 Assessment of soil  pH in Al Batinah   The  analyses  of  soil  pH  from  the  Al  Al  Batinah  region  indicated  over  98%  (Figure  75)  soils  in  the  range  where  most  of  the  plant  nutrients  are  unavailable  plants  (pH  >7.  Cu.  the  total  soil  phosphorous  (P  initially    80 75 .3).  9.  Where  only  EC1:5  was  available. phosphorus (P) is less mobile in soil (about 1 cm from applied granule).  with  a  subsequent  increase  in  4‐16  dS/m  salinity  classes.  9.   The dataset from sabkha  was  eliminated. Unlike nitrogen.  thus  showing  the  trend  of  an increase in soil salinization.    Figure  74  illustrates  clearly  the  decrease  in  soil  salinization  in  <  4  dS/m  range.  distribution  between  two    datasets  (1993‐97  and  2011). 2011).6.4‐9. 2011). which are available at  moderately alkaline range.7. Zn).  Khaburah.3  (developed  by  ICBA)  for  sand  and  loamy sand texture.     9.6% (Aswaq) to 100%  (Barka.  Where ECe was available.  as  the  sites  are  not  currently  and cannot in the future  be used for agriculture.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   The EC 1:5 was available for most sites.1 Consequences of high soil pH   It is clear that high CaCO3 (ubiquitous in Omani soils) is the main reason for buffering pH in the range  between  7. Other nutrients are fixed in soil due to high levels of CaCO3 and pH (P. it was included.   The dataset includes ECe/EC 1:5 from coastal sabkha sites.

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman

precipitated as dicalcium phosphate which is then converted to less soluble octacalcium phosphate) 
and  precipitated  on  the  surface  of  CaCO3  crystals  will  be  abundant  but  only  a  small  fraction  is 
available to plants. It is essential to consider the solubility and mobility of P in soil while scheduling P 
application in soil.   

9.7.2 Assessment of soil texture in Al Batinah 
Soil texture is an important soil characteristic which does not change over the long‐term, unless soil 
of  a  different  texture  is  imported  to  improve  farm  resource  capacity.  Texture  controls  water  and 
nutrient holding capacity and drainage characteristics. Sandy soils have high drainage capacity and 
very  low  nutrient  and  water  holding  capacities,  while  clayey  soils  have  high  nutrient  and  water‐
holding  capacities  with  low  drainage.  The  overall  soil  texture  analyses  in  the  Al  Batinah  region 
(Figure  76)  indicated  25%  soils  are  coarse  textured  (sand  and  loamy  sand)  and  rest  75%  are  in 
medium texture group. The coarse texture soils are distributed from 10% (Shinas) to 38% (Liwa).  
The  saturated  conductivity  of  the 
medium‐textured  soils  is  projected 
to  range  between  3.6  to  36  mm/hr 
(moderately  high‐medium  texture), 
and  for  coarse‐textured  soils  to 
range  between  high  (>36  mm/hr) 
and very high (>360 mm/hr). Under 
coarse‐textured soils, the root zone 
salinity  is  controlled  by  irrigation 
water salinity (1 ECw), and 1.5 ECw 
in medium‐textured soils.  

 

It  is  likely  that  if  soil  salinity  is  not 
properly  managed  in  medium 
textured  soils,  root‐zone  salinity  is 
likely to develop. 
Figure 76. Overall texture classes distribution in Al Batinah  
governorates (Source: ICBA, 2011). 

 

81

76

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman

10. SOIL RESOURCES IN SALALAH  
The  recent  survey  provided  three  sets  of  data:  root  zone  soil  salinity,  pH  and  soil  texture.  The 
evaluation of the datasets and interpretation is given below.   

10.1 Root‐zone soil salinity  
The  survey  findings  in  Salalah  identified  the  root  zone  salinity  (0‐30  and  30‐60  cm)  development 
(Figure  77).  Most  soils 
are  categorized  in  the   
very  slight  salinity  class 
(~46%),  and  34%  in 
slight‐moderate‐strong 
salinity classes. 
One  scenario  (A/B)  was 
run  to  assess  root  zone 
salinity 
management 
efforts  in  Salalah  (Table 
A29  of  Appendix).  The 
results  indicated  only 
22%  soils  have  shown 
(A/B 
>1.1) 
poor 
management  of  root 
zone (0‐30 cm) salinity.  

Figure 77. Root zone salinity classes in Salalah soils  (Source: ICBA, 2011). 

10.2 Soil texture  
Recent  data  from  Salalah  agricultural  zone  was  examined  to  establish  soil  textural  classesto 
understand  soil  behavior  and  predict  soil  management  issues  (Figure  78).  The  figure  reveals  that 
soils  of  Salalah  dominantly  fall 
under  medium  texture  (sandy 
loam  to  sandy  clay  loam  ~  89% 
soils)  and  not  sandy  soils  as 
perceived  under  normal  desert 
conditions.  Such  soils  have 
saturated hydraulic conductivity 
ranging  from  moderately  low 
(0.36  to  <3.6  mm/hr)  to 
moderately  high  (3.6  to  36 
mm/hr),  in  contrast  to  sandy 
soils  (>36  mm/hr).  The  low 
saturated hydraulic conductivity 
suggests there are high chances 
of  root‐zone  salinity  develop‐
ment  if  suitable  measures  are 
 
not  taken;  however,  inorganic 
nutrients  (e.g.,  NO3)  are  less  Figure  78.  Soil  suitability  for  agriculture  (Source:  ICBA,  2011 
likely  to  leach  from  root‐zone  adapted from Soil Atlas 1993). 
and present low risk of offsite pollution. 

 

82

77

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman

These findings make it clear that the soils in Salalah require careful management to ensure that root‐
zone  salinity  does  not  develop  above  the  crop  threshold.  The  concept  of  Leaching  Fraction  (LF) 
keeping in mind water uptake capacity in saline conditions is to be used for root zone salinity  
management. 

 

Figure 79. Soil texture classes from Salalah  (Source: ICBA, 2011). 

 

10.3 Soil pH and nutrient availability 
The  most  soils  (86%)  from  Salalah  are  buffered  at  moderately  alkaline  range  (pH  7.9‐8.4).  It  is 
obvious  that  high  CaCO3  is  the  main  reason  for  buffering  pH  in  this  range  (Figure  80).  Similar 
management options are recommended as those of Al Batinah soils.  
 
 

 

Figure 80. Soil pH classes of Salalah soils  (Source: ICBA, 2011). 
 

 

83

78

  This  assessment  will  be  done  through  defining  a  conceptual  model  and  a  numerical  model  for  the  study  area. and to use the model as a predictive tool to assess the  proposed management options. current.  The  modeling  study  area  covers  Al  Batinah  coastal  plain  area.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 11.  Northern    Batinah  Model  Domain  and  Grid  System (Source: ICBA. The size of the grid cell is 600 m by 600 m. and water quality data obtained from several ministries. and also to the model capabilities that has a limited number  of rows and columns that could be used.  and  the  focus  of  the  study  is  on the most salt‐affected areas due to  irrigation  activities.  This  is  due  to  the  study  area  which extends 200 km along the coast.  Figure  81. particularly salinity intrusion from the sea. 2011). which represents the maximum  number  of  rows  and  columns  that  could  be  used  in  this  case  study.  11.  11.  and  from  the  Alluvium  boundary  at  the  contact  of  Alluvium  and  Ophiolite  formation  in  the  southwest to the Arabian Sea coastline  in the northeast (452683 m to 569499  m  easting).    well  abstraction  and possible seawater intrusion. and groundwater availability in Al Batinah coastal plain. GROUNDWATER NUMERICAL MODEL FOR NORTHERN  BATINAH  The purpose of developing a groundwater model is to evaluate the historical.  The  conceptual  model  for  Al  Batinah  region  is  based  on  the  available  hydrogeological  data. and accordingly limits the minimum cell size to be 600 m. and future  groundwater flow and salinity scenarios.  This  area  is  the  most  affected  by  salinity. which comprises the northern Batinah and southern Batinah. Two models were developed to cover  Al Batinah coastal plain.2 Model grid  The model domain was divided into square grid cells.    84 79 .1 Model domain   The  northern  Batinah  coastal  plain  groundwater  model  covers  the  extent  of  the  Alluvium  formation  and  the  underlain  Upper  Fars  formation.  The  model  area  extends  from  Wadi  Malahah  catchment  in  the  northwest  to  Wadi  Al  Farra  catchment  in  the  southeast  (2629573  m  to  2762978  m  northing). The model will provide quantitative assessment of the causes and  extent of the groundwater salinity problem.  The  upper  catchments  beyond  the  Alluvium  boundary  were  not  included  in  this  study  for  the  following  reasons:  the  bedrock  formation  are  impermeable  and  acts  as a no‐flow boundary to the Alluvium  aquifer. The  grid comprises 278 rows (x‐direction) by 236 columns (y‐direction).

 fixed o or constant  head.  Thosee  cells  are  mostly  the  cells  around  the  mounttainous  areas an nd at wadi beeds.  Head de ependent flu ux boundary (General He ead Boundarry Condition)  The heaad dependen nt flux bound dary conditio on or General Head Bou undary Condition.  The  exttraction  rates  weere  applied  as  time  dep pendent  compon nents.  The  general  head  boundarry  is  used  to o  calibrate  the  t calculateed  hydraulicc  head  with  the  observeed  head  to  augment  rechargee.  and is applie ed to the  boundarry  of  the  aquifer  at  the  Alluvium  bo oundary  at  the  t foothills. repressents the  groundw water througghflow (groundwater basse flow) thatt crosses thee boundary.  2011.  Two  T no  flow  bo oundaries  exxist  in  this  study.  baased on dataa obtained frrom MRMWR).  Boundary  B co ondition  for  northern  Batinah  Alluvium  and d  Upper  Farrs  aquifer  (SSource:  ICBA A. A constant hydraulic heead value of  zero head is given to  all cells ffor both layeers.  This  bound dary  depend ds  on  the  difference in head aacross the bo oundary.  to the ceells outside tthe Alluvium 11.   No fflow Boundaary   No  flow w  boundary  is  a  specifieed  flow  boundarry  of  zero  flow  value.  physical and hydrolo ogical.3 Boundary c B conditions  The bou undary conditions represent the physsical and hyd draulic conditions on thee external bo oundaries  of the aq quifer.  Specified flux bound dary   Source/sink bou undaries  The pum mping wells w were applied d to the  model  according  a to o  their  spatial  and  vertical  distribution n.   Rech harge (Areall recharge)   The rech harge from rrainfall was  applied  to the m model cells that are adjusted to  rainfall  and  a releasin ng  some  amo ount  of  the  raiinfall  as  in nfiltration  to  t the  groundw water.  The  ph hysical  no  flow  bound dary  is  applied  to  the  low  impermeable  geologiccal  units  off  Ophiolitic  Samail    Fiigure  82. whiile inactive ccells were de esignated  Active grid cells werre designated m and Upper Fars boundaries (Figure 8 81).Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman d within the  Alluvium bo oundary. and alllows an infinite flow  to and from the cell depending o on the cell’s hydraulic co onductivity aand head graadient. This b boundary  is applieed to the Araabian Sea coaastline cells. nameely:  Specified head boun ndary (Consttant Head Bo oundary Con ndition)  The constant head b boundary assumes a uniform.  85 80 . witth the head  on one sidee of the boundary being  input to  the  mod del  and  thee  head  on  the  t other  siide  being  caalculated  byy  the  model.

   Initial h head   The  inittial  head  is  the  head  distribution  in n  the  mo odel  domain n  that  represents  thee  beginnin ng  of  the  simulation  s period.  11.4  Flow mod F el calibrattion   11.  86 81 .  8 Initial  heead  conditio ons  in  Alluvvium  and  Upper  Fars  F aquifer (Source:  ICBA.   Stress  period  p is  deefined  as  a  time  period d  during  which  w all  tim me  dependen nt  processess  such as  pumping and recharge aare constant.  In  this  model.4.  A  stresss  period  of  1  year  was  used  in  thee  model.  where  w the  cells  along  the e  contact  Nappes  in  the  uppeer  parts  of  th n  these  low  permeable  rock  and  Alluvium  boun ndary  is  giveen  zero  flow w.  A  physical  no  flow  between boundarry is applied to the low p permeable M Middle Fars fo ormation at tthe bottom o of layer 2.  Simulattion period and stress period  Based  on  the  data  availability.  2011.   In  this  study.  The hyd drological no o flow bound dary is applieed to the flo ow lines and d groundwater divides lo ocated at  the  easttern‐western n  catchmentt  boundariess  where  the  flow  lines  are  parallel  to  the  grou undwater  flow from south (thee mountain) towards north (the coasst).  based  b on  water level data obtaained from M MRMWR).  This  simulation  period  tookk  into  acccount  the  hyydrological  wet  w and  dryy  years  which  hellps  stabilizze  possiblee  hydrologgical fluctuattions. Also a no o flow bound dary is applie ed to the  bottom of the aquifeer (bottom o of layer 2). w where ground dwater flowss is parallel to o the aquiferr base.  thiss  nted the long term averaage of waterr  represen levels  fo or  the  stead dy  state  cond dition.  whilee      Figure  83.  m thee  groundw water head d distribution o of year 1982 2  was  taken  as  thee  start  tim me  for  thee  simulation  purposess.  The  head  distribution n  was  generated  from  thee  availablee  g observation  wells   and  geostatisticallyy  regionallized  to  produce  a  reliablee  distributtion  of  the  hydraulic  h heead  over  thee  model d domain.  Thiss  hydrauliic head is thee starting head and mustt  be  enteered  into  thee  model  beffore  runningg  the  sim mulation.Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman he  northern  Batinah  cattchments.1 Steady statte calibratio on   Initial cconditions   The  initial  con nditions  reeflect  thee  undeveloped  aquifeer  condition  (equilibrium m  conditio ons)  at  th he  beginnin ng  of  thee  simulation  period.  a  longg  simulation  period  was  w defined  to  be  from m  1982  to o  2010. TThis added u up the stress periods to aa  total of 29.

 Main reecharge zonees in model d domain (Sou urce: ICBA.  The  run n  results  represented  tthe  steady  state  condiitions  for  the  t aquifer ((Figure 84). The rem maining 3% aare  supply  wells  for  domestic  and  municipal uses.  f The  areeal  rechargee was assigned to all actiive  cells in tthe model arrea (Figure 85).  Locatio on  of  wells  in  aquifer  do omain  (Sourcce:  ICBA.  About  97%  9 of  the  abstraction  is  agricultu ural.   Wells aabstraction   Wells  abstraction  a c comprised  reecorded  lon ng  term  average  abstracction  from  tthe  Alluvium m  aquifer  (layer 1)). 20 011)    87 82 .  Two  zo ones  of  reecharge  weere  designatted in the mo odel area:      Figure e  84.Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman ntours of  for transsient calibration reflecteed the waterr level condittions of the yyear 1982. No recordeed abstractio on data weree available frrom the Upp per Fars Aquifer (layer 2)) as most  of  the  abstractio on  wells  are  a tapping  the  Aalluviall  aquifer  on nly. TThe head con the yearr 1982 were  generated ((using a GIS  geostatisticaal tool) and u used to deveelop the initial water  table wh hich was useed later in thee transient calibration (Figure 83).  2011) a reecharge rate  of 36 mm p per  untain foothiills  yearr that comprrise 18% of annual rainfall at the mou a recharge rate o of 22 mm peer year that ccomprise 18% % of annual rainfall at the coastal plaain.   Recharrge  Areal  groundwater g r  recharge  is  applied  to  the  model  area  ass  a  constantt  specified  flux. Wellls abstractio ons  were ap pplied to the  model area as  areally  distributed  specified  flu ux.      Figure e 85.

  (i)  is Hydraulic gradient. this head  contour  represents  the  undeveloped  or  natural condition.  Steady  State  calibration  performance  s (Observed  head  vs. Steady state water balance   (Source: ICBA.  88 83 .  The  simulated  steady  state  groundwater  contours  are  presented  in  Figure  88.  groundwater  flows  out  of  the  aquifer  to  the  sea  and  no  water  inflow  from  the  sea  back  to  the  aquifer  (the  head  contour  at  the shoreline is zero).  for  each  catchment.  2006)  257  Total Inflow      347  Outflow  Abstraction    0    Outflow to the sea    347  Total Outflow      347  Balance      0  from  18 % of mean annual rainfall (MAR)  Quantity  (Mm3/year)  90     Calibration performance  Hydraulic conductivity and recharge were used to calibrate the model.  As  shown from the figure.  Table  26  of  (GRC. (T) is Transmissivity.  2011). 2011).   The  calibrated  hydraulic  conductivities  are  shown  in  Figure  87. These aquifer parameters and  recharge  were  varied  to  match  the  model  simulated  heads  with  the  measured/  observed  heads  in  the  field  to  achieve  certain  accuracy  (criteria:  root  mean  square  error  <10%)  (Figure  86).  calculated  head  (Source:  ICBA. Therefore.  where  (w)  is  Catchment  width.  Under  steady  state    Figure  86.  These  calibrated  hydraulic  conductivities  and  groundwater  recharge  distribution  were  used  in  the  transient  simulation. under natural flow  conditions  before  developing  the  aquifer  and  pumping  water  out  of  the  aquifer.  Table 17.      Flow Component  Assumptions  Inflow  Recharge  rainfall    Groundwater  throughflow from  Jabal  W*i*T.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Steady state water balance  The simulated water balance results were matched with the calculated pre‐modeling water balance  in Table 17.

2  Transient sstate  calibration  A  transsient  ground dwater  flow  mo odel  is  deveeloped  based  on  o the  calibrated  steady  state  aquifer  a parametters.  These  values  were  adjusted  a accordin ng to the ann nual net  crop  water  d demand  calculateed  for  thiss  study  (see watter demand  section  for moree details).4.  an  estimatee  was  done  assumin ng  1. 201 11).2%  annual  abstracttion  incremeent  for  the  period  1982  to o  1995. TTo account ffor the  changess in time.  11.  period for the study area.  The  calibrated  hydraulic  h conditio conducttivity ranged between 10 0% to 400% o of the measu ured hydraulic conductiviity.  time  The  simulation  period  was  divided  into  29  stress  5 time  periods.  Well  abstraction  data  that  ccover  the  simulation  period (1982‐2010)  did not exist or were no ot accessible e to the working team.  storage  was  not  needed  n for  the  steady  state  calibrration. Calibrated hydraaulic conducctivity (Sourcce: ICBA.  These  daata  compriseed  the  Natio onal  Well  Inventorry  (NWI)  abstractions  fo or  the  year  1995. Calculated steaady state heaad (Source: ICBA.Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman ons. 2011).     Figgure 87.  Transie ent abstracttion  Well  abstraction  data  were  obttained  from  the  MRMW WR.  and  less  inccrement  percentaage thereaftter until  the  yeear  2010.    89 84 .  with  a  5  steps in each.. thee stress  period  was  d divided  discretely  into  timee  steps  to  obtain  an  acccurate  solution  and  smo oother  head or  drawdown  versus  curves. Figure 42  in  chaptter  4.  preseents  the    average  annual absttraction  rate  ovver  the  sim mulation  Figure 88. In order to d distribute  these  abstractions    along  a the  sim mulation  period.  The  calibrateed  hyd draulic  conducttivity  and  storage  s were used in the traansient  model.

6        104  1988  64  65     0.8  21.2  34.0        56  1994  25  33  3.8  0.0        61  1995  72  55  25.7  3.7  9.2  33.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Transient recharge  The  temporal  variation  of  recharge  depended  mainly  on  the  rainfall  temporal  variation  and  hydrological  characteristics  of  the  study  area  (dry  and  wet  years).7  265  1998  47  28  3.1        130  1989  44  35  6.2  0.0  10.0  5.5  1.8  3.2  36  Year    Total  Recharge  (Mountain)  Wadi Hilti  Salahi  (Sohar)  90 85 .3  2.2  72  2000  13  19  0.6  2.6  4.  Recharge  in  the  model  area  comprised 6 recharge zones: two from natural rainfall.3        88  1990  46  38  2.3  0.2  0.7  7.0        92  1993  23  33  0.2        92  1991  25  23  0.0  202  1996  63  46  12.7  12. Transient recharge distribution in recharge zones (Mm3/year)   (Source: ICBA.0        49  1992  48  39  5. The temporal  distribution of recharge in these zones is given in the following table:  Table 18.1  1.3  0.7  94  1999  32  27  1.7  139  1997  108  72  25.     Natural Recharge  Zone 1  Zone 2  Recharge from Recharge Dams   Zone 3  Zone 4  Zone 5  Zone 6  Wadi  Ahin  (Saham)  Wadi Al  Hawasinah  (Al  Khabourah)  Recharge  (Coast)  Wadi Al  Jizi (Sohar)  1982  73  62              134  1983  42  16              58  1984  7  11              19  1985  13  11              23  1986  32  28              61  1987  49  55     0.1  0. 2011).4  5. and four from recharge dams.3  6.7  0.

1  0. and the conductance.7  87  Average  38  31  5.8  0.  hydraulic  conductivity.1  2.9  11. Although relatively high. The generated Jabal throughflow is presented in Table 19.9  4.5  35  2002  28  15  1.1  7.0  0.4  4.  Transient model calibration performance The  transient  state  calibration  was  achieved  by  changing  three  parameters.0  28  2009  22  16  11.2  3.0  0.1  6. outside the  model boundary.6  9.4  54  2006  42  31  4.6  6. field observations indicated the direct effect  of rainfall events on groundwater levels. and   Recharge factor of 18% in the recharge cells near the basement outcrop areas are found to  be the best rates for getting the best fit between observed and calculated hydraulic head in  the wells located in these areas and thus used in the validation period.8  5.9  2.7  68  2010  38  29  8.0  11.3  13.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 2001  10  13  1.9  3.5  95  2007  61  41  7.1  121  2008  15  13  0.5  60  2003  23  20  2.4  6.  Storage  coefficient/specific  yield  and  recharge  rate.1  51  2004  10  11  2.          91 86 .0  0. The Jabal  throughflow or the general head dependent flow input included the head at the source.8  11. On the other hand.3  36  2005  19  16  1.  and  the  observation  wells  that  have  temporal  and  spatial  representation of the model domain were used. These observation wells were  screened  for  possible  errors. As shown in Figure 89.9  0.8  0.1  0.8  14.  Transient Jabal inflow  Transient Jabal throughflow varied in time depending on rainfall in the mountain region. The recharge factor in the ponding area was considered in  the order of 20‐40 percent of the accumulated water in the ponding areas behind the four storage  dams.0  0.7  0. 113 calibration points were  selected to cover the model domain.5  3. The recharge factor used was around 20 percent  of the rainfall.  namely.1    The recharge due to rainfall was adjusted to ensure that the calculated heads at observation points  are reasonably matching the field measurements.3  0.4  83.  The  observation  wells  data  obtained from MRMWR were used as calibration points in the model.0  0. The storage depth in dams was distributed into equivalent cell areas within the area of dam  storage and in time along the total period of storage as m/day:    A recharge factor of 35% in the dams ponding areas.4  5.0  0. the sand and gravel nature of the aquifer system in the study  area allows for such high recharge.9  0.

95) as shown in Figure 90 (a) and (b). The largest sink is groundwater abstraction.  Jabal inflow (Mm3)  Year  Jabal inflow (Mm3)  Year  1982  258  1997  516  1983  188  1998  389  1984  132  1999  177  1985  140  2000  210  1986  280  2001  218  1987  382  2002  321  1988  324  2003  260  1989  295  2004  205  1990  350  2005  266  1991  319  2006  272  1992  201  2007  456  1993  218  2008  227  1994  219  2009  244  1995  488  2010  242  1996  381  Average  282    The  calibration  results  as  presented  in  the  scatter  plot  examples  showed  that  the  model  achieved  accebtable  calibration  performance  that  match  the  calibration  targets  of  normalized  root  mean  square error of less than 10% (ranged between 6% to 8%).  Transient model water balance  The  calibrated  water  balance  comprises  four  sources  and  three  sinks. while the  highest groundwater throughflow was in the year 1997.   The water balance for the simulation period shows that the largest source is the groundwater inflow  from Jabal.   (Source: ICBA.     92 87 .92 to 0. Similarly. respectively.  while the smallest sink is the storage gain. while the highest recharge was in the  year 1997 (wet year). the least groundwater throughflow was in the year 1984.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table 19. while the smallest source is the storage loss. The main groundwater sinks comprise groundwater abstraction.  The least recharge was in the year 1984 which was a dry year. groundwater  outflow to the sea. 2010).  seawater  intrusion  and  leakage  from  underlain  aquifer. and groundwater increase in storage.  The  groundwater  sources  comprise recharge from rainfall and agricultural return flow. and high correlation coefficient (ranged  between 0. groundwater throughflow from Jabal.  and  groundwater  gain  from  storage  (decrease in storage). Transient Jabal inflow.

  The  T mean  recharge  r is  90  Mm3/year.  The meaan annual reenewable groundwater fflow for the  simulation p period 1982‐2010 comp prises the  rechargee  and  groun ndwater  thrroughflow.       93 88 .  (b)  the  year  2010  (Source:  ICBA monitorring wells).  8 Location  of  observattion  wells  ussed  in  Figu ure 90. 2011 b based on MR RMWR  (a)  the  year  19 995.Oman Salinity S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman   (a)    (a)  (b)  Figure  89.  while  th he  mean  3 groundw water througghflow is 260 0 Mm /year. Exam mples of calib bration perfo ormance:  the mod del (Source: IICBA.  A. 2011).

      94 89 .09     Outflow to the Sea     Storage Gain    13     Abstraction  Sink  Alluvium  4  Alluvium  22  Upper Fars  56  Alluvium  24     Upper Fars   Total     5  464    Sensitivity Analysis  During calibration process.00  Source  Inflow from Seawater     Storage Loss    Upper Fars  69  Alluvium  28  Upper Fars   Total     464  Alluvium  355  Upper Fars  2.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table 20.   (Source: ICBA. This is because the  storage data points were very few and do not cover the modeled area.  general  head  boundary.  and hydraulic conductivity  Least sensitive to changes in storage coefficient and specific yield. the simulated heads were:     Moderately  sensitive  to  small  changes  (less  than  50%)  in  recharge  rates. Mean groundwater balance for Alluvium and Upper Fars aquifers. and hydraulic conductivity.00  Alluvium  260  Upper Fars  0.  Source/Sink  Flow Component  Aquifer  Alluvium  Recharge     Inflow from Jabal     Quantity (Mm3)  90  Upper Fars  0.  Extremely sensitive  to large changes  (order of magnitude) in recharge rates. 2011). general head.

 Groundwater balance for Northern Batinah under (BAU scenario)(Mm3/year)   (Source: ICBA.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table 21. 2011).  Year  1982  1983  1984  1985  1986  1987  1988  1989  1990  1991  1992  1993  1994  1995  1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001  2002  2003  2004  2005  2006  2007  2008  2009  2010  2011  2012  2013  2014  2015  2016  2017  2018  2019  2020  2021  2022  2023  2024  2025  2026  2027  2028  2029  2030  Recharge  146  62  20  25  66  114  142  96  100  53  100  62  67  217  150  284  101  78  40  38  64  56  39  58  102  130  31  73  94  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  51  Groundwater  inflow  235  204  161  163  259  349  305  287  330  312  231  236  253  322  275  295  201  178  262  255  322  271  235  283  290  279  205  276  256  314  307  307  308  309  310  310  310  311  311  311  312  312  312  312  312  312  312  312  312  Seawater  intrusion  0  0  2  8  12  10  10  16  23  39  44  77  90  60  88  84  152  178  213  219  189  179  165  131  81  54  86  76  79  81  81  84  86  88  89  90  91  92  92  93  94  94  94  95  95  95  95  95  96  Removed  from  storage  65  64  97  59  6  0  3  10  7  25  54  45  17  0  14  0  103  86  35  24  15  37  42  3  5  20  86  10  16  43  29  22  17  14  11  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  3  2  2  2  2  1  1  Total  in  1092  919  762  689  886  1200  1171  1086  1191  1120  977  932  942  1251  1145  1347  1072  949  1044  1027  1212  1101  980  1016  1030  1076  856  964  997  1176  1173  1170  1167  1165  1163  1162  1161  1160  1159  1159  1159  1158  1158  1158  1158  1158  1158  1158  1158  Abstraction  120  133  147  164  190  211  235  253  289  321  339  377  389  401  447  497  519  521  524  527  520  512  465  422  381  357  359  360  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  388  Groundwater  outflow  272  196  134  92  103  162  182  147  143  107  74  41  34  80  64  92  38  20  9  6  10  9  12  24  39  69  30  31  38  56  70  73  73  73  72  72  72  72  72  72  72  72  72  72  72  72  72  72  72  Storage  gain  54  2  0  0  51  100  42  7  27  1  16  3  5  118  17  74  0  1  16  4  61  19  1  26  57  55  15  42  18  44  10  3  1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  Total  out  1092  919  762  689  886  1200  1171  1086  1191  1120  977  932  942  1251  1145  1347  1072  949  1044  1027  1212  1101  980  1016  1030  1076  856  964  997  1176  1173  1170  1167  1165  1163  1162  1161  1160  1159  1159  1159  1158  1158  1158  1158  1158  1158  1158  1158      95 90 .

000 mg/l applied to the agricultural areas to account for the  salinity from irrigation practices.  the  main  salt  transport  processes  used  in  the  model  included:  advection.   The  regular  monitoring  data  for  some  selected  water  level  monitoring  wells.000 mg/l was applied  to the cells where mining activities  were taking place.  Eight  zones  of  these  longitudinal dispersivities were delineated in the model area.  and  molecular  diffusion.  ICBA’s farm survey to some selected farms in Al Batinah region. The  used  longitudinal  dispersivity  ranged  between  50  and  3.000  (dimensionless). the quality of these data is low due to weak  quality control.  there  is  a  degree  of  uncertainty  associated  with  the  calibrated concentration values. inconsistency and unreliability of the data as these were obtained from three separate  sources.5 Solute transport model   The solute transport model is developed based on the calibrated transient flow model. 1997.  This  is  a  main  data  limitation  that  affects  the  accuracy of the results and calibration process.  Therefore. These data sources included:      The  MRMWR  regular  data  survey  that  is  usually  conducted  every  five  years. and 2010.  This  solute  transport  model  comprises  only  the  salt  constituent. 2005.   Constant  with  time  concentration  of  500  mg/l  was  assigned  to  the  General  Head  boundary  to  prevent the boundary from over‐diluting the salinity of the groundwater within the aquifer.5.  The  salt  is  a  conservative  constituent  that  does  not  degrade  by  time. Seawater was used in these mining activities. In addition. described in the  previous  section. For this study.  dispersion.1 Transport boundary conditions  The following boundary conditions were used to build the salt model:       Constant with time inflow concentration of 35. This salinity data  was  missing  the  vertical  profile  of  salinity  in  each  well.  A constant recharge concentration of 20.  The salt model setup depended on available salinity data obtained from the MRMWR.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 11. depending on the  hydraulic head differences (for example: across the coastline).7.  Advection  is  the  main  process of conveying dissolved salts from one point to another due to flow of water. Dispersion is the process of mixing that  causes  a  zone  of  mixing  to  develop  between  the  freshwater  and  the  saline/brackish  water.  This  increases  the  uncertainty in the data and model results.  These  years  included: 1993.200 mg/l in both layers.   11.  Due  to  the  above‐mentioned  data  limitation.   A constant recharge concentration of 5. these included (Figure 91):  91    96 .  where  they  measure salinity as EC (µS/cm) in the field and not as TDS (mg/l) in the laboratory. 2000.  the  EC  data  were  converted  into  TDS  using  a  conversion  factor  of  0. This constant concentration  was applied over the constant head cells that were delineated in the flow simulation model.  The  molecular  diffusion  is  a  mixing  caused  by  molecular  motion  due  to  thermal  kinetic  energy  (the  movement of salt particles in place) and it is important in low velocity fluids.  A constant with time recharge concentration of 500 mg/l is applied under recharge dams.   Transport and Dispersivity parameters  Several trials were done to estimate the longitudinal dispersivity zones and values for both layers.

2 200).000 0  and  20.000 0)  Longgitudinal  disp persivity  zon ne  of   h 500  along  the  highly  bracckish  zoness  to  salin ne (Salinity ranges  betw ween  10.00 00). 2011).    (a)    (b)  Figure 91.7  plied to the m model  was app to  limitt  the  num merical  dispersio on. and mosttly in the fresshwater zonees.  A  courant  number  of  o 0.  Longgitudinal  disp persivity  zon ne  of   0 along the  saline  3000 zonees  (Salinityy  of  35.  The  co ourant  number  representss  the  number  of cells a paarticle  will  be  allowed  to  move  through  in  any  direection  in one tiime step.  groundw 92 2    97 .  Longgitudinal disp persivity zon nes of  300 allong the bracckish zones ((Salinity less than 10.0 000).0 000).000 0 kg/m3 and tthat of the saltwater was taken as 1.  Longgitudinal  disspersivity  zone  of  100  located  at  th he  agricultural  areas  to  allow  salinity  intrusion n  thro ough return fflow from irrrigation.  Longgitudinal  disp persivity  zon ne  of   1000 0 along the  saline  zonees  (Salinityy  of  morre than 20.  Longgitudinal  disp persivity  zon ne  of   0 along the  saline  1500 zonees  (Salinityy  of  morre than 25.S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman Oman Salinity         Meaan  longitudin nal  dispersivvity  of  50  fo or  the  wholee  model  areaa  except  thee  delineated d  dispersivityy  zonees.  Farrs aquifer (So The  density  of  the  water was taken as 1.000 0  and  15. (b) Upper  ource: ICBA..025 kg/m3.  Longgitudinal  disp persivity  zon ne  of   h 700  along  the  highly  bracckish  zoness  to  salin ne (Salinity ranges  betw ween  15.00 00). Longgitudinal disp persivity zonees: (a) Alluvium aquifer.

 Scatterplot of observed vs.3. the model was run with the available average salinity which resulted in high salinity  data in the years 1982‐1990.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Initial Conditions   The initial salinity levels represented the average salinity levels for the period 1993 to 2005 reduced by a  factor of 0. this average salinity was reduced by 30% to reflect the initial salinity  levels as adjusted in the calibration process. First. calculated salinity concentration for selected years   93    98 . Later.          Figure 92.

  94    99 .5.  1995  2000    2010    2030    Figure 93.2 Calibration performance  The  calibration  results  showed  good  match  between  observed  groundwater  salinity  and  calculated  groundwater salinity by the model in terms of meeting the criteria of less than 10% of normalized root  mean square error and correlation coefficient of 0. Vertical cross‐section of seawater encroachment over time in the coastal zone (Source:  ICBA.95 for 372 calibration points (Figure 92).  11.5.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 11. 2011).3 Sensitivity analysis  The simulated concentration was:   Moderately sensitive to small changes (less than 50%) in longitudinal dispersivity parameters.

  Least sensitive to changes in effective porosity.  11. groundwater salinity was very limited when abstraction was low.4 Salinity prediction  As can be seen from Figure 93.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Extremely  sensitive  to  large  changes  (order  of  magnitude)  in  longitudinal  dispersivity  parameters. As  more abstraction took place. This is because no real data were available for  the study area. more saltwater intruded to the fresh aquifer system.    95    100 . The salinity increased  in response to abstraction up to the year 2010. more  saltwater will inflow to the fresh aquifer system. If the BAU abstraction will continue in the future.5.

S Strate egy – Annex1: Physical Resources R in n the Sultana ate of Oman Oman Salinity 12. 2011).  The  Batin nah (Source: ICBA.180 km2.  model  domain  includes  the  B catchmeent  areas  of  Wadi  Bani  Kharus. G GROUND DWATER R NUMEERICAL M MODEL FOR SO OUTHER RN          B BATINAH H  12. South Bathina Model ggrid and locaation of the rrecharge  Figure 995. This laayer is underrlain  by  the  consolidated  rocks  of  the  olitic  Semail  formation  (Ophio nd orange co olors  sequencce.  Figure 5.  while  the  t Ophiolitte  outcropss  were  designated  d as  inactivee  cells. 2011).  dams (So 96 6    101 .  Wadi Al Taww (1355 12.1 Model dom M main   The mo odel domain  of southern  Batinah aqu uifer comprisses an area  of 2. Study  94.  The  T model  area  a di  Bani  Khaarus  extends  from  Wad catchmeent  in  the  northwest  to  Wadi  Taww  T catch hment  in  the  southeast  (569499  m  to  607642  m  m  the  Alluvvium  easting).. It covers tthe extent off  the  Allu uvium  form mation  which h  is  composed  of  receent  Pleistoccene  wadi graavels.  Thee  t grid cell  is 250  m  byy  size of  the  250  m.2  M Model grid d   The mo odel domain  was divided d  into  246 6  rows  (x‐d direction)  byy  229  columns  (y‐direction).  M and d  5 km2).  The  grid  comprises  c a a  total  56105  square  cells  (Figuree  he  Alluvium m  outcropss  95).  Th within  the  studyy  boundaryy  comprised  active  grid  cells. brown an as  in  Figure  94. m  to  2622997  2 m  northing).  and  from boundarry  at  thee  contact  of  Alluvium m and Ophiolite formatio on in    the  southwest  to  the  Arabian  Sea  e in the norttheast (2577 7102  Figure coastline onditions forr southern  domain and boundary co Figurre 94. ource: ICBA.  Wadi  Al  Maawil.

4 Boundary conditions  The  boundary  conditions  represent  the  physical  and  hydraulic  conditions  on  the  external  boundaries of the aquifer. physical and hydrological.  Contour  map  of  initial  head  and  simulated  groundwater  contours.   No flow Boundary   No flow boundary is a specified flow boundary of zero flow value.  meters  with  reference  to  swl  (Source:  ICBA. Two no flow boundaries exist in this  study.  Specified flux boundary   Source/sink boundaries  The  pumping  wells  were  applied  to  the  model  according  to  their  spatial  and  vertical  distribution. 2011).   The physical no flow boundary is applied to:    the low impermeable geological units of Ophiolitic Samail Nappes in the upper parts of the southern  Batinah  catchments.  fixed  or  constant head.  A  constant  hydraulic  head  value of zero head is given to all cells  for both layers.  The  extraction rates were applied as time dependent components.  Ponding  areas  of  Al  Maawil.  Those  cells  are  mostly  the  cells  around  the  mountainous  areas  and  at  wadi  beds.  This head was interpolated using observation head wells to cover the study area and used in the model  as a starting head (Figure 96).  Farah. namely:  Specified  head  boundary  (Constant  Head Boundary Condition)  The  constant  head  boundary  assumes  a  uniform.  where  the  cells  along  the  contact  between  these  low  permeable  rock  and  Alluvium boundary is given zero flow.    Figure  96.    the low permeable Basement formation at the bottom of layer 1.3 Initial conditions   The  initial  head was selected as the head at the  beginning of the simulation period  in the year 1982.  12.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 12. and allows an infinite  flow to and from the cell depending  on  the  cell’s  hydraulic  conductivity  and head gradient. This boundary is  applied to the Arabian Sea coastline  cells.   Recharge (Areal recharge)   The recharge from rainfall was applied to the model cells that are adjusted to rainfall and releasing some  amount  of  the  rainfall  as  infiltration  to  the  groundwater.  97    102 .  and  Baraka  dams  were  delineated and marked as recharge cells in the study domain (Figure 95).

  Recharge  Areal groundwater recharge is applied  to  the  model  area  as  a  constant    Figure 97.  The  simulated  steady  state  groundwater  contours  and  the  observed  groundwater  contours  for  the  year  1985  are  presented  in  Figure  97.  The  run  results  represented  the  long‐term  average  flow  under  no  abstraction.  • the aquifer (bottom of layer 1).  and  storage  coefficient.  The model  was  run  with  no  abstraction  from  the  Alluvium  aquifer.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman The hydrological no flow boundary is applied to    the flow lines and groundwater divides located at the eastern‐western catchment boundaries where  the  flow  lines  are  parallel  to  the  groundwater  flow  from  south  (the  mountain)  towards  north  (the  coast).  This  added  up  the  total  stress periods to be 29 stress periods for the simulation period 1982‐2010.  Two  aquifer  parameters  were  used  to  calibrate  the  model:  hydraulic  conductivity.  Storage  is  not  needed  for  the  steady  state calibration.  These aquifer parameters  were  varied  to  match  the  model  simulated  heads  with the measured/observed heads to  achieve  certain  criteria  (<10%).  This  simulation  period took into account  the hydrological wet  and  dry years which  help stabilize possible  hydrological  fluctuations.1 Steady state calibration   A  steady  state  model  was  developed  to  represent  the  pre‐development  flow  system  using  long‐term  average flow.  The  simulated  water  balance  results  were  matched  with  the  calculated  pre‐ modeling water balance.5. Observed and calculated groundwater contours for  year 1985 (Source: ICBA. Simulation period and stress period  The available historical record of water table observations is only available starting from 1982.  98    103 .   Stress period  is  defined  as a time period during which all  time  dependent  processes  such  as  pumping  and  recharge  are  constant.   the bottom bottom ofof the the  aquifer  (bottom  of  layer  1)  groundwater and  at  the  freshwater/saltwater  interface.  12.  a  long  simulation  period  was  defined  to  be  from  1982  to  2010. The flow parallel to the aquifer base The  and groundwater flow parallel to the aquifer base and interface.  interface.5 Flow model calibration    12.  A  stress  period  of  1  year  was  used  in  the  model. Based on  the  data  availability. and to develop the  initial water level to be used in  the  transient  calibration. 2011).

  12.  the isstress  period  is  divided  discrete  time an steps  to  obtain  an  and result in smoother head or drawdown versus time curves. Observed and calculated groundwater contours for year  adjusted  to  ensure  that  the  2000 (Source: ICBA.  storage  coefficient/  specific  yield  and  recharge  rate  from  the  accumulated  water  in  the five storage dams.  The  transient  state  calibration  was  achieved  by  changing  three  parameters. A ten time steps in each stress period accurate solution and result in smoother head or drawdown versus time curves.  time  step multiplier  a  increment the step size within period.  multiplier valuestep  greater than one will multiplier  value  factor  used  to time increment  the  time each step stress size  within  stress  A  time  produce smaller time steps at the beginning of a stress period resulting in better representation of the greater than one will produce smaller time steps at the beginning of a stress period resulting in better  changes of the transient flow field. The recharge factor in the ponding area was considered  in  the  order  of  20‐40  percent  of  the  accumulated  water  in  the  ponding  areas  behind  the  five  storage  99    104 .Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman specified  flux. The  validation  period  was  considered  from  January  2001  to  December  2010.     Transient recharge  The  recharge  due  to  rainfall  was  Figure 98.5.  Two  zones of recharge were designated in the model area:   a recharge rate of 36 mm per year that comprise 18% of annual rainfall at the mountain foothills.each  A time stepperiod.2 were used in the model. The time step The  multiplier is a factor usedis to stress a period with  a  time  step multiplier  of  1. this reflects the water level conditions of the year 1982.  hydraulic  conductivity. representation of the changes of the transient flow field. In order to  simulate the sudden response for  the  recharge  in  observation  boreholes  located  in  the  vicinity  of the dam.2 Transient state calibration  A flow model is developed based on the calibrated steady state aquifer parameters.   a recharge rate of 22 mm per year that comprise 18% of annual rainfall at the coastal plain. A ten time steps in each  with time step multiplier of 1.  namely.  calculated  heads  at  observation  points  are  reasonably  matching  the  field  measurements. a rather small specific  yield was imposed.  Initial conditions   The initial conditions reflect the undeveloped aquifer condition (equilibrium conditions) at the beginning  of  the  simulation  period. A transient transient groundwater groundwater  flow  model  is  developed  based  on  the  calibrated  steady  state  aquifer  In transient model.2  were  used in the  model. 2011). For transient calibration.  In  transient  model.  The  areal  recharge  was  assigned  to  all  active  cells  in  the  model  area  (Figure  95).  On  the  other  hand.  This  is  represented  as  the  long  term  average  of  water  levels  for  the  steady  state condition.   The calibration period was selected from  January 1982 to December 2000 (8 years or 2920 days). the sand and gravel nature of the aquifer system in the  study  area  allows  for  such  high  recharge.  The  recharge  factor  used  was  around  20  percent of the rainfall. the stress period divided discretely into time steps into  to obtain accurate solution parameters.  field  observations  indicated  the  direct  effect of rainfall events on groundwater levels. Although relatively high.

  the  model  simulates  very  closely  the  trends  and  groundwater  levels  resulting  from  groundwater  abstractions  and  recharge  from  the  reservoir  storage  and  rainfall  events.  The  final  values  of  permeability  are  pre‐ sented  in  Figure  99.    There  is  a  good  match  between  observed  and  calculated  groundwater  contours  (root  mean  square  error  <10%. 2006. The model is considered to be validated and can be used for the prediction of  groundwater quantity in the future under different proposed scenarios. 2004. 1997) with an average of 14 Mm3 per year.  Calibrated  hydraulic  conductivity  of  the  study  domain  cells  near  the  (Source: ICBA.91).  The  rate  of extraction  to groundwater recharge  varied from  only   three  fold in the wet year of 1997 to 35 folds in the dry year of 2003 (Figure 102).  the  limited  discrepancies  in  some  of  the  peak  values  may  be  attributed  to  the  accuracy  of  observed groundwater levels as measurements are taken once every month and not necessarily on the  same day of every month.  The  simulated  annual  groundwater  recharge  in  the  period  1982  to  2010  indicates  that  the  annual  groundwater recharge to the Alluvial aquifer is ranging from 2‐3 Mm3 in dry years 2000.  correlation  coefficient  0.     A  recharge  factor  of  30%  in  the  dams  ponding areas and   Recharge  factor  of    18%  in  the  recharge  Figure  99. 1996.  Transient abstraction  The alluvial aquifer has never been under a steady state condition even before 1982 (abstraction was 10  times groundwater  recharge).  These  calibrated  values  were  used  for  the  model  validation  in  the  period  2000 to 2010. and  2010 to more than 49 Mm3 in wet year (e.g. the storage depth in dams was distributed into a 64 cells within the  area of storage (4 km2) of dam and in time to the total period of storage as m/day.  As  illustrated  by  Figure  100.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman dams. The present extraction rate  of 2010 is 185 Mm3 and thus it is 13 folds the average recharge rate (14 Mm3/yr).  The  calibration  was  performed  for  matching  measured  groundwater  levels  in  observation  wells  of  complete  records  with  corresponding  simulated  groundwater  levels  in  space  and  time.  Time series graphs of simulated versus observed groundwater levels are shown in Figure 100 and Figure  101.   100    105 .  The  simulated  and observed groundwater contours for year 2000 is shown in Figure 98. For the calibration purpose.  basement  outcrop  areas  are  found  to  be  the best rates for getting the best fit between observed and calculated hydraulic head in the wells  located in these areas and thus used in the validation period.  However. 2011).

  The years 1998  to  2010 were  relatively  very  dry years  and the  rate  of  extraction ranged  from 6  to  38  folds the recharge rate and saline fresh water interface moved rapidly inland. The simulated groundwater total salinity in (mg/l) for  year 1982 indicates that there was a saltwater intrusion along the coast.  (1995). This clearly explains the salt water encroachment and movement of saline fresh water interface in land.  and  3   (1997) times the recharge rate depending on the precipitation rates.  Simulated  annual  recharge  (million  cubic  meters)  to  the  years  decreased  to  only  4  alluvial aquifer in the period 1982 to 2010 (Source: ICBA. The net mass of salt added to the groundwater of aquifer is  20 billion kilogram of salt. In year 2011. 2011).  9  (1996). 2011).  Observed  and  Calibrated  hydraulic  Figure  101. this interface  approaches monitoring wells NC‐3 and NC‐5. The saline fresh water interface    Figure  100.    101    106 . 2011).Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman This clearly explains the salt water encroachment and movement of saline fresh water interface in land. The simulated groundwater total salinity in (mg/l) for rate was 10 times the recharge rate of dry year. Observed and  Calibrated hydraulic   head  head in well JT‐11 (Source: ICBA.  in well DW‐3 (Source: ICBA. The saline fresh water interface year 1982 indicates that there was a saltwater intrusion along the coast.  has  continued  to  move  200 Recharge(MCM) inland  in  the  period  1982  180 Abstraction (MCM) to  1994  at  an  increasing  160 pace as the extraction rate  140 in  these  dry  years  was  120 from  4  to  29  times  the  100 recharge  rate  depending  80 on  the  precipitation  rates.  The Alluvial aquifer has been under the non-steady condition before 1982 as at that year the extraction The alluvial aquifer has been under the non‐steady condition before 1982 as at that year the extraction  rate was 10 times the recharge rate of dry year.  60 Then the  coastal  saltwater  40 intrusion  or  the  saline  20 fresh  water  interface  0 started  to  move  very  slowly  in  the  period  1985    to  1987  as  the  extraction  rate in these relatively wet  Figure  102.

5  Central part  2000  1.  calculated  head.  Therefore.  The  calibnration  achieved  the  calibration  target  of  normalized  root  mean  square  error  of  less  than  10%  and  a  correlation  coefficient  of  0.95  which  is  also  considered  high.4  Western part  3. the whole central  Table 22.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   12.2  Western part  3. 2011).  saline  water  by  year  2030.5  Central part  1990  0.6  Central part    102    107 .0  Central part  2020  1. then by year 2030. 2011).  This  means  that  if  scenario  1  (business  as usual) implied as a management option in South Batinah area.  12. Simulated variations of inland salt encroachment with time.  Year  Minimum (km)  Area  Maximum  (km)  Area  1982  0  Western and eastern parts 0.3 Transient model calibration performance  Figure  103  shows  the  transient  calibration  performance  of  scatterplot  of  the  observed  vs.4  Central part  2010  1.  and  NC‐5  will  be  intruded  by  2010)  (Source: ICBA.6 Flow model  prediction   If  the  increase  in  the  abstraction  rate followed the same trend of the    last  fifteen  years  (BAU  scenario).0  Western part  2. NC‐ of all the eleven observation wells in time step 10220 days( year  3.5.  the  whole  area  between  the  coast  Figure 103. Observed and Calibrated hydraulic  head in all points  line and monitoring wells TD‐3.5  Western part  4.6  Central part  2030  1.   (Source: ICBA.  the  calibrated  model  can  be  used  for  predition.9  Western part  1.

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman

part will be affected by salt water intrusion. The distances of inland salt encroachment are listed in Table 
22. 
The increase in groundwater recharge caused by the construction of this dam is forcing the saline‐fresh 
water interface to retreat or slowing its inland movement in the whole western section of South Batinah 
depending  on  the  precipitation  rate.  Similar  effects  but  to  a  lesser  extent  can  be  seen  for  Farah, 
Barak_Taw, and Baraka_Fluj (Figure 104). 

Simulated Groundwater salinity for year 2005 

Simulated Groundwater salinity for year 2010 

Simulated Groundwater salinity for year 2015 

Simulated Groundwater salinity for year 2030 

Figure 104. Simulated groundwater salinity for several year (Source: ICBA, 2011). 
 

 

103 
 

108

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman

BIBLIOGRAPHY 
Ahmed M, Esechie H and Al‐Ajmi A (2004). Biosaline agriculture: Perspectives from Oman. Presented at 
a Workshop on Biosaline Agriculture, 27‐30 June 2004, Wageningen, The Netherlands. 
Ahmed M, Hussain N and Al‐Rawahy SA (2011). Management of Saline Lands in Oman: Learning to Live 
with  Salinity.  Chapter  2.  In:  Advances  in  Soil  Classification,  Land  Use  Planning  and  Policy  Implications 
(Taha FK, Shahid SA and Abdelfattah MA (eds.). In Press. 
Ahmed M, Al‐Rawahy SA, Hussain N, Esechie H, Al‐Lawati A, Rahman HA,  Shahid SA, Al‐Habsi S and Al‐
Rasbi  S  (2010).  Biosaline  Agriculture  in  Oman:  A  critical  review.  In:  A  monograph  on  Management  of 
Salt‐Affected Soils and Water for Sustainable Agriculture, Pp. 9‐16. 
Al‐Mulla  Y  (2010).  Salinity  mapping  in  Oman  using  remote  sensing  tools:  status  and  trends.  In:  A 
Monograph on Management of Salt‐Affected Soils and Water for Sustainable Agriculture, Pp. 17‐24. 
Al‐Mulla  YA  and  Al‐Adawi  S  (2009).  Mapping  temporal  changes  of  soil  salinity  in  Al  Rumais  region  of 
Oman  using  geographic  information  system  and  remote  sensing  techniques.  American  Society  of 
Agricultural  and  Biological  Engineers  (ASABE)  Annual  International  Meeting.  Paper  No.  095777.  Reno, 
NV, USA. 
Ashworth JM (2004). Drilling and aquifer testing project in the Western Al Wusta Desert. Proceedings for 
Wellsite Geologists. Pp.19.  
Australian  Water  Resources  Council  (1969).  Quality  aspects  of  farm  water  supplies.  Department  of 
National Development, Canberra. Pp. 45.  
Ayers RS and Westcot DW (1994). Water quality for agriculture. FAO Irrigation and Drainage Paper 29 
Rev. 1, FAO, Rome.  
Benites J, Vaneph S and Bot A (2002). Planting concepts and harvesting good results. LEISA Magazine on 
Low External Input and Sustainable Agriculture, 18(3): 6‐9. 
Century Architects Consulting Engineers (2004). Integrated catchments management for Wadi Al Maawil 
Catchment. Ministry of Regional Municipalities, Environment and Water Resources, Oman. 
ECG (2011). Evaluation losses for agriculture and agribusiness. ECG Paper No 3, Evaluation Cooperation 
Group Washington DC. Pp. 34.  
Ewing B, Moore D, Goldfinger S, Oursler A, Reed A and Wackernagel M (2010). The Ecological Footprint 
Atlas 2010. Oakland: Global Footprint Network, Pp. 111.  
FAO (2006). Conservation Agriculture (Available at www.fao.org/ag/ca).  
Geo‐Resources  Consultancy  (2006).  Drilling  and  aquifer  testing  in  the  northern  Batinah,  Musandam 
Governorate  and  Northern  Al  Massarat.  Ministry  of  Regional  Municipalities,  Environment  and  Water 
Resources, Oman. 
Global Research Economy (2011). Oman Economic Overview. Oman Economy. Global Investment House 
Kuwait. Pp. 45.   
Hoffman  CJ  (2001).  Water  quality  criteria  for  irrigation.  Biological  System  Engineering  University  of 
Nebraska, Institute of Agricultural and Natural Resources. Publication No. EC 97‐782.  

104 
 

109

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman

Hussain  N  (2005).  Strategic  plan  for  combating  water  and  soil  salinity  in  Sultanate  of  Oman  for  2005‐
2015. Soil and Water Research Center, Rumais, Oman, Pp. 117.  
Ministry  of  Agriculture  and  Fisheries  (1984).  Preliminary  soil  and  groundwater  survey  in  the  Batinah 
region, Final report, Part I Groundwater, Hydroconsult consulting engineers, Oman. 
JICA (1985). Hydrological observation project in the Batinah coast of Sultanate of Oman, Interim Report 
II. The Government of Sultanate of Oman. Pp.160. 
Ministry of Environment and Water (MOEW) (2005). Evaluating the recharge efficiency of the Bih, Ham, 
and Tuween recharge Dams using mathematical models. In cooperation with the United Arab Emirates 
University. 
MRMWR  (1995).  Stage  2:  site  screening  for  proposed  large  catchment  recharge  dams,  South  Batinah 
Region.  Draft  Internal  Report.  Recharge  Section  Research  Department,  Directorate  General  of  Water 
Resources Assessment. Pp.  79.  
MRMWR (2004a). Detailed water resource management and planning study for the Salalah region. Part 
A, Main report, Oman. 
MRMWR (2004b). Detailed water resource management and planning study for the Salalah region. Part 
B, Groundwater model final report, Oman.  
MRMWR (2005). Brackish Water Development Study. Water Resources Development Department, The 
Ministry of Regional Municipalities, Environment and Water Resources, Sultanate of Oman. Pp.  198.  
MRMWR (2006). Water metering technical and financial feasibility study. Draft final report. Tender No: 
79/2005.  Submitted  by  ALDAR  consultancy  Talal  Abu  Ghazaleh  International.  The  Ministry  of  Regional 
Municipalities, Environment and Water Resources. Pp.  167.  
MRMWR  (2008).  Water  Resources  in  Oman.  Issued  by  Ministry  of  Regional  Municipalities  and  Water 
Resources on the occasion of the Expo Zaragoza 2008 (water and Sustainable Development), Pp. 138.  
Maas EV (1996). Crop salt tolerance. Chapter 13: In Agricultural salinity assessment and management. 
ASCE Manuals and Reports on Engineering Practice No. 71. American Society of Civil Engineers, pp. 262‐
304. 
Macumber  PG  (1998).  The  cable  tool  program  and  groundwater  flow  in  the  Eastern  Batinah  alluvial 
aquifer. Ministry of Water Resources, Directorate General of Water Resources Assessment. Pp. 159. 
MAF  (Ministry  of  Agriculture  and  Fisheries)  (1982a).  Soil  and  groundwater  survey  for  Buraimi  area. 
Groundwater Development Consultants (International) Limited, Sultanate of Oman. Pp 155.  
MAF (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries)  (1982b). Soil and groundwater survey for Wadi Quriyat area. 
Groundwater Development Consultants (International) Limited, Sultanate of Oman. Pp 205.  
MAF (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries) (1990). General soil map of the Sultanate of Oman. Ministry 
of Agriculture and Fisheries.  
MAF  (1993a).  South  Batinah  Integrated  Study.  Summary  of  Conclusions  and  Recommendations. 
Directorate General of Agricultural Research, Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Sultanate of Oman. 
Volume 1, Pp. 54.  

105 
 

110

 Prepared by Parsons International and Co. Shinas. Volume 1: Executive summary. Sohar. Liwa. Volume 3. Australian Journal of Experimental  Agriculture 46:733‐741.  MAF (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries) (1997). Part 1: Land Use.  Techno  Economic  Feasibility. Integrated Study of North Batinah. Oman.  Technical Report A.  Shina‐Liwa  and  Sohar.  Main Report. Volume 2. Sohar.  MAF (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries) (1997).  Feasibility  study  for  fodder  cultivation in Nejd (Dhofar Region).  Investigation  on  present  situation  and  countermeasures taken for soil and water salinization.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman MAF  (Ministry  of  Agriculture  and  Fisheries)  (1993b). Pp. Sohar. Volume 2.  Part  4:  Farming  systems  report.  Technical Report B‐D. Liwa. Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. Integrated Study of North Batinah. Oman.    Ministry  of  Water  Resources  (2000). Sultanate of Oman. Volume 1.  MAF (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries) (1997).  MAF (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries) (1997). Pp. Volume 1. Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. Saul G.  Directorate General of Agricultural Research.  MAF (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries) (1993c).   106    111 .  MAF (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries) (1997). Oman.  Volume  2:  Financial  statements. Integrated Study of North Batinah. Sultanate of Oman.  Main Report . Sillence M.  Volume 2.  Technical Report A. Oman. Pp. Integrated Study of North Batinah. Draft Report. 106. Friend M.   Masters D.  Technical Report B‐D.  Ministry bof Water Resources.  Part  3:  Crop  water  requirements  report.  MAF (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries) (1997).  MAF (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries) (1997). Integrated Study of North Batinah. Volume 3. 741. South Batinah Integrated Study. Integrated Study of North Batinah. Integrated Study of North Batinah. Oman.  MAF (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries) (1997). The role of livestock in the management of dryland salinity. Shinas. 50 +  57 map sheets. Integrated Study of North Batinah.  Water  Resources  Assessment  Report. Oman. Ltd. Master plan for the Water Sector.  Main Report . Liwa.  MAF  (2005). Oman.  Volume 3. 251. Edwards N. Volume 2.  Pp.  Directorate General of Agricultural Research. Veberly C and Young J  (2006). Sanford P.  Technical Report B‐D.  MAF (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries) (1997).  Technical Report A.   MAF (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries) (1990). Oman. Oman.  South  Batinah  Integrated  Study. Revell D.  General Soil Map of the Sultanate of Oman. Pp.  Part  2:  Irrigation  Report. Shinas. Sultanate of Oman.  Land  Resources.  MAF  (Ministry  of  Agriculture  and  Fisheries)  (2010). Avery A. Volume 3.    Ministry of National Economy (2004). Integrated Study of North Batinah. Volume 1. 16.

 Liberia.  Turner  A. Soil salinization and management options for sustainable crop production.  Naifer  A. Plant. Stockholm Water Symposium 21‐27 August 2005. 1995. Chapter 3.  Final  Report Volume II – Water.)  Springer.  Shahid  SA  and  Abdelfattah  A  (ed.  ERWDA  Soil  Bulletin  No  2. Salinity Expert at ARC. 31. In No‐ tillage crop production in the tropics. Pp.  Zekri  S  (2011). Pp.  3‐36  (In  press).  White S. Pp. Chapter 1. In Handbook of Plant and Crop Stress (M Pessarakli (ed.  Pannell  DJ  (2005). Ferdowsian R (2001). Rethinking the externality issue foe drylands salinity in  Western Australia. Technology transfer in no‐tillage crop production in the third world agriculture.  Economic  impact  of  salinity:  The  case  of  Al  Batinah  in  Oman. Al Ghafri A.   Pannell DJ. 41‐54.  classification.  Using economic  incentives and regulations to reduce  seawater intrusion in  the Batinah  coastal area of Oman.   Qureshi RH (1995).  Development  in  soil  salinity  assessment.  Wadi  flow  data‐Volume  II  (South  Batinah Region 1980‐1992). Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics 45(3):459‐475.    107    112 . Pakistan. Pp. pp. Washington DC. 25‐31.) (1954).  mapping  and  monitoring  from  submicroscopic to regional scales.  modeling. Faisalabad.  Controlling  groundwater  pumping  online. Oregon State  Univ. Chapter 2. 28. Symp.  Australian  Journal  of  Experimental Agriculture 45:1471‐1480.  assessment  and  management  in  irrigated agriculture. Pb Int. 60.  England  (1978). Monrovia. Third Edition. USA.). Center.  p.  Zekri  S  (2009).  Research  and  Development  Surveys  in  Northern  Oman.  Journal  of  Environmental  Management  90:3581‐3588.  Environmental  Research  and Wildlife Development Agency Abu Dhabi. Results of exploratory drilling of the Batinah coast with special reference to saline  intrusion.   Shahid  SA  (2004). 10. Corvallis.).183.  Farm. Final Report. Rumais. McFarlane DJ.  food  and  resource  issues:  politics  and  dryland  salinity. Diagnosis and improvement of saline and alkali soils.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Ministry  of  Water  Resources. Pp.  Surface  Water  Department  (1995). USDA Handbook No. Report No. In Advances in soil salinity assessment and use of marginal  quality  water  in  irrigated  agriculture  (Taha  FK.  Suarez DL (2011). Sultanate of Oman.. p. Prepared  by Public Authority for Water Resources. 592p. Aziz A and Al‐Sulaimani Z (2005). 6. 40. 1994 to Jan 31.  United States Environmental Protection Agency.  International Journal of Agricultural Research  Pp 9. Slutanate of Oman.   Warren  (1983).   University  of  Durham.   Shahid  SA  (2012).    Oman Daily Observer (2011). Council for Conservation of Environment and Water Resources.  Al‐Rawahi  SA.   Shahid  SA.  In: Handbook of Plant and Crop Stress (M  Pessarakli (ed. Aug  1. EPA‐R373‐033. Agricultural Water Management 95:243‐252. Water efficiency – A sustainable way  forward for Oman. Pp. Oman’s Agriculture on a rapid growth trajectory.   Zekri S (2008).  Rahman  K  (2011)  Soil  salinity  development. Proc. Pp. Visit of Prof. 23‐39.   National  Academy  of  Sciences  and  National  Academy  of  Engineering  (1972).  Irrigation  water  quality  manual.  Ravenscroft P (1986).  Water  quality  criteria. Riaz Hussain Qureshi.  Richards L (ed.

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman                                             APPENDIX  Main Tables and Figures  108    113 .

0  39.0  78.0     2506     DM775847AA  475467  2678740  Alluvium  80.1     2419     DM789270AA  479778  2681980  Alluvium  75  15.0     1950  22.1     7776  19.4  0.0  11.0  DB786052AA  476771  2680430  Alluvium  175.0        84  10.2  74.0     468     EB621628AA  561518  2617622  Alluvium  47.9        972  86.4  8.1  96.90E‐04  817  6.0  EB612955AA  561954  2618710  Alluvium  70.7     1.00E‐03  48     EB516995AA  557190  2620539  Alluvium  101.0     185.5     4320     DM880068AA  480549  2680850  Alluvium  80.4  28.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman    Table A 1.2  52.0     4752     DM870960AA  480647  2679080  Alluvium  80  13.7     2967     DM870616AA  480128  2676520  Alluvium  81  21.3  2.8  74.2  11.0  33.0  40. Aquifer properties in Northern Batinah study area (Source: MRMWR.0     473     109    114 .0  39.0     5375  10.3  4.3  76.0  94.0  17.9  26.5  54.0  DB873940AA  483380  2678990  Alluvium  102.0  52.0     2764  6.0     2580  10.4  108.9  34. 2010).70E‐04  83     DM872917AA  482097  2679650  Alluvium  83  3.0     71.  Well ID  Easting  Northing  Aquifer  Drilled  Depth  Ground  Level  Elevation  K  S  T  Yield  (L/s)  DM775543BA  475335  2675340  Alluvium  73.2  52.5  8.5  48.4  4.5  48.0  6.0  DM870878BA  480784  2678850  Alluvium  120.8     5875     DM775543AA  475355  2675320  Alluvium  73.3     1.3     1544     DM778388AA  478822  2673770  Alluvium  74.0  DB870598AA  481176  2676110  Alluvium  175.3  4.1  21.5  DM778607AA  478090  2676750  Alluvium  80  26.5     4320     DM872521AA  482051  2675110  Alluvium  85.0  11.8     778     DM777696AA  477908  2678570  Alluvium  80  29.20E‐04  1728     DM870878AA  480782  2678810  Alluvium  564.0  DB789342AA  479400  2683200  Alluvium  130.0  EB514498AA  554403  2614403  Alluvium  300.00E‐02  50     DM871185BA  481788  2671540  Alluvium  71.7  13.4  26.

2  85.0  DM783435AA  473359  2684540  Alluvium  109.3        1400  12.2  16.0     15050  9.0  DM786987AA  476574  2689930  Alluvium  97  8.6  193.5           2100  9.0     9100  20.0  7.0  24.5           1750  8.0  22.5  31.0  DM695408AA  465025  2694840  Alluvium  80.0           4800  13.50E‐03  690     DN349926BA  439004  2749490  Alluvium  87.0     1265  6.2  11.0  37.0  47.0           2200     DM783435BA  473300  2684500  Alluvium  110.0  DB780739AA  470619  2688340  Alluvium  103  26.5  36.0     1300     DM781421BA  471212  2684130  Alluvium  385.2  26.0  DM599126AA  459200  2691600  Alluvium  37.00E‐04  5100     DB689955AA  469685  2689770  Alluvium  82  25.0  172.7  47.0        2.1  4.2        16900  13.0  DM784617AA  474084  2686560  Alluvium  193.5  32.0     4000  20.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman EB627755AA  567714  2627739  Alluvium  105.0     2200  18.0     4838  9.7  32.2        984  515.0  DM580982AA  450435  2689150  Alluvium  50.0  DM599145AA  459400  2691500  Alluvium  30.0  EM053082AA  503847  2650220  Alluvium  92.0  35.7  105.0  31.0  10.0     5000  20.0  25.0        36     EB046900AA  506340  2649220  Alluvium  40.0     473     EB621628AA  561200  2626800  Alluvium  47.0  DM783398AA  473918  2683770  Alluvium  109.0     1858     EB612955AA  562500  2619500  Alluvium  70.0  40.0  DM783398BA  473900  2683700  Alluvium  102.5  21.0        173  3.0  DB694340AA  464400  2693000  Alluvium  50.0  81.7        7980     DB696350AA  466500  2693000  Alluvium  200.0        84  10.0     4500  11.3  DB694288AA  464800  2692800  Alluvium  57.2     3.5        1603     EM042872AA  502767  2648200  Alluvium  51.0  DM693757AA  464244  2698110  Alluvium  51.0     3650  17.4  194.0  50.0  EB314499AA  554900  2614900  Alluvium  166.0  DM784445BA  474800  2684500  Alluvium  115.0  129.0  29.0  110    115 .0  175.

0  DB694269AA  464600  2692900  Alluvium  57.5        1819     DB865981AA  485850  2669140  Alluvium  60.9     5.0  140.9  15.8        4300  16.4        60  1.0     8000  20.4  EB316218AA  536832  2615820  Alluvium  141.7        1  5.5     5.3        3200  8.0  184.8        1325     DB874067AA  484600  2670700  Alluvium  160.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman DM695584AA  465782  2695460  Alluvium  77.3  102.0           2122  10.8     5.0  115.0     5800  20.7  EB521527AA  572800  2627000  Alluvium  53.0  DB691503AA  461309  2695500  Alluvium  55  50.00E‐05  4600     DM696492BA  466900  2694200  Alluvium  62.0  DM696581AA  466872  2695190  Alluvium  68.0  27.4        36  8.3  161.0  EB327231AA  537300  2622100  Alluvium  142  62.4  DM864585AA  484735  2665370  Alluvium  73.4  EB416443AA  551325  2626125  Alluvium  91.8        1325     EB433368AA  544249  2634269  Alluvium  35.9        2051  5.0  35.0           5800     DM696592BA  466800  2695100  Alluvium  73.0  DM696492AA  466905  2694220  Alluvium  58.8        168  7.0  127.0  DB694235AA  464371  2692910  Alluvium  55  45.9  111    116 .0           4200     DM696405BA  466000  2694500  Alluvium  72.0     8000  20.0  25.2  EB438280AA  551053  2631405  Alluvium  45.7        1500  4.5           8350  7.0  20.36E‐04  57     EB317527AA  537279  2619045  Alluvium  76.9  EB316218BA  536948  2615822  Alluvium  52.7  14.0  24.0           550     EB316218AA  536832  2615822  Alluvium  141.0  DB694517AA  464272  2695970  Alluvium  45  32.0  132.36E‐04  59  9.36E‐04  59  9.0           4700     DM695584BA  465700  2695400  Alluvium  75.5        1.0           10000     DB698632AA  468706  2696550  Alluvium  40  11.0  DM695408BA  465000  2694800  Alluvium  80.7  11.0     316     EB327231AA  537582  2625315  Alluvium  NA  62.7  92.

0  DN435055AA  445528  2730550  Alluvium  38.0  10.4  DB754868AA  474600  2658800  Alluvium  34.7  10.4  DN434936BA  444584  2739560  Alluvium  80.4        36  8.0  DN515605AA  454865  2716630  Alluvium  64.3  7.8     5.0  6.7  14.0  EM144165AA  514684  2641550  Alluvium  96.0  55.4  EB433368AA  543600  2633800  Alluvium  35.0  10.5        50     DN604232AA  463807  2702080  Alluvium  111.0  36.0     449.0  DB754819AA  474100  2658900  Alluvium  35.5        5408  25.7  EB521527AA  551200  2625700  Alluvium  53.7        7  3.0  22.0  10.2  EB316218BA  536948  2615820  Alluvium  50.9  DN515033BA  455308  2710360  Alluvium  50.4  35.0  8.0           110  8.3        3533     DN429451AA  449432  2724310  Alluvium  109  18.0  16.5  12.2        9     DB874012AA  484135  2670210  Alluvium  160.0  DN425136AA  445955  2722040  Alluvium  80.8  73.0  35.0  DM870028AA  480090  2670730  Alluvium  62.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman EB438280AA  548800  2632000  Alluvium  45.4  45.4        7123  25.5        28     DN604232CA  463807  2702080  Alluvium  111.5  167.6  DN432453AA  443151  2734580  Alluvium  90.1        2422     DB873253AA  483788  2672630  Alluvium  60.80E‐04  891     DN603280BA  463807  2702080  Alluvium  111.0     8200  25.36E‐04  57     DN507668AA  457916  2706880  Alluvium  45.0  DM951301AA  491038  2653080  Alluvium  68.0     2210     DN600060AA  460885  2699820  Alluvium  66.1        985  473.0     880  19.2        2160  10.2        2160  25.0     9630  25.0  21.7  36.0        5621                         112    117 .9        2051  5.0  DM949578AA  499787  2645860  Alluvium +  Tertiary  35.0  124.0     274.0           85  8.5        93     DM954622AA  494301  2656160  Alluvium  74.8     2.0     9900  20.1  83.0  22.2        168  7.

0  27.50E‐04  17  5.3     1.0     3800  18.00E‐03  48     EB516995AA  556900  2619500  Alluvium+  Upper Fars  101.0  15.7        1  5.0            113    118 .4  EB317527AA  537200  2615700  Alluvium  +Tertiary  76.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman DM696405AA  466035  2694530  Alluvium  +Ophiolite  63.7  13.0     316     EB514498AA  554900  2614800  Alluvium  +Upper Fars  300.0  94.80E‐04  81  32.0  190.0     468     EM140241BA  510426  2642170  Alluvium  +Upper Fars  195.0  EB627755AA  567500  2627500  Alluvium +   Seeb  99.3  103.0  115.0  39.8  0.0  53.7  7.0     3.0     1858     EB416443AA  546400  2614300  Alluvium +   Seeb  91.4  205.0  CM960654BA  490510  2666400  Upper Fars  236.9  2.5  21.

0  61.0  2.0  2.8  241.0  29.3     326.4  EM814609AA  584000  2616900  Alluvium  75.0  3.0  EM815391BA  586038  2613177  Alluvium  102.0  0.60E‐03  5000.0  EB729486AA  579800  2624600  Alluvium  73.0     EB827331AA  587300  2623100  Alluvium  72.0  29.0  EM804882AA  584800  2608200  Alluvium  328. Aquifer properties in southern Batinah study area (Source: MRMWR.0  4.0  131.8  148.0  24.0  EB828171AA  588700  2621100  Alluvium  104.5  8.6  9.50E‐02  7238.0  9.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table A 2.7  EB718411AA  578100  2614100  Alluvium  71.5  1.0  91.0  61.0  82.7  32.0  0.9  EB819144AA  589400  2614000  Alluvium  70.8           21.1  70.0     1276.0     225.5  25.00E‐02  6031.0  1.0  32.6  6.0  14.00E‐03  4100.1  31.8     6.8  1.0  89.3  14.9  17.0     EM810135AA  580300  2611500  Alluvium  200.5     1.0  3.0     269.7  114    119 .0  1.0  EB819706AA  589000  2617600  Alluvium  34.0  46.0  1.0  EM810760BA  580600  2617000  Alluvium  72.3     14.  Well ID  Easting  Northing  Aquifer  Drilled  Depth  Ground  Level  Elevation  K  S  T  Yield  (L/s)  EB703203AA  573000  2602300  Alluvium  140.0  48.0  7.0  16.9  10.2  226.1  11.4     4.00E‐03  1380.0  3.0  35.0     EM810135BA  580300  2611500  Alluvium  200.0  0.9  EM810760AA  580600  2617000  Alluvium  77.0     EM808768AA  588603  2607863  Alluvium  350.0  91.0  14.4  0.0  EB814639AA  584300  2616900  Alluvium  51.20E‐03  4256.5  EB818717AA  588180  2617740  Alluvium  106.5  EB728120AA  578200  2621000  Alluvium  305.0  19.0     EM810135CA  580300  2611500  Alluvium  135. 2010).0  61.00E‐03  3900.0  18.00E‐02  7560.0     EM815391AA  585900  2613100  Alluvium  257.0     EB728048AA  578400  2620800  Alluvium  39.2        5253.2        326.2  175.1           31.0     6470.0     146.0  12.6  81.0  54.0  48.0  1.0  30.0  1.0  23.0  EM804882BA  584807  2608018  Alluvium  210.0  2.0  23.0     153.6     316.7  EB705870AA  575700  2608000  Alluvium  140.

0  91.0  23.0  0.9  EM808768AA  588603  2607860  Alluvium  350.40E‐03  220.0  48.0     EB814639AA  584300  2616900  Alluvium  51.0  EB728048AA  578400  2620800  Alluvium  39.0     EM816551AA  586550  2615180  Alluvium  275.0     EM618133BA  569050  2611340  Alluvium  135.0  15.0     EL885738AA  585300  2587800  Alluvium  80.6  9.1  0.7  EB729486AA  579800  2624600  Alluvium  73.0  EM617782BA  567800  2617292  Alluvium  60.0  11.6     316.3  15.4  21.0  32.0     634.00E‐02  6031.0  NA        225.0     EM617782AA  567815  2617288  Alluvium  80.0  89.3  49.5     1.0  24.0  16.2  226.0  124.0     EM618133AA  569042  2611333  Alluvium  200.0  14.0  16.1  11.3     326.0  68.0     269.5  8.0     2105.4  6.0  150.0     153.1           31.7     204.4  0.6  6.0  24.0  6.0  EB723708AA  573000  2627800  Alluvium  72.0  1.0  25.1  31.0  39.0  EB819706AA  589000  2617600  Alluvium  34.0     92.0  19.0  3.0  EM814609AA  584000  2616900  Alluvium  75.0     895.0  EB827000AA  587000  2620000  Alluvium  24.0  32.3           12.5  EM606366BA  566905  2603891  Alluvium  90.20E‐03  4256.0     EB722568AA  572600  2625800  Alluvium  74.9  17.3  3.0  EB813836AA  583300  2618600  Alluvium  39.0  10.2  2.0  30.7  EB718411AA  578100  2614100  Alluvium  71.0  EM804882BA  584800  2608200  Alluvium  208.0  59.0  91.5  EB618381AA  568800  2613100  Alluvium  70.0  12.3  15.0  3.6  2.6  20.0  EM804882AA  584800  2608200  Alluvium  328.6  46.0  7.0  4.0  12.9  EB819144AA  589400  2614000  Alluvium  70.3     316.4  6.0  13.0  280.4     7.0     855.0     48.0  54.0     146.0     115    120 .0  39.8  241.5  1.0           5.7     220.00E‐03  1380.3  14.8  10.0  68.0     225.0     EM606032CA  566612  2600508  Alluvium  28.6  EB721092AA  571900  2620200  Alluvium  74.0  32.00E‐04  180.0  EB628478AA  568700  2624800  Alluvium  49.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman EB818717AA  588180  2617740  Alluvium  106.0  2.0     2269.0  2.

6           1.0  150.0     EB714222AA  573333  2612420  Alluvium  144.0     EB715815AA  575100  2618600  Alluvium  223.7  51.0     EB721092AA  571900  2620200  Alluvium  74.0  EM916281AA  596800  2612100  Alluvium  96.0  59.2        316.0  24.0  EB714222AA  574200  2612200  Alluvium  144.6  50.0     662.4     426.40E‐03  220.7     220.0  150.0     549.1  7.0     EM617782BA  567800  2617290  Alluvium  60.0     92.0        3.0  13.0     EB723708AA  573000  2627800  Alluvium  72.0     880.0  4.2  5.0           10.9  69.0     EM711700BA  571150  2617220  Alluvium  50.0  25.4           1.8     562.0  EM906911AA  596100  2609100  Alluvium  95.1  EB628478AA  568700  2624800  Alluvium  49.0     48.0  9.6  116    121 .0  10.2  5.3  19.0  43.0  548.8     562.0  32.3  15.5  62.9  6.0  EM916281AA  596800  2612100  Alluvium  96.0  43.0  EM606065BA  566612  2600510  Alluvium  45.0  7.0  34.0  EM915221AA  595200  2612100  Alluvium  150.0  4.0     EM902729AA  592211  2607967  Alluvium  350.0  2.6  EM915221AA  595200  2612100  Alluvium  150.5           0.0  59.0           41.3  3.6           3.4     7.3  15.3  19.4     426.0  35.5  EB728850AA  578500  2628000  Alluvium  72  2.0  74.0  59.0     2269.0     EB728850AA  578669  2627621  Alluvium  75.0  44.0  59.5  EM711700AA  571142  2617200  Alluvium  54.5  EA573160AA  553600  2571000  Alluvium  72.0        5.0  EM713234AA  573324  2612400  Alluvium  234.2  10.0     EA573203AA  553000  2572300  Alluvium  70.70E‐03  1201.4           1.0  44.8  EM713233BA  573336  2612400  Alluvium  231.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman EB723400AA  573022  2624069  Alluvium  305.3  170.3     316.0  1.7  EM606032CA  566612  2600510  Alluvium  28.0  39.0     EB618381AA  568800  2613100  Alluvium  70.7     204.0  13.0  582.3  49.0     EB722568AA  572600  2625800  Alluvium  74.0  59.8  2.2  10.0  27.0        5.

7  32.0  23.0  82.70E‐04  188.0  1.4  EB723400AA  573000  2624000  Alluvium +  Fars  305.0  3.0  29.00E‐03  4100.0  Upper Fars  59.0  4.5  EM810760AA  580600  2617000  Alluvium +   Upper Fars  77.0  500.0  131.0  EM606398AA  566905  2603890  Alluvium +  limestone  150.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman EM713233AA  573336  2612400  Alluvium  +     350.0  29.0  14.0  EM815391BA  585900  2613100  Alluvium +  FARS  102.0     EM815391AA  585900  2613100  Alluvium +  FARS /Seeb  257.0  61.5           10.0  0.2        5253.0  2.50E‐02  7238.8  70.0     6470.0  46.0     EM713234BA  573324  2612400  Alluvium +   Upper Fars  234.0  1.0  1.0  EM606366BA  566905  2603890  Alluvium +  limestone  150  124.0  35.00E‐04  180.0  14.0  124.9  2.4     4.0  46.8  148.1        1235.0  EB705870AA  575700  2608000  Alluvium +  Seeb  140.0  EB703203AA  573000  2602300  Alluvium +   Upper Fars  140.00E‐03  3900.5  1.0  23.0           41.0  0.8  1.0     EM810760BA  580600  2617000  Alluvium +  Fars  72.0                 117    122 .0  EB728120AA  578200  2621000  Alluvium  +Sur (Fars)  305.2        326.2  175.0  58.3     14.9        316.0  3.1  0.0  EA573213BA  553100  2572300  Alluvium +  dolomite  90.7  EM810135BA  580300  2611500  Alluvium +   Upper Fars  200.4  6.

  Summary of declining and rising water table trends   (Source: ICBA.07    DB874130AA  484549  2671146  Saham  Wadi Sakhin    5.28  DB964233AA  494583  2662600  Saham  Wadi Shafan  ‐0.03    DB873940AA  483380  2678990  Saham  Wadi Ahin  ‐1.48  DM789369AA  479627  2683900  Sohar  Wadi Hilti    0.19  DM791895AA  471931  2698480  Sohar  Wadi Al Jizi  ‐0.43    DC356835AA  436694  2756780  Shinas  Wadi Qawr  ‐0.79  DM784423AA  474397  2684440  Sohar  Wadi Hilti    1.58    DM793593AA  473968  2695290  Sohar  Wadi Al Jizi    0. 2011).26  DB956996AA  497078  2659840  Saham  Wadi Shafan    0.06    DN339973AA   439693  2739280  Shinas  Wadi Hatta    3.84    DM693757AA  464244  2698110  Sohar  Wadi Al Jizi    1.44  DB780988AA  471025  2690110  Sohar  Wadi Hilti  ‐1.61  DC434427AA  444480  2734960  Shinas  Wadi Faydh  ‐0.27    DM442480AA  457900  2707900  Shinas  Wadi Hawarim  ‐0.098  DM783435AA  473359  2684540  Sohar  Wadi Hilti    0.16    DM441646AA  457900  2707900  Shinas  Wadi Hawarim    0.6  DM870616AA  480128  2676520  Sohar  Wadi Ahin  ‐1.15    DB8790189AA  486766  2670987  Sohar  Wadi Al Jizi    1.    Well Name  X  Y  Wilayah Catchment Declining Trend  (m/Year)  Rising trend  (m/Year)  NC‐24B  522846  2633160  Saham  Wadi Ahin  ‐0.65    DM873955AA  483514  2679583  Saham  Wadi Ahin  ‐0.07  DM696761AA  466536  2697040  Sohar  Wadi Al Jizi  ‐1.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Table A 3.17    DB796024AA  476554  2690660  Sohar  Wadi Hilti  ‐0.04    DB967078AA  496949  2661000  Saham  Wadi Shafan    0.28      118    123 .12    DB875691AA  485900  2676100  Saham  Wadi Ahin  ‐3.23    DM874728AA  484284  2677812  Saham  Wadi Ahin  ‐0.

50  34.84  19.84  32.89  36.87  17.20  89.58  110.39  46.47  128.93 38.31  28.53  31.31  61.77  2.10  5.32  141.77  15.89  54.76  22.94  1775      119    124 .45  14.88  8.83  91.59  32.99 27.28  117.47  6.26  86.43  70.00 70.66  33.88  33.98  53.18  35.28 44.54  22.84  15.44  33.28  31.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Table A 4.68  21. Estimation of total rainfall volume over Al Batinah governorates (Mm3)  Catchment Name  Wadi Malahah  Wadi Qawr  Wadi Al Hawarim  Wadi Hatta     Wadi Faydh  Wadi Bid'ah  Wadi Rijma     Wadi Fizh     Wadi Bani Umar Al Gharbi    Wadi Suq  WAdi Al Jizi     Wadi Al Hilti     Wadi Ahin     Wadi Sakhin  Wadi As Sarami     Wadi Shafan     Wadi Al Hawasinah     Wadi Mashin  Al Mayha     Wadi Bani Ghafir     Wadi Al Fara'     Wadi Bani kharus     Wadi Ma'awil     Wadi Manumah  Wadi Taww  Total  Catchment Component Lower Malahah Lower Qawr Lower Al Hawarim Upper Hatta Lower Hatta Lower Faydh Lower Bid'ah Upper Rijma Lower Rijma Upper Fizh Lower Fizh Upper Bani Umar Al Gharbi Lower Bani Umar Al Gharbi Lower Suq Upper Al Jizi Lower Al jizi Upper Al Hilti Lower Al Hilti Upper Ahin Lower Ahin Lower Sakhin Upper As Sarami Lower As Sarami Upper Shafan Lower Shafan Upper Al Hawasinah Lower Al Hawasinah Lower Mashin Upper Al Mayha Lower Al Mayha Upper Bani Ghafir Lower Bani Ghafir Upper Al Fara Lower Al Fara Upper Bani Kharus Lower Bani Kharus Upper Ma'awil Lower Ma'awil Lower Manumah Lower Taww    Area (km2) 33 58 156 271 93 166 155 293 180 267 27 276 205 212 633 518 330 319 735 269 366 213 194 272 483 591 390 275 730 720 600 783 686 487 759 421 315 783 76 366 14701 Rainfall  (mm)  94 94 94 125  95 95 100  119  96 119  96 119  96 100  142  105  141  99 151  102  91 135  118  133  73 147  86 83 126  74 195  90 187  91 187  91 195  90 90 90 Rainfall Volume  (Mm3)  3.

7  0.0019  665  7.0053  1330  26.0023  1330  21.0032  1330  39.9  0.2  Total        120    125 .0  14  Mayhah‐Mabrah‐Hajir  25.4  0.8  3  Rajmi  10.0039  665  6.0032  1330  18.5  8  Ahin  11  0.9  0. 2011.6  0.3  0.  No.0011  1330  3.0041  665  17.0145  300  12.5  207.1  5  Suq  6.004  1330  15.9  15  Bani Ghafir  19.6  4  Fizh  15.   (Source: ICBA.9  17  Ma'awil  7.6  0.8  0.1  0.0023  1330  10.3  0.0056  1330  29. 2006).4  0.0029  1330  13.6  0.9  16  Fara  9.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table A 5. Estimated groundwater inflow from Jabal in Al Batinah study area.0014  1330  2.0  11  Shafan  19.1  6  Jizi  9.8  0.4  0.8  7  Hilti  11.0036  665  13.6  2  Bidáh  17.0034  665  8.8        269.2  10  Sarami  5.0023  1330  21. based on GRC.9  9  Sakhin  3.     Catchment Name  Catchment  Width (km)  Hydraulic  Gradient  Transmissivity  2 (m /day)  Groundwater  Throughflow  3 (Mm /Year)  1  Hawrim  15.1  0.9  0.7  13  Mashin  10.7  12  Hawasinah  8.

126   2002  2003  2004  2005  2006  2007  2008  2009  698  124  Okra  Raddish  Field Crops  0  1023  632  Cantaloupe  Others  758  Watermelon  0  150  Cauliflower  Squash  770  Cabbage  0  994  Onion  Carrot  427  Eggplant  0  927  Pepper  Garlic  1195  160  Potao  Cucumber  0  1205  0  0  0  0  733  688  1013  136  706  1518  449  1075  837  222  1334  0  1280  0  0  0  0  733  550  810  122  706  1670  449  860  837  112  1602  0  928  0  0  0  112  632  576  992  120  320  696  385  1024  1184  160  1200  0  662  107  156  35  120  632  576  992  120  320  960  400  1336  592  120  1320  0  719  59  66  59  115  630  576  994  118  316  873  387  1195  827  129  1242  0  745  60  66  60  70  664  578  919  118  439  916  406  1077  899  154  1319  0  724  55  62  57  117  648  566  874  114  461  996  386  1052  853  130  1300  0  1971  201  105  30  73  446  780  506  254  326  320  381  496  379  78  1408  0  1794  183  95  18  66  406  332  398  298  570  221  346  556  346  119  1457  0  1723  162  116  27  94  529  606  544  242  483  534  391  701  580  129  1493  0  1614  144  130  30  99  597  642  629  220  471  694  411  850  712  150  1517  0  2074  113  318  2  38  329  385  298  477  452  266  515  760  635  69  2882  121  0  3114  417  426  0  46  462  472  669  888  604  171  934  1137  642  46  2605  1711  2001  Tomato  2000  2010  1999  1997  Vegetables  1998     Crop Type  Table A 6.  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman . Cropped areas for Al Batinah modeled area (Feddan). Annex 2).   (Source: ICBA 2011.

127     3115  26  0  0  911  0  Sorghum   Sugarcane  Tobacco  Maize1  Others  Forages  0  Fruit crops    3781  86  290  Banana  Papaya  Others  79606  2562  Mango   Total  5251  52  Lemon  Coconut  31794  0  Others  Date palm  0  7568  Sorghum  Rhodes grass  13378  1178  Barely  Alfalfa  45  Wheat  77892  302  86  3781  2562  3185  52  31794  0  0  0  7520  13360  0  4077  0  0  0  42  1189  27  78012  400  120  3840  2640  3040  52  31794  0  0  0  7440  13600  0  960  0  0  48  3120  1200  27  64408  400  120  4000  2640  3040  522  31794  0  0  0  7440  1360  0  824  0  0  26  2808  1064  41  77328  400  160  4400  2640  3040  52  32000  0  0  0  7600  13600  0  332  0  508  28  2960  1120  40  77041  384  142  4234  2638  3015  50  31951  0  0  0  7465  13565  0  696  0  508  37  2911  1099  40  0  574  0  508  30  3010  1101  34  4934  0  2770  0  0  19  2234  1183  123  0  0  0  0  1254  0  0  1296  0  7315  10325  10444  4640  0  2307  0  462  19  2234  1183  123  402  160  4413  2570  2157  48  485  14  3358  1530  1654  16  485  14  3358  1530  1654  16  76479  76022  62780  62686  353  122  4082  2614  2695  48  31931  31924  25423  25423  0  0  0  7395  13448  13381  0  696  0  508  36  2938  1086  35  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 2733  0  3500  0  0  0  1030  934  338  0  1303  0  0  2085  1462  9752  12584  7492  0  1811  0  0  43  2745  1254  158  430  19  3675  1530  1639  15  381  14  3358  1530  1635  16  64933  66199  66637  430  19  3675  1530  1639  15  25423  25423  25423  0  1360  0  9976  6392  0  2162  0  0  32  2558  1227  141  122  70029  381  14  4246  1530  1635  16  25423  0  183  1550  16291  2864  0  1891  834  0  0  0  456  80  .

128   Vegetables  790  873  155  Cantaloupe  Okra  Raddish  1279  Others  Wheat  2.  Crop Type    34  0  0  1506  0  0  0  0  916  860  1266  170  883  1897  561  1344  1046  278  1668  1998    34  0  0  1600  0  0  0  0  916  688  1013  153  883  2087  561  1075  1046  140  2002  1999    51  0  0  1160  0  0  0  140  790  720  1240  150  400  870  481  1280  1480  200  1500  2000    50  0  0  827  134  195  44  150  790  720  1240  150  400  1200  500  1670  740  150  1650  2001  Table A 7. 2011). 0  Squash  56  0  0  0  Carrot     0  Garlic  Field Crops  948  187  Cauliflower  Watermelon  962  Cabbage  1242  534  Eggplant  Onion  1159  Pepper  200  2139  1494    1997  Potao  Cucumber  Tomato  1.    50  0  0  899  74  82  74  144  788  720  1242  148  395  1091  484  1494  1034  161  1553  2002    44  0  0  931  75  83  75  87  830  722  1149  148  549  1145  507  1346  1124  192  1649  2003  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   43  0  0  905  69  78  71  146  810  707  1093  142  576  1245  483  1315  1066  162  1625  2004    154  0  0  2464  251  131  38  91  557  975  633  317  407  400  476  620  474  97  1760  2005    154  0  0  2243  229  119  22  83  507  415  497  372  712  276  433  695  432  149  1821  2006    176  0  0  2154  202  145  34  117  661  757  680  302  604  667  489  876  725  161  1866  2007    197  0  0  2017  180  162  37  124  746  803  786  275  589  868  514  1062  890  187  1896  2008    423  0  0  2592  141  397  3  48  411  481  372  596  565  333  644  950  794  86  3603  2009    123  100  0  0  3892  521  532  0  58  578  590  836  1110  755  214  1167  1421  803  58  3256  2010  .   (Source: ICBA. Cropped areas in Al Batinah governorates (Feddan).

0  0  9460  16722  0  Others  Sorghum  Rhodes grass  Alfalfa  Forages  0  Tobacco  3.129     0  1139  Maize1  Others  Fruit crops    4726  107  363  Banana  Papaya  Others  99508  3203  Mango   Total  6564  65  39742  Lemon  Coconut  Date palm  0  0     4. 33  Sugarcane  0  3894  Sorghum      1472  Barely  97365  378  107  4726  3203  3981  65  39742  0  0  0  0  9400  16700  0  0  5096  0  0  0  52  1486  97515  500  150  4800  3300  3800  65  39742  0  0  0  0  9300  17000  0  0  1200  0  0  60  3900  1500  80510  500  150  5000  3300  3800  653  39742  0  0  0  0  9300  1700  0  0  1030  0  0  33  3510  1330  96660  500  200  5500  3300  3800  65  40000  0  0  0  0  9500  17000  0  0  415  0  635  35  3700  1400  96301  480  177  5293  3297  3769  62  39939  0  0  0  0  9331  16956  0  0  870  0  635  46  3639  1374  95599  441  153  5103  3268  3369  60  39914  0  0  0  0  9244  16810  0  0  870  0  635  45  3673  1358  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 95027  503  200  5516  3213  2696  60  39905  0  0  0  0  9144  16726  0  0  717  0  635  38  3762  1376  78475  606  18  4197  1913  2067  20  31779  0  0  1567  0  12906  5800  0  0  2884  0  578  24  2792  1479  78358  606  18  4197  1913  2067  20  31779  0  0  1620  0  13055  6167  0  0  3462  0  0  24  2792  1479  81166  538  24  4594  1913  2049  19  31779  0  0  1700  0  12470  7990  0  0  2702  0  0  40  3198  1534  82749  538  24  4594  1913  2049  19  31779  0  0  1629  0  12190  9365  0  0  2264  0  0  54  3431  1567  83296  476  18  4197  1913  2044  20  31779  0  0  2606  1828  15730  3416  0  0  4375  0  0  0  1288  1167  124  87536  476  18  5308  1913  2044  20  31779  0  0  229  1938  20364  3580  0  0  2364  1042  0  0  0  570  .

4 554.3 804.1 580.4 387.2 744.8  882.6 620.3             Mar  1121  1009 840.4 781.8  804.3 562.8 413.7 948.1  140.6 694.6       656.4 715       1139    858.6 573.3 430.6 1218 324. 2011).5 607.7 784.6 1009 896.5 467.8 983.5 538.4 543.2 1352 Jul  1134  1020 850.    Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 1348  1213 1011 1213 1078 1351 1483 1418 1157 May  1261  1135 946 1135 1009 755.5 128.2 1020 906.4 281.4 591.3 507.9 Oct  623.9 561.4 509.8 1079 Sept  868.8 955.5 456. Crop water requirements for Al Batinah governorates (m3/Feddan) (Source: ICBA.1 663.2 525.4  781.5 484.5  490.1 686.7 735.9 193.6  551.5  551.2  530.1  675.8  561.4 1387 1109 Jun  1229  1106 921.6  Feb  893.8 Nov  522.1 296.7 490.3 574.2 311.5  459.6 1106 983.8 574.4 670. of  days 980.8 Jan  612.6 349.5 499.2  470 391.130     Crop cycle   Oct‐Feb  Oct‐Feb  Nov‐Feb  Oct‐Jan  Feb‐May  Feb‐Jun  Oct‐Jan  Oct‐Dec  Jan‐Mar  Jan‐Apr  Perennial  Jan‐Mar  Jul‐Sept  Jan‐Apr  Apr‐Jun  Jul‐Sept  Perennial  Perennial  Perennial  Perennial  Perennial  Crop/Plant  Onion Tomato Pepper* Potatoes Watermelon* Sweet Melon Cucumber* Cabbage Lettuce Wheat Alfalfa Maize1 Maize2 Barely Sorghum1 Sorghum2 Dates Mango Lime Banana Rhodes grass                 82  81  105  92  90     105  63  92  105  150  123  132  177  150  150  No.4  588.1  765.3 403.8  674 759.9 607.8 417.6  481 481.5 491.2 565.5 1233 905.9 1110 1372 1247 Aug  11132  10019 8349 10019 8906 2348 2726 2946 2942 1906 12245 3240 1982 1616 1164 4639 2714 2159 1176 2761 2629 Total  125  10337  9304 7753 9303 8269 2180 2532 2735 2732 1770 11371 3008 1840 1500 1081 4308 2520 2004 1092 2564 2441 .4 255.8 Dec  538  484.6 651.7 Apr  Table A 8.9 621.6 882.6 469.3  311.8 491.8 1144 960.1 1161 175.

0 1.0 4.9 1.2 0.2 1.2 1.0 0.6 1.131   1500  1886  2520  1886  1886  1886  1886  1886  1886  1886  Cabbage Cauliflower Watermelon  Cantaloupe Okra Raddish Garlic Carrot Squash Others 3008  2735  2356  2700  2700  Wheat Barely Sorghum  Sugarcane Tobacco    2441  Onion Field Crops 1886  Eggplant    2481 1092  Pepper Vegetables 1857 2004  Potao 2473 2473 2493 2693 2962       1857 1857 1857 1857 1857 1857 1857 1477 2404 1857 1075 1974 1064 1081  Cucumber 2524 Weight ed  Average     2564  Average  CWR (Drip  & Surface)  m3/Feddan  Tomato Vegetables    0.0 4.8 1.7 24.2 9.9 0.3 1.7 1.3 2010 .0 0.6 3.1 1.0 1.7 2.8 3.2 0.1 11.3 0.4 2008 0.7 2.8 0.3 1.2 4.8 0.7 1.0 0.0 0. Agricultural water demand for Al Batinah  governorates (Mm3).2 6.6 1.0 2005 0.3 34.2 0.8 0.1 1.2 1.1 10.1 0.3 1.0 1.8 0.3 1.1 7.4 1.2 1.1 0.9 1.4 1.2 5.6 5.0 2.1 9.0 1.6 0.4 0.5 0.0 1.2 0.7 1.8 0.3 0.1 1.0 1.3 0.0 1.0 0.1 0.7 1.0 0.2 1.0 0.0 0.7 1.4 0.2 1.1 1.2 23.4 1.8 0.4 1.2 0.9 0.1 10.4 2002 Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman       1.3 1.1 27.1 1.6 4.1 0.5 0.7 3.3 2.7 0.0 0.1 1997 0.3 0.1 0.7 3.2 0.5 3.0 0.1 10.4 1.2 0.1 10.1 0.1 4.9 4.5 19.4 3.3 1.3 4.3 0.3 0.2 0.8 1.5 3.6 3.1 1.6 0.1 0.8 2.0 0.9 0.6 1.4 0.3 1.5 3.8 8.0 0. 2011).5 0.4 2.2 0.2 5.1 27.1 5.3 1.7 0.1 0.4 1.5 21.5 0.3 5.0 0.5 5.4 0.2 11.5 3.4 0.0 0.4 1.9 3.6 4.2 4.2 2006 0.2 1.2 4.3 2009 126  0.9 4.9 1.7 2.3 1.7 1.2 0.3 0.1 9.0 0.4 1.0 1.3 0.7 2.0 1.4 0.9 1.6 2.1 1.0 4.6 2.0 0.9 4.5 0.6 3.0 0.8 1.5 3.0 0.0 0.1 23.1 10.0 3.7 3.7 0.0 0.2 0.2 5.8 0.3 0.1 0.0 0.9 0.5 0.7 0.2 1.5 0.2 0.3 0.7 1.0 0.2 0.6 2.0 0.1 4.1 9.1 2.2 23.3 0.3 1.0 0.2 2.6 2004 1.2 1.0 3.2 0.4 1.5 0.0 1.9 1.7 0.3 0.4 1.1 0.5 0.5 5.0 1.7 2001 Table A 9.0 0.8 0.2 5.8 4.8 1.7 4.1 0.3 2.5 0.1 7.7 0.3 0.6 0.0 0.3 2.2 4.7 0.3 1.0 0.6 2.   (Source: ICBA.3 4.8 0.8 1.0 1.5 0.4 4.0 0.7 3.2 0.6 23.0 2.2 4.0 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.2 2.3 2000 1.1 23.2 23.  1.0 0.9 0.7 1999 0.3 0.2 26.1 1.1 0.3 2007 0.2 1.4 0.5 0.8 0.6 1.4 27.7 2003 1.7 1.6 1.0 1.8 1998 0.0 1.0 0.2 0.6 2.2 4.7 0.3 0.7 0.

8 4.1 4.7    19.3 0.6 367.3 0.1 14.2 292.4 0.1 0.0 859 496.6 367.2 54.2 43.7 4.7 6.1 17.6 2.4 235.0 107.4 19.0 108.0 324.6 23.0 702 383.0 22.8 6.0 109.0 0.3 19.0 4.8 17.2 32.0 48.2 211.5 52.6 0.8 17.0 5.9 4.9 34.0 Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 851 489.8 17.8 33.6 9.6 8.2 43.0 48.7 5.0 0.1 4.7 234.8 2.0 5.3 0.3 214.7 319.3 4.4 0.2 0.0 665 379.8 17.2 4.1 19.4 273.3 0.8 34.1 32.0 0.5 1.0 678 378.3 365.2 34.1 0.4 251.9 33.7 0.132       2146 10337  10854  10854        8269  8657  7753  9303  9304  8657  8657  Rhodes  grass  Sorghum Others Forages Fruit crops   Date palm Coconut Lemon Mango  Banana Papaya Others Total Fruit crops   10178 11371  Alfalfa       8524 8524 9160 9160 7633 8524 8142       7840 11196       Forages    2473    2700  Others 1743 Field Crops 2251  Maize1 875 509.0 0.0 14.8 17.1 78.4 259.4 0.6 1.2 0.3 10.5 3.8 0.2 4.9 33.7 322.2 43.7 0.3 0.0 847 488.8 0.0 107.0 215.5 0.8 1.2 292.4 49.8 0.8 0.0 0.6 368.8 1.0 105.4 0.0 0.0 108.4 3.0 0.5 14.6 6.4 0.9 43.9 19.1 .2 0.3 23.2 3.7 320.9 1.0 858 489.9 0.8 1.8 0.0 215.6 19.9 2.6 367.6 0.9 3.7 5.9 56.8 1.6 18.0 0.5 21.2 45.9 57.7 322.1 2.4 73.8 0.8 17.5 0.2 0.9 7.2 32.0 688 383.5 321.8 12.9 0.6 15.2 0.4 180.8 211.2 47.4 0.6 365.6 0.6 365.7 0.0 0.0 865 499.4 242.6 365.6 0.4 101.1 33.0 660 379.2 118.0 860 495.2 4.1 211.4 286.2 292.4 22.5 18.8 34.2 0.0 2.0 143.0 853 487.0 127  721 389.2 20.6 18.3 212.1 17.6 1.8 0.1 21.2 2.0 0.6 0.2 1.2 56.7 13.2 292.4 19.0 140.3 215.1 316.8 0.0 0.0 0.7 34.0 150.0 148.8 29.2 47.2 292.4 51.1 0.4 19.7 54.6 19.2 292.0 106.2    319.2 32.0 107.

6 0.1 0.1 8.1 8.8 1.1 8.7 0.9 1.2 0.0 0.0 1.9 3.2 2.3 0.0 0.6 0.0 0.4 15.8 1.4 0.0 0.4  1.1 18.4 1.2 0.1 2.4 0.5 0.7 2.2 1.5 1.0  1.2 2006 0.4 1.1 7.7 0.2 3.8  0.6  0.0 1.8 1998 0.3 2.3 0.5  2.3 2.1  18.8 0.5 0.9  1.1  0.5 0.0 1.8 0.1 8.2  1.5 1.1 0.5 2.6 1.5 18.2 2009       1.5 1.1 0.8 1.3  1.3 3.1 2.1 18.0 2005 0.5 0.6 0.3 2007 0.8 0.1 1.7 0.1 22.8 0.5  1.9 1.2  3.1 0.3 4.4  2010  .8  1.0 0.1 6.9 0.133   1886  2441  1500  1886  2520  1886  1886  1886  1886  1886  1886  1886  Eggplant Onion Cabbage Cauliflower Watermelon Cantaloupe Okra Raddish Garlic Carrot Squash Others 3008  2735  2356  2700  2700  2251  Wheat Barely Sorghum  Sugarcane Tobacco Maize1    1092  Pepper Field Crops 2004  Potao    1081  Cucumber Vegetables 2524  1743 2473 2473 2493 2693 2962 1857 1857 1857 1857 1857 1857 1857 2481 1857 1477 2404 1857 1075 1974 1064 2524 Average CWR  Weighted (Drip&Surface)  Average  m3/Feddan  Tomato Vegetables    0.2 2.0 1.3 0.9 1.0 0.5 1.9 0.9 0.0 0.3 3.9 4.6 0.2 4.9 1.1  0.7 0.8 0.8 0.1 22.6 0.8 3.9 1.6 1.5  0.9 0.0 0.5 19.2 1.9 1997 0.3 1.3 0.8 1.4 0.8 0. 2011)  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 0.6 0.4  0.1 1.1 18.5  0.4 0.1  7.4  1.1 6.8 0.4 0.1 7.0 0.3 1.9 2.1 0.6 1.9 0.0 1.3 1.5 3.1 21.2  0.1 21.1  8.0 1.0 1.7 1.9 0.1 0.3 3.2 3.2 2.8 1.2 3.3 3.2 4.0 1.0 0.3 2008 128  0.4 0.4 2.2 1.2 0.4  0.0 0.6 1999 0.0 0.0  1.3 1.0 0.9  0.0 0.3 1.1 8.0  0.2 2.2  3.1 8.9 1.7 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.2 0.9 1.3 1.7 1.2 2.2 4.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5  2002  Table A 10.7 2004 0.4 0.0 0.5 0.8 3.1 3.3 2.4  0.5 0.2 2.0  0.1 0.2 0.8 2.3 0.8 0.0 0.9 0.1  1.8 1.0 0.5  2.2 0.0 0.0 0.5 0.4  0.3 1.8 0.1 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.0 0.1 4.3 1.0 0.0 0.0  1.2 4.2 2.7 0.1 0.0  1.0 2.0  0.1 0.0 0.1 0.5 3.2 0.5 0.1 7.0 0.2 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.7 1.1 0.0 0.4 17.1 4.8 2001       0.2 4.9 1.1  0.8 1.5 1.3  27.5 0.7 3.7 3.0 0.2  2.3 0.4 0.1 0.8 3.9  0.3  0.0 0.1 0.0  1.2 0.0 0.3 0.4 2.3 1.6 0.1 0.9  1.1 18.7 1.9 0.3 0.0  0.3 0.1 0.1 4.2 1.6 0.5 0.4 2000 0.3 1.3 1.6 0.3 0.2 3.7 0.1 0.6 0.8  0.3 3.6 0.8  6.3 0. Agricultural water demand for Al Batinah model area (Mm3) (Source: ICBA.1 0.7 0.8 2003 0.4 0.9 1.3 1.3 0.1 0.

7 27.6 172.7 18.5 45.2 5.0 292.0 1.9  171.9 201.7 26.4 3.1 0.0  1.2 39.2 38.7 687 397.1 6.1 169.2  233.9 678 390.5 294.7 58.1 0.2 41.7 9.4 259.4 532 303.5 407.4  43.1 0.6 18.2 233.5 257.3 26.2 0.1 26.6 172.5 3.1 233.3  26.9 194.5 27.6 0.2 42.3 0.0 15.1 34.6 12.0 562 306.1 14.4 4.5 169.2 0.2 94.0  0.3 18.1  1.4 3.5 3.1 13.6     15.7 2.3 0.8 36.3 0.4     8.5 292.8  187.2 38.0 0.0 120.7 80.5 0.8 15.0 85.9 17.5 27.8  27.2 0.5 6.1 34.5 144.8 15.9 207.3 2.1  0.6 3.2 233.8 0.6 0.8 14.4 27.8 255.1 15.8 39.5 292.1 129  542 302.5 0.8 39.3 3.9 1.0 15.2 11.0  15.0 0.5 Fruit 8657  8269  Date palm Others    Fruit crops   8657     Forages Papaya 10854  Others 9304  10854  Banana 2146 10337  Rhodes  grass  Sorghum 7840 10178 11371  Alfalfa 11196    Forages 2473    2700  Field Crops Others 683 389.0 0.1 26.4 18.6 16.4 686 391.5 11.3 5.0 85.9     229.9 0.9  681 391.7 0.7 550 306.2 1.8  14.6 528 303.4 0.0 84.8 14.5 255.7 0.7  0.5 0.5 45.1 34.6 8524 8524 9160 9160 7633 8524 8142 256.0 87.3  .6 0.1 0.0 15.8 14.4 1.5 292.7 253.0 114.0 112.1 170.0 0.0 169.2  577  311.1  44.6  3.3 0.1 62.3   692 399.1 15.2 0.9 1.5 257.0 11.0     257.3 15.5 0.6 11.134     7753  9303  Lemon Mango     8657  Coconut 700 Total 2.9 218.9 2.1 7.9 1.2 233.8 14.5 293.0 118.5  0.9 188.1 233.5 0.7 34.4 172.3 26.0 0.7  1.0 0.0 86.5 3.9 Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 688  396.1 0.3 27.8 15.6  5.7 4.1 2.7 0.7  3.8  3.3 26.5  294.0 0.9 1.7 4.0 0.5 293.3 0.0  0.8 14.8 17.1 0.4 4.2 15.0 87.5 45.0  85.1 23.0 85.

    1982  Agricultural  Municipal  Northern  Agricultural Batinah  115 4  119 42 Municipal Total 1 Southern  Batinah  43  162 1983  129 4  133 46 1 47  180 1984  143 4  147 51 2 53  200 1985  159 5  164 57 2 59  223 1986  184 6  190 63 2 65  255 1987  204 6  210 70 2 72  282 1988  228 7  235 79 2 81  316 1989  247 8  255 87 3 90  345 1990  281 9  290 97 3 100  390 1991  310 10  320 108 3 111  431 1992  329 10  339 119 4 123  462 1993  365 11  376 133 4 137  513 1994  378 12  390 148 5 153  543 1995  388 12  400 165 5 170  570 1996  436 13  449 166 5 171  620 1997  483 15  498 167 5 172  670 1998  506 16  521 168 5 173  694 1999  507 16  523 169 5 174  697 2000  507 16  523 170 5 175  698 2001  510 16  526 171 5 176  702 2002  505 16  521 172 5 177  698 2003  498 15  514 172 5 177  691 2004  458 14  472 173 5 178  650 2005  408 13  421 174 5 179  600 2006  369 11  380 175 5 180  560 2007  358 11  369 176 5 181  550 2008  348 11  359 176 5 181  540 2009  351 11  361 176 5 181  542 2010  384 12  396 176 5 181  577         130    135 .   (Source: ICBA. Estimated historical abstraction rates in Al Batinah  governorates (Mm3). 2011).Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table A 11.

10  9  Sakhin  0.13  0.07  11  Shafan  0.17  0.04  3  Rajmi  0.039  0.09  0.03  2  Bidáh  0.71    131    136 .07     Total  1.06  5  Suq  0.11  0.029  0.  (Source: Modified after GRC.181  1.05  4  Fizh  0.Livestock water requirements in Al Batinah governorates.05  0.05  0.  No.  Catchment Name  Livestock 2003  (GRC) (Mm3/yr)  Livestock demand (census 2005)  1  Hawrim  0.18  8  Ahin  0.04  10  Sarami  0.02  0.25  15  Bani Ghafir  0. : Livestock water demand in main catchments of Al Batinah governorates.061  0.7  3     Table A 13.  No  Animal  Range of Per day  water requirements  (Liters)  Average Water  Requirements  (Liters)  Number of  animals  Livestock Water  Demand (m3/year)  1  Camel  22‐50  36  5626  73926  2  Cattle  20‐50  35  66411  848401  3  Sheep  3‐5  4  110572  161435  4  Goat  3‐5  4  430005  627807    Total        1711569    Total (Mm )        1.124  0.069  0.16  16  Fara  0.18  7  Hilti  0.035  0. 2003: Assumption Livestock per catchment is assumed similar to GRC  2003 distribution).   (Source: Agriculture Census 2004‐2005).07  13  Mashin  0.19  12  Hawasinah  0.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table A 12.03  0.124  0.13  14  Mayhah‐Mabrah‐Hajir  0.05  0.09  6  Jizi  0.

8  Total     Table A 14.741  1.21  2.031  2.4  0.6  0.3  Modern  3 (Mm )  Water demand  (Mm3)   (Census 2005)    Sprinkler   Flood  3 3 (m /  (Mm )  Feddan)        Crop water requirements      Flood  3 (m /  Feddan)     70%     60%  69%  60%  60%  60%  53%  60%  98%  60%  74%  53%  64%  69%  90%  97%  97%  Modern  Percentage of  irrigation  technology (ICBA  2010)        48%  30%  46%  30%  30%  30%  17%  30%  96%  30%  55%  17%  37%  46%  82%  94%  95%  Percentage of  irrigation  technology  (Census 2005)    Flood  Modern            Vegetables  Cropped  areas in  2010  (Feddan)  Major crops  (Batina  region)        1.5  1.886  1.75  Total water  demand  (40% Flood  & 60% drip)  .886  1.1  1.3  6.5  0.  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman       1  0.735  3.2  9.4  3.9  0.1  0.1  8.176  2.525  2.6  0.23  1.1  0.159  1.43  1.8  0.71  0.886  1.5  Modern  3 (Mm )  Waterd demand  (m3)   (ICBA 2010)            132  1.886  1.741  1.3  0.031  1.3  1.1  1.564        1.8  0.1  1.1  1.4  0.12  1.500  2.2  0  0.1  0.164  2.3  1  0.4  8.12  0  0.520  1. 2011).385  2.2  0.7  0.3  Flood  3 (Mm )        0.7  1  0.441  1.2  2.7  0.5           0.1  0.031  2.761        2.253  1.6  0.946  3.7  0.23  0.092  2.6  0.886  1.777  1.2  0  0.1  1.008  1.5  0  0.5  0.7  0.1  1  0.2  24.031  2.004  1.5  1.59  2.741  1.6  4.137   100  570  Wheat  Barely  96%  75%     70%     3892  Others  54%  52%  521  Squash  70%  70%  70%  83%  70%  4%  70%  45%  83%  63%  54%  18%  6%  5%  15791  532  Carrot  Total  Vegetables  Field Crops  0  578  Okra  Garlic  590  Cantaloupe  58  836  Watermelon  Reddish  1110  755  Cauliflower  214  1167  Eggplant  Cabbage  1421  Pepper  Onion  803  58  3256  Potato  Cucumber  Tomato        4%  25%  54%  42%  30%  40%  31%  40%  40%  40%  47%  40%  2%  40%  26%  47%  36%  31%  10%  3%  3%  Flood        46%  58%     2.741  1.07  8.3  0.741  1.616  2.741  1.326  1.741  1.8  1.7  2.34  34  8.24  2.008  1.4  0.17  1.1  2.7  0.741  1.33  1.714  2.1  0.3  2.5  0.031  2.031  2.886  1.031  2.629  2.9  0.9  0  0.6  2.7  1.031  1.886  2.850  997  2. : Reduced water requirements through using innovative irrigation methods (Source: ICBA.6  0.1  8.240  2.77  0.5  1.8  0.886  1.1  0.3  0  0  0.3  2.08  1.1  8.5  1.6  0  0.6  0.3  0.031  2.4  1.081  2.7  1.9  0.3  1.886  1.3  0.3  0  0.6  0.1  1.366  Drip  3 (m /  Feddan)           2.741  2.

2  59.318  2.82  19.02  4.1  170.511  2.94  6.46  275.323  10.4  4.511  1.575  2.371  2.9  0.3  0.2  0.657  8.770  2.8  3.633  7.09  0  0  0  .634  2.350  2.318  2.2  0  5.1  25.323  8.542  10.3  0.138     2364  4076     Others  Total Field  Crops  Forages  229  Others  476  Others  87536  18  Papaya  Total  5308  Banana  41558  1913  Mango   Total Fruits  2044  20  70%  89%  95%  95%  89%  82%  74%  95%  94%        31779  70%  26111  Lemon  Coconut  Date palm  Total  Forages  Fruit crops    93%  1938  75%  15%  20364  95%  95%  92%  96%  Rhodes  grass  Sorghum  3580     1042  Maize1  Alfalfa  91%  0  Tobacco  95%  0  Sugarcane  91%  0  Sorghum   30%     11%  5%  5%  11%  18%  26%  5%  6%        30%  25%  7%  85%  5%        9%  5%  8%  4%  5%  9%  50%  54%  54%  50%  46%  42%  54%  53%  39%  42%  53%  9%  54%  52%  54%  52%  54%  54%  52%              50%     46%  46%  50%  54%  58%  46%  47%     61%     58%  47%  91%  46%     48%     46%  48%  46%  46%  48%  9.3  0.9  0  0  0        133  718  397.588  7.1  0.6  0.180  10.9  2.9  2.5  0.5  52.2  53.753  8.81  2.349  9.019  10.2  225.3  0  15.532                 512  4.588  8.75  2.318  1.906  2.6  2.7  14.269  7.2  237  749.7  1.9  1.511  2.303  7.991  7.1  21.2  3.657  8.6  4.68  0.6  0.906  8.7  22  26.7  10  9.18  55.3  186.8  38.2  2.704  2.2  0  0  0        2.156  7.4  2  0.2  0  0  0        856  175.1  10  8.1     5  0.1  0  0  0                       49.79  222.496  2.7  0.132  12.27  10.726                    7.1  2.99  17.2  6.304  9.963  2.704  1.1  5.1  18.7  6.4  17.68  0.5 5  0.2  301.2  0  0  0        579  221.704  2.2  7.019  8.71  46.7  2.2  298.7  4.04  4.1  128  223.657  9.1  2  0.337  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman                   8.245  2.1  200.991  7.323  9.8  0.991  8.7  19.012  9.1  30.348  11.9  47.5  317.337  11.5  1.

4  83  469  319  144  7  469  1995  204  488  119.5  145  524  374  149  1  524  2001  35  218  143.7  117  468  259  190  19  468  1993  57  217  80.7  1  813  365  176  272  813  1996  141  380  119.3  105  459  287  162  10  459  1994  62  218  105.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table  A  15.3  49  461  233  210  17  461  1992  93  201  56.  :  Groundwater  balance  for  the  proposed  recharge  dams  case  under  BAU  scenario  (Mm3)  (Source: ICBA.5  220  373  112  259  2  373  1985  24  140  5.0  108  504  376  128  0  504  2002  61  321  147.8  39  569  377  128  63  569  2003  52  260  150.2  73  423  138  214  70  423  1987  105  381  10.3  209  602  91  397  114  602  1983  59  188  0.1  46  453  189  228  35  453  1990  93  350  29. 2011).9  104  502  381  119  1  501  134    139 .9  37  510  210  226  74  510  1991  49  318  44.2  200  568  372  189  7  568  2000  36  210  132.  Year  Recharge  (with)  Inflow  from  Jabal  Seawater  intrusion  (with)  Removed  Total  from  Inflow  storage  Abstraction  Outflow  Storage  gain  Total  Outflow  1982  136  258  0.9  5  646  366  192  88  646  1997  268  515  96.1  68  529  379  127  22  529  2004  36  205  156.8  0  880  368  254  257  880  1998  96  389  108.7  39  631  370  232  29  631  1999  73  177  118.5  187  435  101  313  21  435  1984  19  132  2.1  38  534  154  232  149  534  1988  131  323  13.6  177  347  125  220  2  347  1986  61  280  8.2  33  500  170  245  85  500  1989  90  295  22.

6  122  525  395  108  22  525  2015  134  277  175.8  26  661  395  228  39  661  2028  81  177  135.5  98  522  395  126  1  522        135    140 .2  194  588  395  184  9  588  2029  59  209  147.5  27  570  395  152  23  570  2019  107  344  150.1  54  528  393  119  17  528  2010  88  241  160.9  72  577  395  151  30  576  2023  82  216  158.9  25  550  387  121  42  550  2007  123  456  149.8  171  514  395  118  0  513  2014  86  139  178.0  38  527  395  118  14  527  2011  155  259  149.9  135  550  391  131  28  550  2009  69  244  161.0  49  611  395  142  73  610  2012  83  188  161.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 2005  55  266  159.7  0  891  395  241  255  891  2027  118  389  127.3  23  674  395  142  137  674  2017  153  320  151.5  16  609  395  165  49  609  2021  127  197  149.4  10  677  395  186  96  677  2026  251  521  118.9  79  536  395  138  3  536  2024  191  490  144.3  129  545  395  149  1  545  2030  51  217  156.3  14  742  389  146  207  742  2008  29  226  159.6  3  829  395  171  263  829  2025  142  383  142.9  34  515  383  120  12  515  2006  96  272  157.1  26  613  395  122  95  612  2016  107  380  163.9  11  635  395  158  83  635  2018  95  293  154.7  14  616  395  158  64  616  2020  128  313  152.5  98  572  395  160  17  572  2022  140  210  154.7  99  532  395  132  5  531  2013  40  133  170.

: Treated wastewater quantities and uses by wilayat in Al Batinah governorates.  Wilayat Name  Owner Name  Awabi  MRMWR  Barka  Ajit Kumar karasandas  Sohar Poultry Company  S.O.   (Source: ICBA.A.G  Al Khabourah   Liwa    Ar Rustaq  Ground  recharge  3 (m /day)   Reuse  Others  3 (m /day)  300           300  150           150  240     240        Total use  3 (m /day)  250           250  AECO Developments  700           700  Ministry Of Commerce And  Industry  100           100  GULF MUSHROOM PRODUCTS  4           4  AES Barka  1           1  AES Barka  1           1  AES Barka  5           5  MRMWR  2000           2000  MRMWR  79           79  Royal Oman Police  23           23  155           155  MRMWR  Alhassan Engineering Co. 2011).  S.G        Dust con  70  70  130           130  4           4  MRMWR  189           189  Ministry Of Social Affairs  120           120  Ministry Of Defence  700           700  Ministry Of Defence  5           5  104           104  SOHAR PORTPROJECT    Industrial  use  3 (m /day)   MRMWR  L&T Modular Fabrication LLC  Al Musanaah   Irrigation  use  (m3/day)   Royal Oman Police  136    141 .A.O.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table A 16.

5     Ministry Of Education  125     MRMWR  Bahwan Group Of Companies     288  187.  200  Al Manara International  (Interbeton)  180           180  Bahwan Group Of Companies  180           180  1000           1000        5           5  Majis Industrial Services SAOC  29           29  Sohar Aluminum Company  30           30  Sohar Aluminum Company  30           30  Larsen & Toubro (Oman)LLC  500           500  Bahwan Group Of Companies  700           700  L&T Modular Fabrication LLC  130           130  Sohar Aluminum Company  Oman Methonol Company LLC  HMR Env Eng Services     200  25  25  80  450  80  137    142 .Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Saham  Ministry Of Defence  288     Ministry Of Health  62.5     250        125  500           500  700           700  46           46  Ministry Of Education  180           180  Ministry Of Social Affairs  120           120        500        Royal Oman Police  Ministry Of Health  Shinas       MRMWR  Royal Oman Police     Royal Oman Police  Sohar        80  80     500  26  wadi  26  41           41  Oman Engine Oil  5           5  JGC Corporation ( Oman )  5           5  Al‐Jazeera Tube Mills Co.

 For Industrial  Estates  582           582  Ministry Of Commerce And  Industry  50           50  Ministry Of Health  23           23  Royal Oman Police  138           138        75        Ministry Of Education  Oman Mining Company     Sohar Municipality  Ministry Of Education  As Suwayq    Ministry Of Health     MRMWR        17074  220  80  40     560  478.5  1665  160  40  75  595  18708      Table A 17.375  138    143 .000  May‐96  0  16  0  Jun‐96  0  45  0  May‐02  NA  240  ‐  Apr‐88  171. 2004).  Main wadis in Salalah and their mean annual runoff volume (m3)   (Source: Modified after MRMWR.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Majis Industrial Services SAOC  1445        Alwadi Hotel  180           180  OMAN SUN FARMS  300           300  70           70  360        360  3375           3375  100           100  Ministry Of Health  80        Ministry Of Defence  80           80  Public Estab.000  50  1.30%  Sahalnawt  272  610. 2 Wadi  Area (km )  Event Date  Runoff  3 Volume (m )  Mean  Catchment  Rainfall (mm)  Runoff  Volume  Coefficient  Average  Volume  3 (m )  Jarsis  100  Dec‐85  245.000  0  ‐  245.

60%  Mar‐89     140  0  Apr‐92  21.000  20  16%  May‐96  7.50%  Apr‐88  42.000  6.453.000  68  9.341.80%  May‐02  NA  160  ‐  Apr‐88  6.000  45  2.000  80  19%  Mar‐89     190  0%  Apr‐92  106.20%  Jul‐Aug 1998  1.20%  Dec‐96  56.553.000.000  20  1.000  130  178%  Jun‐96  25.000  150  11.30%  May‐96  5.260.750  1.839.917.190.000  40  10%  May‐96  280.898.332.30%  May‐02  171.000  105  10%  Apr‐92  1.000  50  0.000  34  2820%  Apr‐88  5.914.000  40  1.000  150  22%  May‐02  NA  160  ‐  8.500    139    144 .058.888.60%  Oct‐99  115.218.715.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Arzat  Hamran  149  4  Darbat  394  Upper (Falls)  Darbat  Lower  (Taqah)  418  Mar‐89  2.40%  May‐96  300.30%  Jun‐96  134.000  50  4%  May‐02  34.500.000  40  0.000  80  19%  Mar‐89  NA  190  ‐  Apr‐92  1.000  40  45%  Jun‐96  7.000  120  0.333  5.000  32  1.000  40  33%  Jun‐96  13.000  37  0.000  152  310%  Sep‐Oct 1998  3.

 Main catchments  and catchment areas in Al Batinah  governorates (Source: ICBA.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Table A 18.  Catchment Name  Area (Km2)  Wadi Malahah  32  Wadi Qawr  61  Wadi Al Hawarim  155  Wadi Hatta  162  Wadi Faydh  163  Wadi Bid'ah  154  Wadi Rijma  393  Wadi Fizh  184  Wadi Bani Umar Al Gharbi  386  Wadi Suq  211  Wadi Al Jizi  693  Wadi Al Hilti  594  Wadi Ahin  660  Wadi Sakhin  366  Wadi As Sarami  406  Wadi Shafan  755  Wadi Al Hawasinah  894  Wadi Mashin  274  Al Mayha‐Mabrah‐Al Hajir System  1. 2011).387  Wadi Bani Ghafir  1.252  Wadi Al Fara'  1169  Wadi Bani kharus  1145  Wadi Ma'awil  1096  Wadi Taww  365  Wadi Manumah  24  Total  12982    140    145 .

19  11  WAdi Al Jizi  Upper Al Jizi  633  142  16.7     0. Mean annual water surface inflow and outflow in the main catchments in Al Batinah  governorates (Mm3) (Source: ICBA.7     0.7     0.18     Lower Rijma  180  96  0.4  6.7     0.35     0.10  4  Wadi Hatta  Upper Hatta  271  125  18. modified after GRC.04  3  Wadi Al Hawarim  Lower Al Hawarim  156  94  0.12  Upper Fizh  267  119  13  4.35     0.10  12  13  Wadi Al Hilti  Wadi Ahin  141    146 .9     0.7     0.  Catchment Name  Catchment  Component  Area  2 (km )  Rainfall  (mm)  Runoff   Percentage  of Rainfall  Surface Inflow  from Jabal  Catchments  (Mm3)  Surface  out Flow  to the  Coast  (Mm3)  1  Wadi Malahah  Lower Malahah  33  94  0. 2011.35     0.20     Lower Al Hilti  319  99  0.57     Lower Al jizi  518  105  0.7     0.9  13.7     0.14  8  9  Wadi Fizh  Wadi Bani Umar Al  Gharbi  10  Wadi Suq  Lower Suq  212  100  0.2  5.2  14.11  Upper Ahin  735  151  11.22     Lower Hatta  93  95  0. 2006).06  5  Wadi Faydh  Lower Faydh  166  95  0.19  Upper Al Hilti  330  141  11.7     0.11  6  Wadi Bid'ah  Lower Bid'ah  155  100  0.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Table A 19.7     0.26     Lower Bani Umar Al  Gharbi  205  96  0.21     Lower Ahin  269  102  0.12     Lower Fizh  27  96  0.02  Upper Bani Umar Al  Gharbi  276  119  13  4.11  7  Wadi Rijma  Upper Rijma  293  119  12  4.02  2  Wadi Qawr  Lower Qawr  58  94  0.  No.

16  19  Al Mayha‐Mabrah‐ Al Hajir System  Upper Al Mayha‐ Mabrah‐Al Hajir  730  126  12  11.85          142    147 .5     0.3     0.44     Lower As Sarami  194  118  0.5  5.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 14  Wadi Sakhin  Lower Sakhin  366  91  0.23  15  Wadi As Sarami  Upper As Sarami  213  135  12  3.49     Lower Bani Ghafir  783  90  2.60  8.2  3.7     0.77     Lower Ma'awil  783  90  2.1  3.39     Lower Bani Kharus  421  91  2.3     1.5  2.30  16  17  Wadi Shafan  Wadi Al Hawasinah  18  Wadi Mashin  Lower Mashin  275  83  0.25  Upper Al Hawasinah  591  147  4.76     Total     14701        95.16  Upper Shafan  272  133  9.1     1.7     0.7     0.62  20  21  22  23  Wadi Bani Ghafir  Wadi Al Fara'  Wadi Bani kharus  Wadi Ma'awil  24  Wadi Manumah  Lower Manumah  76  90  4.77     Lower Al Fara  487  91  2.29     Lower Shafan  483  73  0.31  25  Wadi Taww  Lower Taww  366  90  2.7     0.65     Lower Al Hawasinah  390  86  0.7     0.3     1.48  Upper Al Fara  686  187  4.88  Upper Ma'awil  315  195  4.3     0.02  Upper Bani Kharus  759  187  4.4  7.37  Upper Bani Ghafir  600  195  6.04     Lower Al Mayha‐ Mabrah‐Al Hajir  720  74  0.9     0.5  6.

9  0.3  10  1990  2.8 21.4 20  2006  4.2  33.1  0  1989  6.3  0.8 0.1  1.8 5.6 4.0  0.1  5.7  14  0    143    148 .2  0.4  6.2 5  2001  1.7  7.5 12  2002  1.1 8  2004  2.1  0.7 19  1999  1.0 75  1996  12.0  10.4 5.0  5.8     1  1992  5.8  11.1 7.9 3.5 21  2007  7.8  3.0  1.7 12.1     11.6  9.2  34.0  0.1 20  2008        2009  11.3  2.7 20  Average  6.8  14.1  6.  Year  Wadi Al Jizi  (Sohar)  Wadi Hilti Salahi  (Sohar)  Wadi Ahin  (Saham)  Wadi Al  Hawasinah (Al  Khabourah)  Total from  Recharge Dams  1982        0  1983        0  1984        0  1985        0  1986        0  1987     0.6  2.6  1  1988     0.2 14  2000  0.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Table A 20.2  7  1991  0.7  3.2 3.1     5  1993  0.2     0  1994  3.2  12.5 17  2003  2.9 4. Estimated annual infiltration volumes from main recharge dams in the study area (Mm3)  (Source: MRMWR.0  0.5 1.3     3  1995  25. 2010).7  0.7 30  1997  25.7  9.3 14  2005  1.9  0.1  2.3  13.7  0.3 6.7 84  1998  3.9 2.3  0.6  6.7 30  2010  8.4 4.5 3.

  Musanah  Barka  Name  Aswaq    ID  EC  (mS/cm)  μ pH  SAR  (mmoles/l)0.5  6.03  0  0.442  8.57  310  15.5  35.35  8.34  14MS  11.41  17.4  0.5  17.863  8.761  8.32  13MS  2.75  62.94  3.62  6.26  3BK  2.79  4.67  7.77  8.75  4.5  2.5  3.51  277.67  4BK  4.02  20.5  12.75  7.27  120.875  1.71  7BK  16.24  148.30  462.70  1942.72  622.41  21SWQ  4.5  20.77  427.64  277.92  1855  80.75  2.00  17.08  70.749  8.87  18SWQ  1.47                      15SWQ  0.5  22.38  20SWQ  3.99  19.96  5.5  Na   (mg/l)  Na   (meq/l)  Mg   (mg/l)  Mg   meq/l)  Ca   (mg/l)  Ca   (meq/l)  1BK  0.25  5.08  5BK  8.04  16SWQ  0.5  18.50  204.429  8.52  2.82  67  3.68  198  8.25  1.77  7.75  93  4.85  73.57  375  18.20  742.5  35.25  98.45  7.84  9MS  1.895  7.31  357.41  12MS  1.79  410  17.5  26.51  19SWQ  3.75  1.4  0.59  7. Groundwater quality in Al Batinah (2011.47  610  50.14  8.5  14.46  55.04  3.55  121.71  480  20.82  8BK  15.5  84.25  6.76  14.5  1.53  332.86  7.5  34.85  27.30  15.60  34.45  12.79  7.82  48.00  17SWQ  0.31  432.52  2BK  0.25  1.19  1.64  144    149 .28  5.28  35.06  2.75  4.36  202  10.52  287.25  6.00  10.00  36  1.73  0.71  7.56  68.45  1.79  432.81  6.87  114.24  1305  56.34  6BK  9.5  51.60  231  19.62  27. 2011).5  15.48  7.20  0  0.758  8.90  30.25  3.5  1.2  0.25  2.28  46.80  77.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Water quality  Table A 21.80  21.5  32.53  587.06  3.80  22KBH  6.72  10MS  1.19  537.84  83.25  2.807  8.5  48.51  11MS  1.75  2.12  4.35  4.92  0  0.07  8.00  25.5  3.92  5.71  50.5  14.75  5.5  12.89  422.125  0.25  8.68  322.82  248.16  307.36  11.5  4.13  126  10.25  2.1  5.2  8.37  73.)   (Source: ICBA.919  8  3.5  6.25  10.89  33  2.18  3.

84  35.77  16.90  34  1.00  18.95  166.46  3.5  2.02  2106.75  3.75  915  75.29  4.325  0.84  1.33  36SOH  5.49  139  6.43  3.23  18.96  3.7  7.25  2.66  49.87  41LWA  4.13  602.29  130  5.28  8.19  3.52  1310  57.691  8.95  49SHN  18.73  292.49  8.25  173.33  3.42  24KBH  9.48  8.31  43LWA  5.01  2.475  0.21  8.11  1652.05  37.46  3.00  13.05  335  27.45  0.28  39LWA  1.76  40LWA  1.50  685  29.175  0.96  33SOH  0.5  8.25  415  20.62  48.747  8.54  5.44  210.20  812.75  7.10  0  0.2  7.53  365  18.79  11.08  2200  95.04  4.93  415  34.05  7.16  27.75  5.75  189.612  8.75  5.53  129.49  26KBH  29  7.14  89.5  11.25  480  23.22  2.71  360  17.38  465  38.26  11.10  6.62  14.57  35SOH  2.92  195.77  8.5  135.39  1.70  29SHM  2.25  1.71  27SHM  0.5  193.67  270  11.467  8.51  42LWA  5.5  5.31  7.22  347.82  9.5  62.42  7.5  14.5  26.94  141.25  9.45  154.2  17.91  8.03  2.44  905  39.5  6.25  10.01  8.62  2420  105.72  425  34.24  7.20  0  0.70  142.625  0.44  33  1.83  47SHN  5.73  62  5.69  31SHM  10.81  330  27.87  1015  50.84  400  32.01  510  41.56  68.66  1632.57  7.98  8.28  102  4.17  141.5  6.79  25KBH  16.369  8.42  1047.5  40.25  4.81  4343.5  1.45  1312.56  84.12  412.44  3.5  6.13  282.141  8.22  762.36  2357.5  12.5  15.01  8.50  134.5  45.75  5.56  8.25  7.25  8.68  5.78  8.74  735  60.27  1285  55.15  8.31  1.45  38SOH  8.80  3600  156.07  7.67  34SOH  1.06  116.90  420  20.24  105.20  410  17.92  202  10.76  173.09  136  6.21  575  28.05  32SHM  21.5  17.5  2.25  6.5  35.19  44LWA  11.15  30SHM  7.75  5.89  64  3.93  23  1.7    6.10  37SOH  5.84  320  13.95  8.65    145    150 .26  50.58  487.91  28SHM  1.5  33.21  50SHN  24.43  7.5  57.64  17.5  3.Shinas  Liwa  Sohar  Saham  Khabura  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 23KBH  7.31  1040  85.65  46SHN  2.44  71.55  110.92  213.5  134.96  45SHN  1.08  48SHN  10.20  46.65  5.25  4.

 Se. As.    Other factors such as toxicity problems with specific minerals or pesticides. Unsafe water contains high level of contaminants such as nitrates. and other electrolytes. Cd. Hg.      Total coliform bacteria    pH (acid or alkaline level)    Total dissolved solids    Total soluble salt    Salinity    Hardness    Alkalinity (CO3 + HCO3)   Sulfate    Phosphates   Al. bacteria. NO2. organic  materials and suspended solids.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Drinking water quality standards   Livestock and poultry  Introduction   Water  is  essential  to  meet  the  requirements  of  feed  ingredients  and  for  livestock  and  poultry. Therefore water quality is to be maintained to a  safer  level  for  better  livestock  performance. Cu.  Following  are  the  typical  water  quality  parameters  for  livestock and poultry use. B. F. SO4. Pb. or occasionally. Cr. V. Zn.  or  productivity  of  livestock  and  poultry  cannot  be  considered suitable.  heavy algae growth     146    151 .  reproduction. NO3.  Water  that  adversely  affects  the  growth.  In  this  regards  safe  water  quality  is  desirable  for  healthy  livestock  and  poultry  (Tables  A22‐A24). Co.

 Avoid use for pregnant or lactating animals.          147    152 .5 – 5.  1994. Considerable risk in using for pregnant or lactating  cows. Ayers and Westcot.0  Very Limited  Use  Unfit for poultry. watery  droppings in poultry.0        Satisfactory for  Livestock  May cause temporary diarrhoea or be refused at first by animals not  accustomed to such water. horses or sheep. 1. 1974. cf.              Limited Use for  Livestock  Usable with reasonable safety for dairy and beef cattle.          11.      8. In general. May cause temporary  diarrhoea in livestock not accustomed to such water.0‐16.5  Excellent  Usable for all classes of livestock and poultry. increased mortality and decreased  growth. Water Quality for Agriculture – FAO Irrigation and Drainage Paper 29 rev. especially in turkeys.      Very  Satisfactory    Usable for all classes of livestock and poultry.  1.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table A 22. swine  and horses. or for the young of these species. 1994). sheep.0‐11.  > 16.0  Not  Recommended  Risks with such highly saline water are so great that it cannot be  recommended for use under any conditions.0‐8.  Water Salinity   Rating  Remarks  EC dS/cm  < 1. horses.  use should be avoided although older ruminants.0  Unfit for Poultry  Often causes watery faeces.0  Unfit for Poultry  Not acceptable for poultry. poultry may  subsist on waters such as these under certain conditions.    5. Water quality requirements for livestock and poultry uses (Adapted from National Academy  of Sciences (1972.

1  Boron (B)  5.05  6 Calcium   100  Carbonates + bicarbonates (alkalinity)   2.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table A 23.  5  Insufficient data for livestock.05 mg /l.0  Arsenic (As)  0.  6 Zinpro Water Analysis Program.0 2002  148    153 .05  6 Sodium (Na)    50  Sulfur  50  Vanadium (V)  0.   4  Lead is accumulative and problems may begin at a threshold value of 0. Version 2.0  1  Adapted from National Academy of Sciences (1972).  3  Adapted from Australian Water Resources Council (1969).01  Nitrate + Nitrite (NO3‐N + NO2‐N)  100.7  6 Potassium (K)    20  Selenium (Se)  0.0  Cobalt (Co)  1. 1994).0  6 Phosphorous (P)    0. Value for marine aquatic life is used here. 1.  2  Insufficient data for livestock.2  2 Beryllium (Be)   0.05  Mercury (Hg)  0.10  Zinc (Zn)  24.0  Copper (Cu)  0.5  Fluoride (F)  2. Water Quality for Agriculture – FAO Irrigation and Drainage Paper 29 rev.  Constituent (Symbol)  Upper limit   (mg/L)  Aluminium (Al)  5. Value for human drinking water used.0  Cadmium (Cd)  0.1  5 Manganese (Mn)   0.0  3 Magnesium   <250  Iron (Fe)  not needed  4 Lead (Pb)   0. Guidelines for levels of toxic substances in Livestock drinking water1  cf.000  6 Chlorides   100  Chromium (Cr)  1.0  Nitrite (NO2‐N)  10. cf FAO Bulletin 29.

 Desired and potential levels of pollutants in livestock water supplies (Source: Agricultural  Waste Management Field Handbook.8‐7.000    Phosphate in mg L‐1  <1  not established          149    154 .5‐8.  Substance  Desired range  Problem range  Total bacteria per 100 ml  < 200  Fecal coliform per 100 ml  <1  >1 for young animals  >10 for older animals  Fecal strep per 100 ml  <1  >3 for young animals  >30 for older animals  pH  Dissolved solids in mg L‐1  >1.  If pH is less than 5.000  6. page 1 to 16).5  <500  >3.  It  is  generally  assumed  that the human pH guideline (pH 6. lower feed conversion efficiency  and reduce intake of water and feed.5.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   pH   Guidelines  for  the  suitability  of  water  pH  do  not  exist  due  to  lack  of  research. it reduces  feed intake.000     Sulfate in mg L‐1  <250  >2.000  Total alkalinity in mg L‐1  <400  >5.5 or >8.        Table A 24.5) is satisfactory for dairy cattle.5  <5. pH more than 9 may cause digestive upsets and diarrhea.000.

00‐30.  however.   SAR = Na/[(Ca+Mg)/2]0.25‐0. 4) Excessive concentration of  elements that causes ionic imbalance in plants or toxicity.00  C7*  Extreme  *Modified Richards (1954) classification to suit water classes from  Al Batinah and Salalah  Water Sodicity  Richards (1954) classified water sodicity (SAR) into four classes (Table A26).  the  one  of  Richards  (1954)  is  the  most  widely used. C6 and C7) to accommodate water salinity levels from Oman for better interpretation. C5‐C7 can be added to C4.00  C5*  Strong  10.   Water salinity  Richards classified water salinity and sodicty into four classes.25‐5. Although the water use depends on climate and soil types. it should be noted  that same SAR can give different sodicity class at different water conductivities. however.00  C6*  Very strong  > 30. To correlate  the information to USDA water salinity classes.75‐2. 3) Residual sodium carbonates (RSC) – bicarbonate anions (HCO3‐) and carbonate anions (CO32‐)  concentration as related to calcium (Ca2+) and magnesium (Mg2+) cations.   Table A 25.75  C2  Medium  0. 2) Relative proportion of sodium cation (Na+) to other cations‐sodium adsorption ratio (sodium  hazard). Ca and Mg are in meq/L      150    155 .  Water salinity  Salinity class  Salinity hazard  dS/m  C1‐C7  0.25  C3  High  2.  2004):  1)  Total  soluble  salt  content. Water salinity classes.   There  are  many  water  classification  systems  in  use.25  C1  Low  0.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Water quality standards  Agriculture use  Introduction  The  principal  parameters  for  water  classification  are  dissolved  constituents  in  water.  There  are  four  basic  criteria  for  evaluating  water  quality  for  irrigation  purpose  (Shahid.00  C4*  Very high  5.00‐10. This classification is modified (addition of  C5.1‐0.5  Where Na.

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table A 26.  RSC  meq/L  Water suitability for  irrigation  Less than 1.   RSC (meq/L) = (CO32‐ + HCO3‐)‐(Ca2+ + Mg2+)  Where cations and anions are in meq/L  Table A 27.50  Marginal  More than 2. Water sodicity classes  Water SAR  Sodicity class  Sodicity hazard  (mmoles/L)0.25‐2. Water RSC classes.50  Unsuitable                      151    156 .5  S1‐S4    Less than 10  S1  Low  10‐18  S2  Medium  18‐26  S3  High  More than 26  S4  Very high    Residual sodium carbonates (RSC)  The RSC is used to predict the additional sodium hazard associated with CaCO3 and MgCO3 precipitation  involves calculation of the RSC.25  Safe  1.

5  327.88  109.68  3.98  262.85  340  14.2  7.98  390  19.26  390  16.44  190  9.05  7.9  7.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table A 28: Groundwater quality Salalah (2011).97  1242.99  43.94  280  13.08  7.04  52.5  9.29  200.23  7.34  6.5  22.5  25.  ID  EC   (dS/m)  pH  SAR  0.97  130 SAL  3.14  390  32.46  13.33  98 SAL  7.79  280  13.31  8.29  1620  70.06  61  5.73  7.5  24.5  25.30  1195  52.56  7.35  117  9.75  9.45  13.95  234.25  4.31  852.37  192  15.63  7.5  54.26  8.61  188.48  70 SAL  7.5  37.07  7.718  7.83  66 SAL  4.44  14.97  7.79  482.69  13 SAL  2.3  7.68  22.75  3.5  25.5  9.69  735  31.5  13.36  3.77  170  13.10  73 SAL  7.61  7.10  136 SAL  4.75  9.82  72.10  92 SAL  2.06  7.72  122 SAL  3.38  14.30  215.32  101 SAL  8.75  15.28  217  10.27  7.84  241  12.69  7.935  7.44  34 SAL  7.68  7.7  7.63  131.5  24.5  10.29  7.25  11.85  297.59  114.10  192  15.23  214.90  427.32  8.5  17.16  183.54  930  40.26  116  9.35  1155  50.41  9 SAL  2.98  10.5 (mmoles/l)   Na   (mg/l)  Na   (meq/l)  Mg   (mg/l)  Mg   (meq/l)  Ca   (mg/l)  Ca   (meq/l)  1 SAL  4.35  7.62  285  12.43  520  22.69  56  4.45  11.26  185.27  327.97  132 SAL  4.17  108.72  4.75  7.50  277.64  340  16.97  98  8.41  4.60  183.5  35.5  21.72  9.54  260  12.25  16.61  4250  349.23  557.17  6 SAL  1.5  20.5  16.47  152    157 .99  845  36.97  95 SAL  3.36  7.25  10.06  255  12.67  7.639  7.29  7.25  262.5  18.68  7.99  3.5  16.03  260  12.97  134 SAL  5.25  5.38  317.53  880  38.5  13.82  517.04  7.22  275  13.5  13.33  4.5  10.75  10.5  6.98  170  13.25  10.25  6.71  572.72  63 SAL  4.46  4.25  4.07  197.18  37 SAL  10.82  40 SAL  6.8  8.25  13.48  7.75  5.29  7.09  582.34  33 SAL  7.49  705  35.57  125  10.62  320  15.11  1157.07  412.51  6562.08  187.95  76.97  3 SAL  1.42  7.5  24.41  7.25  8.75  9.95  817.5  13.03  124 SAL  6.97  104 SAL  1.75  9.49  3.47  187.40  61.79  507.43  3.5  8.9  7.51  5.05  2600  113.5  12.44  590  29.5  43.75  120 SAL  3.74  7.96  1430  62.79  365  15.60  231.66  222.80  84.5  7.02  213.67  417.34  262.62  680  29.46  18375  799.91  107.00  162.46  127 SAL  4.58  60 SAL  7.08  43 SAL   15.65  16 SAL  2.36  31 SAL  2.5  50.66  230.5  15.4  14.

Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman     Figure A 1. Overall soil salinity distribution in Al Batinah  governorates (2011). 2011)  153    158 . and individual wilayat  (Source: ICBA.

 2011). Overall pH distribution in Al Batinah governorates (2011). and individual wilayats (Source:  ICBA.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Figure A 2.  154    159 .

  155    160 .Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman   Figure A 3. and individual  wilayats (Source: ICBA. 2011). Overall soil textural classes distribution in Al Batinah governorates (2011).

06  29  0‐30  8.02  14  30‐60  0‐30  2.24  47  0‐30  8.25  67  0‐30  7.26  0‐30  1.N  Depth  cm  1  156    161 A/B  0.05  0.69  1.03  55  0‐30  1.78    89  0‐30  4.79  31  0‐30  3.86  69  0‐30  2.24  86  30‐60  4.89    151  0‐30  2.83  74  30‐60  16.74  0.09    107  0‐30  4.59  1.26    123  0‐30  2.50  1.58  136  30‐60  2.30    A/B >1.24  1.  Assessment of root zone salinity efforts in Salalah governorate (Source: ICBA.19  44  30‐60  3.70  1.92    93  0‐30  1.Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman Table A 29.26  0.34  0.35  34  30‐60  1.99  0.69  1.88    147  0‐30  4.N  Depth  cm  0‐30  EC  dS/m  A  3.95  1.48  66  30‐60  2.31    97  0‐30  2.77    85  0‐30  4.05  33  0‐30  2.41  1.39  0.23  2.  S.08  0.34  2.40  6.56    30‐60  1.18  59  0‐30  12.52  1.06  41  0‐30  6.71  11  0‐30  1.95    133  0‐30  2.18  1.88  64  30‐60  9.19  30‐60  3.05    137  0‐30  2.61  1.72  126  30‐60  2.27  152  30‐60  2.99  22  30‐60  5.54  100  30‐60  2.44  0.72  106  30‐60  1.53  1.92  51  0‐30  27.87  70  30‐60  3.43    149  0‐30  2.23  39  0‐30  25.97    105  0‐30  1.03  57  0‐30  1.30  1.47    131  0‐30  2.08  1.01  1.24  1.64  78  30‐60  3.84  0.17  1.59  36  30‐60  2.56  26  30‐60  2.45  0‐30  1.00  1.63  4  30‐60  5  0‐30  2.72  21  0‐30  5.07    3.79  134  30‐60  2.05  0.16  42  30‐60  5.41    145  0‐30  3.10  52  30‐60  14.01  0.63  76  30‐60  2.75    103  0‐30  1.97    115  0‐30  7.47  1.25  124  30‐60  1.37  112  30‐60  8.82  102  30‐60  5.16  0.30  110  30‐60  4.66  84  30‐60  4.05  1.30  2  30‐60  EC  dS/m B  3.80  104  30‐60  1.75  56  30‐60  1.76  114  30‐60  18.07  48  30‐60  8.12  63  0‐30  10.74    87  0‐30  4.31  1.42  1.26  140  30‐60  2.93  45  0‐30  10.77  150  30‐60  2.56  1.92    79  1.05  146  30‐60  3.02  32  30‐60  1.38  1.N  Depth  cm  0‐30  EC  dS/m A 2.16  2.92  24  30‐60  1.95  1.30  108  30‐60  5.80  22%  .82  1.99  82  30‐60  2.20  49  0‐30  8.68  98  30‐60  2.09  30‐60  3.08  37  0‐30  5.97  92  30‐60  2.15  138  30‐60  2.50  1.31  0.29  46  30‐60  8.47    95  0‐30  3.41    143  0‐30  2.83  13  0‐30  15  17  A/B    S.42  154  30‐60  2.44  54  30‐60  1.14    101  0‐30  6.04    135  0‐30  2.71  53  0‐30  4.09  1.99  65  0‐30  3.14  0.96    125  0‐30  2.88    109  0‐30  4.50  60  30‐60  11.57  1.73  94  30‐60  1.53  0.95  118  30‐60  7.65  50  30‐60  8.82  20  30‐60  2.33    117  0‐30  7.57  1.31  120  30‐60  1.52  28  30‐60  1.31  1.58  1.07    113  0‐30  19.20  38  30‐60  5.40  116  30‐60  6.46  0.05  1.00  35  0‐30  2.59  3  0‐30  1.71  0.21  23  0‐30  25  27  S. 2011).88  1.48  77  0‐30  4.55  142  30‐60  1.57  0.87    129  0‐30  3.61  1.77  68  30‐60  3.25    111  0‐30  8.52  30  30‐60  1.87  72  30‐60  5.87  0.26  148  30‐60  3.02  1.23  6  30‐60  7  0‐30  2.44  132  30‐60  2.18  71  0‐30  7.22  1.16    119  0‐30  1.75  0.15  83  0‐30  3.62  0.55  81  0‐30  2.04  8  9  0‐30  14.97  73  0‐30  14.17  1.75  18  19  0‐30  2.11  62  30‐60  12.49  1.48  58  30‐60  1.62  1.N  Depth cm  0.97  1.54  0.27  1.08  0.86  43  0‐30  3.57  0.1  S.51  130  30‐60  2.86  122  30‐60  2.77  61  0‐30  11.96    121  0‐30  1.99    91  0‐30  2.01    127  0‐30  3.95    153  0‐30  3.78  0.89  90  30‐60  4.12    141  0‐30  1.83  80  30‐60  EC  dS/m B  3.41  0.00  12  30‐60  2.43  144  30‐60  1.33  1.01    99  0‐30  2.06  88  30‐60  3.78  0.36  96  30‐60  4.90  16  0‐30  4.80  2.14  128  30‐60  3.90    139  0‐30  2.79  1.50  40  30‐60  19.11  75  0‐30  2.42  1.20  1.14  10  30‐60  20.

5  204.001  <0.001  <0.125  7.001  <0.863  2.01  < 0.01  < 0.001  Cr  mg/l  <0.375  0.0001  <0.03  7.825  1.01  < 0.45  Al  mg/l  2.45  0.001  <0.0001  <0. Water analyses from Batinah and Salalah.749  2BK  16.85  7.15  0.001  0.001  <0.4  3.001  <0.5  nd  nd  Mg  mg/l  17.67  10.0001  <0.001  <0.01  < 0.37  5.0001  0.75  27.001  <0.81  8.075  <0.5  462.001  <0.75  6BK  1.001  <0.03  7.001  <0.001  <0. 2011  2.1  <0.25  61.01  < 0.25  20.442  1BK  7BK  EC   (mS/cm)  ID  8.001  <0.001  0.001  <0.4  0.35  8.001  <0.175  0.001  <0.001  Mn  mg/l  0.275  0.62  7.001  <0.001  Ni  mg/l  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 0.25  2.075  0.825  Pb  mg/l  <0.0001  <0.65  15.77  3BK  8BK  0.65  1.85  8  8.5  202  73.5  98.725  0.9  <0.01  < 0.0001  <0.5  357.75  62.03  8.725  0.001  <0.35  8.03  8.001  <0.725  3.001  < 0.001  0.725  0.25  34.001  <0.001  <0.125  <0.5  380  282.1  7.825  0.5  70.7  4.0001  <0.48  5  1.001  <0.3  2.525  1.12  8.3  2.2  432.85  0.0001  0.76  7.5  198  148.925  0.175  1.01  S  mg/l  P  mg/l  0.001  <0.001  <0.03  8  7.925  <0.6  0.125  2  3.425  19.025  <0.5  1855  742.5  0.001  <0.45  0.001  <0.825  2.25  10.775  1.79  2.001  <0.775  9.91  Sum of   (NO3/NO2)   mg/l  0   ‐   ‐  0  0  0  0  0  0  42.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.01  V  mg/l  33.8  7.28  8  7.95  0.001  < 0.4  5.4  120.5  21.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.01  < 0.01  < 0.1  <0.9  14.65  10.075  1.001  <0.001  <0.162 1.5  < 0.71  4BK  15.03  <0.7  1.775  0.001  <0.425  0.758  0.85  0.35  3.001  <0.001  <0.62  0.9  0  0  0  0  0  0   ‐  Coliform   (MPN)  Per 100ml  0   ‐   ‐  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0   ‐  E.05  0.01  < 0.001  0.1  <0.075  <0.0001  B  mg/l  157  <0.55  1  1.775  Si  mg/l  < 0.45  0.Coli   (MPN)   Per 100ml  .18  7.001  < 0.675  0.75  1305  277.675  0.25  322.875  10.225  0.6  3.725  13.075  0.75  10.001  < 0.01  < 0.525  0.25  <0.45  7.75  1942.225  Co  mg/l  < 0.36  8.001  < 0.775  0.75  0.001  <0.625  Mo  mg/l  8.75  10.001  <0.001  <0.0001  <0.001  Zn  mg/l  <0.81  7.25  114.919  1.125  14.425  2.95  7.85  0.01  < 0.5  622.875  <0.7  0.807  10MS  11MS  12MS  13MS  14MS  15SWQ  16SWQ  17SWQ    9.001  < 0.575  13.05  <0.425  0.001  <0.0001  <0.5  332.895  1.03  707.2  <0.001  Ba  mg/l  0.001  <0.001  <0.001  0.925  7.001  <0.525  1.05  8.425  7.52  7.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.375  0.001  <0.001  <0.5  1.75  0.01  < 0.825  1.001  <0.125  2.8  1.725  0.001  <0.3  7.7  1.675  8.01  < 0.001  0.4  0.45  11.001  0.4  Ca  mg/l  <0.41  8.5  179.001  <0.75  0.95  13.001  < 0.96  8.001  < 0.001  <0.925  0.01  < 0.125  Na  mg/l  nd  15.001  <0.125  < 0.59  0.5  68.001  < 0.0001  <0.26  6.75  0.225  12.77  5BK  9MS  4.5  244.001  Cu  mg/l  <0.06  7.15  8.375  0.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.725  11.7  Fe  mg/l  Table A 30.001  <0.025  0.19  pH  73.5  432.56  4.5  228.001  <0.5  640  870  600  78.65  0.12  1.01  < 0.5  587.575  0.875  1.5  248.775  <0.4  0.001  0.01  < 0.761  0.06  8.001  <0.575  0.001  <0.001  <0.25  50.125  0.001  <0.0001  <0.5  33  19.001  <0.2  11.001  <0.5  242.5  375  307.5  25.75  55.975  2.5  610  126  77.5  537.001  0.001  <0.425  3.01  < 0.83  5.001  <0.525  <0.4  0.425  0.001  <0.001  <0.34  4.18  6.001  <0.001  <0.5  < 0.001  <0.425  0.001  < 0.375  1.0001  <0.7  12.875  310  67  46.001  <0.1  8.0001  <0.001  <0.25  1.75  0.001  <0.75  0.001  Cd  mg/l  <0.25  0.375  2.

001  <0.03  5.01  < 0.375  15.001  <0.01  < 0.025  <0.001  <0.001  < 0.025  < 0.125  11.725  <0.01  < 0.13  0.001  0.2  7.001  1.075  <0.25  27.425  0.25  575  23  34  18.001  <0.0001  0.1  2.001  <0.125  202.5  735  487.77  7.175  0.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.05  7.5  410  121.001  0.0001  0.001  3.001  <0.375  0.475  13.725  0.25  35.5  7.001  <0.01  < 0.24  4.01  0.825  0.001  <0.5  1285  480  427.7  16.001  <0.625  11.001  <0.9  2.01  < 0.3  <0.575  < 0.7  0.001  0.001  <0.75  0.23  3.001  < 0.25  <0.5  231  277.975  <0.001  <0.001  <0.49  0.44  2.85  0.5  6.001  <0.001  <0.0001  <0.42  2.8  0.001  <0.01  3  15.001  0.725  0.01  51.001  <0.99  0.001  < 0.75  7.747  28SHM  0.15  0.001  <0.875  13.001  <0.001  < 0.675  2.01  < 0.675  0.24  8.001  0.44  8.25  170.65  0.25  105.425  0.1  0.001  0.5  527.001  <0.001  <0.5  1215  112  213  867.95  2.01  < 0.05  <0.03  772.6  < 0.001  <0.7  7.0001  <0.825  11.79  8.95  8.001  <0.65  8.001  <0.025  <0.5  83.5  1565  4256.29  5.675  13.075  0.75  0.6  <0.35  0.001  < 0.001  <0.01  < 0.725  0.001  <0.03  8.025  <0.875  0.98  23KBH  31SHM  6.7  8.57  24KBH  10.5  287.001  <0.07  8.075  17.23  8.001  <0.001  < 0.25  173.35  10.03  9.001  <0.001  <0.5  3600  2200  1047.79  7.4  < 0.001  <0.05  <0.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.05  8.175  < 0.65  4.5  422.0001  <0.075  <0.001  1.775  0.0001  158  <0.4  0.001  0.03  49  2800  1997.25  1312.0001  <0.001  <0.01  < 0.001  <0.001  <0.375  13.3  <0.001  0.8  1.75  nd  1632.15  3.47  3.001  <0.975  4.25  136  68.175  415  210.001  <0.5  8.25  <0.0001  <0.001  4.7  0.25  71.001  < 0.65  15.5  1.7  0.5  1310  46.275  4.65  10.001  <0.001  44.48  21SWQ  30SHM  3.001  <0.0001  0.55  0.6  4.001  <0.5  nd  1652.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.01  3.75  465  330  415  62  27.5  905  685  320  292.725  8.375  <0.7  18.975  0.1  329.04  84.5  827.001  <0.3  0.25  3.001  <0.001  <0.55  0.01  < 0.725  5.75  30.001  <0.33  8.625  0.86  0   ‐  0  0  0  0  0  4.475  0.001  <0.001  0.5  2.001  <0.7  16.001  <0.0001  0.0001  <0.5  93  36  48.725  0.375  1.21  4.775  0.01  < 0.125  1.001  <0.001  <0.05  2.3  0.05  8.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.3  4.25  129.691  27SHM  33SOH  29  26KBH  21.001  <0.163 1.325  < 0.775  0.14  19SWQ  29SHM  1.95  7.1  1.001  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 0.77  8.004  13  < 0.5  138.001  <0.76  2.8  13.3  < 0.001  <0.001  0.369  34SOH  35SOH  36SOH  37SOH  38SOH  39LWA  1.31  25KBH  32SHM  9.675  0.01  < 0.001  <0.92  7.01  < 0.001  <0.001  <0.025  1.001  < 0.001  37.001  <0.1  16.25  5.4  1.275  < 0.001  <0.0001  0.325  <0.275  4.6  <0.025  <0.225  < 0.68  8.5  213.875  0.25  282.001  <0.275  0.01  < 0.001  <0.01  < 0.001  <0.001  <0.5  141.0001  <0.05  <0.95  0.95  <0.025  <0.175  <0.775  0.01  < 0.125  2.25  <0.001  0.01  < 0.001  <0.025  0.28  2.05  8.175  13.8  15.23  0.001  <0.8  7.001  <0.001  <0.125  2.001  <0.001  <0.001  < 0.475  0.25  142.001  <0.01  < 0.001  <0.725  <0.49  5.22  8.3  <0.001  <0.001  <0.5  1.0001  <0.46  7.001  < 0.001  <0.001  <0.05  8  7.975  2.9  7.5  510  4343.612  0.001  0.85  7.71  4.001  <0.65  7.15  72.5  48.75  8.001  13.6  0.001  <0.25  35.001  0.001  <0.001  1  0.001  <0.001  0.001  0.725  0.001  <0.001  <0.43  7.03  4.025  < 0.001  <0.5  1365  660  212.001  <0.001  <0.49  7.1  <0.025  0.725  3.82  8.45  420  141.75  89.001  < 0.01  < 0.45  0.55  17.65  0.325  0.86  20SWQ  2.5  0.001  <0.001  <0.64  7.94  8.775  0.001  <0.14  3.001  <0.85  8  8.9  0.25  9.001  <0.001  0.35   ‐  0.55  7.001  <0.78  1.8  7.001  < 0.001  <0.02  0.05  0.625  0.55  < 0.001  <0.1  8.0001  <0.6  < 0.75  2106.2   ‐   ‐  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0   ‐  0  0  0  0  0  0   ‐   ‐  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .001  <0.0001  <0.429  18SWQ    8.001  0.001  <0.75  102  50.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.475  < 0.03  3.05  0.65  0.001  <0.625  8.001  < 0.225  0.001  <0.43  7.67  22KBH  7.

001  <0.001  <0.175  4.001  < 0.2  10.001  <0.19  11.3  0.725  11.001  <0.25  61.001  <0.725  2.25  340  222.48  1.001  < 0.001  0.01  < 0.07  18.001  <0.001  <0.525  8.001  <0.75  7.001  <0.001  < 0.025  <0.141  2.001  <0.001  < 0.01  < 0.001  <0.2  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0   ‐   ‐  0  0  0  0   ‐   ‐   ‐   ‐  0  .5  0.6  7.7  24.001  <0.03  39.001  <0.5  234.001  <0.001  <0.5  139  130  4.5  2.0001  <0.5  56  43.0001  <0.45  1.164 4.5  110.0001  <0.65  8.5  705  590  327.001  0.001  0.075  <0.475  2.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.625  0.675  6.35  0.001  <0.01  < 0.001  <0.5  7.75  8.7  4.5  400  425  335  49.001  < 0.775  3.29  4.35  0.001  < 0.001  <0.25  0.001  <0.001  <0.825  0.001  <0.46  812.001  < 0.05  < 0.467  40LWA  277.0001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.325  2.01  < 0.275  5.6  0.001  < 0.75  257.18  16.075  <0.01  8.001  <0.625  6.001  < 0.7  0.075  7.975  7.001  <0.5  0.0001  159  <0.01  < 0.24  2.55  3.5  38  65.65  11.7  0.25  517.5  1040  915  412.375  0.55  8.01  < 0.001  <0.675  0.325  0.85  3.91  11.01  < 0.75  407.75  61  84.4  4.5  5.43  7.01  < 0.96  8.41  10.84  8.425  0.975  3.8  0.95  9.425  0.001  <0.5  200.2  2.225  0.001  < 0.001  <0.001  <0.04  8.001  < 0.001  <0.45  8.05  0.375  8.001  <0.54  10.001  <0.5  62.001  0.001  < 0.001  <0.001  0.75  117  2357.0001  <0.5  1.01  < 0.275  < 0.25  135.001  <0.025  0.375  8.025  9  8.2  0.525  3.001  0.79  12.001  < 0.75  76.01  < 0.46  7.001  <0.001  <0.5  8.001  <0.001  <0.35  <0.275  0.56  5.001  <0.001  < 0.15  5.001  <0.0001  <0.25  9.01  455  792.725  8.001  <0.725  3.05  8.001  0.01  < 0.001  < 0.5  350  83.89  1.35  0.42  7.001  <0.0001  <0.5  97.325  0.001  <0.5  0.001  <0.001  <0.025  0.75  183.35  8.001  < 0.001  < 0.125  8.5  582.0001  <0.5  285  231.001  <0.775  0.001  <0.3  7.93  13.825  8.001  <0.5  156.001  <0.001  0.75  94.38  7.001  <0.55  0.1  >200.001  <0.45  <0.475  0.001  <0.001  <0.01  < 0.4  0.775  4.2  2.001  <0.5  502.36  7.54  8.001  <0.5  255  795  80.15  5.575  4.05  7.001  <0.625  4.8  0.46  9.625  14.725  12.875  0.0001  <0.5  195.0001  <0.3  < 0.675  2.001  <0.2  0.925  < 0.5  410  154.001  <0.001  < 0.01  < 0.99  7.01  < 0.001  0.45  1.001  <0.35  0.55  8.15  8.45  0.62  7.425  0.925  5.425  8.125  8.5  134.0001  <0.01  < 0.01  < 0.001  <0.01  1.001  <0.001  < 0.05  1.001  <0.12  8.001  <0.001  < 0.15  0.001  <0.33  7.01  < 0.5  187.55  0.5  290  <0.001  < 0.718  2.56  6.5  2420  270  347.125  10.125  1.68  2.25  0.75  320  1015  365  480  202  116.4  0.001  <0.001  < 0.025  0.39  7.001  < 0.001  <0.69  1 SAL  3 SAL  6 SAL  9 SAL  13 SAL  16 SAL  31 SAL  33 SAL  34 SAL  37 SAL    7.5  183.0001  <0.05  8.001  <0.001  <0.001  0.0001  <0.001  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 0.85  12.0001  <0.325  762.001  <0.95  4.0001  <0.15  1.05  <0.5  0  0  0  0   ‐   ‐  0  0  0  0   ‐   ‐   ‐   ‐  1  0  4.0001  <0.001  0.525  12.225  0.2  41LWA  42LWA  43LWA  44LWA  45SHN  46SHN  47SHN  48SHN  49SHN  50SHN  7.05  0.4  0.42  10.001  0.075  <0.001  <0.639  1.001  <0.001  <0.001  < 0.65  10.0001  <0.001  <0.575  0.001  <0.85  8.52  3.001  <0.001  < 0.325  8.0001  <0.001  <0.075  0.001  < 0.25  188.925  0.75  602.6  2.1  1  1  3.001  <0.001  <0.05  2.001  <0.31  8.01  < 0.675  5.55  0.03  4.03  2.48  5.001  <0.9  7.68  7.001  <0.001  <0.29  >200.01  < 0.001  <0.001  <0.65  8.001  < 0.75  33  360  64  166.225  0.675  < 0.001  <0.125  0.075  0.52  3.5  <0.001  <0.5  Water analysis from Salalah 2011  1.5  4.5  187.07  9.5  213.45  0.92  10.5  0.001  <0.03  9.01  < 0.0001  <0.25  < 0.35  0.001  0.001  <0.1  7.001  <0.425  10.05  0.91  13.45  0.001  <0.29  8.35  0.001  <0.675  2.19  7.001  <0.75  7.25  129.025  <0.04  7.375  0.001  <0.75  100.05  0.36  1620  880  930  297.525  3.5  11.31  7.0001  <0.001  <0.975  8.4  8.5  37.475  12.05  <0.35  <0.001  <0.

001  < 0.5  472.05  0.2  4.625  0.0001  <0.51  7.6  8.001  <0.46  7.925  3.675  8.001  < 0.001  <0.0001  <0.25  0.7  40 SAL      7.1  5.001  <0.01  < 0.5  280  262.001  0.001  < 0.001  < 0.175  4.01  < 0.3  0.6  < 0.45  7.55  0.74  92 SAL  124 SAL  7.98  7.0001  <0.4  4.25  236  168.001  <0.575  0.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.23  4.001  <0.325  0.35  < 0.0001  <0.05  12.001  <0.0001  <0.625  8.001  326.001  <0.001  < 0.575  8.45  53.67  95 SAL  6.45  0.5  262.5  845  572.97  63 SAL  120 SAL  7.2  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  2  0  0  0  0  .38  5.001  <0.5  0.5  390  230.875  5.935  15.001  <0.65  6.001  <0.61  98 SAL  127 SAL  3.001  <0.72  7.225  0.001  <0.65  8.7  9.75  2.4  0.001  <0.001  < 0.001  <0.525  0.01  < 0.35  < 0.0001  <0.5  417.77  10.575  1.75  1430  1157.001  <0.5  262.475  4.001  <0.275  9.725  7.001  <0.55  0.001  <0.5  482.575  1.3  2  40.75  3.375  0.54  7.3  10.425  0.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.625  0.001  <0.001  < 0.5  98  52.001  <0.001  < 0.001  <0.25  109.5  4.05  0.625  3.001  0.001  <0.5  317.35  7.5  131.001  <0.001  <0.001  0.01  < 0.62  7.7  0  23.075  0.56  60 SAL  1.001  <0.4  6.001  < 0.425  0.0001  160  <0.08  7.25  13.91  6.025  <0.001  <0.13  12.05  <0.001  < 0.001  <0.275  0.325  0.001  < 0.001  <0.5  0.075  0.375  8.001  <0.0001  <0.98  5.001  <0.01  3643.15  0.001  < 0.001  <0.001  <0.001  < 0.75  116  170  107.3  4.6  8.59  9.0001  <0.25  0.0001  <0.06  70 SAL  122 SAL  4.001  <0.165 3.001  <0.001  < 0.01  < 0.001  < 0.6  8.25  7.001  <0.001  <0.4  0.001  1.07  130 SAL  132 SAL  134 SAL  136 SAL  8.85  13.68  7.001  <0.5  475  231.25  390  192  6562.05  10.001  <0.8  7.35  0.11  4.01  < 0.45  7.38  0  2  3.001  <0.001  <0.34  15.65  < 0.55  10.575  0.001  <0.44  7.5  8.25  185.75  151  96.63  7.2  0  1  1  9.375  0.001  <0.8  >200.001  <0.25  162.025  <0.1  0.001  < 0.0001  <0.01  < 0.01  < 0.01  < 0.001  0.25  133.475  5.001  <0.001  <0.075  <0.41  9.06  7.725  4.21  8.68  7.01  < 0.7  8.6  2.76  6.575  7.275  3.01  < 0.65  3.001  <0.001  <0.6  0.01  < 0.85  1.2  4.001  0.0001  <0.975  8.5  152  207  350  300  5.5  340  507.575  <0.275  3.001  < 0.001  <0.001  0.475  8.42  66 SAL  3.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.3  8.001  <0.0001  <0.49  7.275  0.8  8.5  190  217  275  412.425  0.001  <0.3  0.0001  <0.32  18375  735  520  365  557.075  5.2  7.001  < 0.001  < 0.001  <0.75  145.001  <0.01  < 0.001  <0.0001  <0.9  43 SAL   104 SAL  6.58  7.075  2.5  114.001  <0.9  8.001  <0.73  101 SAL  4.5  7.29  4.7  165.45  0.001  <0.175  0.75  2.5  280  260  260  390  241  255  215.6  8.001  <0.25  68.475  0.001  < 0.001  <0.5  <0.001  <0.72  7.29  5.26  7.7  6.001  <0.225  8.55  8.001  < 0.15  0.025  3.075  8.001  < 0.001  <0.001  <0.4  0.01  < 0.75  125  197.175  8.001  < 0.2  0  4.47  7.85  6.625  11.01  < 0.01  < 0.475  12.27  4.0001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.2  0.001  < 0.001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.475  < 0.29  73 SAL  3.001  0.75  37  30.01  < 0.5  427.075  0.001  <0.4  8.25  72.55  0.525  0.05  <0.075  <0.001  < 0.001  <0.001  < 0.975  5.9  7.001  < 0.01  < 0.35  2.5  4250  170  131.03  8.001  <0.05  0.3  4.75  <0.75  109  257.5  1242.15  3.275  217.9  8.001  <0.875  8.25  0.001  0.1  3.425  0.7  8.2  8.0001  <0.0001  <0.001  <0.001  <0.4  7.001  0.0001  <0.001  < 0.001  < 0.001  < 0.001  <0.001  Oman Salinity Strategy – Annex1: Physical Resources in the Sultanate of Oman 10  0.001  <0.001  < 0.001  <0.75  5.0001  <0.001  < 0.025  3.2  10.6  6.5  2600  852.34  7.3  0.001  < 0.5  19.001  <0.5  192  108.001  <0.001  <0.38  8.41  7.5  1195  1155  680  817.525  9.575  9  7.05  0  0.001  <0.01  < 0.575  1.15  0.001  <0.25  214.001  <0.375  0.001  <0.25  74.