Program Overview & Update

December 11, 2014

History
 2009 – Several citizens approached Mayor and Aldermen

requesting traffic calming for their neighborhoods. Mayor
and Aldermen allocated $50,000 for the project and created
a Citizen Traffic Calming Committee to work with staff to
develop a traffic calming policy for the City as a whole.
 2010 – Council adopts City of Savannah Traffic Calming
Policy, and two data-driven “Hot Spot” lists; one each for
local residential and residential collector streets. Direct
staff to exhaust these lists prior to adding new streets.
 2010 –City staff begin working with Paradise Park
neighborhood to develop a Traffic Calming Pilot plan.

History
 2011 – Paradise Park Traffic Calming Pilot plan

completed and implemented.
 2012 – Council appoints 9 members to a permanent,
staggered-term committee.
 2012 – Citizen Office and Traffic Engineering educate
committee members about Traffic Calming.
 Set implementation goals for the top local residential

street and residential collector route.

 2013 – First two neighborhoods engaged in process to

calm a total of 6 “Hot Spot” list streets.

Traffic Calming is…
 A change in roadway

geometry by the use of
physical measures in
such a way to encourage
slow speeds, improve
safety, and reduce the
need for police
enforcement.

Traffic Calming is…

Traffic Circle

Raised Crosswalk

Curb Extensions

Chicane with center island median

What Traffic Calming is not…

All-way stops

Speed limits/enforcement

Markings to narrow lanes

Roadside environment

Traffic Calming Score Matrix
Criteria

Points

Speed

0-30

Extent by which 85% speeds exceed posted speed limit; 2 points assigned for every 1 mph.

0-15

Points assigned based on vehicles per day (VPD):
<750 VPD
0 points
750 – 1000 VPD
5 points
1001 – 1500 VPD
7 points
1501 – 2500 VPD
10 points
2501 or more VPD
15 points
Cut Thru Traffic Confirmed by Study
15 points
>5000 VPD
0 points

Crash
History

0-20

Crash rate per million vehicles per mile of roadway (based on past 3 yrs)

Pedestrian
Generators

0-10

4 points for each school on the street; 2 points for each park or community center on the street; 2
points if any (not for each) commercial or institutional use (including churches) exists on the street.

Pedestrian
Facilities

0-10

10 points assigned if there is no continuous sidewalk on at least one side of the street.

Roadway
Geometry

0-15

Each street segment will be rated on a scale of 0 to 15 for potentially hazardous roadway geometry
and other factors. Factors to be considered include horizontal and vertical curvature (5 points),
setback of homes from the street (5 points), and uncorrectable limited sight distance (5 points).

Total Points
Possible

100

Volume
(Residential
streets only)

Basis for Point Assignment

Hot Spot List
 As part of the adopted policy, Traffic Engineering staff

was directed to develop a “Hot Spot List” of streets for
traffic calming.
 The Traffic Calming Score Matrix was applied to streets

and street segments that had been the subjects of
previous speeding or cut-through complaints.
 Streets were prioritized based on the number of points
scored on the matrix.

Local Residential Routes
Location

Segment

Neighborhood

Total

1

60th Street

Bull To Waters

Ardmore

67.00

2

Willow Rd

White Bluff To Golf Club

Windsor Forest

65.31

3

51st Street

Exchange To W Of Stanley

Jackson Park

63.00

4

Durant Av

Skidaway To Pennsylvania

Gordonston

62.00

5

Dutchtown

Apache To Mohawk

Wilshire & Savh Mall

57.90

6

58th St

Abercorn To Waters

Ardmore

56.00

7

Texas Av

Pennsylvania To N Carolina

Avondale

54.49

8

Henry St

Skidaway To Pennsylvania

Gordonston

51.567

9

New York Av

Pennsylvania To N Carolina

Avondale

50.68

Local Residential Routes
Location

Segment

Neighborhood

Total

10

49th St

Bull To Waters

Ardsley Park

49.00

11

Gwinnett St

Pennsylvania To E Of Minnesota

East Savannah

47.82

12

Sheridan Dr

Dyches To Dyches

Paradise Park

44.77

13

36th St

Price To Waters

Midtown

44.67

14

44th St

Bull To Waters

Ardsley Park

40.50

15

Hillyer Dr

Dyches To Dyches

Paradise Park

38.36

16

Gordonston

Goebel To Pennsylvania

Gordonston

38.00

Waters To Bee Road

Parkside

37.50

Goebel To Pennsylvania

Gordonston

35.01

17 Washington Av
18

Kinzie Av

Residential Collector Routes
1
2

Location

Segment

Neighborhood

Total Points

Georgia Av

Bolling To Bonaventure

Avondale & East Savannah

71.00

Avondale & Victory Hts

58.75

Bonaventure Rd Pennsylvania To Downing

3

Goebel Av

Gwinnett To Skidaway

Gordonston

52.61

4

Dyches Dr

Dunwoody To Paradise

Paradise Park

43.93

5

52nd Street

Waters To East Of Bee

Parkside

43.50

6

Edgewater Rd

Montgomery Xrd To
Dunwoody

Oakhurst & Paradise Park

42.71

7

Tibet Av

Middleground To Canal

Largo Woods & Leedsgate

37.11

8

Windsor Rd

White Bluff To Briarcliff

Windsor Forest

34.16

9

Windsor Rd

Briarcliff To Black Oak Ct

Windsor Forest

31.04

10

Tibet Av

Canal To Abercorn

Wilshire & Leedsgate

29.18

11

Liberty Pw

Ogeechee To 516 Overpass

Liberty City

26.32

Traffic Calming Engagement Process
Step 1 - Identification
Project Neighborhood

Define Project Area

Assign Traffic Calming Members to
Project Neighborhood

(from “Hot Spot List”)

(Traffic Engineering)

(Citizen Office and TE)

Step 2 – Data Collection
Gather New Traffic Data

Collect Parcel Data

(Traffic Engineering)

(Citizen Office)

Step 3 – Initial Engagement
Project Team = TC Members +
neighborhood lead(s)

Meeting #1 – Project area residents & property owners
(Project Team + TC Members + TE + CO)

Traffic Calming Engagement Process
Step 4 – Design Concept
Additional Data Collection
(Project Team + TE + CO)

Meeting #2 – Neighborhood
Design Charrette

(Project Team + TC + TE + CO)

Evaluation by Traffic
Engineering

Meeting #3 – Design Concept
Presented to Neighborhood

(Project Team + TE + CO)

Step 5 – Finalize Design/Temporary Trial
Formation of Neighborhood
Traffic Calming Committee and
Adoption of Master Plan

Collection of Signatures for Master
Plan/Temporary Measure Installation
(Neighborhood Committee)

Installation of
Temporary Measures

Step 6 – Installation of Permanent Measures
Collection of Signatures for Permanent Measure
Installation
(Neighborhood Committee)

Installation of Permanent Measures

Project Areas – Project Neighborhood 1

Avondale Estates/Bonaventure Road
 February 2013 – Initial engagement with neighborhood





leadership.
March 2013 – Neighborhood Meeting #1
April 2013 – Neighborhood Meeting #2
June 2013 - Neighborhood Meeting #3
June 2013 – Evaluation of comments and adjustments to
master plan maps by Traffic Engineering.
July 2013 – Final master plan maps delivered to
Neighborhood Traffic Calming Committee for adoption.
October 2013 – Avondale Estates Neighborhood Master
Plan adopted.
October 2014 – Neighborhood has thus far been unable to
secure the necessary signatures to move into the temporary
testing phase.

Project Area – Project Neighborhood 2

Olin Heights
 February 2013 – Initial engagement with neighborhood





leadership.
March 2013 – Neighborhood Meeting #1
April 2013 – Neighborhood Meeting #2
June 2013 - Neighborhood Meeting #3
June 2013 – Evaluation of comments and adjustments to
master plan maps by Traffic Engineering.
July 2013 – Final master plan maps delivered to
Neighborhood Traffic Calming Committee for adoption.
September 2013 – Olin Heights Neighborhood Master Plan
adopted.
October 2014 – Neighborhood has thus far been unable to
secure the necessary signatures to move into the temporary
testing phase.

Project Area –
Project
Neighborhood 3

Gordonston
 August 2013 – Initial engagement with
neighborhood leadership.
 September 2013 – Neighborhood Meeting #1

 October 2013 – Neighborhood Meeting #2.
Neighborhood leadership presents a proposed
master plan developed outside of the City’s traffic
calming process. Residents vote to forgo a design
charrette in favor of the outside plan.
 December 2013 – Neighborhood Meeting #3.

Gordonston
 February 2014 – City Staff receives a second
proposed master plan developed by the
Neighborhood Traffic Calming Committee.
 July 2014 – Neighborhood Meeting #4
 August 2014 – Neighborhood Traffic Calming
Committee adopts the most recent map as its
master plan.
 Current – Actively soliciting signatures from

residents/property owners for the installation of
temporary measures.

Project Area – Project Neighborhood 4

Windsor Forest
 March 2014– Initial engagement with neighborhood




leadership.
April 2014 – Neighborhood Meeting #1
May 2014– Neighborhood Meeting #2
July 2014 - Neighborhood Meeting #3
Current– Evaluation of comments and adjustments to
master plan maps.
November 2014 - Final master plan maps to be
delivered to Neighborhood Traffic Calming Committee
for adoption.

Challenges Faced
 As written, the City’s Traffic Calming Policy requires a great

deal of staff time to get neighborhoods to the point of a
master plan adoption only for residents to find that they
don’t have the support for plan implementation.
 Large neighborhoods face an especially difficult time
gathering majority support for even temporary measures.
 Policy requires a Citizen Traffic Calming Committee but
does not provide a purpose for the group.
 Mature neighborhoods with offset driveway and other
geometric conditions often limit measure selection and
placement.

Next Steps
 The Citizen Traffic Calming Committee has recommended

revisiting the policy to improve the likelihood of successful
Traffic Calming implementation:
 Require neighborhood support in the very earliest stages.
 Tailored impact areas to improve support ratios.
 Reasonable time limits so City Staff and the Committee can

move forward if neighborhood support is not forthcoming.
 Minimum point threshold from the Scoring Matrix for
consideration.