C

Chhiinn N
Naa
by Richard Kay, Goju-Kensha Karate-do
chin = seize

na = control

Chin Na is the Chinese art of ‘restraining and immobilising’. Chin means ‘to seize or catch’; Na means ‘to hold
and control’. Therefore, chin na can be translated as ‘seize and control’.
The methods of applying chin na techniques include:
1.
2.
3.

Grabbing – Control and lock joints or muscle/tendon to immobilise
Pressing – Applying pressure to qi cavities or nerve endings to cause pain, unconsciousness or death
Striking – Applied to vital points or qi cavities

The categories of chin na techniques are:
a)

Dividing the muscle/tendon (fen jin)
Action:
Results:
Methods:

b)

Misplacing the bone (cuo gu)
Action:
Results:
Methods:

c)

Techniques which prevent opponent from inhaling
Pain, unconsciousness, death
Direct sealing of windpipe (grab throat, compress throat with arm, press/strike throat
cavity); Strike muscles surrounding lungs; Cavity press or nerve strike

Pressing (dian mai) or sealing/blocking (duan mai) the vein/artery
Action:
Results:
Methods:

e)

Techniques which tear put bones in the wrong positions
Pain, ligament torn off bone, bones pulled apart
Twist and bend the joint in wrong direction; Bend joint against natural range of motion

Sealing the breath (bi qi)
Action:
Results:
Methods:

d)

Techniques which tear apart the opponents muscles or tendons
Immobility, pain and unconsciousness
Twist and bend the joint; Split and tear the muscle/tendon apart

Techniques which strike or press a blood vessel
Disrupt blood flow, causing pain, unconsciousness, death
Striking; Pressing (fingers, knuckles)

Cavity press (dian xue) or pressing a primary qi channel (dian mai)
Action:
Results:
Methods:

Techniques which disturb or effect opponent’s qi circulation
Disrupting qi flow causing pain, unconsciousness, death
Press with fingers

The key points for proper application of chin na techniques are:
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ

Power is soft and gentle so technique is fast and effective
Feel correct mutual angle between you and opponent
Proper expression of ‘martial power’ (jin) to make technique powerful and penetrating

The levels of chin na techniques can be divided according to:
I. Experience
How a person understands the technique and the technical difficulty of the technique. A beginners’ power is slow
and stagnant, so techniques are executed slowly and poorly. Also, a beginner cannot catch correct locking angle
through feel of contact, and usually the opponent feels the angle as technique is applied
II. Martial Syle
Same technique varies in terms of results and effectiveness due to variations in the training methods of a style
and the understanding of teacher and student.
III. Categories
The easiest to learn and apply is ‘dividing muscle/tendon’ and ‘misplacing the bone’; next is ‘grabbing the
tendon’; next is ‘sealing the vein/artery’; the hardest is ‘pressing cavity’.
IV. Training Pocedures
Regulate your body (for accuracy of technique; includes locking angle, body positioning and controlling posture),
your breathing (helps manifest your power at higher level) and your mind (control the flow of qi to generate more
power).

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