LAWYER

(intro)A lawyer is a person who practices law, as an attorney, counsel or solicitor.[1] Law is the
system of rules of conduct established by the sovereign government of a society to correct wrongs,
maintain the stability of political and social authority, and deliver justice. Working as a lawyer
involves the practical application of abstract legal theories and knowledge to solve specific
individualized problems, or to advance the interests of those who hire lawyers to perform legal
services.
The role of the lawyer varies significantly across legal jurisdictions, and so it can be treated here in
only the most general terms.[2]

Purp)
Employment law is significant topic as the recession occurs. Recession means lack of jobs. The
businesses are getting close down and people found themselves as jobless. Some employees are
dismissed from their jobs and in this competent environment; people are not able to tolerate this. So they
are hiring employment lawyer to overcome themselves from the dismissal situation. The employment
lawyers have a huge knowledge and experience to handle such issues related to the jobs. Their
experience and knowledge becomes intrinsic to the entire process of keeping a job and staying with
regular payment.
(QUAL) he requirements may vary depending on the country. Generally, an applicant needs to have

graduated from high school and have a bachelor's degree, and be able to pass the entrance exams
for law school at a University. And then there is a 3 course of study to obtain a law degree. Being
called to "the Bar " means that a person is now a fully qualified lawyer, able to practice law in their
jurisdiction.
A bachelor's degree, then go to law school for about 3 years (if you attend full-time)..then pass the
bar.
You need a law degree in most states and then you need a license to practice law. The only 'training'
in most places is what you get on the job.
body of law is complex and broad. If you want to practice it as an attorney, you'll need to undertake extra
education, prove you can provide competent legal help to others, and then keep up with legal
developments throughout your career so that clients get the best and most up-to-date legal advice. To
fulfill those qualifications, would-be lawyers earn a bachelor's degree, attend law school and then sit for a
bar exam, which is necessary to obtain a license to practice.

Pre-Law
The first qualification needed to become a lawyer is a bachelor's degree. The major isn't important, according to the
American Bar Association, the body that accredits law schools and establishes ethical codes for attorneys. The ABA
says that, historically, students tend to major in disciplines such as history, political science and English. The ABA
recommends, though, that rather than trying to find the "right" major, students choose challenging classes that
emphasize critical reading and analysis, projects, organization, writing and research.

Law School
After a bachelor's degree, attorneys complete law school to qualify themselves to practice. To get in, students must
pass the LSAT -- the Law School Admission Test -- which assesses a student's potential for the study of law. For
those who pass, it's an expensive three years. Law students paid $22,116 in 2011 for tuition as residents attending a
public institution, according to statistics from the ABA. It takes three years to earn the required degree, which is a
juris doctor, abbreviated to J.D.
Related Reading: Qualifications Needed to Become a Public Defender Attorney

Specialized Knowledge
Some schools offer specialization and certificate programs for those wanting to focus on a particular area of law.
Popular programs are international law, intellectual property, litigation and business law, according to the ABA.
Students may also obtain an second advanced degree. In these joint degree programs, students might, for instance,
earn a J.D./M.B.A., the top student choice in 2011. The ABA says that 87 percent of law schools offered such
degrees in 2011.

PURP)
you are considering law school, you are taking the initial step toward a potentially rewarding career in the legal
profession. A legal education can be one of the most challenging and fulfilling endeavors an individual will pursue in
their lifetime.
There are many potential reasons one may choose to attend law school. Learning the skills of a lawyer and then
using them in practice is the most common reason.
However, some may simply be interested in the complexities of the law and seek to learn more about it. Still others
are motivated to enter law school to effect change through government, interest groups, or other non-profit
organizations.
Like any other profession, not all lawyers are rich and successful. However, the legal profession is generally
rewarding both personally and financially. A person with a background in legal education can, in additional to
practicing law, turn to other fields such as teaching, business, and advocacy.
wyers must be able to examine legal issues, while keeping in mind the constantly changing law and legal system.
They also must be able to advocate, to the best of their ability, diverse interests. This also means advocating
interests with which they may not personally agree. Lawyers must have skills to communicate effectively, verbally and
in writing. At the same time, successful attorneys must have the ability to effectively persuade and negotiate.
Practicing attorneys, therefore, are intricately involved in business dealings, political negotiations, and debating some
of the most difficult issues facing society. The work of an attorney often involves avoiding and negotiating past
conflict. In this manner, the work of an attorney can be very interesting. You'll find lawyers at work in the center of the
biggest deals in government, business, and the non-profit sector.
Attorneys find themselves in a wide variety of positions. Some become in-house counsel on corporate, governmental,
or interest group staffs. Others work for large law frims who represent business clients. Still others work in smaller
firms or open their own practice. Other lawyers pursue careers in academia or as jurists sitting on the bench.Sound
like an interesting field? It is. But you should also go in with "both eyes open." People often have inaccurate views
about practicing law.

Attorney Income
Some view law school as an automatic ticket to "big bucks." According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median
salary for lawyers in 2006 was approx. $102,000. This figure, of course, included attorneys in all fields and all levels
of experience, and in all different regions of the U.S. Starting lawyers at big, prestigious corporate law firms can
make high six-figure salaries.
The annual salary for large law firm partners who have been with the firm for many years often easily tops $500,000.
And, of course, there are some high-flying attorneys who make millions. However, there's a greater number of
"everyday" lawyers who work in smaller legal practices and earn much more modest incomes (starting salaries
around $35,000. are not uncommon). Many of these attorneys make a decent living at their trade, but they certainly
don't qualify for a glamourous lifestyle. And there are many other lawyers who, burgeoning under massive student
loan debt, struggle to find jobs and pay their bills.
Be Realistic
Some people have inaccurate views of what lawyers do. Having seen television programs such as Law and Order,
some may get the idea that all lawyers spend their time in the court room trying cases. This is not true for most
attorneys. Much of a lawyer's work involves reading, research, negotiations, and discussions. Indeed, some lawyers
hardly ever set foot in a courtroom. The job of many attorneys is often to study agreements and potential situations to
avoid litigation, not engage in it.
Finally, some approach law from an unrealistic perspective. For example, many individuals seek to practice
environmental law based upon their deeply held belief in environmental protection. But they should know that a large
number of the positions in environmental law involve representing the interests of chemical companies, industrial
manufacturers, and global oil corporations--the very groups most environmentalists oppose.
Still others envision practicing criminal law to protect the innocent from arbitrary governmental power. But these
lawyers must realize that those who practice criminal law represent many people who are guilty of commiting heinous
crimes, in addition to the innocent. Like all fields, a career in law has "pros" and "cons."
On the whole, most lawyers find their work to be interesting and rewarding. But you must be realistic about what a
career in law, or any other field, entails.

Reson to pursue law as a crrer
wyers must be able to examine legal issues, while keeping in mind the constantly changing law and legal system.
They also must be able to advocate, to the best of their ability, diverse interests. This also means advocating
interests with which they may not personally agree. Lawyers must have skills to communicate effectively, verbally and
in writing. At the same time, successful attorneys must have the ability to effectively persuade and negotiate.
Practicing attorneys, therefore, are intricately involved in business dealings, political negotiations, and debating some
of the most difficult issues facing society. The work of an attorney often involves avoiding and negotiating past
conflict. In this manner, the work of an attorney can be very interesting. You'll find lawyers at work in the center of the
biggest deals in government, business, and the non-profit sector.
Attorneys find themselves in a wide variety of positions. Some become in-house counsel on corporate, governmental,
or interest group staffs. Others work for large law frims who represent business clients. Still others work in smaller
firms or open their own practice. Other lawyers pursue careers in academia or as jurists sitting on the bench.Sound

like an interesting field? It is. But you should also go in with "both eyes open." People often have inaccurate views
about practicing law.
Attorney Income
Some view law school as an automatic ticket to "big bucks." According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median
salary for lawyers in 2006 was approx. $102,000. This figure, of course, included attorneys in all fields and all levels
of experience, and in all different regions of the U.S. Starting lawyers at big, prestigious corporate law firms can
make high six-figure salaries.
The annual salary for large law firm partners who have been with the firm for many years often easily tops $500,000.
And, of course, there are some high-flying attorneys who make millions. However, there's a greater number of
"everyday" lawyers who work in smaller legal practices and earn much more modest incomes (starting salaries
around $35,000. are not uncommon). Many of these attorneys make a decent living at their trade, but they certainly
don't qualify for a glamourous lifestyle. And there are many other lawyers who, burgeoning under massive student
loan debt, struggle to find jobs and pay their bills.
Be Realistic
Some people have inaccurate views of what lawyers do. Having seen television programs such as Law and Order,
some may get the idea that all lawyers spend their time in the court room trying cases. This is not true for most
attorneys. Much of a lawyer's work involves reading, research, negotiations, and discussions. Indeed, some lawyers
hardly ever set foot in a courtroom. The job of many attorneys is often to study agreements and potential situations to
avoid litigation, not engage in it.
Finally, some approach law from an unrealistic perspective. For example, many individuals seek to practice
environmental law based upon their deeply held belief in environmental protection. But they should know that a large
number of the positions in environmental law involve representing the interests of chemical companies, industrial
manufacturers, and global oil corporations--the very groups most environmentalists oppose.
Still others envision practicing criminal law to protect the innocent from arbitrary governmental power. But these
lawyers must realize that those who practice criminal law represent many people who are guilty of commiting heinous
crimes, in addition to the innocent. Like all fields, a career in law has "pros" and "cons."
On the whole, most lawyers find their work to be interesting and rewarding. But you must be realistic about what a
career in law, or any other field, entails.

2. Growth and Opportunity
In the last several years, the legal profession has experienced staggering growth. A steady
rise in profits and revenues, expanded headcounts and significant salary increases have
provided plenty of job opportunities in a broad range of legal positions.

3. Financial Rewards
The legal profession is one of the most lucrative industries in today’s job market. Doubledigit growth in recent years has produced healthy revenues and rising salaries. Associates in
the nation’s largest law firms start at $150,000 to $180,000 and partners earn average

salaries in excess of $1.2 million. Many non-lawyers also reap significant financial rewardsin
the legal profession. More »

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4. Client Service
At the heart of the legal professional’s role is client service. Whether you are
a lawyerrepresenting a multinational corporate client, a paralegal assisting abused women
obtain restraining orders or a law clerk researching a tax issue for a new business, the
fundamental purpose of the legal professional is the help others resolve their legal problems.

5. Diverse Practice Areas
Increased segmentation and specialization in the legal profession has spawned a growing
number of legal specialties and sub-specialties that cater to almost every legal interest.Legal
professionals who seek a career in litigation can specialize in criminal law,employment
law, family law, products liability or dozens of other practice areas. Legal professionals who
prefer a career in corporate law can specialize in tax law, mergers and acquisitions, real
estate, finance or another corporate practice area that satisfies their interests. More »

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6. Intellectual Challenge
Navigating an evolving legal system, advances in technology, vast bodies of case law and the
demands of the legal profession creates a stimulating intellectual environment for the legal

professional. Lawyers and non-lawyers alike must grapple with conceptually challenging
issues, reason with logic and clarity, analyze case and statutory law, research complex legal
issues and master oral and written communications.

7. Prosperity
Historically, the legal profession has weathered economic downturns quite well and should
do so in the future, in part due to the growing geographic and practice diversification of
many law firms. In fact, some practice areas such as litigation, bankruptcy and
reorganization, residential real estate foreclosures and regulatory compliance will actually
benefit from an economic slowdown. As a result, legal professionals should find plenty of
job opportunities in any economic climate.

8. Prestige
In a culture that views high pay, impressive schooling and societal power as hallmarks of
success, the legal profession has long been regarded as a noble and elite profession. This
image is further boosted by the portrayal of legal careers in the media as exciting, glamorous,
fast-paced and desired. As a result, the legal profession has held its allure and careers in the
law remain is one of the most sought-after professions in today’s job market.

9. Global Perspective
More firms and corporations are crossing international borders and expanding across the
globe through mergers, acquisitions, consolidation and collaboration with foreign counsel.
The globalization of the legal profession provides today’s legal professional with a world
view and the opportunity to serve international clients. More »

10. Dynamic Environment
The legal profession is continually changing and evolving, bringing new challenges and
rewards. Legal professionals must be problem-solvers and innovators, willing to assume new
responsibilities, tackle new challenges, master new technology and navigate an ever-evolving
legal system. This dynamic legal landscape makes each day unique and fosters an enjoyable,
fulfilling work experience. More »

1. Diverse Legal Career Options
The complexities of our legal system have created hundreds of legal career
optionsthat serve a variety of core and non-core legal functions.
From lawyers, judges andmediators to paralegals, secretaries andconsultants, the
legal professional’s role is expanding and evolving to keep pace with the everchanging legal syste

Interview a person from sai d carrer
1) What specific training was required to obtain this job?
4 year undergraduate degree; 3 years of law school
2) Can you tell me some vocabulary or terminology specific to your job?
praecipe -- another word for "motion" (e.g., "I filed a praecipe to discontinue the case today.")
COMES NOW -- some lawyers start motions this way (e.g., "COMES NOW Plaintiff Suzy Sunshine and
for her Motion to Compel avers as follows.")

3) What type of reading do you do on a daily basis?
Case law; statutes; drafts of briefs, letters, etc.; emails from partners I work for, other associates,
paralegals, my secretary, etc. Funny, I led off in answering this by referring to case law and statutes, but it
seems like I mostly read and respond to email all day.
4) Have the reading demands increased, if yes, how?
I do tons of reading and writing. My husband is in school and complains about having to read a chapter or
write a 6-page, double-spaced paper and I laugh at him because that's nothing to me.
5) If you could go back and change something related to your education or your life as a student what
would you change or what would you do differently?
I might have attended a different law school. There aren't many alumae from my school in the city I live in,
so sometimes I feel like an oddball when no one else has gone to my school.
6) Is it fun to be a lawyer? Why or why not?
Sometimes. It's usually not the actual practice of law is that is so much fun. It's the people I work with who
make it enjoyable. Sometimes you can make fun of other people (e.g., opposing counsel, opposing party,
etc.), so that can be fun. It's a little immature, but it's the truth.
7) How much does someone with your job title usually make?
Depends. If you're at a large litigation firm like me, probably at least $100,000/year.
8) What is the most interesting case you've defended? Details!
Sorry, it's confidential.
9) Have you won most of your cases? Details.
Define "won." And sorry, it's confidential. :)

10) If you weren't a lawyer, what would you want to be? Why?

Become a court reporter. It seems easy and pretty mindless, you're on your own most of the time.
Source(s):Me!

Why Do You Think You Will Succeed as an Attorney?

Although this may seem like a negative question, it is anything but. This is a wonderful opportunity for you to describe
your expertise and comment upon the things that drive you to succeed. For instance, you could say “I graduated at
the top of my class from XYZ Law School and I have a passion for helping my clients get the justice they deserve.”
You may also elaborate on this by explaining your legal field of choice and why you selected it. If you are interested in
criminal law, for example, you could state that you want to put the predators behind bars and keep neighborhoods
safe. Be sure that any answer you provide is specific to the position for which you are applying.

What is Your Motivation to Do Your Best?

This question is somewhat similar to the one above, but requires a different sort of answer. With it, your interviewer
likely hopes to discover your tendency to stay motivated even during tough times—and throughout tough cases.
Perhaps a family member was a lawyer and you want to follow in that tradition. Similarly, it may be that a lawyer you
hired to help you through a personal legal battle failed you and you want to do things differently. Whatever the
reason, you should always be prepared to answer this question truthfully, bluntly and in just a few sentences.

What is Your Greatest Weakness as an Attorney?

Regardless of your chosen profession, explaining your greatest weakness will always be a difficult task. As such, you
should follow it up with the steps you are taking to become stronger in that area. For example, you could state
“Although I tend to spend too much time on small details, I am working very hard to develop the ability to see things
as an entire picture.” You might also answer with “My greatest weakness is constantly striving for perfection and
being reluctant to delegate tasks to my paralegal team. However, I have recently begun allowing myself to share
more of the workload and I am seeing satisfactory results.”

What is the Toughest Case You Have Taken? What Was the Result?

Even if you have not tried a case on your own since graduating from law school, you should be prepared to answer
this question. If you have experience, provide a relatively brief but thorough explanation of the case to your
interviewer whether the result was positive or negative. If you have not yet tried a case on your own, describe a case
that you witnessed or one in which you participated somewhat. Keep in mind that your interviewer is looking for things
such as your emotional involvement with your clients, the things that drive you to perform your best in specific cases,

and perhaps even the knowledge that you take away from losing a case.

Not only will these questions help your interviewer determine your competency and level of expertise in the field, but
they will also help to provide vital information about your passions and whether or not you will work well with the rest
of the company

SOCIAL HELP THROUH SAID CARRER


Become a child welfare attorney. Practicing child welfare lawyer Richard Cozzola offers the
following advice through the American Bar Association: "To work in this field, you must
have multi-disciplinary skills to know when you have to ask questions and access other
professions." He advises prospective child welfare attorneys to make connections in both the
legal and social work fields and "get experience in representing all sides" to get a clearer
picture of your clients' cases.

2
Manage an adoption agency. Adoption professionals must be aware of both the legal and
psychological aspects of the child placement process. With law and social work degrees, you
will be prepared to meet each of these needs, explains lawyer and social worker Raymond
Albert.


o

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3
Practice public interest law. The Yale University School of Law explains that public interest
lawyers work in three main settings: government agencies, nonprofit organizations and
private-public interest law firms. Public interest lawyers may deal with issues like prisoner's
rights, gay and lesbian rights, children's advocacy and human rights law, all of which require
a knowledge of both the law and the social dynamics behind these social issues.

4
Work as a mediator or arbitrator. Mediators serve as neutral third parties in legal disputes.
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, arbitrators must have an in-depth
knowledge of the law as well as listening skills and the ability to resolve disputes effectively.
Since social work students are trained to be effective communicators and assess clients
impartially, mediation may be a good way to use your law and social work degrees.

Become a child welfare attorney. Practicing child welfare lawyer Richard Cozzola offers the
following advice through the American Bar Association: "To work in this field, you must
have multi-disciplinary skills to know when you have to ask questions and access other
professions." He advises prospective child welfare attorneys to make connections in both the
legal and social work fields and "get experience in representing all sides" to get a clearer
picture of your clients' cases.

2
Manage an adoption agency. Adoption professionals must be aware of both the legal and
psychological aspects of the child placement process. With law and social work degrees, you
will be prepared to meet each of these needs, explains lawyer and social worker Raymond
Albert.


o

Sponsored Links

FedEx Scholar of the Year
Answer 5 Questions & You Could Win A Flight Ticket to Your University
shipnow.van.fedex.com

3
Practice public interest law. The Yale University School of Law explains that public interest
lawyers work in three main settings: government agencies, nonprofit organizations and
private-public interest law firms. Public interest lawyers may deal with issues like prisoner's
rights, gay and lesbian rights, children's advocacy and human rights law, all of which require
a knowledge of both the law and the social dynamics behind these social issues.

4
Work as a mediator or arbitrator. Mediators serve as neutral third parties in legal disputes.
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, arbitrators must have an in-depth
knowledge of the law as well as listening skills and the ability to resolve disputes effectively.
Since social work students are trained to be effective communicators and assess clients
impartially, mediation may be a good way to use your law and social work degrees.
 case law
hese lawyers have behaved in a most lawless manner and deserve to be summarily debarred. The
culprits names should be published so that unsuspecting litigants will never engage their services.
At the outset, how does it help the Sri Lankan Tamil cause by striking work in TN courts? Only the
hapless Indian litigant suffers with no benefit accrued to the Sri Lankan civilian Tamil whose cause these
so called lawyers claim to espouse.
Why did the lawyers throw eggs at Subramaniam Swamy? If they have any grievance against him, they
can seek redressal in a court of law. If lawyers behave like street hoodlums, imagine the plight of any
litigant who engages their services.

The Tamil Nadu police deserve medals for cracking down on the rioting lawyers i.e. for taking steps to
ensure rule of law. If you look at other states like Maharashtra, the police stand by as mute spectators
when goondas indulge in violence.
These TN lawyers think they can break all the laws and be immune from prosecution. The Bar Council of
India must debar these goons and the High Court must pass strictures against these miscreant advocates
- so called "officers of the court".
As it is the maximum delays in courts are caused by adjournments taken by lawyers because they are
"busy in another court". Who suffers? The hapless litigant. Now with the lawyers going on indefinite strike,
the litigant again suffers for no fault of his other than to engage the services of these "advocates".
The High Court must not take a lenient view of the lawyers misdeeds, in fact these lawyers deserve the
most stringent punishment, as they are meant to uphold the law, not to break it with impunity.
The Tamil Nadu police must not bow down to any political pressure in their efforts to maintain the rule of
law.
Miha · 6 years ago
Advocacy is an autonomous profession.they are the learned & struggle for upholding rule of law.Basically
human nature being what it is , all human beings are good unless they prove contrary.However, law as
necessary evil is required to eradicatethe greater evil. This is the era of civil society & problems of the
society can be solved only by law made by the representatives of the people.This law is a dead letter
unless given the interpretational meaning by the lawyer.As long as the world is alive only two profession
will have the job 1.doctor.2.lawyer-because there wioll be deceases & disputes.The role of a lawyer in a
modern civil society is of prevention is better than cure. counselling for settlement,negotiation,
conciliation, Arbitration etc.justice should not only be done but manifestly & undoubtedely seen to have
done
LAWZONE · 6 years ago

Advat and dis
You need to be aware of the disadvantages as well as the advantages of working in the
legal sector

Why choose a career in law?
Law will always challenge you. Whether it’s intellectually, because of the hard work you
need to put in or because of the people you need to deal with. Most of the time overcoming
these challenges will help you grow as a person and even make you better at your job.
Law is certainly a rewarding. It could be rewarding because of working in the charity
sectorand helping disadvantaged people. Or it could be rewarding because you’ve taken
part in a million pound sale of a corporation. Or perhaps the little victories will provide you
with a great sense of satisfaction too like helping out a colleague or providing a great idea to
your firms partner. Regardless of your role, you will get a great feeling of accomplishment
from performing your job to a high, professional standard.
Generally speaking legal sector workers are very well paid. This isn’t just for the solicitors
and barristers; an experienced paralegal can earn up to 50k per year in city firms. This does
usually depend on the sort of firm you work for. A firm which deals only with legal aid won’t

pay its employees as much as a corporate law firm. However, the legal profession
is regularly ranked in the top 20 best paid careers in the UK. (Source here and here)

But…
Law firms ask their employees to work long hours. This mean you may have to spend a lot
of time away from your loved ones. If there’s a deadline, or big client who needs work doing
for them, then you’ll be expected to put in extra hours. There are even some horror stories
of solicitors being called by their firm in the middle of the night, saying they’re needed at
work, and telling them a taxi is on the way! This sort of experience should be limited to the
biggest firms though. If you’re getting paid that much, a little out of hours work is expected.
There is a definite need for qualifications if you want to be a solicitor or barrister. Although
this is getting better in recent years with the ability to qualify as a legal executive. There is
still the need for at least 4 years of legal training plus two years of practical training if you
want to become a solicitor or barrister through the traditional route. This of course is very
expensive and consequently could be unobtainable to some people.
It’s about who you know. All profession have this problem to some degree – the boss of a
company is more likely to hire his son than you; even if you’re a perfect candidate. In law it’s
especially apparent so making good connections early on in your legal career is vital. It is
unfortunate that sometimes the best connected candidate is chosen over the candidate with
the best ability, but that should give you the extra drive to become well connected and
network with the right people.

Reasons to become a solicitor
You can go into the legal area you enjoy the most. When you’re making your training
contract applications you will be able to pick the firms which practice the areas of law you
enjoy the most. After your LLB and LPC courses you should know the areas for you. It really
is key to enjoy the work you do; you’re going to be spending the rest of your working life
doing it after all! In the words of Confucius; choose a job you love, and you will never have
to work a day in your life. There is luckily a diverse range of firms to choose from who
should practice in at least one of the legal areas you enjoy
There should be lots of travel opportunities if you’re working in a big firm. Some firms
even offer an overseas seat as part of their training contract. This is mostly limited to the
large international firms, however you can expect at least some travelling especially if you’re
involved in EU law, corporate law, human rights and environmental law. Working in a small
high street firm the opportunites for travel will obviously be much less.
Solicitors have great career progression. There isn’t even the standard way of promotion
to achieve a higher salary. Generally speaking the more experience you have, the more
money you will make (this goes for other roles such as

legal secretaries and paralegals too). You may one day even be able to become partner of
the firm which will bring along a ton of other challenges and opportunities.

But…
It’s hard to get a training contract. Especially in this economic climate. There are quite a
few processes you need to go through to get your training contract too – there will be lots of
competition. To even get to the interview stage you need great academics and a CV stuffed
with relevant work experience. If you don’t get a training contract that’s a lot of money spent
on legal education not getting put to use…
There is a constant need for education. This isn’t necesseraily a bad thing. It depends on
your personality. The law is constantly changing and you need to keep up to date in order to
properly perform your job. You also can’t fall behind in regards to technology used. Can you
imagine if a solicitor refused to learn about WestLaw or Lexis when they first came out?
They wouldn’t be able to perform their job as well as well as a solicitor who had mastered
these resources.
The work may get repetitive. Even if you love the area of law you practice in, day after day
of filling in paperwork could get tedious. As could dealing with the same cases and pieces of
legislation every day. But that’s the same for a lot of jobs; plus you have the chance to
move upwards within the firm (maybe working toward becoming a partner) or even take on
another area of law.

Reasons to become a barrister
Becoming a barrister is certainly prestigious. This is mostly for historical reasons with the
Bar being seen as one of the few suitable career for upper class men in the 18th & 19th
centuries. Due to the amount of training needed, high competition, and ability advocate
before higher courts the profession has maintained this prestige to the current day.
If you want to go into politics then becoming a barrister first is a good idea. Loads of past
and current politicians have been barristers like Tony Blair and Margaret Thatcher. The
skills needed to become a barrister are very similar to the ones you need if you want to
become a politician. It also makes sense that if you spend all that time reading about the
law, you would want to help create it in the future too.
Fighting a cause. Being a barrister is brilliant if you’re really fighting for something that you
believe in. You could be passionate about the environment, human rights or criminal justice.
But as long as you believe in the work you’re doing then you can be happy in the knowledge
you’re making a difference.

But…
There is a lot of pressure. This pressure is different then being a solicitor, which is mostly
pressure over a period of time (like hitting a deadline). The pressure you will face as a

barrister could be more focused around the moment rather than over time; the pressure to
perform in court is a perfect example of this. You can’t let the pressure get to you or your
argument will fall apart. This will result in your client; who needs you to do your job perfectly,
being let down.
It’s even harder to become a barrister than it is to become a solicitor. There are only
15,000 barristers in the United Kingdom. There are not as many pupillage places available
as there are places on the Bar Professional Training Course, so unfortunately a certain
number of applicants are going to be disappointed. As with being a solicitor you should
make some good contacts via networking or mini pupillages before applying.
You need to be naturally talented. You can’t just be good at speaking & arguing; you need
to be the best. The same goes for being good at thinking on your feet. If you’re good at law
but don’t necessarily possess the quick thinking, persuasive and charismatic attributes
required by a barrister
then you’re not likely to be successful.

career as a lawyer is an extraordinary calling. However, becoming a lawyer is an
enormous undertaking in terms of time commitment and financial investment.
Therefore, it is important to learn as much about the profession as possible before
you embark on a career path as a lawyer. These top 10 reasons to become a lawyer
explain some of the benefits of working as an attorney. Keep in mind that that a
career as an attorney has also has its drawbacks

Michelangelo Gratton / Iconica / Getty Images

1. Earning Potential
Lawyers are among the highest paid professionals in the legal industry and most attorneys
earn salaries well above the national average. While the median annual salary for all lawyers
is $110,590, the world’s top lawyers pull in million dollar incomes. Keep in mind, however,
that not all lawyers make big bucks and salaries depend on employer size, experience level
and geographic region. Lawyers employed in large law firms, major metropolitan areas
and in-demand specialties generally earn the highest incomes. More »

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2. Prestige
For generations, a career as a lawyer has been a hallmark of prestige. Impressive degrees,
generous salaries, and an authority over others have placed lawyers in an elite circle of
professionals who command respect and embody the definition of success. Today, lawyers
still enjoy a unique professional status and a glamorous imageperpetuated by the media.

3. Opportunity to Help Others
Lawyers are in a unique position to help individuals, groups and organizations with their
legal problems and further the public good. Public interest lawyers champion legal causes for
the greater good of society and help those in need of legal assistance who might not
otherwise be able to afford a lawyer. Lawyers in private practice often perform pro bono
work to help low-income individuals and underserved portions of the population such as the
elderly, victims of domestic abuse and children. More »

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4. Intellectual Challenge
Working as a lawyer is one of the most intellectually rewarding jobs on the planet. From
helping to patent a trade secret to devising trial strategy to forming a multi-million dollar
merger, lawyers are problem-solvers, analysts and innovative thinkers whose intellect is
crucial to career success. More »

5. Diverse Practice Areas
As the legal profession evolves, increased industry segmentation and specialization have led
to a broad array of sub-specialties. Lawyers can specialize in one or several niche areas
ranging from bread-and-butter practices such as employment law and civil litigationto niche
specialties such as green law or forclosure law. More »

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6. Work Environment
The majority of lawyers work in law firms, government and corporations. In an age where
cubicles have become the mainstay of the modern workplace, lawyers typically work in an
office with four walls. Lawyers in larger firms enjoy plush offices, ample support staff and a
variety of office perks ranging from gym memberships to box seats at sporting events.More »

7. Transferable Skills
Even if you don’t practice law, a J.D. can open doors to new opportunities and serve as a
stepping stone to a new career. The skills you develop in law school and as a lawyer can
serve you well in many careers such as legal consulting, management, writing, mediationand
academia. More »

8. Global Influence
As lawmakers, thought leaders and change agents, lawyers are in a unique position to
affect societal change. For centuries, lawyers have stood at the center of society; they
write the laws, rule the courts and hold influential positions in government. In these
roles, lawyers are able to impact top policy makers and leaders and affect change
around the globe. More »

9. Flexibility
Lawyers are autonomous and have the ability to make their own hours, set their own
fees and choose their own clients and practice areas. The job has an inherent flexibility
that allows lawyers to attend to personal matters or spend a day away from the office if
needed. More »

10. Other Perks
A career as a lawyer also offers a number of other perks. For example, some lawyers travel
the country, or the world, to participate in trials, depositions, arbitrations and business deals.
Other lawyers rub shoulders with business leaders, politicians, sports figures and even
celebrities. Another perk of practicing law is learning to think like a lawyer: studying
law sharpens your analytical, reasoning and critical thinking skills, giving you a new
perspective of the world.
ny individuals choose a career in the law for the wrong reasons. Before embarking
on the demanding, time-intensive and expensive journey to becoming a lawyer,
make certain that you are making a well-informed decision. Below I debunk a few
common myths about life as a lawyer.

.myth

. Becoming a lawyer is a guaranteed path to financial success.
The truth is, the most highly compensated attorneys are employed in the world’s
mega-firms (firms with over 101 attorneys) and such firms represent only 1% of all
law firms according to the American Bar Foundation’s Lawyer Statistical Report.
Furthermore, most mega-firms are extremely selective in their hiring process,
choosing only the top students from the most prestigious law schools. The vast
majority of lawyers work in lower-paying venues such as small firms,public
interest and the government. According to NALP, 83 percent of all lawyers who work
in private practice are employed in firms of fewer than 50 lawyers.
Large law firm lawyers report the least career satisfaction according to a
recent survey by the American Bar Association. Billable hour quotas at many large
firms require lawyers to work 60-80 hours per week. When you divide your hours
worked into your monthly salary, that big-firm paycheck may not look so generous.
Attorneys employed in the public sector – which ranks among the lowest paying
practice environments - reported the most career satisfaction.

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2. As a lawyer, I can eradicate injustice and affect societal change.
While you can make a positive impact as a lawyer, litigation has little to do with
virtue triumphing over evil and everything to do with advocating your client’s position
based upon the facts and applicable law. Judicial decisions are not so much about
the pursuit of justice or right vs. wrong as about reaching a compromise between all
the parties.
Judicial policy also affects many case decisions. In the ABA survey cited above, two
out of every three lawyers surveyed reported concern that the court system they
serve is becoming too political.

3. I will make a great lawyer because I am good at arguing.
Although litigation is an adversarial process, legal advocacy is not about “arguing” in
the sense of engaging in a verbal battle with your opponent. Instead, it is about
persuading your audience – judge, mediator or jury – through a logical, wellresearched, well-reasoned discussion based on the facts and the law. Thus, to
succeed as a litigator, a track record of “winning arguments” is not as important as
top-notch oral advocacy and writing skills.

4. Litigators lead a thrilling, high-powered and glamorous life.
Unlike the lawyers portrayed on television shows, the majority of the work of trial
attorneys occurs outside the courtroom. In fact, less than one percent of all civil

cases actually proceed to trial. The vast majority of cases are settled out of court
or through alternative methods of dispute resolution.
The daily life of the average trial lawyer is quite unglamorous. Trial lawyers spend
most of their time in the discovery stage of litigation, reviewing pleadings, drafting
and answering discovery requests and taking depositions. The work of a trial lawyer
is also very research and writing-intensive as much of their work involves drafting
briefs, memorandums of law and motions. Litigators spend many long hours
engaged in tedious document review, gathering thousands of documents to be
produced in litigation and reviewing each document to determine if it must be turned
over to the other parties.

5. The work of a lawyer is intellectually challenging.
While law practice can be intellectually rigorous, much of the lawyer’s work is
mundane and repetitive. New lawyers, especially those in large firms, are often
charged with the mind-numbing tasks of document review, cite checking and routine
research. Law firm lawyers must track their time in six to fifteen-minute increments
throughout the day, a painstaking but necessary task.

Dis

 Long Hours

Lawyers typically work long hours and sometimes are required to work weekends or
irregular hours to meet with clients, do research and write briefs. According to the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, one-third of full-time lawyers in the United States work 50 or more hours
each week. 40 hours each week is considered a full-time schedule. Working longer hours can
have a negative impact on a lawyer's family life and health.

Loans

Working as a lawyer comes only after much academic preparation and work. A lawyer in the
United States must first complete approximately four to five years of full-time study for a
bachelor's degree, pass the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), complete three years of
full-time study for a law degree and pass the Bar Examination. Lawyers usually earn higherthan-average salaries, but they may have had to take out student loans to do so. Paying back
student loans can be a financial burden, especially if the schools were private or expensive
ones, or the lawyer did not work when studying for the Bar Examination, as is common.

Lawyer Jokes

Lawyers are often respected for attaining higher education, earning good salaries and being a
professional. At the same time, public perception of lawyers can be quite negative. Lawyer
jokes are one manifestation of this. Lawyers are commonly called, or joked as being,
bloodsuckers, ambulance chasers, criminals, sleazy and unethical.

Bar Fees

To practice law in the United States, a person must first pass the Bar Examination
administered by the state in which he wishes to practice law. Then he has to pay annual fees
to the state's bar association to maintain licensure as a lawyer in that jurisdiction. As an
example, the State Bar of California's 2011 membership fee is $410. This is a significant
amount of money to pay each year. Some state bars, like the State Bar of California, have
reduced membership fees for lawyers who earn below a certain amount of money, but the
fees must still be paid.

Related carrer
Judge
Teacher (law school, college, high school)
Law clerk (first year out of law school)
Politics- legislator, campaign advisor, etc.
Writer
Researcher

Legal professions are those occupations that are associated in any way with a court room.
The first and the main is the judge, who decides cases (with the help of jury members) and
passes judgments. Then there are lawyers, both working for the defense and the
processing in a case. Lawyers usually have paralegals to assist them with the preparation
and presentation of cases. Where cameras are not permitted in the court rooms, artists are
employed by the media to draft the scenes. Court reporters, law clerks, legal writers and
forensic artists are also form part of legal occupations.

SOME LEGAL PROFESSIONS

Judge
Judges are assumed to be
objective and above being
swayed. They decide questions
brought before a court of
justice.

Magistrate
Magistrate is a judicial officer
that has restricted powers to
administer and enforce law in
several jurisdictions.

Jurist
Jurist studies, develops and
applies the law, on the other
hand, in some countries a jurist
is a person with a degree in law.

Prosecutor
Prosecutor is an attorney of
prosecution in countries that
performances legal party
responsible such as to present a
case.

Attorney
An attorney is a person
authorized to practice law by
the highest court of a state or
another jurisdiction to
represent a client.

Paralegal
Paralegal is a legal
assistant that executes
tasks as lawyers, but
he/she cannot argue a
case in court, or give
legal recommendation.

FUTURE AIM

Richard Susskind has successfully positioned himself as the legal profession's
Nostradamus. He predicted widespread use of e-mail by lawyers back when the
technology was new and most attorneys were dismissing its relevance due to
privilege and confidentiality concerns. His latest book discusses how artificial
intelligence, knowledge management systems and removal of regulatory restrictions
will revolutionize how we practice law. It is provocatively titled, "The End of
Lawyers?"
Employment change. Employment of lawyers is expected to grow 11 percent during the 2006-16
decade, about as fast as the average for all occupations. The growth in the population and in the
level of business activity is expected to create more legal transactions, civil disputes, and criminal
cases. Job growth among lawyers also will result from increasing demand for legal services in such
areas as health care, intellectual property, venture capital, energy, elder, antitrust, and
environmental law. In addition, the wider availability and affordability of legal clinics should result in
increased use of legal services by middle-income people. However, growth in demand for lawyers
will be constrained as businesses increasingly use large accounting firms and paralegals to perform
some of the same functions that lawyers do. For example, accounting firms may provide employeebenefit counseling, process documents, or handle various other services previously performed by a
law firm. Also, mediation and dispute resolution increasingly are being used as alternatives to
litigation.
Job growth for lawyers will continue to be concentrated in salaried jobs, as businesses and all levels
of government employ a growing number of staff attorneys. Most salaried positions are in urban
areas where government agencies, law firms, and big corporations are concentrated. The number of
self-employed lawyers is expected to grow slowly, reflecting the difficulty of establishing a profitable
new practice in the face of competition from larger, established law firms. Moreover, the growing
complexity of law, which encourages specialization, along with the cost of maintaining up-to-date
legal research materials, favors larger firms.
Job prospects. Competition for job openings should continue to be keen because of the large
number of students graduating from law school each year. Graduates with superior academic
records from highly regarded law schools will have the best job opportunities. Perhaps as a result of
competition for attorney positions, lawyers are increasingly finding work in less traditional areas for
which legal training is an asset, but not normally a requirement - for example, administrative,
managerial, and business positions in banks, insurance firms, real estate companies, government
agencies, and other organizations. Employment opportunities are expected to continue to arise in

these organizations at a growing rate.
As in the past, some graduates may have to accept positions outside of their field of interest or for
which they feel overqualified. Some recent law school graduates who have been unable to find
permanent positions are turning to the growing number of temporary staffing firms that place
attorneys in short-term jobs. This service allows companies to hire lawyers on an "as-needed" basis
and permits beginning lawyers to develop practical skills.
Because of the keen competition for jobs, a law graduate's geographic mobility and work experience
assume greater importance. The willingness to relocate may be an advantage in getting a job, but to
be licensed in another State, a lawyer may have to take an additional State bar examination. In
addition, employers increasingly seek graduates who have advanced law degrees and experience in
a specialty, such as tax, patent, or admiralty law.
Job opportunities often are adversely affected by cyclical swings in the economy. During recessions,
demand declines for some discretionary legal services, such as planning estates, drafting wills, and
handling real estate transactions. Also, corporations are less likely to litigate cases when declining
sales and profits restrict their budgets. Some corporations and law firms will not hire new attorneys
until business improves, and these establishments may even cut staff to contain costs. Several
factors, however, mitigate the overall impact of recessions on lawyers; during recessions, for
example, individuals and corporations face other legal problems, such as bankruptcies, foreclosures,
and divorces requiring legal action.
For lawyers who wish to work independently, establishing a new practice will probably be easiest in
small towns and expanding suburban areas. In such communities, competition from larger,
established law firms is likely to be less than in big cities, and new lawyers may find it easier to
establish a reputation among potential clients.

Imagine yourself standing before a judge telling your clients side of the story to a jury. What
a sense of pride! Being a lawyer is not a simple task. The status of a lawyer as a career is
more difficult then a majority of high school students believe.
A lawyer is someone whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and
represent in a court of legal matters. In other words, a lawyer is someone who defends the
truth in society. For years, lawyers have been part of the core- profession. This consisted if
high class careers. Doctors and articles were a few of those careers. Law was a historically

male- dominated profession. In 1960, three point five percent of lawyers in the United
States of America were woman. Twenty years later the percentage of women lawyers in the
United States went up fifteen percent. By 1993 the percentage rose twenty three percent.
The numbers continued to grow and grow. Today a numerous amount of law firms are
owned by the female gender. "Woman are under represented in the law profession, and
that within the profession, they are situated in the least well- paid, least prestigious
areas."(Rogers, Jackie Krasas 1965 - pg 127.) She does make a clear point. It's unfortunate
I agree with this statement. Females are just as intelligent as the male gender.
Before becoming a lawyer, there are a few requirements to fulfill. You must complete four
years of undergraduate work. You must also complete another three years of law school.
An aptitude test is given also known as an LSAT only then can you get started. Altogether
you are spending seven years in school. Becoming a lawyer doesn't happen overnight.
After all the hard work there are still skills required to become one. You are obligated to
obey all rules provided by the law. developing proficiency in reading and writer are two
aspects. Without the ability to communicate you will fail to succeed. Good analyzation skills
are required as well.. A background of multi...