Project  Scheduling  

Module  7  

0

Learning  Objec7ves  
•  Project  Scheduling  Based  on  Expected  Ac7vity  Times  
•  Project  Scheduling  Considering  Uncertain  Ac7vity  Times  

1

 What  is  PERT/CPM?  
•  PERT/CPM  is  used  to  plan  the  scheduling  of  individual  ac7vi7es  that  make  
up  a  project.  
o  PERT  
•   Program  Evalua7on  and  Review  Technique  
•  Developed  by  U.S.  Navy  for  Polaris  missile  project  
•  Developed  to  handle  uncertain  ac7vity  7mes  
o  CPM  
•  Cri7cal  Path  Method  
•  Developed  by  DuPont  &  Remington  Rand  
•  Developed  for  industrial  projects  for  which  ac7vity  7mes  generally  were  known  

•  PERT  and  CPM  have  been  used  to  plan,  schedule,  and  control  a  wide  
variety  of  projects,  such  as  
o 
o 
o 
o 

R&D  of  new  products  and  processes  
Construc7on  of  buildings  and  highways  
Maintenance  of  large  and  complex  equipment  
Design  and  installa7on  of  new  systems  

2

Why  use  PERT/CPM?  
•  Project  managers  rely  on  PERT/CPM  to  help  them  answer  
ques7ons  such  as:  
o  What  is  the  total  &me  to  complete  the  project?  
o  What  are  the  scheduled  start  and  finish  dates  for  each  specific  
ac7vity?  
o  Which  ac7vi7es  are  cri&cal  and  must  be  completed  exactly  as  
scheduled  to  keep  the  project  on  schedule?  
o  How  long  can  noncri&cal  ac&vi&es  be  delayed  before  they  cause  an  
increase  in  the  project  comple7on  7me?  

3

Project  Scheduling  with  
Known  Ac7vity  Times  

4

How?  

Project  Network  

•  A  project  network  can  be  constructed  to  model  the  precedence  
of  the  ac7vi7es.      
•  The  nodes  of  the  network  represent  the  ac7vi7es.      
A  
3  

•  The  arcs  of  the  network  reflect  the  precedence  rela7onships  of  
the  ac7vi7es.      
•  A  cri7cal  path  for  the  network  is  a  path  consis7ng  of  ac7vi7es  
with  zero  slack.  

5

Example:    Frank’s  Fine  Floats  
         Frank’s  Fine  Floats  is  in  the  business  of  building  
elaborate  parade  floats.    Frank  ‘s  crew  has  a  new  float  to  
build  and  want  to  use  PERT/CPM  to  help  them  manage  
the  project.  
         The  table  on  the  next  slide  shows  the  ac7vi7es  that  
comprise  the  project  as  well  as  each  ac7vity’s  es7mated  
comple7on  7me  (in  days)  and  immediate  predecessors.  
         Frank  wants  to  know  the  total  7me  to  complete  the  
project,  which  ac7vi7es  are  cri7cal,  and  the  earliest  and  
latest  start  and  finish  dates  for  each  ac7vity.  

6

Example:    Frank’s  Fine  Floats  
 

 
 
 
 
               Immediate            Comple7on  
   Ac7vity          Descrip7on                      Predecessors          Time  (days)  
       A              Ini7al  Paperwork                              -­‐-­‐-­‐  
             3  
       B              Build  Body                                    
       A
 
             3  
       C              Build  Frame                                  
       A
 
             2  
       D              Finish  Body                                  
       B
     
             3  
       E                Finish  Frame                                
       C
 
             7  
       F                Final  Paperwork                            B,C  
             3  
       G              Mount  Body  to  Frame                    D,E                              6  
       H              Install  Skirt  on  Frame                        C  
             2  

7

Example:    Frank’s  Fine  Floats  
•  Project  Network  

Start  

A  
3  

B  
3  

   

   

C  
2  

   

D  
3  

   

F  
3  

   

E  
7  

   

G  
6  

   

Finish  
H  

   

2  

8

Determining  the  Cri7cal  Path  
Calculate  the  slack  7me  for  each  ac7vity  by:    
         
 Slack  =  (Latest  Start)  -­‐  (Earliest  Start),  or    
         
                     =  (Latest  Finish)  -­‐  (Earliest  Finish).    
 

Ac7vity        ES          EF        LS              LF        Slack  
         A                      0                3            0                3      0    (cri7cal)  
         B                        3              6            6                9          3  
         C                        3              5            3                5        0    (cri7cal)  
         D                      6                9            9            12      3  
         E                        5          12              5            12      0    (cri7cal)  
         F                        6              9          15            18        9  
         G                  12          18          12            18        0    (cri7cal)  
         H                      5              7          16            18  11  
•  A  cri7cal  path  is  a  path  of  ac7vi7es,  from  the  Start  node  to  the  Finish  node,  with  0  slack  
7mes.  Cri7cal  Path:                A  –  C  –  E  –  G  
•  The  project  comple7on  7me  equals  the  maximum  of  the  ac7vi7es’  earliest  finish  7mes.  
•  Project  Comple7on  Time:        18  days  

9

Example:    Frank’s  Fine  Floats  
•  Project  Network  
B   3        6  
3   6    9  

Start  

D   6        9  
3   9    12  
F  
3  

A   0        3  
3   0    3  
C   3        5  
2   3    5  

6    9  

   

G   12    1  8  
6   12  18  

15  18  

E   5  1    2  
7   5  12  

Finish  
H  

5  7  

   

2   16  18  

Critical Path: Start – A – C – E – G  –  Finish

10

Project  Scheduling  with  
Uncertain  Ac7vity  Times  

11

Uncertain  Ac7vity  Times  
•  An  ac7vity’s  mean  comple7on  7me  is:  
 

 

     

         

                       t    =    (a  +  4m  +  b)/6  

•  The  cri7cal  path  is  determined  as  if  the  mean  7mes  for  the  
ac7vi7es  were  fixed  7mes.    
 

 

 

•   a      =    the  op7mis7c  comple7on  7me  es7mate  
•   b      =    the  pessimis7c  comple7on  7me  es7mate  
•   m    =    the  most  likely  comple7on  7me  es7mate  

12

Example  

•  Consider  the  following  project:  
 

a  

 

m  

b  

Immediate   Op7mi7c   Most  Likely   Pessimis7c  

Ac7vity   Predececor   Time  (Hr)  
A  
-­‐-­‐  
4  
B  
-­‐-­‐  
1  
C  
A  
3  
D  
A  
4  
E  
A  
0.5  
F  
B,  C  
3  
G  
B,  C  
1  
H  
E,  F  
5  
I  
E,  F  
2  
J  
D,  H  
2.5  
K  
G,  I  
3  

Time  (Hr)   Time  (Hr)  
6  
8  
4.5  
5  
3  
3  
5  
6  
1  
1.5  
4  
5  
1.5  
5  
6  
7  
5  
8  
2.75  
4.5  
5  
7  

t  =  (a  +  4m  +  b)/6    

Expected  
Time  
6  
4  
3  
5  
1  
4  
2  
6  
5  
3  
5  

13

Example:    ABC  Associates  
• 
• 

Cri7cal  Path  (A  –  C  –  F  –  I  –  K)  
Project  Comple7on  Time:    23  hours  

6 11
5 15 20

D

19 22
3 20 23
J

13 19
6 14 20

H

0 6
6 0 6

A

6 7
1 12 13
E

13 18
5 13 18
I

Start

6 9
3 6 9

C

9 13
4 9 13

F

Finish

18 23
5 18 23

K

0 4
4 5 9

B

9 11
2 16 18

G

!

14

Uncertain  Ac7vity  Times  (con7nued)  
•  An  ac7vity’s  comple7on  7me  variance  is:  
 

 

 

                             σ 2    =    ((b-­‐a)/6)2  

 

•  a      =    the  op7mis7c  comple7on  7me  es7mate  
•   b      =    the  pessimis7c  comple7on  7me  es7mate  

15

Example  (con7nued)  
Suppose  we  want  to  es7mate  the  probability  that  the  project  will  be  completed  
within  24  hours.  
From  previous  discussion,  cri7cal  path    is  A  –  C  –  F  –  I  –  K.  
a  
m  
b  
t  
 
 
Ac7vity  
A  
B  
C  
D  
E  
F  
G  
H  
I  
J  
K  

Immediate  
Predecessor  
-­‐-­‐  
-­‐-­‐  
A  
A  
A  
B,  C  
B,  C  
E,  F  
E,  F  
D,  H  
G,  I  

Op7mi7c  
Time  (Hr)  
4  
1  
3  
4  
0.5  
3  
1  
5  
2  
2.5  
3  

Most  Likely  
Time  (Hr)  
6  
4.5  
3  
5  
1  
4  
1.5  
6  
5  
2.75  
5  

Pessimis7c  
Time  (Hr)  
8  
5  
3  
6  
1.5  
5  
5  
7  
8  
4.5  
7  

Expected  
Time  
6  
4  
3  
5  
1  
4  
2  
6  
5  
3  
5  

Variance  
 
   4/9    
   4/9    
0  
   1/9    
   1/36  
   1/9    
   4/9    
   1/9    
1  
   1/9    
   4/9    

The  comple7on  7me  is  assumed  to  have  a  normal  distribu7on  with  
mean  equal  to  the  sum  of  the  means  along  the  cri7cal  path:  6+3+4+5+5=23  
Variance  equal  to  the  sum  of  variance  along  the  cri7cal  path:    

σ 2  =    σ 2A  +  σ 2C  +  σ 2F  +  σ 2H  +  σ 2K  
             =    4/9  +  0  +  1/9  +  1  +  4/9  =    2  

 

 

 σ    =    1.414  

Note:    
The  standard  devia7on  of  the  comple7on  7me  should  NOT  be  calculated  by  the  sum  of  the  standard  devia7ons.  

16

Example  (con7nued)  
•  We  want  to  es7mate  the  probability  that  the  project  will  be  
completed  within  24  hours    
 Let  X  be  the  comple7on  7me.  
 X  has  a  normal  distribu7on  with  a  mean  µ  =  23  and  
 standard  devia7on  σ  =  1.414.  
z=

x−µ
σ
24 23
)
1.414
= P (Z  0.71)

P (X  24) = P (Z 
= 0.7611

0.7611  

µ = 23
24  
0.71  

x  
z  

17

18

Example  (Con7nued)  
•  What  is  the  probability  that  the  project  will  NOT  be  
completed  within  24  hours  
Let  X  be  the  comple7on  7me.  
X  has  a  normal  distribu7on  with  a  mean  µ  =  23  
and    standard  devia7on  σ  =  1.414.  

P (X > 24) = 1
=1
=1
=1

P (X  24)
24 23
P (Z 
)
1.414
P (Z  0.71)
0.7611 = 0.2378

0.7611  

µ = 23
24  
0.71  

x  
z  
19

Example  (Con7nued)  
•  What  is  the  probability  that  the  project  will  be  completed  
between  21  and  25  hours?  
Let  X  be  the  comple7on  7me.  
X  has  a  normal  distribu7on  with  a  mean  µ  =  23  
and    standard  devia7on  σ  =  1.414.  

21 23
25 23
Z
)
1.414
1.414
= P ( 1.41  Z  1.41)

P (23  X  25) = P (

= P (Z  1.41)
= 0.9207

P (Z 

1.41)

0.0793

= 0.8414
21  
-­‐1.41  

µ = 23

25  
1.41  

x  
z  
20

How?  

 Find  Normal  Probabili7es  

Tip:  Let  the  Graph  be  Your  Guide!  

•  Show  the  graph  with  the  ‘x’  scale  and  then  the  ‘z’  scale  
directly  underneath  it  
•  Shade  in  the  desired  area  on  the  graph  
•  Calculate  the  z  scores  associated  with  the  relevant  x  scale  
•  Look  up  the  area  [tabled  value]  in  the  normal  probability  
distribu7on  
•  Find  the  probability  associated  with  the  desired  area  
The  table  value  gives  you  the  probability  of  
geqng  a  z-­‐score  that  is  less  than  the  look-­‐up  value.  

21

Takeaways  
•  Iden7fy  the  ES,  EF,  LS,  LF,  cri7cal  path,  comple7on  7me  
•  Incorporate  the  uncertain7es  to  evaluate  the  likelihood  to  
finish  a  project  
•  Review  how  to  convert  a  normal  random  variable  to  a  
standard  normal  random  variable  to  find  probabili7es  
•  Exercises:    
o  (Normal  distribu7on,  Ch  3)  22,  23,  24,  26  
o  (Project  Scheduling  Ch  13)  1,  6,  8,  14  

22