6 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited

NOTICE TO THE SHAREHOLDERS
Notice is hereby given that the 53
rd
Annual General Meeting of the Shareholders of Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
(BPC) will be held in the Y.B.Chavan Auditorium, at Yeshwantrao Chavan Pratishthan, General Jagannath Bhosale Marg,
Mumbai 400 021, on Monday, 18
th
December 2006 at 10.30 a.m. to transact the following Ordinary Business and Special
Business:
A. Ordinary Business
1. To receive and adopt the Directors’ Report alongwith the addendum thereto and the Report on Corporate Governance,
the Audited Profit & Loss Account for the year ended 31
st
March, 2006 and the Balance Sheet as at that date along
with the Report of the Statutory Auditors and the Comments of the Comptroller & Auditor General of India.
2. To declare dividend.
3. To appoint a Director in place of Shri V. D. Gupta, who retires by rotation in pursuance of Section 256 of the
Companies Act, 1956. Shri V. D. Gupta, being eligible, offers himself for re-appointment.
4. To appoint a Director in place of Shri P. C. Sen, who retires by rotation in pursuance of Section 256 of the Companies
Act, 1956. Shri P. C. Sen, being eligible, offers himself for re-appointment.
5. To appoint a Director in place of Prof. A. H. Kalro, who retires by rotation in pursuance of Section 256 of the
Companies Act, 1956. Prof. A. H. Kalro, being eligible, offers himself for re-appointment.
6. To fix the remuneration of the Statutory Auditors.
To consider and, if thought fit, to pass the following Resolution, with or without modifications, as a Special Resolution:-
“RESOLVED that pursuant to the provisions of Section 224(8)(aa) and other applicable provisions, if any, of the
Companies Act, 1956, remuneration of the Single / Joint Statutory Auditors to be appointed by the Comptroller &
Auditor General of India (C&AG) under Section 619(2) of the said Act, be and is hereby approved to be fixed at
Rs. 13,50,000, to be paid to the Single firm of Statutory Auditors or to be shared equally by the Joint Statutory
Auditors, in case of appointment of Joint firms of Statutory Auditors by the C&AG, in addition to actual reasonable
travelling and out of pocket expenses and service tax as applicable, for the year 2006-07 and for subsequent years,
till further recommendation for increase in the remuneration is approved.”
B. Special Business
7. Appointment of Director
To consider and, if thought fit, to pass the following Resolution, with or without modifications, as an Ordinary
Resolution :-
“RESOLVED that Shri. P. K. Sinha, Joint Secretary & Financial Advisor, Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas be and
is hereby appointed as Director of the Company.”
NOTIC-6-9-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 1:59 AM 6
7 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
8. Appointment of Director
To consider and, if thought fit, to pass the following Resolution, with or without modifications, as an Ordinary
Resolution :-
“RESOLVED that Shri. S. K. Joshi, be and is hereby appointed as Director of the Company.”
9. Appointment of Director
To consider and, if thought fit, to pass the following Resolution, with or without modifications, as an Ordinary
Resolution :-
“RESOLVED that Shri R. K. Singh, be and is hereby appointed as Director of the Company.”
By Order of the Board of Directors
Sd/-
(N. Viswakumar)
Company Secretary
Registered Office:
Bharat Bhavan,
4 & 6 Currimbhoy Road,
Ballard Estate,
MUMBAI – 400 001.
Date : 17
th
November 2006
Notes :
1. Explanatory statements under Section 173 of the Companies Act, 1956, in respect of the above items of Special Business
and Explanatory Statement in respect of the Special Resolution at Item No. 6 are annexed hereto:
2. A member entitled to attend and vote at the Meeting is entitled to appoint a proxy or proxies, in the alternative, to attend
and vote instead of himself and such proxy need not be a member. Proxies, in order to be effective, should be duly
completed & affixed with the revenue stamp and be deposited at the Registered Office of the Company not less than forty
eight hours before commencement of the Meeting.
3. In order to help us in providing appropriate answers backed by relevant financial data, the shareholders may please send
their queries that they would desire to raise at the AGM, at least one week in advance, to the Company Secretary at the
Registered Office.
NOTIC-6-9-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 1:59 AM 7
8 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
EXPLANATORY STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO SECTION 173 OF THE COMPANIES ACT, 1956.
Item No. 6 Fixation of the remuneration of the Statutory Auditors
The Remuneration of the Statutory Auditors was fixed, earlier, by the shareholders at the 51
st
Annual General Meeting
held on 30
th
August 2004 at Rs. 10,00,000, to be shared equally in addition to actual reasonable travelling and out of
pocket expenses and applicable service tax. However, consequent to the merger of the erstwhile Kochi Refineries
Limited with BPC, the accounts of Kochi Refinery will not be separately published and will have to be merged with the
accounts of BPC, thereby increasing the scope and coverage of audit of BPC. Considering the increase in the nature
and scope of audit activities, the Audit Committee has recommended increase in the remuneration of the Statutory
Auditors, from Rs. 10,00,000 to Rs. 13,50,000, to be paid to the single/joint firm of the Statutory Auditors, in addition
to actual reasonable travelling and out of pocket expenses and service tax as applicable, for the year 2006-07 and for
subsequent years, till fur ther approval of the shareholders for increase in the remuneration.
None of the Directors are interested or concerned in the Resolution.
Item No.7 Appointment of Director
Shri P. K. Sinha, Joint Secretary & Financial Advisor, Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas, was appointed as Additional
Director, by the Board of Directors, under Ar ticle 77A of the Ar ticles of Association of the Company, with effect from
21
st
February 2006, in accordance with the directions of the Government of India.
Shri P. K. Sinha, being an Additional Director, holds office up to the date of the ensuing Annual General Meeting. The
Company has received a notice, u/s 257 of the Companies Act, 1956, from a member, proposing the name of
Shri P. K.Sinha as Director of the Company. A brief resume of Shri P. K. Sinha, as required under Clause 49(IV)(G) of
the Listing Agreement, is provided separately in the Corporate Governance Repor t enclosed to the Directors’ Repor t.
Shri P. K. Sinha does not hold any shares in the Company as on the date of appointment. The Directors recommend
appointment of Shri P.K.Sinha as Director of the Company.
Except Shri P. K. Sinha, no other Director is interested in the Resolution.
Item No. 8 Appointment of Director
Shri S.K. Joshi was appointed as Additional Director, by the Board of Directors, under Ar ticle 77A of the Ar ticles of
Association of the Company, with effect from 8
th
March 2006, in accordance with the directions of the Government of
India. Shri S.K.Joshi has fur ther been appointed as Director (Finance) of the Company.
Shri S.K. Joshi, being an Additional Director, holds office up to the date of the ensuing Annual General Meeting. The
Company has received a notice, u/s 257 of the Companies Act, 1956, from a member, proposing the name of
Shri S.K. Joshi as Director of the Company. A brief resume of Shri S.K. Joshi, as required under Clause 49(IV)(G) of
the Listing Agreement, is provided separately in the Corporate Governance Repor t enclosed to the Directors’ Repor t.
The Directors recommend appointment of Shri S.K. Joshi as Director of the Company.
Except Shri S.K. Joshi, no other Director is interested in the Resolution.
NOTIC-6-9-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 1:59 AM 8
9 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
Item No. 9 Appointment of Director
Shri R.K. Singh was appointed as Additional Director, by the Board of Directors, under Ar ticle 77A of the Ar ticles of
Association of the Company, with effect from 8
th
March 2006, in accordance with the directions of the Government of
India. Shri R.K. Singh has fur ther been appointed as Director (Refineries) of the Company.
Shri R.K. Singh, being an Additional Director, holds office up to the date of the ensuing Annual General Meeting. The
Company has received a notice, u/s 257 of the Companies Act, 1956, from a member, proposing the name of
Shri R.K. Singh as Director of the Company. A brief resume of Shri R.K. Singh, as required under Clause 49(IV)(G) of
the Listing Agreement, is provided separately in the Corporate Governance Repor t enclosed to the Directors’ Repor t.
The Directors recommend appointment of Shri R.K. Singh as Director of the Company.
Except Shri R.K. Singh, no other Director is interested in the Resolution.
By Order of the Board of Directors
Sd/-
(N. Viswakumar)
Company Secretary
Registered Office:
Bharat Bhavan,
4 & 6 Currimbhoy Road,
Ballard Estate,
MUMBAI – 400 001.
Date : 17
th
November 2006
NOTIC-6-9-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 1:59 AM 9
10 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION & ANALYSIS REPORT
INDUSTRY STRUCTURE AND DEVELOPMENTS
As per the revised estimates released by the Central
Statistical Organisation, the Indian economy is
estimated to have grown at a rate of 8.4% in the year
2005-06 as against 7.5% growth achieved in the
previous year. The agricultural and allied sector has
recovered from a sharp decline in the growth rate in
2004-05 to post a growth rate of 3.9% in 2005-06. The
manufacturing and services sectors have continued to
deliver high growth rates, thereby fuelling the overall
growth of the economy. These trends have been
maintained during the first quar ter of the current
financial year, when the economy has been estimated
to have grown at a rate of 8.9%.
The growth in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at rates
in excess of 8% has been achieved by the economy
only in five years of recorded history and in two out of
the last three years. The Economic Survey of 2005-06
attributes the dynamic growth rates in the recent past
to factors like a new industrial resurgence, pick up in
investment, modest inflation despite spiralling global
crude prices, laying of some institutional foundations
for faster development of physical infrastructure, rapid
growth in expor ts and impor ts etc. The sharp rise in the
benchmark indices of the Indian stock market reflects
the growing confidence of the investing community on
the sustained growth of the economy in general and the
corporate sector in par ticular.
Although the economy has grown at a robust pace, the
consumption of petroleum products has remained more
or less static. The consumption of petroleum products
in 2005-06 has been flat as compared to the previous
year. The consumption of petroleum products during
2005-06 stands at 111.92 Million Metric Tonnes (MMT).
With the growing significance of the services sector in
the Indian economy, the high growth in GDP is not
translating into a corresponding growth in the demand
for petroleum products.
Consumption of High Speed Diesel (HSD) has shown a
marginal growth over the previous year. Although the
industrial demand for HSD has been consistently
rising, the decline in the retail sector has led to the
overall demand remaining flat. There has been decline
in consumption of products like Naphtha and Fuel Oil
(FO) in line with increase in consumption of products
like Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). Only few products
like Motor Spirit (MS), Aviation Turbine Fuel (ATF) and
Lubricants have seen some growth during the year.
While the sales volume of petroleum products in 2005-
06 has not shown any significant change, as compared
to 2004-05, there has been an increase in the
consumption of gas.
The sharp increases in the international prices of crude
oil witnessed in 2004-05 continued during the year
2005-06. The benchmark Brent crude prices touched a
high of USD 67.33 per barrel during the year as
compared to USD 55.72 in the previous year. The
average price of the Indian basket of crude, which had
shown a sharp rise in the previous year, continued its
upward movement and reached a level of USD 55.72
per barrel in 2005-06. This represented a significant
jump over the level of USD 39.30 per barrel in
2004-05. The current financial year has continued to
witness a sustained growth in crude oil prices in the
world markets, even crossing USD 75 per barrel on
several occasions. Although there has been some
recent downward movement, the crude oil prices
have been hovering around USD 58 per barrel. The
impact of these high prices on the economy has been
contained through a policy of distributing the burden
between the Government of India, the oil companies
and the consumer.
The average spread between light – sweet and heavy –
sour crude oils continued to remain at fairly high levels of
around USD 4.50 per barrel. With the commissioning of
the Refinery Modernisation Project at the Mumbai
Refinery and the ongoing Capacity Expansion and
Modernisation Project at the Kochi Refinery, Bharat
Petroleum Corporation Limited (BPC) would be in a position
to take advantage of the high spread by processing a
higher percentage of heavy – sour crude oils.
The prices of finished products in the international
markets have also remained high in line with the high
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11 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
crude oil prices. The average price of HSD rose from
USD 48 per barrel in 2004-05 to USD 67.78 in 2005-06.
The prices of other products like Unleaded Petrol,
Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and Superior Kerosene
Oil (SKO) have also shown a rising trend during the
year. Although international prices have been rising,
domestic prices were not increased in line with them.
This has had a significant impact on the margins of the
oil companies and the same is reflected in the
substantial reduction in profitability of the oil marketing
companies during 2005-06.
Although there was a par tial increase in the price of
petrol and diesel in June 2005 and September 2005, the
prices of SKO and LPG for domestic consumption were
left unchanged. Consequently, the oil marketing
companies continued to bear a substantial por tion of
the subsidy burden. This was the situation even after
the upstream companies contributed towards sharing
some of the burden of the rising prices. Finally, the
Government of India issued Oil Bonds for an amount of
Rs.1,15,000 million to the public sector oil companies
in March 2006 to help them cope with the rising costs
being incurred by them. While the issue of bonds and
the sharing of burden by the upstream companies have
given some breathing space, the oil marketing
companies were losing their ability to generate internal
resources required for investments in key areas like
upgradation of refineries, building new capacities,
setting up new marketing infrastructure and exploration
of oil and gas.
The Rangarajan Committee, constituted by the
Government to look into various aspects of pricing and
taxation of petroleum products, submitted its repor t in
February 2006. The Committee has given
recommendations relating to the pricing of MS, HSD,
domestic LPG and SKO for supply through the Public
Distribution System. Besides, it has also
recommended restructuring of excise duties to make it
a pure specific levy. Some of these recommendations
have already been implemented, including the change
in the basis of pricing of petrol and diesel from impor t
parity to trade parity and reduction in customs duty
from 10% to 7.5% on these products. These changes
will have an impact on the bottomlines of the oil
companies.
India continues to be heavily dependent on imports for
meeting its crude oil requirements. Based on the
provisional figures, the domestic production of crude oil
during the year 2005-06 stood at around 32.20 MMT while
imports were almost of the order of 100 MMT, valued at
USD 39 billion. While there has been a marginal increase
in the quantum of crude imports as compared to the
previous year, the increase in value terms has been
significant, reflecting the sharp rise in prices.
With a refining capacity of close to 133 MMTPA and
consumption of around 112 MMT in 2005-06, the
country continues to have enough refining capacity.
With several refineries in the process of expanding
their capacities, this surplus refining capacity is
expected to continue for some time to come.
The export of petroleum products continues to grow and
has reached a level of 21.5 MMT in 2005-06. At the same
time, import of petroleum products has reached a level of
11.7 MMT as compared to 8.9 MMT in 2004-05.
Consequent to the announcement of the Auto Fuel policy
by the Government of India, the transition to Euro – III
grades has commenced and the whole country is
expected to be covered by March 2010. Considering the
sharp rise in prices of crude and petroleum products,
the Government of India has been considering
measures for introduction of eco-friendly alternate
fuels. In this regard, the Government had mandated oil
companies to blend 5% ethanol with petrol. There were
supply constraints of ethanol, which came in the way
of oil companies commencing the supply of ethanol
blended MS. With improvement in the supply position
from distilleries, the oil marketing companies are likely
to commence supply of ethanol blended MS shor tly.
The requirement of ethanol is expected to be of the
order of 580 million litres for 5% doping with petrol.
There are also indications of reduction of duty on
ethanol, which may ensure lower prices for
consumers.
Private players continued to make their presence felt in
the domestic market. The retail network has grown
considerably, with private players adding around 960 new
outlets during the year. This has led to their market share
increasing from 12.12% as on 31
st
March 2005 to 13.82%
as on 31
st
March 2006. However, during the current year,
the continuing rise in international product prices, without
corresponding increase in domestic retail prices, has had
a negative impact on the performance of the private
players.
OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS
The Indian economy appears to be in good shape. With
strong fundamentals in place, the economy is slated to
deliver strong GDP growth consistently in the coming
years. As stated earlier, the period April – June 2006
has witnessed the economy grow at a rate of 8.9% over
the corresponding period of the previous year. The
development of infrastructure, including the road
network and growing demand for vehicles, are some
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:02 AM 11
12 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
factors which will contribute to a strong demand for
energy in the coming years. Given its share of the
energy basket, the oil and gas sector can be expected
to maintain a moderate growth rate of 4% to 5% in the
coming years.
The recent past has been a period when the refiners’
margins were at their peak. The growing spreads
between the products and crude have contributed to the
Refineries delivering excellent results, thereby
mitigating to a cer tain extent, the losses in the
marketing side of the business. However, the cycle has
star ted to change and the coming days could see some
downward pressure on the refiners’ margins. The
completion of the Refinery Modernisation Project at
Mumbai Refinery and the Capacity Expansion and
Modernisation Project at Kochi Refinery would enable
BPC to be in a position to service the needs of the
market very efficiently. The extension of the pipeline
from the Mumbai Refinery to Delhi will reduce the cost
of moving the products and ensure better utilisation of
the enhanced refining capacity of the Mumbai Refinery,
thereby increasing profitability.
The retail market continues to offer great potential for
growth and profitability. The growth in the economy had
led to a rapid expansion in the vehicle population
across the country. With the growing levels of
disposable income, the retail demand for fuels is
expected to remain buoyant in the coming years. BPC
has been focused on tapping this oppor tunity to the
maximum. Considerable effor ts and investment are
being directed in this area and these are expected to
deliver significant payoffs.
The Lubricants business has enormous potential. With
the commissioning of the Lube Oil Base Stock (LOBS)
plant at the Mumbai Refinery, Group II+ base oils will
now be available. Apar t from meeting the in-house
demand, the production of this high quality base oil offers
potential for marketing the same within the country and
for expor ts. The Lube business is also examining the
oppor tunities available in neighbouring countries like Sri
Lanka. During 2005-06 exports of Lubricants have been
made to Afghanistan, Nigeria and Sudan for the first time.
The gas sector continues to offer exciting prospects for
growth. BPC has been an early entrant in this market.
The key challenge has been the sourcing of gas
supplies at competitive prices. BPC’s stake in Petronet
LNG Limited has helped in this regard. With increasing
quantities becoming available on spot basis, BPC has
been trying to get its share of these supplies at
competitive rates. City Gas Distribution is another
excellent oppor tunity. The joint venture with GAIL
(India) Limited (GAIL) in the form of Indraprastha Gas
Limited (IGL) for supply of Compressed Natural Gas
(CNG) & Piped Natural Gas (PNG) in Delhi has set the
tone for similar models for other cities. New
companies have already been formed for under taking
city gas distribution in Pune in Maharashtra and Kanpur
and surrounding areas in Uttar Pradesh. A new joint
venture company has also been formed for the supply
of natural gas for industrial, commercial, domestic and
automotive use in the Gandhinagar, Sabarkantha and
Mehsana districts of Gujarat.
The sharp spike in crude oil prices and product prices
has led to alternatives being explored as a means of
reducing the demand for petroleum products. One of the
key initiatives in this regard is Bio-diesel. While work
has star ted in this area, which offers immense
potential, it will take some time for fruitful results.
The recent approval and the consequent completion of
the merger of Kochi Refineries Limited (KRL) has
meant that the combined entity is now better equipped
to leverage its strengths in key areas of supply chain
management. Besides, the greater product security will
enable customers to be serviced more effectively.
These are expected to have a significant positive
impact on the bottomline in the days to come.
Over the last few years, BPC has been undergoing a
rapid transformation to become a successful, profitable
and innovative player in the energy business. Various
initiatives like Pure for Sure, premium fuels, loyalty
programs, non-fuel retailing, e-business and “Beyond
LPG” have been successfully launched. While these
initiatives have been successful in meeting targets, the
dramatically changing scenario, due to regulatory
changes as well as aggressive competitors, makes it
essential for BPC to not only adopt new strategies and
processes, but also acquire new and different
capabilities and mindsets.
BPC is in the midst of embarking on an intensive
enterprise programme to energise and prepare itself for
the emerging challenges and move on to a new level of
growth. Areas like Retail, Refining, Logistics, Natural
Gas, LPG and Exploration & Production need to be
addressed and looked at afresh. This initiative, named
“Project Destiny”, has commenced and BPC has set an
ambitious target of becoming the most profitable
downstream player in the country in the next five years.
Areas of focus include re-evaluation of the supply chain
management system, increase in retail market share,
reduction of dependence on external crude sources,
venture into localized power systems and putting in
place a robust leadership development plan.
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13 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
The petroleum business continues to face the risk of
the volatile prices of crude oil and finished products.
While prices have risen, the complete impact of the
same has not been passed on to the end consumer.
Also, selling prices of mass consumption petroleum
products do not reflect full costs on account of various
socio-economic factors. Consequently, the financial
health of companies is impacted. While the recent
easing of prices in the international markets does offer
some hope, it remains to be seen whether this is a
temporary situation. In the event of prices restar ting
their upward movements, the pressure will increase on
the finances of the marketing companies.
Competition remains the key challenge for the existing
players. While the high prices in the international
markets and the inability to pass on the same in the
domestic markets has had an impact on new players,
this is expected to be a temporary phenomenon. In the
medium to long term, the competitive pressures are
expected to remain strong. However, BPC is geared up
to face the emerging situation and is confident of not
only retaining its position, but also growing in this
dynamic market.
PERFORMANCE
The performance of the various Strategic Business Units
(SBUs) and Entities is discussed in detail further.
REFINERIES
MUMBAI REFINERY
Mumbai Refinery achieved its highest ever crude
processing level of 10.30 MMT during the year,
covering 21 types of crudes, including 4 new ones,
taking the total number of crudes processed to 67.
During the year, processing of high sulphur crude was
enhanced to 40.7% and production of value added
products like C3/LPG (440 Thousand Metric Tonnes
[TMT]), Gasoline (1058 TMT), ATF (380 TMT) was
maximized and improved upon vis-à-vis the previous year
for enhancing refinery margins. The refinery also
commenced export of 380 cst viscosity Fuel Oil during the
year to save on high value middle distillates. Production
and delivery of Euro III equivalent MS and HSD was
enhanced for meeting the demand of Mumbai metro and
other major cities. The first batch of 97 octane petrol was
produced and despatched in October 2005.
The gross refinery margin of Rs.5,606.35 million for the
year works out to USD 1.64/bbl compared to the
previous year’s margin of USD 4.56/bbl. The gross
margin was lower mainly due to sharing of the subsidy
burden for LPG, SKO, MS and HSD, reduction in duty
protection rates, additional octroi payment and
unfavourable spread between crude and product prices,
especially on Naphtha and Fuel Oil.
The successful commissioning of the Hydrocracker
Unit in August 2005 under the Refinery Modernization
Project has enabled the refinery to process higher
quantum of high sulphur crudes and has also enhanced
the installed capacity of the refinery to 12 MMTPA.
With the completion of the LOBS plant, the refinery has
developed the capability to manufacture 180 TMTPA of
Group II+ Lube Base Oils and has joined the elite
group of Fuel-cum-Lube producing refineries. This plant
has been fully integrated with the Hydrocracker Unit for
leveraging the equipment available in the Hydrocracker
Complex so as to minimize capital investment for LOBS
production. Since the unit is based on Hydroprocessing
technology, the LOBS production is not constrained by
crude origin and quality, as is the case with
conventional units. This plant is the first of its kind in
the country.
The capabilities of the quality assurance laboratories
were upgraded to test and cer tify Euro-III quality
Gasoline and Diesel. New generation analytical
instruments like High Performance Liquid
Chromatograph (HPLC) for determining Poly Nuclear
Aromatics (PNA) species, instrument for measuring
low concentration Sulphur levels using X-ray technique
etc. have been installed to meet the new business
requirements.
Mumbai Refinery’s Quality Assurance Laboratory (ISO/
IEC: 17025 accredited) has been bestowed with six gold
certificates for 100% satisfactory performance in the
laboratory proficiency testing program under the Shell
Main Product Correlation Scheme (SMPCS) for HSD, FO,
MS and SKO testing by M/s. Shell Global Solutions. This
programme helps in benchmarking the analytical
capabilities of the quality assurance laboratory for
repeatability and reproducibility against world standards.
Effective maintenance and inspection practices have
fur ther improved the plant and equipment availability to
achieve targeted throughput, as demonstrated by the
record run length of four years of one of the Crude
Distillation units & Fluid Catalytic Cracking unit.
Implementation of a structured reliability oriented
maintenance programme through enhancement of
employee skills, as well as deployment of new
generation maintenance tools, has enhanced the
efficiency of the maintenance system in the refinery.
The power system reliability in Mumbai Refinery
was fur ther strengthened by commissioning of the
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:02 AM 13
14 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
state-of-the-ar t Gas Insulated Switchgear (GIS), which
prevents ingress of atmospheric moisture and dust.
The Distributed Control System (DCS) and
Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS) systems of one of
the Crude Distillation Units in the refinery have been
upgraded to the latest generation systems.
Condition monitoring of crude and product storage
tanks was extensively carried out using acoustic
emission technique for accurate prediction of residual
service period. Advanced techniques like Gamma Ray
Scanning for ascer taining coke formation inside heater
tubes and Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD) for high
thickness weld joints were deployed, to improve
inspection, quality and safety standards.
The refinery achieved 4 million manhours without any
Lost Time Accident (LTA) during the year. This year,
1599 mandays of safety training was impar ted to the
employees. Around twenty managers from various
functions were trained on ‘Root Cause Analysis
techniques` by external exper ts to avoid recurrence of
similar incidents in their areas. For enhancing
contractors’ safety, training was conducted for 7288
contractors’ workmen, 1065 contractors’ supervisors
and 47 contractor owners. As a par t of women
empowerment and to improve the safety culture, 22
women employees were enrolled into a safety group
called ‘Suraksha Vahinis’ at the refinery. They were
given training on various facets of safety for promoting
safety awareness among employees.
For reducing stringent SO
2
source emissions by a further
10%, the refinery has commissioned two sulphur
recovery trains with 70 MT/day capacity and 99%
efficiency during the year. The refinery processed
5587 M
3
of oily sludge and recovered 3031 MT of useful
oil, thus reducing the oily waste generation. The effluent
treatment plant was revamped and converted into two
trains at a cost of Rs.80 million for improving on-stream
reliability. Online analyzers for oil content, pH, total
suspended solids and total organic carbon were provided
for continuous monitoring. As a part of the clean energy
initiative, Mumbai Refinery is progressing a hybrid solar
and wind power project for harnessing 10 Kilo Watts for
its Marine Oil Terminal at Mumbai.
In recognition of its long tradition of outstanding
community development work, Mumbai Refinery was
selected out of several Public Sector organizations by
Oil Industry Development Board Drought Relief Trust to
implement a Rs.2.5 million project for providing water
to villages at Washala and Karjat - two villages adopted
by the refinery. The project includes repairs/deepening
of wells, building bunds to capture and store rainwater,
repairs and leak proofing of existing bunds, building
water tanks etc. It is being implemented with the help
of a Non-Government Organisation “The Bridge –
Charitable Trust” who have exper tise in watershed
development and rainwater harvesting projects.
During the year, Mumbai Refinery continued its
pathbreaking work on fur thering AIDS awareness
among employees as also the neighbourhood, as a
chosen corporate par tner of AVERT Society, an USAID
body. As a par t of World AIDS week, two unique
initiatives were under taken, namely, fixing of neck
labels with messages on HIV/AIDS on LPG cylinders
despatched from the refinery and Uran LPG plant to
reach nearly one-lakh customers and a rickshaw rally
organised at Karjat village.
The Mumbai Refinery has won the prestigious “Golden
Peacock National Quality Award 2005 under the
manufacturing sector amidst stiff competition.
To institutionalize team building, a customized
programme on ‘Leadership by Values’ was organized
for 135 senior/middle management staff of Mumbai
Refinery. Additionally, 6208 mandays of functional
training and 1062 mandays of development training
were organised during the year. For fostering skill
upgradation through e-learning, kiosks have been
provided at strategic locations in the refinery for
employees to have easy access to training packages.
These packages have special features of online auto-
cer tification. Besides meeting the in-house training
needs, the refinery also trained two batches of 12
technical staff each, of M/s. BAPCO, Bahrain and
M/s. Khar toum Refinery, Sudan on Hydrocracker and
Rotary Equipment / HSE respectively, as a par t of a
business development initiative.
KOCHI REFINERY
During the year, Kochi Refinery achieved a crude oil
throughput of 6.94 MMT as compared to 7.92 MMT in
the previous year. In 2005-06, the production of Mineral
Turpentine Oil (MTO) and ATF were the highest ever at
53.17 TMT and 155.73 TMT respectively.
The gross refinery margin for the year 2005-06 stood at
Rs.7,153.98 million which works out to USD 3.2/ bbl as
compared to USD 5.9/ bbl in the previous year. The
reduction in margin is mainly on account of the refinery
sharing the subsidy burden on LPG, SKO, MS and HSD
and reduction in duty protection.
The Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit (FCCU) was revamped
as par t of the Capacity Expansion and Modernisation
Project - Phase-I during April-June 2005. Along with an
increase in processing capacity of FCCU from
1.4 to 1.75 MMTPA, technology upgradation in areas
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15 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
such as Feed Injection Technology (FIT), Riser
Termination Device (RTD), Reactor Stripper Packing, cold
wall riser, cold wall flue gas duct and cold wall Orifice
Chamber were implemented. With the completion of the
project, the refinery has commenced production of auto
fuels conforming to BS-II product specifications norms.
Kochi Refinery’s laboratory was accredited with ISO/
IEC: 17025 cer tification by the National Accreditation
Board for Testing. The laboratory has enrolled itself for
the SMPCS program for next year.
Kochi Refinery was awarded the International Safety
Rating System (ISRS) Level 8 by M/s Det Norske Veritas
AS. The Kerala Chapter of National Safety Council has
awarded the refinery the ‘Runner Up’ trophy for
outstanding performance in industrial safety among
large size chemical industries in Kerala. The refinery
has also given 100 % safety training to employees,
contractors, contract labours and supervisors.
At the refinery, around 13,700 MT of oil sludge was
processed and 3,875 MT of oil was recovered during
the year 2005-06. Conventional burners of the heater
EH1 were replaced with low Nox burners. An
impervious storage facility is being constructed for the
storage of oily sludge. Ground water reconnaissance
study was completed during the year. A detention pond
of capacity 1,20,000 KL was constructed to collect
storm water from various tank farms as a rain
harvesting initiative. Facilities are currently being
provided to use the water thus harvested as process
water for gardening and for fire fighting purposes.
The refinery also maintains an eco-park covering an area
of 5.5 acres of land in which varieties of plants and trees
were planted and maintained. The ecological park and the
treated effluent water bed attract different living species,
including certain seasonal migratory birds.
During the year, the refinery was conferred with the
following awards :
a) Three Star Expor t house status from Joint Director
General of Foreign Trade.
b) Jawaharlal Nehru Centenary award for Energy
Performance of Refineries.
c) OISD award for overall performance in safety.
d) FACT MKK Nayar Memorial productivity award.
A focused training on Role Management was organized
in the form of a 3-day workshop covering 29 middle/
senior level managers of Kochi Refinery. High quality
technical and behavioral training was impar ted to a
total of 1455 refinery personnel.
One of the greatest challenges that the refining industry
is facing today is the need for large capital investment
for meeting increasingly stringent product quality
requirements. The demand for residual fuels like Fuel
Oil and Low Sulphur Heavy Stock (LSHS) is dwindling
on one hand, while the price differential between
heavier and lighter crude oil is widening. Keeping this
in view, BPC is embarking upon projects to produce
Euro-IV quality transpor t fuel and is also examining the
feasibility of upgrading the residue at the two refineries
to enhance profitability.
In order to benefit from Refinery-Petrochemical synergies,
Kochi Refinery is setting up a Chemical Grade
Propylene Recovery Unit. Project implementation is in
progress and is slated for completion by January 2008.
RETAIL
The fiscal year 2005-2006 was a testing year for the
industry. Spiralling crude prices, uncer tainty over retail
price increases, erosion of margins, expansion and
consolidation of the business by private oil companies
and treading a fine line between profitability and market
share, brought into play business dynamics and
ushered in a new paradigm, bringing in new
experiences for the industry.
The Retail Business unit overcame stiff competition
and aggressive market tactics deployed by the
competition and was able to stem the initial slide by
retaining the second position in the retail fuels market
with sales of 11.61 MMT during 2005-2006. This
represents a loss of 4.52% over the volumes achieved
in 2004-05, which stood at 12.16 MMT. This is in line
with the performance of the industry as a whole.
The high point of the year for the Retail Business was
BPC being conferred the award of the Forecour t
Retailer of the Year 2005 by Images, the leading Retail
publishing house. The jury, while deciding on BPC as
the winner in this category, took into account BPC’s
unique bouquet of retail products and services and
par ticularly for “setting innovative trends in retailing”,
“providing increased value for money to its customers”
and “providing evidence of leadership in the field of
collaborative effor ts for its retail operations.”
The emphasis during the year was on network expansion
with the commissioning of 902 retail outlets, representing
21% of the 4304 new retail outlets commissioned by the
industry during 2005-06. Numbers apart, the qualitative
aspect of the retail network continued to make BPC stand
out in the industry, with throughput per RO at 153 KL being
15% higher than that of other industry members. The year
also saw a significant increase in competition from private
sector players who have gained 10% of HSD and
4.6% MS market share.
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16 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
During the year, MS volumes were 2.47 MMT, a
marginal growth of 0.68% over the previous year. The
subdued growth in MS sales has to a large extent been
compensated by the extensive success enjoyed by
“Speed”, the market leader in the branded fuels
segment. With an 18% share of MS volumes, Speed
recorded sales of 445.8 TMT through a 2700 strong
retail outlet network and consolidated its leadership
position with a 40.2% share of a rapidly expanding
market. The annual event “Speed Run” has now
become a signature event, much sought after by
vehicle enthusiasts and the Bangalore and Mumbai
legs of the event witnessed a large turnout, adding
momentum to the brand.
The HSD sales during the year amounted to 7.52 MMT.
“Hi Speed Diesel”, the premium HSD product launched
in 2004-05, made rapid strides with sales of 344.8 TMT
from 2512 retail outlets. In the process, it gained a
market share of 16.5 % as against 4% market share in
the previous year in this segment.
Recognition for BPC’s branded fuels continued, with
Intellect, the specialist research unit of the Lintas
Media Group, in its study on petro-consumers, finding
that 48 % of the car owners use the branded petrol –
Speed, while among diesel users, 34 % use BPC’s
branded diesel – Hi-Speed Diesel.
During the year, BPC launched Speed 97 in
September 2005 in the Delhi market and later on,
extended the same to other centres like Mumbai,
Chennai, Hyderabad, Coimbatore, Bangalore etc. By the
end of the year, Speed 97 was available in 79 retail
outlets in major urban markets. Speed 97 sales stood
at 334 MT for the first 6 months after its launch.
During the year, a series of new mass media
campaigns around Speed and Hi-Speed Diesel were
launched. In keeping with BPC’s tradition of connecting
with today’s contemporary Indian, the latest youth icon
of the country – Mahendra Singh Dhoni – has been
signed as the new Brand Ambassador for Speed and
MAK brands. BPC is confident that the association with
M. S. Dhoni and its existing Brand Ambassador, Narain
Kar thikeyan, will enable the brands to scale new
boundaries of brand recall and visibility.
BPC continues to be the forerunner in the alternate fuels
segment, recording strong growth of 22.81% in CNG
sales in Delhi, Mumbai, Surat and Ahmedabad. Auto
LPG sales grew by 136% with sales of 26.86 TMT. One
of BPC’s retail outlets, M/s. Nagpals Garage in
Bangalore, has the distinction of having the highest
Auto LPG throughput in the country, fuelling 7000
autorickshaws every day. This would be amongst the
leading Auto LPG sellers in the retail petroleum
industry globally. CNG and Auto LPG sales, while
replacing MS/HSD sales in these markets, helped in
retaining customers who had migrated from traditional
fuels. The year also saw the addition of 23 CNG
stations and 17 Auto LPG stations in the network.
Another 45 CNG / Auto LPG stations are on the anvil.
With a view to expand BPC’s horizons, the Retail
Business has been examining oppor tunities beyond the
country’s borders. The Nepal Government is on the
verge of deregulating the oil sector in that country.
Currently, Indian Oil Corporation (IOC) is the sole
supplier of petroleum products to Nepal. To take
advantage of the impending deregulation, BPC has
entered into an MOU with Surya Petroleum, a company
under the Soaltee group in Nepal. This group has
interests in several industrial sectors in Nepal
including power, automobile trading etc. The MOU
envisages BPC and Surya Petroleum to jointly explore
development of business oppor tunities in the Nepalese
oil sector.
BPC continues to remain committed to delivering
superior value to customers. The year saw the
expansion of the “Pure for Sure” (PFS) network through
the enrolment of 670 fresh retail outlets under the PFS
brand. With a total of 4643 retail outlets cer tified under
the PFS banner, 65% of the RO network now
consistently delivers superior value to customers. With
the product assurance of Quality and Quantity, the
customer validation of the PFS brand has fur ther
strengthened, with 7.2 out of every 10 litres purchased
from the BPC network being through a PFS outlet. With
a view to assure quantity and quality across the entire
network, there are plans to bring the non-PFS outlets
also under the ambit of third par ty audit.
Automation at retail outlets is another key area of
attention. The objectives behind this initiative are to
provide assurance on Quality and Quantity to customers,
improvement in service / transaction time at the outlet,
mitigate risks relating to frauds and ensure effective
monitoring of stocks. During the year, pilots were carried
out at 8 outlets for syndicating the learnings before the
major rollout planned in 2006-07. Around 900 outlets will
have automation operational by the end of 2006-07.
Gaining long term customer loyalty continued to remain
a strong strategic focus for the business. The “Petro
Card” base grew by 0.13 million customers to reach
1.58 million and the Smar tFleet base grew to
0.54 million with the enrolment of 0.05 million heavy
vehicles during the year. The strategic emphasis during
the year was to drive activation and customers
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17 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
rewarded BPC’s effor ts with the Petro Card and
Smar tFleet business clocking a turnover growth of
31%. Sale of fuels through the cards accounted for
nearly 20% of Retail’s MS and HSD market sales
turnover. Keeping pace with the increasing penetration
of credit and debit cards in various consumer
segments, BPC has firmed up strategic payment-
facilitating alliances with State Bank of India and HDFC
Bank, for increased customer convenience and to drive
their respective customer bases to BPC’s outlets.
BPC added another dimension in its Customer
Relationship Management programme by joining
hands with the Tata group in the launch of the Tata
Credit-cum-Loyalty Card. BPC is par t of the Coalition
Loyalty Program as the exclusive fuel par tner. The
Tata Group has initiated the programme in association
with Master Card International and SBI Card, that
would accord a unified view of customers across
various par ticipating brands. The programme will be
a ‘mileage’ program, where members will earn a
common currency of reward points for their
transactions (including referrals, where tracked)
across the par ticipating companies.
BPC’s network of 383 In & Out stores is by far the
largest organized convenience retailing proposition in
the country. The sales turnover grew by 42% to touch a
level of Rs.605 million in 2005-06. During the year, 6
In & Out stores made up the “millionaire club” by
clocking sales of Rs.1 million per month with several
more stores being within striking distance of this mark.
The daily sales per square foot of these millionaire
stores is in excess of Rs.40/-, which is more than
several established supermarkets in the country. On
the Allied Retail Business (ARB) front, Food &
Beverages (F&B) and Automated Teller Machines
(ATMs) continued to be the area of focus under the
alliance management strategy. Alliances with 19 banks
account for the 222 ATMs located in BPC’s network of
retail outlets. With the fast food industry showing an
annual growth of 40%, F&B as a proposition within the
In & Out, as well as a standalone proposition, is an
area where BPC plans to grow aggressively. The
existing 27 restaurants at the retail outlets achieved a
turnover of Rs. 129 million during the year.
Another key alliance initiative with Western Union
Money Transfer has seen the In & Out store network
record 17,430 transactions and a turnover of Rs.370
million. The In & Out network is today amongst the
largest branded retail networks offering this service,
besides banks, financial institutions and post offices.
During the year, the web of alliances of the In & Out
proposition was strengthened with the entry of new
par tners – Godrej Sara Lee for its Ambipur range of car
accessories, IFB Industries Ltd. for setting up
Launderettes and consolidation of existing alliances
with ITC, Red Bull and others. The pilot initiative in
Kolkata, on retailing of movie tickets from the stores
through strategic alliance with a multiplex, has been
highly successful with the stores recording sales of
Rs.2.2 million wor th of movie tickets during the year.
The multiplex alliance is now being rolled out across
major cities in the country.
The “In & Out convenience store” brand had the
distinction of being nominated for the “Retailer of the
Year – Food & Grocery” award at the Images Retail
Awards – 2005 alongside three leading retailers of the
country – Nilgiris, Food Bazaar and Star India Bazaar.
The branded service stations, “V-Care” in BPC’s
network, which were launched during 2004-05, saw the
addition of 10 more centers during the year 2005-06.
Managing the supply chain efficiently holds the key to
the success of the retail business. The total tankage
across the country now stands at 3.01 million KL. The
extension of the Mumbai Manmad product pipeline to
Piyala near Delhi, along with a connecting pipeline to
Bijwasan and Tap off points at Kota and Bharatpur, has
been mechanically completed. This will help in
bridging product shor tfalls and consolidate product
security in the Nor thern Region.
The concept of Model Location, which was introduced
in the previous year, has facilitated the shift from
compliance to excellence in operations, thereby
becoming a role model for the oil industry. A total of 33
locations have been cer tified as Model Locations and
another 17 locations are being taken up for cer tification
during 2006-07.
During the year, BPC finalised a Road Transpor t rate
contract through a process of e-bidding. This was a
first in the Indian petroleum industry. This process has
significant potential for bringing about savings in
transpor tation costs, which forms a major por tion of
the distribution costs for oil marketing companies. With
a view to effectively track the fuel movements
transpor ted through lorries, Global Positioning
Systems (GPS) have been installed in 150 tank lorries.
BPC has commenced a new initiative of segmenting
customers, with a view to provide superior customer
enablement, thereby achieving market leadership
position. This initiative of offering solutions to
customers, based on their psychographics and fuelling
behaviour, was initiated during the year. The year
2006-2007 will see a larger rollout of these programmes
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18 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
across the country. This and other initiatives will
suppor t BPC’s endeavour to remain the retailer of
choice across all segments of the customer population.
INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL (I&C)
The year 2005-06 has been a landmark year for the I&C
business as, for the first time, the sales volume
(excluding the sales volume of the erstwhile KRL) for
the year crossed the 6 MMT mark. While the other PSU
oil majors recorded negative growth in the sales of
I & C products, BPC registered a growth of 9.16% over
the previous year. The volume of 6.67 MMT, which
includes the sales volume of the erstwhile KRL, is the
highest volume ever achieved, surpassing the previous
best of 5.57 MMT sold during 2004-05.
BPC recorded the highest growth in the industry for
HSD, FO, LSHS and Naphtha. The bunkering business
grew at a rate of 16.6% over last year. BPC fur ther
consolidated its position in the LNG business by
achieving a volume of 473 TMT against 249 TMT sold
during 2004-05. The entire LNG allocation to BPC has
been evacuated, with the enrolment of new customers
such as National Fer tilizers Ltd, KRIBHCO, NTPC-
Auraiya and Indraprastha Gas Ltd.
In May 2005, BPC also successfully ventured into
the City Gas business with marketing of City Gas to
industrial customers in Gandhinagar district of
Gujarat. BPC has sold a volume of 6.3 TMT City Gas
during 2005-06.
With a view to source additional LNG, BPC signed an
LNG Sale and Purchase Agreement with National
Iranian Gas Expor t Company (NIGEC) for impor t of
1.25 MMTPA of LNG effective 2009-10. Apar t from the
above, BPC, along with Petronet LNG Limited (PLL) and
the other marketers of LNG, is also discussing with
various overseas suppliers for sourcing additional
LNG for the proposed Kochi Terminal.
During the year, BPC‘s installations at Kakinada,
Sewree, Jawaharlal Nehru Por t Trust and Marine Oil
Terminal near Mumbai obtained ISO 9001:2000
cer tification for Bunker Supply Chain Management.
Commercial marketing of Crumb Rubber Modified
Bitumen (CRMB) was star ted in April 2005 and has
shown steady growth during the year. A new product,
Polymer Modified Bitumen (PMB) was also launched in
November 2005.
The year also saw the launch of trading of furnace oil
futures by National Commodity and Derivatives
Exchange Limited (NCDEX) and BPC par tnered the
new initiative as ‘Exclusive Warehouser and
Accredited Assayer’.
A new initiative of a Mobile Dispensing Unit for
industrial fuelling was star ted during the year. The Unit
offers many advantages to customers, in terms of
saving of fuel cost and increasing productivity of heavy
mining and ear th moving machineries and equipments.
The first unit of the Mobile Dispenser has been put to
use by Bharat Coking Coal Ltd. (BCCL) in their Muraidih
mining area, Dhanbad in March, 2006.
A number of new initiatives were under taken during the
year in the areas of customer servicing and technical
suppor t to customers. In this competitive era, these
initiatives are expected to help in retaining the existing
customers and facilitate tying up of new business.
Intense competition and aggressive marketing by Oil
PSUs and private marketers will continue to be the
order of the day. Despite this, the I&C business, which
had increased its market share by 2% in 2005-06, looks
forward to facing the challenges and scaling greater
heights in the years to come.
LUBRICANTS
The Lubricants business has witnessed a slight decline
in sales volume in 2005-06, as compared to the sales
volume in 2004-05. With a view to prevent value
erosion, BPC has refrained from pushing customers to
pre-pone their upliftment prior to the end of the financial
year. Consequently, most of lost sales volume has been
recovered in the first quar ter of 2006-07 with higher
market realisation.
While the retail channel has witnessed a decline in
sales, the business has recorded an impressive growth
of 11% over historicals in the bazaar segment. This
segment is an area of constant focus considering its
huge potential. To establish the BPC brand in the
growing bazaar channel, where currently its presence
is very low, a scientific potential study was done along
with M/s Linterland. Consequent to this study, the future
placement of Primary Lube Distributors will be focused
on markets with the highest potential.
The direct channel has also grown significantly, with a
growth percentage of 9% over the sales volume in the
previous year. Some of the major customers added
during 2005-06 in the direct channel include SAIL, Pune
Municipal Transpor t, Pune, Atlas Copco and SECL,
Bilaspur. Expor ts have shown an increase of 6%, with
expor ts of lubricants being made for the first time to
Afghanistan, Nigeria and Sudan.
For effective planning, production and product
placement, the Lubes Business was the first to
implement end to end system based integrated Supply
Chain Management (SCM). In fact, BPC has taken the
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19 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
lead in the oil industry to implement SCM Advanced
Planning Optimizer (APO). The project was completed
in a shor t span of 5 months.
During the year, the Lubes SBU, along with Engineering
& Projects, has commissioned a fully automated Lube
Filling Plant with an installed capacity of 20,000 MT per
annum at Loni (Ghaziabad). Also, as a process of
technical upgradation of existing plants, a new
automatic filling machine has been put up at the Budge
Budge (Kolkata) Plant.
With the commissioning of the plant producing LOBS at
the Mumbai Refinery, evacuation of the same from the
refinery became critical. To meet this requirement, a
road loading terminal at Sewree is being constructed. A
pipeline has also been constructed from the refinery to
Wadilube for evacuation of Base Oils.
The Product and Application Development (P&AD)
Centre at Mumbai has developed 27 new formulations
to meet the market requirements during the year 2005-
06. The new grades developed are expected to yield
additional / new business and generate additional
sales volume in the coming years.
During 2005-06, BPC’s grade MAK TATA Motors
Genuine Engine Oil 15W-40 has been approved for all
models of commercial vehicles, including vehicles
fitted with Cummins Engines. Also, technical approval
has been obtained for the 4T 10W 30 grade and
commercial sales of the same will commence shor tly.
The Total Fuel Lube Management, which was carried
out by the P & AD depar tment, has shown significant
improvement in equipment / machine utilization,
reduction in oil consumption and increase in
productivity for the customer. This is being offered
as a value added service to impor tant customers
and is expected to sustain relationships on a
long term basis.
The R&D setup has conducted several technical
seminars to promote the advantages of using the high
quality Base Oils produced at the Mumbai Refinery.
To build the MAK brand on a long term basis, the “MAK
Anti Ageing Magic” campaign was launched with wide
coverage on mass media i.e. TV, radio, print and
cinema. “MAK” Lubricants has acquired an enviable
position in the minds of the general public and the
brand recall is very high.
With an established brand, in-house Base Oil facilities
at Mumbai Refinery, new Genuine Oil tie-ups and better
reach in bazaar trade, the Lubricants business is well
placed to grow its sales volume and margins.
LPG
The year 2005-06 has been an eventful year in the LPG
Business. While the price of LPG has been spiralling in
the international market, the domestic LPG consumer
has been protected from any price hike. Consequently,
there has been an adverse impact on the profitability of
the PSU oil marketing companies. In this scenario, the
focus has been on ensuring that the demand of genuine
customers are satisfied, while cur tailing the leakage of
domestic cylinders to the non-domestic segment.
During the year 2005-06, the sales volume of LPG has
declined by 0.81% as compared to the previous year;
however, BPC’s market share was 26.11%.
However, the packed commercial segment, where the
product is subject to market determined prices, has
registered a high growth of 99.25 %. The overall LPG
sales were 2586.44 TMT, including the sales of the
erstwhile KRL. With the addition of 1.21 million new
customers during the year, Bharatgas is present in
22 million households as on 31.3.06 and this customer
population is catered to by 2123 LPG distributors.
On the infrastructure front, a new LPG bottling plant has
been commissioned, with a capacity of 44 TMTPA at
Rajkot. With this, BPC now has 45 bottling plants with a
rated capacity of 2028 TMTPA at the end of the year.
The total bottling done during the year has been
2493.4 TMT with a capacity utilisation of 113%.
The LPG Business unit has launched many new
initiatives which have shown promising results. One
such initiative was Beyond LPG, a value added service
to Bharatgas consumers, by providing a variety of
products and services at their doorstep, at attractive
prices and offerings. This initiative clocked a turnover
of over Rs. 1330 million during the year.
Bharat Cutting Gas was another innovative product
launched for use by industrial customers. This product
was well appreciated by major customers like
Railways, BHEL, Vizag Steel etc. and has immense
potential in future.
Reaching out to the economically weaker sections,
BPC has star ted community kitchens for the
convenience of people attending to the sick at
Government Hospitals. A total number of 37 such
kitchens were established, with a gas stove for
cooking, where the people come and use the facilities
and pay as per the usage time.
Rural marketing was another priority area and BPC was
able to reach LPG to over 500 villages through the
e-choupal network of ITC Limited. BPC has also
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20 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
positioned 24 Rural Marketing Vehicles (RMVs) that move
around from village to village and fill cylinders in the
presence of the customer. A total of 5.89 lakh gas
connections was released during the year in rural areas
from RMVs and distributors catering to rural areas.
With a view to reduce the initial investment for
acquiring an LPG connection, 5 kg cylinders were
introduced, mainly aimed at the rural and low income
group segments. This has proved to be very successful
and presently about 70,000 customers are using
5 kg cylinders.
Safety has always been a priority area and towards
this end, BPC has been propagating the use of a
Suraksha LPG Hose with enhanced safety features,
developed by LERC, the Oil Industry Research Centre at
Bangalore. During the year, 2.48 million customers
have changed over to the Suraksha LPG hose and on a
cumulative basis, over 5 million hoses have been sold
through BPC’s network in the last three years.
Besides, consumer education on safety has been a
major thrust area. Along with the ground activities of
holding safety clinics and customer education
programs, the electronic media was used to air films
on safety through various TV channels.
While the subsidy burden on LPG used by the domestic
segment remains a matter of concern, the LPG
business is aggressively pursuing a strategy of
introducing value-added products for the industrial
segment and providing enhanced offerings to domestic
customers. In the long run, this will pave the way for
profitable operations and sustainable growth.
AVIATION
The Indian aviation industry has been going through a
dynamic growth phase. A number of new players have
entered the market. There has been a quantum
increase in the number of international flights into the
country. The booming economy, coupled with the
attractive fares on offer, has led to a sharp increase in
the number of first time fliers. The once stagnant
market is now buzzing with activity. In this scenario,
ATF sales have been growing rapidly despite the high
prices. The growth is expected to continue in the
coming years.
These changes and activities have opened tremendous
oppor tunities for growth for the Aviation Business Unit.
During the year 2005-06, BPC grossed a sales volume
of 680.67 TMT of ATF. This represents a growth of
15.91% over the previous year. Several locations,
including strategic locations like Mumbai, Delhi,
Bangalore, Hyderabad, Ahmedabad and Cochin
achieved their highest ever sales during the year.
Despite the intense competition, BPC has been able to
retain most of the major domestic and international
customers.
BPC is the sole distributor of AeroShell Lubricants in
India. The Aviation Lubricants sales have increased by
nearly 33.11% over the last year. During the year
2005-06, BPC has been successful in acquiring orders
from the Indian Navy and the Indian Air Force. Fur ther,
BPC also secured the approval of the Centre for Military
Airwor thiness and Cer tification (CEMILAC) for two
more products- AeroShell Turbine Oil-750 (ASTO-750)
and AeroShell Turbine Oil-3 (ASTO-3).
The Government has also taken steps to privatize many
of the major airpor ts in India. The privatization of Delhi
and Mumbai International Airpor ts is expected to be
complete by the year 2006-07. The uncer tainty with
respect to the ownership and operation of the Industry
hydrant at both these airpor ts represents an oppor tunity
and a threat to BPC’s operations at these locations.
Fur ther, two new International airpor ts are coming up
under public-private par ticipation at Bangalore and
Hyderabad. From amongst stiff competition, BPC has
been selected as technical consultants for the
construction of the Hyderabad International Airpor t Fuel
Hydrant system.
Consequent to the rapid growth in the services sector,
the Indian aviation industry is witnessing
unprecedented growth. The necessary infrastructural
facilities are also being enhanced across the country to
cater to this phenomenal growth in the number of
passengers. BPC, with its infrastructural strengths,
brand image and customer friendly offerings, is well
poised to take advantage of the emerging growth
oppor tunities.
HUMAN RESOURCES
As on 1
st
April 2006, BPC had 11,995 employees and
the erstwhile KRL had 1879 employees on its rolls.
BPC’s core strength has always been the quality of its
human resources. In line with this belief, BPC always
seeks to involve people across the organization in all
the major initiatives being under taken. This
engagement ensures ownership of people at all levels
to the goals and targets set. Accordingly, a cross
section of the employees were enrolled in the process
of revisiting BPC’s vision, keeping in mind the
emerging needs of the competitive market place
through the process of ‘Appreciative Inquiry’. A total of
around 1000 management staff have been covered
during the year.
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:03 AM 20
21 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
The entry of competitors in the Indian market, both in
the upstream and downstream segments of the
industry, have driven compensation levels upwards,
which in turn posed a major problem of retention of
staff in the public sector oil companies. Attracting and
retaining the best talent has become a big challenge.
Several recommendations have been made to the
Government of India in this regard. As a proactive step,
with a view to differentiate performance and reward
high performers, BPC had introduced a Performance
Related Incentive Scheme for the first time in 2003-04.
The scheme has been fine tuned during the year by
increasing the differential of incentive across various
levels of performance. Notwithstanding these
initiatives, BPC had an attrition rate of 4.71% during the
year 2005-06.
With a view to benchmark performance with the
highest standards, BPC had identified competencies
which set apar t outstanding performers. During the
year, the process was carried forward and these
competencies have been used to profile select staff.
BPC has implemented the ‘development center’ for its
employees. The ‘development center’ is a method for
assessing the competencies and development
potential of the par ticipants by trained assessors
using diagnostic processes. A total of three
Development Centres were conducted during the year
covering 31 Territory Managers.
Training and Development continues to be an
impor tant thrust area. The Bharat Petroleum Learning
Center at Mumbai and the Regional/Refinery Training
Centers are used for impar ting training on new
initiatives and for skill upgradation of employees.
During the year 2005-06, 7977 mandays of training
were conducted in BPC and 6015 mandays of training
in the erstwhile KRL. Through this process, 4103
employees of BPC and 1455 employees of the
erstwhile KRL were trained and inputs given in both
functional and managerial areas.
The Bharat Petroleum Scholarship for Higher Studies
scheme launched in 2003-04 is BPC’s contribution to
promote excellence in higher education. Deserving
students are identified and financial suppor t provided
for higher studies in prestigious institutions in India and
abroad. During the year, 19 students going abroad and 5
students studying in India were awarded scholarships
under the scheme.
Reaching out to others has been BPC’s forte over the
years. This has now been recognized internationally as
BPC, along with Maruti Udyog has been ranked number
one in Corporate Social Responsibility in the country by
TNS Automotive. The study, conducted across 16
countries, addressed issues like ethics, concern for
employees, products that improve the quality of life,
creation of jobs, preservation of natural resources and
disaster relief efforts on the part of companies.
The Ideas platform, which was institutionalised in the
year 2000, to nur ture creativity and innovation amongst
employees, has become a key event in the
organization. Employees look forward to this event to
share the innovations made by them at their work
place. During the year, new award categories were
introduced, both in Refining and Marketing, besides
Research & Development. A total of 51 Awards were
given away in recognition of the contribution made by
the par ticipants.
One of the key challenges that BPC is facing is the
retention of skilled and experienced manpower. The
opening up of the economy has created numerous
avenues, besides increasing overall compensation
levels. At the same time, BPC has ambitious plans and
goals. While attrition is a reality, BPC is constantly
focused on improving its HR policies to face the
emerging challenges.
INTEGRATED INFORMATION SYSTEMS
BPC has continued with its tradition of using
Information Technology (IT) as a facilitator in
achieving business objectives and deriving significant
benefits. Several milestones were achieved in 2005-06
with the successful deployment of various IT initiatives.
The “Supply Chain Management” (SCM) project was
implemented during the year for the Lubes business.
The project was aimed at improving responsiveness
to market demand while substantially lowering overall
supply-chain costs. The end to end supply chain
planning processes cover demand planning, supply
network planning, production planning and detailed
scheduling. The SCM project went live in October
2005. In the days to come, this solution is expected to
yield major benefits through inventory optimization
across the Lubes supply network, in addition to
providing complete visibility and transparency for the
entire supply chain.
In recognition of the successful SCM implementation,
BPC was awarded the prestigious ‘NASSCOM IT USER
award - Best Supply Chain Management under the Oil
& Petrochemical Refineries/Fer tilizer Category’. There
are now plans to under take implementation of SCM in
the LPG SBU, which is one of the largest SBUs having
complex logistics involved in the movement of
packed and bulk LPG and associated inventory
management problems.
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:03 AM 21
22 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
Subsequent to the receipt of ‘in principle’ approval
from the Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas for
the merger of BPC’s erstwhile subsidiary, KRL, work
was initiated on achieving system integration across
the merged entity. This involved aligning business
processes, making changes in a running SAP R/3
system and training of the affected users. The
process was completed within a shor t span of four
months and things were kept in readiness pending
completion of the merger formalities. Consequently,
there was a smooth transition to a single system on
1
st
October 2006 within a shor t time of receiving all
relevant approvals for the merger.
With a view to exercising better budgetary control over
expenditure, BPC has implemented the Fund
Management module of SAP R/3, effective from 1
st
April
2006. Another process improvement achieved was the
implementation of the off-cycle payroll feature, by
which all employee payments/reimbursements from
the financial year 2006-07 onwards are directly
remitted to the employee’s bank account, thus
eliminating the generation of a large number of
payment vouchers across the company.
The SAP Business Information Warehouse has been
upgraded from version 3.0B to the latest version 3.5 in
a shor t span of three weeks, by the in-house team.
This will help build a strong base for integration with
the Net Weaver components of SAP and thereby keep
up with new technology, offering new and powerful
features. The Solution Manager tool in SAP, that enables
all users to directly log in issues for speedy response
from the suppor t desk as well as for on line system
monitoring, has been upgraded to Version 3.2.
During the year 2005-06, BPC has connected 200 retail
outlets through Ku Band based VSATs across the country
for on-line capturing of data in respect of Petro Card /
Smar tFleet Card and the Cash Management System.
This will also suppor t the retail automation initiatives.
As on date a total number of 500 Ku band based VSATs
have been deployed at upcountry locations across the
country for online transactions and data access. This
will help in creating a common communication medium
across different applications, leading to cost savings and
highest possible network uptime. BPC’s KU band based
VSAT captive hub operating on INSAT 3A is running
successfully with 100% uptime and remotes with more
than 99.5% uptime. BPC has won the Uptime Champion
2005 award in Technology Senate 2005 – an exclusive
off-site CIO event organized by The Indian Express Group
and its associate technical publications, Express
Computer and Network Magazine at Bangkok, Thailand.
The Uptime Champion award is in honour of
organisations where IT infrastructure needs are to be
guaranteed with an uptime of 99.999 percent and
protection available on 24x7 basis.
As a par t of the Information Security Policy, the
password policy was successfully implemented in the
BPC domain across the country to enhance data security.
During the year, strong suppor t continued to be
provided to the businesses in implementing new
initiatives like e-choupal, B2B and sale of CNG and
LNG. Implementation of the Instant Messaging feature
has enabled businesses in bringing down the
communication cost at major locations. Vendor Por tal,
an in-house development, provides real time
information on Request For Quotations, Contracts,
Purchase Orders, Statement of Accounts etc. for select
vendors from the backend SAP R/3 system over the
Internet. BPC leverages smar t card technology to
design and offer loyalty cards. B2B and B2C
transactional platforms have been created to assist
industrial customers and global aviation consumers to
transact business online. SMS PULL Applications,
developed in-house for Smar tFleet Card owners, helps
them to know their balance, set limits or block the
usage of Fleet cards and track the location of the
vehicle, based on the usage of the Fleet card.
The Performance Index for IT Infrastructure and suppor t
on Facilities Management Services/Call Centre
operations have been maintained at near 100% levels,
thus helping to maintain the highest level of
satisfaction amongst the end user community. During
the year, revenues of around Rs. 24 million have also
been generated by way of External Consulting
Assignments by the SAP R 3 specialists.
Clearly, BPC is one of the few Indian corporate houses
that walk the talk when it comes to using the
information super highway, giving it an “e-edge”.
HEALTH SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT
In line with BPC’s policy, a number of initiatives for
promoting HSE activities in the organisation were
under taken during the year. Regional HSE Councils
have been created in the four regions. The councils,
comprising of representatives from all the Business
Units and Entities at the region, commenced functioning
with the objective of integrated monitoring, review and
coordinated measures for protection of working
personnel, the environment and the surrounding
community.
BPC considers the root cause findings from incident
investigations as the most impor tant means of
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:03 AM 22
23 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
preventing such incidents. A platform has been
provided for locations to present ‘Near-miss‘ incidents.
BPC has institutionalized the Health Safety Environment &
Security awards, rewarding locations for near-misses i.e.
prompt preventive actions, environmental care and
excellent HSE&S performance.
Exclusive HSE workshops have been introduced to cover
all employees working at locations and offices in a phased
manner. A number of loss control measures and protective
devices for prevention of spill/gas/vapour and reduction of
greenhouse gas emission were implemented for protecting
the environment. Several Clean Development Mechanism
(CDM) Projects that come under the Kyoto Protocol have
been identified. Steps have been undertaken to arrange
host country approval and registration with United Nation
Framework Convention for Climate Change (UNFCCC) to
avail carbon emission reduction credits.
In order to reinforce safety for large numbers of hired
vehicle drivers and cleaners, a seminar on ‘Road
Transpor tation Safety‘ was jointly organized with
National Safety Council, Chennai. A large number of
transpor ters and officials attended the seminar in
which everyone expressed their commitment for
improved performance. In addition, a large number of
safety clinics, training programmes and workshops
were held for vehicle crews at BPC’s 47 training
centers across the country. Special health clinics were
held at locations for vehicle crews who underwent
various health check-ups by doctors. Medical advice
and prescriptions were given in sensitive cases
requiring fur ther treatment.
BPC’s HSE effor ts have been recognized by a number
of regulatory bodies and safety savvy organizations.
During the year, the Corporation received the first OISD
Safety Award in the category of LPG Marketing
Organisations. 22 locations have also received awards
for contribution to safety activities and environmental
protection from National Safety Council and
Greentech Foundation.
INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND
RISK MANAGEMENT
BPC had commenced impor ts of crude oil for meeting the
Refinery requirements in 2002. Since then, the
international markets have witnessed considerable
volatility and fluctuations in the prices of crude oil and
finished products. BPC has been making efforts to
develop the required capabilities for efficiently
managing the emerging business realities. BPC’s
International Trade depar tment had undergone a
restructuring exercise in line with the global best
practices during 2004-05. The essence of the
restructuring, which was to build Trading Risk
Management capability, has helped in developing
competence in managing commodity risk and innovative
decision making capability to suppor t future trading
potential. During the year, BPC made a small begining in
hedging its margin risk through selling swaps in product
cracks (Dubai crude – Singapore product differential).
The year 2005-06 saw imports of 11.86 MMT of crude oil
for meeting the requirements of both Mumbai and Kochi
refineries. While there has been a small increase in the
quantity of imports as compared to the previous year,
the sharp rise in prices has seen the value of imports
at a record level of USD 4898.4 million as against
USD 3183.0 million for the year 2004-05. The ratio of
term to spot purchase of imported crude was of the
order of 71:29, implying security of volume tie-ups.
With the implementation of the Refinery Modernization
Project at Mumbai Refinery, BPC maximized
procurement of the heavy-sour variety of crude and
captured the price differential between heavy-sour
crude oils (benchmarked to Oman/Dubai average) and
light-sweet grades (benchmarked to Dated Brent).
During the year, BPC had also imported 217 TMT of
Euro III MS and 61 TMT of Euro II HSD to meet the
shortfall and comply with the Euro III & BS II emission
norms. In addition, to meet the deficit in the availability
of LPG, BPC had imported 202 TMT of LPG during
the year.
BPC expor ted 1384 TMT of products during the year, as
compared to 1286 TMT expor ted in the previous year.
This represents an increase of over 8% over the
previous year, mainly on account of expor t of Fuel Oil
from the refineries. The foreign exchange earnings
increased to USD 608 million from USD 407 million
during the previous year.
Providing logistic suppor t for impor ts, expor ts and
coastal movements of products at the least cost
continued to be the focus of the International Trade
depar tment. With the shipping rates as volatile as the
crude prices, it became necessary to balance the
shipping arrangement through a combination of
Contract Of Affreightment (COA), Spot and Time
Char ter. During the year, four time char ter vessels
were taken, which besides giving cost advantages,
provided immense flexibility in operations.
BPC embarked on hedging its exposures on refinery
margins as well as expor t realizations based on the
laid down Commodity Risk Management Policy. During
2005-06, BPC has hedged 2.7 million barrels of refining
margins and 40 TMT of expor ts. In line with
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:03 AM 23
24 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
international best practices, a sound governance
mechanism has been put in place. The volume and
nature of hedge to be under taken is determined by the
Risk Management Committee appointed by the Board
and the overall risk management approach is approved
by the Trading Risk Management Board. Counterpar ties
are enrolled through a rigorous evaluation process and
trading is commenced only after completion of
registration and ISDA (International Swaps and
Derivatives Association) negotiations are concluded.
The first year of hedging operations saw net cash
inflow to counter margin loss in physical volumes.
RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT
Recognizing the role of innovation and technological
excellence in achieving and sustaining a competitive
edge in the high tech business, BPC has been
continuously strengthening the infrastructure at its
Corporate R&D Centre at Greater Noida in Uttar
Pradesh as well as at its Product & Application
Development Centre at Sewree in Mumbai.
The Corporate R&D Centre focused attention on value
addition through process optimization studies,
selection of optimum catalysts and additives, detailed
crude evaluations and crude compatibility studies,
product quality upgradation studies etc.
The R&D Centre also extended valuable technical
suppor t to Refinery and Marketing operations,
including carrying out corrosion abatement studies
and technical assistance in launching of new grades
of bitumen, viz., Crumb Rubber Modified Bitumen and
Polymer Modified Bitumen. A cost effective LPG
additive for cutting gas application has been developed.
Exploratory research programs were also under taken
in the area of alternative fuels including Bio-diesel
and Hydrogen.
The Product & Application Development Centre has
continued to extend valuable technical suppor t to the
business and developed several new formulations to
meet customer requirements. The new formulations
include high performance gasoline engine oils, long life
rear axle oils, synthetic gear oils, greases, metal
working fluids and improved formulations for existing
grades. Exclusive grades of lubricants for use by
Defence have been developed.
EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION OF
CRUDE OIL AND GAS
In continuation of its endeavour to consolidate its
presence in the upstream oil and gas sector, BPC has
taken a number of strides forward in the past year.
A strategic decision has been taken to balance the risk
by spreading it on a mix of exposure to Exploration,
Development and Production assets with a budget of
upto Rs.15,000 million over a five year period.
With a view to achieving quick return on investment
and retaining the goal of oil security, a number of
proper ties were evaluated during the year, both in India
and abroad. BPC has successfully ‘farmed-in” into an
on-land block (Cachar, Assam) with a view to acquiring
14.5 % par ticipating interest out of the 29% holding of
Premier Oil, a UK based company.
In early 2006, BPC joined the consor tium of Oilex
(Australia), M/s Videocon Industries Limited (VIL),
GAIL and Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited
(HPC) for bidding for two out of five exploration
blocks in Oman, offered by the Government of the
Sultanate of Oman. These blocks are adjoining the
south Oman salt basin, which is a prolific producer
of oil in that country. The consor tium was awarded
Block No. 56 by the Government of the Sultanate of
Oman. BPC holds par ticipating interest of 12.5% in
the consor tium.
BPC has also signed a MOU with VIL for cooperation in
the upstream area. BPC has also entered into a MOU
with Petroleo Brasileiro SA (Petrobras), a National Oil
Company in Brazil and Foresight Oil Limited
(Foresight), UK, for cooperation in upstream,
midstream and downstream activities of the oil and
gas sector in India and abroad.
A consor tium, comprising of BPC, Oilex (Operator),
VIL, Gujarat State Petroleum Corporation Limited
(GSPC) and HPC, was awarded an exploration block
WA-388-P in Australia, with each par tner having 20%
stake. Subsequently, another block (no.103) was
awarded in the Joint Petroleum Development Area
(JPDA) between East Timor and Australia offered by
Timor Sea Designated Authority (TSDA) in the JPDA
2005 bidding round. JPDA is an area being jointly
promoted by the Governments of Australia and East
Timor for hydrocarbon exploration in the area between
Australia and Timor. BPC and the other consor tium
members Oilex (Operator), VIL and GSPC will each
have 25% par ticipating interest in this block.
BPC has also par ticipated in the recently concluded
NELP-VI bidding round offered by the Government of
India in consor tium with operators like Oil & Natural
Gas Corporation Limited (ONGC), Hindustan Oil
Exploration Company Limited, GSPC, Norwest Energy
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:03 AM 24
25 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
and Premier Oil. BPC, in consor tium with Oilex
(Operator), VIL, GSPC and GAIL, has also bid for
2 blocks offered by Egyptian Natural Gas Company
(EGAS) in the 2006 Egyptian gazettal round. The
outcome of the same is awaited.
Exploration work is in progress in all the blocks
awarded under the NELP-IV bidding round of the
Government of India. The total expenditure
commitments for BPC for these blocks would be
approximately Rs.1580 million during the
exploration phase.
Considering the need for a focused approach for
Exploration and Production activities, implementation of
the investment plans of BPC at a quicker pace,
facilitate faster decisions, mitigate business risks,
adopt the latest technology, acquire business skills,
expeditiously place competent human resources etc.,
it was felt that the formation of a separate subsidiary
company would be the best option. BPC’s board has
recently approved the formation of a wholly owned
subsidiary company viz. Bharat PetroResources
Limited, with an authorised share capital of Rs. 10,000
million, for carrying on Exploration and Production
related activities.
BPC, in its ambition to fulfil the national endeavour of
accruing reserves as well as enhancing refining
capacity, is successfully spreading capital in both risk
related ventures as well as revenue generation assets.
With a view to enhancing the technical capability and to
become a robust exploration company, BPC has
proposed to strengthen the Exploration & Production
activities by establishment of interactive work stations
for internal evaluation of seismic, geological, well-
logging and testing data of different exploration and
exploitation blocks. The process of augmenting
manpower required for manning these work stations
and to give a thrust in its endeavour to succeed in its
operations is being seriously pursued.
AWARDS AND RECOGNITION
Besides the accolades indicated under the respective
Businesses and Entities, the year also saw BPC being
recognised by prestigious institutions for achieving
excellence in performance in different fields.
Superbrands, a leading international organisation,
selected the BPC brand as one of the superbrands in India.
Similarly, Brand Finance, one of the leading brand
evaluation agencies worldwide, has ranked BPC as the
third most valuable Indian brand with an assessed brand
value of ‘just over USD 3 billion’. BPC was also voted as
one of India’s leading brands and placed in the 17
th
position
by MEDIA, a leading international publication. In Asia, BPC
is ranked 205 among Asia’s Top 1000 brands, the highest
position among Indian petroleum companies.
BPC had a composite ranking of 8
th
among 30 leading
Indian companies in the Forbes Global 2000 list. BPC was
also ranked amongst the top ten companies in Business
India’s ‘Super 100’ list. The company also scaled up its
ranking to 368th in the prestigious ‘Fortune Global 500’ list,
as compared to 429th in the previous year.
The investing community continued to repose confidence
in BPC. Institutional Investor, a reputed American journal
serving the global investor community, ranked BPC in the
5
th
position amongst the top 28 Oil & Gas companies in
Asia in the area of Management of Investor Relations.
Amongst Indian corporates, BPC ranked 4
th
amongst
the top 40 companies. BPC was also placed in the
22
nd
position amongst Asian Companies in the prestigious
‘Platts Top 250 Global Energy Companies’ list.
In recognition of BPC’s outstanding work for persons with
disabilities, BPC was presented with the prestigious
NCPEDP – Shell Helen Keller Award 2005.
INTERNAL CONTROL SYSTEMS AND
THEIR ADEQUACY
BPC has a system of internal controls to ensure
optimum utilization and protection of resources, IT
security, speedy and accurate repor ting of financial
transactions and compliance with applicable laws and
regulations, as also internal policies and procedures.
For this purpose, the company has formulated a clearly
defined organization structure, authority limits and
internal guidelines, rules for all operating units and
service entities. SAP R/3 and Business Information
Warehouse systems have fur ther enhanced the internal
control mechanism.
BPC has an internal audit depar tment consisting of
exper ts from various functions, which supplements the
review of key business processes and controls through
regular audits. Audit repor ts, significant risk area
assessment and adequacy of internal controls are also
periodically reviewed by the Audit Committee through
meetings held with management, internal audit and
statutory auditors.
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:03 AM 25
26 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
GROSS PROFIT (Rs. in Million)
RETURN ON CAPITAL EMPLOYED (Percentage)
EPS
DPS
RESOURCES GENERATED (Rs. in Million)
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE (Rs. in Million)
Depreciation
Interest
Tax
Profit After Tax
MARKET SALES VOLUME (Million Metric Tonnes)
35000
30000
25000
20000
15000
10000
5000
0
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06
33,016
21,144
27,204
20,922
4,810
4,809
5,612
5,960
3,066
2,459
1,050
1,398
9,658
4,770
7,436
9,409
8,498
12,500 16,946
3,906
2,916
1,156
2,474
7,680
24
22
20
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
10.49
15.99
21.30
9.76
1.65
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
11.00
15.00
17.50
12.50
28.33
41.67
56.49
32.19
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06
8.07
2.50
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06
18000
16000
14000
12000
10000
8000
6000
4000
2000
0
10,998
12,763
17,399
12,820
10,614
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06
20000
18000
16000
14000
12000
10000
8000
6000
4000
2000
0
12,494
16,525
15,087
9,241
20,191
14,226
Note: Previous years’ figures do not include the figures of the erstwhile KRL and hence are not comparable to those of the current year.
Retail Lubes Direct Aviation LPG
EARNINGS PER SHARE (EPS) /
DIVIDEND PER SHARE (DPS) (Rupees)
22
20
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06
1.79 2.03 2.33 2.59 2.57
0.52
0.51
0.57
0.59 0.68
5.25 5.30 5.20
5.57 6.66
0.11
0.12
0.11
0.12
0.11
11.54 12.11 11.89 12.16 11.61
19.15
20.37
19.86
21.03
21.63
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:03 AM 26
27 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
Impor ted
Bombay High
CRUDE PROCESSED (Million Metric Tonnes) PRODUCTION (Million Metric Tonnes)
TREATED EFFLUENT WATER QUALITY VIS-A-VIS STATUTORY
STANDARDS AT KOCHI REFINERY
pH BOD TSS Oil Phenols Sulphides
SO2 NOX SPM
Standards
Actuals
TYPICAL AMBIENT AIR QUALITY VIS-A-VIS STATUTORY
STANDARDS AT KOCHI REFINERY
TREATED EFFLUENT WATER QUALITY VIS-A-VIS STATUTORY
STANDARDS AT MUMBAI REFINERY
25
20
15
10
5
0
TYPICAL AMBIENT AIR QUALITY VIS-A-VIS STATUTORY
STANDARDS AT MUMBAI REFINERY
400
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
0
pH BOD TSS Oil & Grease Phenols Sulphides
8.77
8.76
8.71
9.14
3.59 3.23
4.54 5.09
5.18 5.48 4.22 4.05
11.59
5.65
17.24
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
8.60
8.28 8.21 8.26
2.43
2.46
2.48 2.54
4.23 4.07 4.23 4.18
1.62 1.73 1.50 1.88
4.52
8.16
3.40
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06
8.5
7.2
15
9
20
10.4
1.5
10
1
0
0.5
0.1
SO2 NOX SPM
80
21.9
80
35.2
135.4
360
25
20
15
10
5
0
Standards
Actuals
Standards
Actuals
Standards
Actuals
8.5
6.75
10.94
15
9.82
20
1.92
10
1
0.5
0.35
400
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
0
80
23.1
80
27.6
128.2
360
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
0.25
Note: Previous years’ figures do not include the figures of the erstwhile KRL and hence are not comparable to those of the current year.
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Light Distillates Middle Distillates
16.08
Heavy Distillates
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:04 AM 27
28 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
The Directors are pleased to present their report on the performance of Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited (BPC) for
the year ended 31
st
March, 2006
PERFORMANCE OVERVIEW
Group Performance
The combined Refinery throughput at BPC’s Refineries at Mumbai and Kochi, along with that of Numaligarh Refinery
Limited (NRL), increased from 19.10 MMT during the last year to 19.37 MMT in 2005-06. Group market sales decreased
marginally from 21.80 MMT to 21.79 MMT. In addition, the Group exported 1.39 MMT of petroleum products.
Financially, the Group companies achieved a sales turnover of Rs. 862.23 billion, up from last year’s level of Rs. 720.37
billion. Group profit after tax (PAT) decreased from Rs. 20.74 billion to Rs. 7.04 billion. After setting off the minority interest,
the Group earnings per share decreased from Rs. 51.40 to Rs. 14.86.
CONSOLIDATED GROUP RESULTS
2005-06 2004-05
Physical Performance
Crude Throughput (MMT) 19.37 19.10
Market Sales (MMT) 21.79 21.80
Financial Performance Rs.in Million
Sales / Income from Operations 862,229.01 720,366.03
Less: Excise Duty Paid (87,068.27) (76,117.60)
Net Sales / Income from Operations 775,160.74 644,248.43
Gross Profit 21,226.75 41,032.93
Interest 3,052.22 2,468.94
Depreciation & amortisation 9,457.92 8,809.71
Profit before Tax 8,716.61 29,754.28
Provision for Taxation - Current 815.83 7,823.91
Less: MAT Credit (240.00) -
Profit after Current Tax 8,140.78 21,930.37
Provision for Fringe Benefit Tax 157.22 -
Provision for Taxation - Deferred 957.81 2255.65
Excess/ (Short) Tax provision in earlier years written
back/provided for 10.07 1,065.93
Net Profit 7,035.82 20,740.65
Minority Interest 1,662.85 5,321.03
Net Income of the group attributable to BPC 5,372.97 15,419.62
Group Earnings per share attributable to BPC (Rs.) 14.86 51.40
DIRECTORS’ REPORT
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:04 AM 28
29 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
Company Performance
BPC’s Mumbai Refinery had a crude throughput of
10.30 MMT, which was higher than the level of
9.14 MMT achieved during the last year. The crude
throughput of Kochi Refinery, acquired by BPC pursuant
to the Scheme of Amalgamation, was 6.94 MMT. BPC’s
domestic market sales increased from 21.03 MMT to
21.63 MMT, partly on account of inclusion of domestic
market sales of the erstwhile KRL.
Financially, BPC achieved a 33.34 % growth in sales
turnover from Rs. 638.57 billion to Rs. 851.50 billion. Part of
this increase was due to inclusion of the erstwhile KRL’s
turnover pursuant to the Scheme of Amalgamation.
However, gross profit before interest, depreciation and tax
decreased by 32 % to Rs.14,226.15 million. The profit before
tax decreased by 69.98 % from Rs. 13,563.48 million to
Rs. 4,071.95 million. After providing for tax (including
deferred tax and fringe benefit tax) of Rs.1,155.49 million,
as against Rs. 3,905.52 million during the last year, the
profit after tax showed a decrease of 69.80 % from
Rs. 9,657.96 million last year to Rs. 2,916.46 million.
The Board of Directors has recommended a dividend of
25% (Rs.2.50 per share) for the year on the enlarged
paid-up share capital of Rs.3,615.42 million, which will
absorb Rs.903.86 million out of profit after tax, exclusive of
Rs.126.77 million for tax on distributed profits.
The earnings per share translates to Rs.8.07, as compared
to Rs.32.19 during 2004-05. Internal cash generation during
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Highlights of the financial results as compared to those of the previous year are as follows :
Rs. in Million
2005-06 2004-05
Sales Turnover - Gross 851,496.22 638,570.03
Gross Profit before Depreciation, Interest and Tax 14,226.15 20,921.90
Interest 2,474.14 1,398.03
Depreciation & amortisation 7,680.06 5,960.39
Profit before tax 4,071.95 13,563.48
Provision for taxtion - Current 246.40 2,805.10
Less: MAT Credit (240.00) -
Provision for Fringe Benefit Tax 133.82 -
Provision for taxation - Deferred 1,025.34 1,466.34
Excess/(Short) Tax Provision in earlier years written back/provided for 10.07 365.92
Net Profit 2,916.46 9,657.96
Transfer from/(to) Debenture Redemption Reserve (1,890.00) 1,860.00
Balance brought forward from the previous year 6,281.74 0.01
Amount transferred on Amalgamation 20,843.18 -
Amount available for disposal 28,151.38 11,517.97
The Directors propose to appropriate this amount as under :
Towards Dividend :
Interim Dividend (declared & paid) - @ Rs. 5 per share - 1,500.00
Second Interim Dividend (declared) - @ Rs. 7.50 per share - 2,250.00
Final (proposed) Dividend - Rs. 2.50 per share 903.86 -
Towards Corporate Dividend Tax 126.77 520.43
For transfer to General Reserve 291.65 965.80
Balance carried to Balance Sheet 26,829.10 6,281.74
Summarised Cash Flow Statement:
Cash Flows:
Inflow/(Outflow) from operations 13,499.18 2,340.36
Inflow/(Outflow) from investing activities (46,167.73) (9,573.45)
Inflow/(Outflow) from financing activities (6,261.22) (5,980.59)
Net increase/(decrease) in cash & cash equivalents (38,929.77) (13,213.68)
Note: The results of 2005-06 include the performance of the erstwhile KRL and hence are not comparable with those of
the previous year.
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:04 AM 29
30 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
the year was lower at Rs.10,613.71 million, as against
Rs.12,819.55 million last year. BPC contributed Rs. 203.92
billion to the exchequer by way of taxes and duties
vis-à-vis Rs. 152.19 billion during the last financial year.
Borrowings from the banks increased to Rs.63,095.58
million from Rs.30,804.13 million at the close of the
previous year. Additional, the Corporation had
Collateralised Borrowing and Lending Obligation (CBLO)
through Clearing Corporation of India Ltd. amounting to
Rs.8,650.00 million. Public deposits as at March 31, 2006
stood at Rs.970.34 million as compared to Rs.2,231.35
million at the end of the previous year. The amount of
deposits, matured but unclaimed, at the end of the year
was Rs.11.34 million, which pertains to 101 depositors.
The total Capital Expenditure during the year 2005-06
amounted to Rs. 20,190.84 million.
The comments of the Comptroller and Auditor General of
India (C&AG) on the Accounts, along with the explanations
of the Board of Directors, are annexed as Annexure D.
REFINERIES
Mumbai Refinery
During the year 2005-06, Mumbai Refinery processed
10.30 MMT of crude as against 9.14 MMT during 2004-05,
thereby achieving its highest level of crude processing in
a financial year. However, the gross margin for the current
year stood at USD 1.64 per barrel, as against the gross
margin of USD 4.56 per barrel in 2004-05. This translated
into an overall gross margin of Rs.5,606.35 million as
compared to Rs.14,064.09 million in the previous year.
The sharp reduction in the gross margin can be attributed
to the sharing of subsidy burden for LPG, SKO, MS and
HSD, reduction in duty protection rates, additional octroi
payment at Mumbai and unfavorable spread between
crude and product prices, especially for Naphtha and Fuel
Oil. With the commissioning of the Hydrocracker unit and
LOBS plant at the Mumbai Refinery, the gross margin is
expected to improve in the coming years.
Kochi Refinery
During the year 2005-06, Kochi Refinery processed
6.94 MMT crude as compared to 7.92 MMT during the
previous year. The gross margin per tonne of crude
processed, which stood at USD 5.9 per barrel in 2004-05,
went down to USD 3.2 per barrel during 2005-06.
The details of the performance of the Refineries,
activities and future plans are discussed in the
Management Discussion and Analysis Report (MD&A).
MERGER OF KRL WITH BPC
Pursuant to the provisions of Section 391 to 394 of the
Companies Act, 1956, and with the approval of the Board of
Directors, the proposal for merger of Kochi Refineries
Limited (KRL) with BPC was approved by the shareholders
of BPC and KRL with a swap ratio of 4 fully paid up equity
shares of Rs.10/- each of BPC for every 9 fully paid up
equity shares of KRL. The Ministry of Company Affairs,
New Delhi accorded their sanction to the Scheme of
Amalgamation vide Order dated 18
th
August 2006.
Allotment / Issue of BPC shares in the approved Swap
Ratio to KRL Shareholders, who were eligible for such
shares as on the record date of 29
th
September 2006, has
been completed and the said Shareholders have become
Shareowners of BPC.
MARKETING
During the year 2005-06, BPC’s overall marketing sales
stood at 21.63 MMT. While there was no significant change
in the sales volume as compared to the previous year,
BPC’s market share amongst Public Sector Oil Companies
increased to 23.1% as on 31
st
March 2006, as compared to
22.6% at the end of the previous year. The year witnessed
a sharp reduction in the sales volumes of HSD, both for the
Industry as well as for BPC. This was offset by a
significant increase in the sales of ATF, FO and Naphtha as
compared to the previous year. BPC also exported
0.80 MMT of Naphtha, 0.33 MMT of FO and 0.24 MMT of
HSD during the year. A detailed discussion of marketing
performance is covered in MD&A.
PROJECTS
Central India Refinery Project
Bharat Oman Refineries Ltd. (BORL), a Joint Venture
Company formed by BPC along with Oman Oil
Company Ltd. (OOCL), is in the process of setting up a
6 MMTPA capacity grassroot Refinery at Bina, in Madhya
Pradesh with Crude Oil / Supply System consisting of a
Single Point Mooring system (SPM) and Crude Oil Storage
Terminal (COT) at Vadinar and a 935 km long cross-
country crude oil pipeline from Vadinar to Bina. The
approved revised cost of the Refinery project is Rs.103.78
billion and so far, BPC and OOCL have each contributed
Rs. 755 million towards the equity of the Company.
Environmental clearances, which had delayed the
implementation of this project, have since been received.
In view of the decision by OOCL to limit its equity
contribution in BORL to the present level of Rs.755 million,
BPC has, with the approval of the Government of India,
decided to enhance its equity contribution in BORL upto
50%, amounting to Rs. 19,960 million. As at 31
st
March, 2006,
BORL has net worth of Rs. 1500.15 million with a book
value of Rs. 9.93 per share.
A new configuration study has been completed, wherein
the configuration based on use of the integrated Full
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:04 AM 30
31 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
Conversion Hydrocracker with Diesel Hydrotreater /
Delayed Coker Unit / Continuous Catalyst Regeneration
Reformer, has been found to be the most suitable option for
the BORL Refinery.
For the selected new process configuration, Engineers
India Limited (EIL) have completed the detailed cost
estimate; and profitability analysis has been carried out by
SBI Caps Limited. BORL has signed an agreement with the
consortium of lenders led by SBI, for loans amounting to
Rs. 63,870 million.
The project is proposed to be implemented on conventional
basis instead of the lump sum turn key (LSTK) route
envisaged earlier. Project implementation has commenced,
with a schedule for mechanical completion in
December 2009. As on 31
st
October 2006, the total
commitments made amounted to Rs.19,075 million and
the cumulative expenditure as on that day stood at
Rs.2,145 million.
Uttar Pradesh Refinery Project
To cater to its long-term product requirements, BPC will be
setting up a 7 MMTPA capacity grassroot Refinery at
Lohagara in Allahabad District of Uttar Pradesh. The
location of the Refinery has been selected, based on the
maximum deficit of petroleum products in the region. The
crude oil import facilities, being set up by BORL at Vadinar
in Gujarat for the Bina Refinery project, will be augmented
suitably to take care of the crude requirement of U.P.
Refinery also. The SPM, COT and the crude pipeline from
Vadinar to Bina will be shared and a new crude pipeline
(approx. 400 kms. long) will be laid from Bina to Lohagara.
Implementation of the Refinery project will be taken up by
extending the crude oil pipeline from Bina to Lohagara in
Phase II, after completion and stabilization of the Bina
Refinery project in Phase I.
Extension of Mumbai-Manmad Product Pipeline to
Piyala with Feeder line from Piyala to Bijwasan
BPC is currently transporting petroleum products from its
Mumbai Refinery through a 18” dia. multi-product pipeline
to Manmad terminal and further through a 14” dia.
multi-product pipeline to Manglia terminal. With the
capacity of Mumbai Refinery having expanded to
12 MMTPA there is a need to economically evacuate
products from the Refinery, to cater to the requirements of
the Northern Region. This project was conceived to meet
this objective, by extending the Mumbai-Manmad- Manglia
pipeline to Piyala, with a feeder line from Piyala to
Bijwasan near Delhi, at an approved cost of Rs. 8,074.6
million, inclusive of a foreign exchange component of
Rs. 2,365.6 million. As on November 1, 2006, the
commitments amounted to Rs.7,525 million and the
cumulative expenditure incurred amounted to
Rs.5,951 million.
With the total pipeline length from Mumbai to Bijwasan
being approximately 1358 kms, it will be one of the longest
pipelines in the country. The project has been
mechanically completed in September 2006.
Capacity Expansion cum Modernization Project
at Kochi Refinery
Phase I of the Capacity Expansion cum Modernization
Project (CEMP), that envisaged Kochi Refinery
modification required to meet Bharat Stage II (BS II)
product specifications, has been completed with an
approved cost of Rs.2730 million. Kochi Refinery has
commenced supply of MS and HSD conforming to
BS II norms since April 2005.
Phase II of the CEMP, at an estimated cost of Rs.25,918
million, envisages facilities for production of auto fuels
conforming to Euro-III equivalent norms and modernization
and capacity expansion of the Kochi Refinery from the
present 7.5 MMTPA to 9.5 MMTPA. The project is
scheduled for completion in September 2009.
SBM Project at Kochi Refinery
This project envisages setting up of Crude Oil Receipt
Facilities consisting of Single Buoy Mooring (SBM), shore
tank farm and pipelines along with associated facilities. It
will facilitate transportation of crude oil in very large crude
carriers (VLCC), thereby reducing the transportation cost.
With an estimated cost of Rs.8,210 million, the project is
scheduled for completion by the middle of 2007.
RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT
Recognizing the role of innovation and technological
excellence in achieving and sustaining a competitive
edge in the hi-tech business, BPC is continuously
strengthening the infrastructure at its Corporate R&D
Centre, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh as well as at its
Product & Application Development Centre, Sewree,
Mumbai.
Corporate R&D Centre made focused efforts for value
addition through process optimization studies, selection
of optimum catalysts and additives, detailed crude
evaluations and crude compatibility studies, product
quality upgradation studies etc. The R&D Centre also
extended valuable technical support to Refinery and
Marketing operations, that included corrosion abatement
studies and technical assistance in launching of new
grades of bitumen viz., Crumb Rubber Modified Bitumen
and Polymer Modified Bitumen. A cost effective LPG
additive for cutting gas application was developed.
Exploratory research programs were also undertaken in
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:04 AM 31
32 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
the areas of alternative fuels including Bio-diesel and
Hydrogen.
The Product & Application Development Centre continued
to extend valuable technical support to the business and
developed several new formulations to meet the
requirements of customers. The new formulations included
high performance gasoline engine oils, long life rear axle
oils, synthetic gear oils, greases, metal working fluids and
improved formulations for existing grades. Exclusive
grades of lubricants for use by the Defence sector were
also developed.
The Research and Development Center at Kochi Refinery
which was set up in 1988 is recognized by the
Department of Scientific and Industrial Research (DSIR),
Government of India. The Centre is continuously engaged
in research to develop value added products from the
refinery streams. The Centre collaborates with esteemed
institutions like the Indian Institute of Petroleum,
Dehradun, Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai and
Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore. Natural
Rubber Modified Bitumen and Bitumen Emulsion are the
popular value added products developed by this Centre.
A bio-filter for bitumen off gases has been developed in
collaboration with Regional Research Laboratory,
Thiruvananthapuram.
Optimisation and innovative improvements in the process
operations and undertaking exploratory research to
discover new avenues for growth and diversification are
the other objectives of the R&D Centre. Apart from other
petroleum testing facilities, the Centre is equipped with
facilities for evaluation of crude oils from various origins,
Fluid Catalytic Cracking(FCC) catalysts and various
catalyst additives (Octane enhancement, Gasolene sulphur
reduction etc.). The FCC pilot plant, True Boiling Point
Apparatus(TBP) and FCC offline simulation software have
been extensively utilized for the evaluation of new
improved catalysts and additives.
The areas covered under R & D and the benefits derived
from R & D activities are detailed in Form B of Annexure A
of the Directors’ Report.
NON-CONVENTIONAL ENERGY INITIATIVES
BPC has embarked upon various non-conventional energy
initiatives. Towards this objective, BPC has an ambitious
programme of generating power for its own consumption
through windmills. Work on windmills of 5 MW capacity in
the State of Karnataka will start shortly. There are plans to
scale up the capacity gradually in a few other States also.
BPC has also started Jatropha plantation at a few places in
the country to enter the Bio-diesel value chain. A pilot
project on end to end Bio-diesel production has been
initiated in an area of around 1000 acres of land in UP.
Although at a very nascent stage, BPC plans to enter the
area of fuel cells in cooperation with BHEL and depending
upon the commercial viability, the programme will be
accelerated. Also, BPC is experimenting on the generation
of solar power for part of our Retail Outlet requirements at
a moderate cost, coupled with a solar-cum-wind power
generator, which is being tested for its commercial
prudence.
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
The industrial relations have been peaceful and cordial
throughout the year. Extensive communication on business
and other related issues were sent to all the stakeholders
i.e. management, employees and their associations /
unions during the year.
FULFILLMENT OF SOCIAL OBLIGATIONS
As a responsible corporate citizen, BPC accords significant
importance to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and
takes it as one of the prime focus areas. Community
Development Programmes were undertaken to bring all
round development in adopted villages, consisting of
economically and socially backward population and
significant resources were allocated towards these
activities. Under the Component Plan, welfare activities
were undertaken at 37 adopted villages spread over 13
states across the country. The main impetus of activities
was given in the fields of health, education, infrastructure
development and usage of non-conventional alternate
energy sources.
BPC is always at the forefront to stand by the side of
people affected by natural disasters/ calamities and had
contributed towards the relief of Jammu & Kashmir
earthquake victims as well as rehabilitation of tsunami
affected people in Tamil Nadu and Kerala.
BPC sportspersons continued to excel and hit the headlines
in the national as well as international sports arena. The
Indian Badminton Men’s and Women’s teams and Women’s
Table Tennis team consisting of BPC Sportspersons, won the
Bronze medal in the Team events at the Commonwealth
Games in Melbourne (Australia).The BPC Billiards/Snooker
players won the maximum number of National titles this
year. Ms. Anuja Thakur was conferred with the prestigious
Arjuna Award, being the first lady cueist in the country to be
thus honoured. This year, she won the National Snooker title
for women. Mr. Manan Chandra won his maiden National
title in Snooker and retained his Pool title. Mr. Devendra
Joshi won the Men’s National Billiards title. Ms. Marianne
Karmarkar won the National Pairs title in Bridge.
Details relating to employees belonging to Scheduled
Caste (SC), Scheduled Tribe (ST) and Other Backward
Classes (OBC) are given in Annexure C.
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:04 AM 32
33 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
BPC has been providing reservations and concessions for
physically challenged persons in the recruitment process
since 1981. The reservations were earlier provided for
Group C and Group D posts. However, after the enactment
of “The Persons with Disabilities (Equal Opportunities,
Protection of Rights and Full Participation) Act, 1995", the
reservations stood extended to posts in Group A and Group
B with effect from February 1996. BPC identified positions
in these groups which could be reserved for filling up by
persons with disabilities. It is BPC’s endeavor to achieve
the desired percentage for physically handicapped persons
in identified posts during direct recruitment. BPC currently
has 156 physically challenged persons employed in the
Organization as at 31
st
March 2006.
Various concessions are given to the physically
challenged persons such as age relaxation of 5/10 years,
besides giving them a sympathetic consideration
during interviews; hearing aids are provided for the
hearing-impaired persons and also relevant equipment
required by orthopaedic handicapped persons; visually
handicapped staff are provided with special “talking”
computers; also, Income Tax Relief through salary
as per Section 80U is given, provided the physically
challenged person complies with the requirements of
Income Tax rules.
Besides the above, as a corporate body, various initiatives
have been undertaken as a part of community development,
like Pulse Polio Immunisation Programme; setting up of a
Thalessemia care unit at Sion Hospital and organising
workshops for physically handicapped persons in
association with the Social Welfare branch of Municipal
Corporation of Mumbai. Under the project “Healing Touch”,
BPC provided adequate space and the necessary kiosk to
operate spark plug cleaning and testing equipment at its
retail outlets, for providing self-employment opportunities
to physically challenged persons.
IMPLEMENTATION OF THE OFFICIAL LANGUAGE POLICY
The Official Language Committees function at the
Corporate, Regional, Area and Location levels in order to
promote the use of Hindi at work places. These
committees review the progress made in Official
Language Implementation. Hindi workshops were
organized in the Regions and Refinery. The Parliamentary
Committee inspected the Official Language Implementation
at six of BPC’s locations during the period and expressed
their appreciation for the efforts taken by BPC.
The “Chairman’s Inter-Region Rajya-bhasha Rolling
Trophy” has been instituted to create competition and
awareness. Various competitions and cultural
programmes were organized at locations during the Hindi
fortnight celebrations from 14th – 28th September 2005.
CITIZENS’ CHARTER
Citizens Charter - a tool for ensuring transparency in
communicating with customers and educating them about
their rights, apart from various infrastructure / services
being available for customers, is always in the forefront of all
activities of BPC. The financial year was very eventful,
particularly in respect of enhancing customer service
levels. The Grievance Redressal Mechanism was also well
taken care of, which is fully established and positioned at
various consumer contact points.
The Right to Information Act, 2005 has been implemented
in BPC, effective 12.10.2005 in the true spirit of the Act.
People across the organization are familiar with the Act
and BPC has a unique single window concept of all replies
under the Act. During the period ending 31
st
March 2006,
143 requests for information were received of which only
one case was referred to the Chief Information
Commissioner.
Various schemes, programmes and services to provide
value addition to retail customers, pioneered by BPC,
received good response and created a brand differentiation
in the minds of customers. Various customer focused
initiatives taken by different SBUs are discussed
separately in the MD&A report.
VIGILANCE
The Vigilance Department continued to assist the
management in promoting transparency with the objective
of maintaining high standards of integrity by one and all in
the organization in handling public funds while carrying out
business operations. Interventions by way of suggestions
towards strengthening of certain areas were made, based
on experience gained during scrutiny of the business
processes.
Apart from a preventive role, the vigilance machinery
continued to act effectively on complaints and source
information, with the purpose of safeguarding
stakeholders’ interest, while ensuring that motivated
complaints, if any, were effectively weeded out. Vigilance
Awareness Week was observed from 7
th
to 11
th
November
2005, at all locations throughout the country, in which
customers, clients, dealers, distributors, contractors,
vendors etc. also participated. This occasion was utilized
to spread awareness among the public to fight corruption.
Adequate briefing was provided to the Ministry of
Petroleum & Natural Gas and Central Vigilance
Commission (CVC) to enable them to reach just
conclusions in matters referred by them. Simultaneously,
instructions emanating from the Ministry and CVC from
time to time were explained and interpreted to the
concerned, to ensure their proper implementation.
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:04 AM 33
34 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
SUBSIDIARY COMPANY
Numaligarh Refinery Limited (NRL)
BPC holds 62.96% of the paid up equity in Numaligarh
Refinery Ltd. (NRL), which is a Mini Ratna Company
(Category I). As on 31
st
March 2006, the 3 MMTPA Refinery
completed 1502 days of Lost-Time Accident Free operations
since its commissioning. The crude oil processed during the
year was 2.13 MMT, as compared to 2.04 MMT during the
previous year. As at 31
st
March, 2006, NRL has net worth of
Rs. 16,913.28 million with a book value of Rs. 22.99 per
share. The company achieved a turnover of Rs.58.20 billion
and earned a profit after tax of Rs.4,489.34 million in 2005-06
as against a turnover of Rs.42.99 billion and profit after tax of
Rs.4,091.52 million in the previous year. NRL has declared a
dividend of Rs1.90 per share as against a dividend of
Rs.1.70 per share in the previous year. NRL has till date,
commissioned 58 Retail Outlets, of which 36 are in the North
East and the remaining in other parts of the country.
The benchmarking study conducted by Shell Global Solution
for India PSU Refineries, based on operating data for the
year 2004-05, placed NRL in the first tercile in
12 parameters, in the second tercile in 4 and in the third
tercile in 8, considering 24 parameters in 5 different
performance categories. NRL was ranked first in the
parameter ‘Non turn around maintenance cost’ amongst
global refineries and also achieved first rank in 4
parameters amongst Indian PSU refineries. NRL was
conferred with the prestigious 5
th
Annual Greentech Safety
Gold Award in the Petroleum Refinery Sector’ for the year
2006, in recognition of its outstanding performance in the
field of Health & Safety.
Annual Accounts of the Subsidiary Company
In view of dispensation granted by the Central Government
under Section 212(8) of the Companies Act, 1956, copies of
the Balance Sheet, Profit and Loss Account, Directors’
Report and the Auditors’ Report of the Subsidiary
Company i.e. NRL are not attached to the Balance Sheet of
the Company. However, in compliance with the conditions
of the dispensation, the Consolidated Financial Statements
have been presented in the Annual Report and the
summarized Balance Sheet and Profit & Loss Account of
NRL are enclosed as Annexure E to the Directors’ Report
for information. The Audited Annual Accounts of NRL and
related detailed information are open for inspection by any
member at BPC’s Registered Office. Further, BPC will
make available these documents, on request, to any of its
members and the said documents will also be published
on BPC’s website.
JOINT VENTURE COMPANIES
Bharat Shell Limited
Bharat Shell Limited (BSL) a Joint Venture Company (JVC)
between BPC and Shell Overseas Investment (BV) (Shell)
of Holland, markets Shell branded lubricants. As at
31
st
March, 2006, BSL has net worth of Rs. 742.16 million
and book value of Rs. 3.71 per share. The face value of
BSL is Rs. 2.50 per share. During the financial year
2005-06, BSL achieved sales of Rs.3918.29 million, as
compared to Rs.3240.12 million during the previous year.
The net profit after tax for the year stood at 86.55 million, as
against Rs.44.57 million in the previous year.
Petronet India Limited
BPC has 16% equity participation in Petronet India Limited
(PIL) a financial holding company, with investment of
Rs.160 million. PIL was formed to give impetus to the
development of pipeline networks throughout the country.
PIL is facilitating pipeline access on a common carrier
principle, through its joint ventures for the pipelines
commissioned by them viz. Vadinar-Kandla (Sikka-Kandla
section), Kochi-Karur and Mangalore-Hassan-Bangalore.
As at 31
st
March, 2006, PIL has net worth of Rs. 1027.49
million with a book value of Rs. 10.27 per share. For the
financial year 2005-06, PIL registered a gross revenue of
Rs.5.39 million, against Rs.5.43 million in the previous
year, resulting in a net loss of Rs.19.27 million, against a
net loss of Rs.14.74 million in the previous year.
The new pipeline policy has affected the future of this
Company. As there are no possibilities of future projects
coming under the PIL ambit, the promoter oil companies
and other investors in PIL have concluded that continuation
of PIL is not viable. Accordingly, the winding up process for
PIL has been initiated with the appointment of financial
advisors and consultants for the divestment of PIL’s stake
in the other pipelines.
Petronet CI Limited
Petronet CI Limited is a JVC set up for laying a pipeline of
about 1760 km for evacuation of petroleum products from
the Refineries at Jamnagar/Koyali to feed various
consumption zones in Central India. BPC has equity
participation of 11% aggregating to Rs.15.84 million. As at
31
st
March, 2006, PCIL has net worth of Rs. 5.68 million
with a book value of Rs. 0.39 per share. The project was to
be implemented on Build Own Operate and Transfer
(BOOT) basis, for which the bids invited evoked a poor and
conditional response. Due to unwillingness of the
promoters to participate in the project, the project has been
abandoned and process for winding up of the company has
been initiated.
Petronet CCK Limited
Petronet CCK Limited (PCCKL) is a JVC promoted by BPC
and PIL. BPC had 26% equity in PCCKL amounting to
Rs.260 million. BPC’s share has now increased to
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:04 AM 34
35 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
49%, consequent to the acquisition of the share of the
erstwhile KRL. PCCKL owns the Kochi-Karur pipeline
which is a 292 km long multi-product pipeline from BPC’s
oil installation at Irimpanam near Kochi to Karur receiving
terminal along with a tap off point at Coimbatore for
transportation of MS/SKO and HSD. The pipeline
commenced commercial operations from September
2002. The volume of pumping till March, 2006 amounted
to 3.97 MMT.
As at 31
st
March, 2006, PCCKL has net worth of Rs. 649.15
million with a book value of Rs. 6.49 per share. PCCKL has
registered a turnover of Rs.312.65 million and cash profit
of Rs.92.34 million for the year ended 31
st
March 2006 as
against a turnover of Rs.372.26 million and a cash profit of
Rs.147.33 million in the previous year. BPC has submitted
expression of interest for acquiring PIL’s 23% interest in
PCCKL, as PIL is being wound up.
Petronet LNG Limited
Petronet LNG Limited (PLL) was set up for importing LNG
and setting up LNG terminals at Dahej and Kochi, with
facilities like jetty, storage, re-gassification etc. to supply
natural gas to various industries in the country. PLL was
promoted by four public sector companies viz BPC, IOC,
ONGC and GAIL, who contributed equally with 12.5% of the
equity. The balance 50% equity was raised over a period of
time from Gaz de France–10%, the Asian Development
Bank – 5.2% and balance 34.8% from the public, raised in
the month of March 2004. BPC’s investment of 12.5%
amounts to Rs.987.50 million. PLL has achieved financial
closure on project finance basis and converted its short
term loans of Rs.12,600 million into long term loans. As at
31
st
March, 2006, PLL has net worth of Rs.10,719.46 million
with a book value of Rs. 14.29 per share. The shares of
PLL are listed on the Stock Exchange, Mumbai and
National Stock Exchange of India Ltd.
PLL has set up LNG receipt and re-gassification terminal
facilities of 5 MMTPA capacities at Dahej in Gujarat and
started commercial supplies of re-gassified LNG from this
terminal. Income from operations for the current financial
year was Rs.38,371.73 million, as compared to
Rs.19,452.65 million and a net profit of Rs.1,949 .27 million
for the current year, against a loss of Rs.284.46 million in
the previous year.
Indraprastha Gas Limited
Indraprastha Gas Limited (IGL), a JVC with GAIL, was set
up for implementing the project for supply of CNG to the
household and automobile sectors in Delhi. BPC has
invested Rs.315 million in IGL, which amounts to 22.5% of
its equity. Besides commissioning 143 CNG Stations, IGL
has laid considerable infrastructure for supply of piped
natural gas (PNG) as also connections to numerous
domestic and commercial customers. As on
31
st
March 2006, IGL has provided PNG connections to
46,989 customers.
As at 31
st
March, 2006, IGL has net worth of Rs. 3,786.97
million with a book value of Rs. 27.05 per share. IGL
registered a turnover of Rs.6,096.26 million for the year
2005-06, as compared to Rs.5282.28 million in the
previous year. Profit after tax for the year 2005-06 was
Rs.1061.38 million, as compared to Rs.926.85 million
during the previous year. IGL has declared a dividend
of 25% for the current year, against a dividend of 20% in
the previous year. The shares of IGL are listed on the
Stock Exchange, Mumbai and National Stock Exchange of
India Ltd.
Central UP Gas Limited
Central U.P. Gas Limited is a JVC set up in March, 2005
with GAIL as the other partner, for implementing the City
Gas Distribution project for supply of CNG to the
household, industrial and automobile sectors in Kanpur.
Subsequently, it is proposed to cover Allahabad, Bareilly
and Jhansi. This project will be implemented on the lines
of IGL. BPC’s investment in this project is expected to be
Rs.150 million, this being 22.5% share of the equity capital.
Uttar Pradesh State Industrial Development Corporation Ltd
(UPSIDC), a representative of the Government of Uttar
Pradesh, will invest up to 5% and financial institutions will
have the balance 50% in the share capital. The company
commissioned the first CNG station on 7
th
April 2006.
Maharashtra Natural Gas Limited.
Maharashtra Natural Gas Limited is a JVC with GAIL,
which was incorporated on 13
th
January 2006 for
implementing the City Gas Distribution project for supply of
CNG to the household and automobile sectors in the city of
Pune and adjacent areas in Maharashtra, except Mumbai,
Navi Mumbai and Thane. This project will be implemented
on the lines of IGL. BPC’s investment in this project is
expected to be Rs.225 million, being 22.5% share of the
equity participation. The Government of Maharashtra will
invest up to 5% and balance 50% will be offered to financial
institutions.
VI e Trans Private Limited
An investment of Rs.1 million, representing 33.33% of the
equity of VI e Trans Pvt Limited, was made in May 2001.
The company is engaged in providing logistic support
systems for the Indian surface industry and its users, with
the help of electronic and physical infrastructure and
web-based systems. The company registered a turnover of
Rs.30.99 million for the year ended 31
st
March 2006, as
against a turnover of Rs.30.35 million in the previous
year. The company has ended the year with a loss of
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:05 AM 35
36 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
Rs.2.33 million for the current year, after recognition of
defered tax assets of Rs.0.70 million as compared to a
loss of Rs.0.53 million in the previous year, after provision
of deferred tax liability of Rs.1.01 million.
CONSERVATION OF ENERGY, TECHNOLOGICAL
ABSORPTION AND FOREIGN EXCHANGE
The details regarding energy conservation, technology
absorption and foreign exchange used and earned as
required by Section 217(1)(e) of the Companies Act, 1956,
are given in Annexure A.
MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING WITH MINISTRY
OF PETROLEUM & NATURAL GAS
BPC, for the seventeenth successive year has entered into a
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Ministry of
Petroleum & Natural Gas for the year 2006-07. For the
15
th
consecutive year (year ending March 2005), BPC has
achieved an ‘Excellent’ rating for its performance. Based on
an internal evaluation of performance for the year 2005-06,
BPC once again merits an “Excellent” rating, subject to
approval by the Government of India. From the year 2005-06,
the performance of BPC’s subsidiary company, NRL has a
bearing on the rating of BPC.
PARTICULARS OF EMPLOYEES UNDER SECTION 217(2A)
As there were no employees who were drawing the
specified remuneration, particulars of employees under
Section 217(2A) of the Companies Act, 1956, read with the
Companies (Particulars of Employees) Rules, 1975 for the
year ended 31
st
March 2006, are not required to be given.
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
As required under Clause 49 of the Listing Agreement, the
Report on Corporate Governance, together with the
Auditors’ Certificate regarding compliance of the SEBI
Code of Corporate Governance, is annexed as Annexure B.
The Annual Report also contains a separate section on the
‘Management Discussion and Analysis’, which is part of
the Directors’ Report.
The forward looking statements made in the ‘Management
Discussion and Analysis’ are based on certain
assumptions and expectations of future events. The
Directors cannot guarantee that these assumptions are
accurate or these expectations will materialise.
DELISTING OF SECURITIES
Till the year 2004-05, BPC was listed on the Stock
Exchange, Mumbai (BSE), The National Stock Exchange of
India Limited (NSE), The Madras Stock Exchange Limited
(MSE), The Delhi Stock Exchange Association Limited
(DSE) and the Calcutta Stock Exchange Association
Limited (CSE). However, there was no trading in BPC
shares on the MSE, DSE and CSE during the last five years,
consequent to the nationwide availability of the trading
terminals of BSE and NSE, coupled with availability of
facilities for internet trading. Accordingly, applications
were made for delisting of BPC’s shares from MSE, DSE
and CSE, after taking necessary approvals from the Board
of Directors and Shareholders in the Annual General
Meeting and after complying with all the required SEBI
Regulations.
While BPC’s equity shares have been delisted from the
DSE and MSE, the application for delisting of shares from
CSE is being processed by the Stock Exchange.
DIRECTORS’ RESPONSIBILITY STATEMENT
Pursuant to Section 217(2AA) of the Companies Act, 1956,
the Directors of BPC confirm that:
The financial statements are prepared in conformity with
the Accounting Standards issued by the Institute of
Chartered Accountants of India and the requirements of the
Companies Act, 1956, to the extent applicable to BPC, on
the historical cost convention, as a going concern and on
accrual basis. There are no material departures from
prescribed Accounting Standards in the adoption of the
Accounting Standards. The accounting policies used in the
preparation of the financial statements have been
consistently applied, except where otherwise stated in the
Notes on Accounts.
The Board of Directors and the management of BPC accept
responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of these
financial statements. The estimates and judgments relating
to the financial statements have been made on a prudent
and reasonable basis, in order that the financial statements
reflect, in a true and fair manner, the form and substance of
transactions, and reasonably present BPC’s state of affairs
and profits for the year. To ensure this, BPC has taken
proper and sufficient care in maintaining adequate
accounting records in accordance with the provisions of
the law; and also in installing a robust system of internal
controls, for safeguarding assets and for preventing and
detecting frauds as well as other irregularities, which is
reviewed, evaluated and updated on an ongoing basis.
BPC’s internal auditors have conducted periodic audits to
provide reasonable assurance that the established policies
and procedures of BPC have been followed. However,
there are inherent limitations that should be recognised in
weighing the assurance provided by any system of
internal controls.
The financial statements have been audited by the
Statutory Auditors– M/s. V. Sankar Aiyar & Co.,
Chartered Accountants.
The Audit Committee of the Board meets periodically with
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:05 AM 36
37 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
the internal auditors and the statutory auditors to review
the manner in which the auditors are discharging their
responsibilities; and to discuss auditing, internal control
and financial reporting issues. To ensure complete
independence, the statutory auditors and the internal
auditors have full and free access to the members of the
Audit Committee to discuss any matter of substance.
DIRECTORS
Shri M.S.Srinivasan, Special Secretary, Petroleum &
Natural Gas, resigned from the directorship of BPC with
effect from 16
th
June 2005. Smt Aditi S Ray, Economic
Advisor, MoP&NG resigned from the directorship of BPC
with effect from 21
st
February 2006. Shri M. Rohatgi,
Director (Refineries) resigned from the Board with effect
from 1
st
October 2005, on his appointment as Chairman &
Managing Director of Engineers India Ltd.
The Directors have placed on record their appreciation
of the valuable contributions made and guidance given
by Shri M.S.Srinivasan, Shri M. Rohatgi and
Smt. Aditi S. Ray for the development and progress of
BPC’s business.
Shri Ashok Sinha, Director (Finance) was appointed as
Chairman & Managing Director with effect from
19
th
August 2005. Shri Ajay Tyagi, Joint Secretary, Ministry
of Petroleum & Natural Gas was appointed as Additional
Director with effect from 21
st
April 2005 and he was
reappointed at the Annual General Meeting held on
23
rd
September 2005.
Shri P.K.Sinha, Joint Secretary & Financial Advisor,
Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas was appointed as
Additional Director under Article 77A of the Articles of
Association of the Company with effect from
21
st
February 2006.
Shri S.K.Joshi, Executive Director (Corporate Treasury)
was appointed as Additional Director under Article 77A
of the Articles of Association of the Company with
effect from 8
th
March 2006. Shri Joshi also assumed
the office of Director (Finance) from that date in
pursuance of his appointment by the President of India.
Shri R.K.Singh, Executive Director (LPG) was appointed
as Additional Director under Article 77A of the Articles
of Association of the Company with effect from
8
th
March 2006. Shri Singh also assumed the office of
Director (Refineries) from that date in pursuance of his
appointment by the President of India.
The above three Directors, having been appointed as
Additional Directors, hold office till the ensuing Annual
General Meeting. Notices under Section 257 have been
received, proposing their names for appointment as
’directors retiring by rotation’ at the ensuing Annual
General Meeting.
As required under Section 256 of the Companies Act, 1956,
Shri V.D.Gupta, Shri P.C.Sen and Prof. A.H.Kalro, Directors
will retire by rotation at the ensuing Annual General
Meeting and being eligible, offer themselves for
re-appointment as Directors at the said Meeting.
As required under the Corporate Governance Code, brief
bio-datas of the above Directors who are appointed /
reappointed at the Annual General Meeting are provided in
the Corporate Governance Report.
STATUTORY AUDITORS
M/s. V. Sankar Aiyar & Co., Chartered Accountants,
Mumbai, were appointed as Statutory Auditors for the year
2005-06, by the Comptroller & Auditor General of India
(C&AG), under the provisions of Section 619(2) of the
Companies Act, 1956. They will hold office till the ensuing
Annual General Meeting. Further, the C&AG has appointed
M/s. V Sankar Aiyar & Co. as Statutory Auditors for the
financial year 2006-07.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Directors convey their appreciation of the services
rendered by employees at all levels, without whose
valuable contribution, the excellent performance of BPC
would not have been possible.
The Directors place on record their deep appreciation
towards BPC’s valued customers for their continued
cooperation, patronage and confidence and look forward
to the continuance of this mutually supportive relationship
in future.
The Directors also gratefully acknowledge the support and
guidance received from the various ministries of the
Government of India, particularly from the Ministry of
Petroleum & Natural Gas, in BPC’s operations and
developmental plans.
The Directors sincerely thank BPC’s dealers, distributors,
contractors and suppliers for their contribution to its
success.
The Directors express their sincere thanks to each and
every shareowner of BPC and the erstwhile KRL for
reposing confidence in the management.
For and on Behalf of the Board of Directors
Sd/-
Mumbai Ashok Sinha
Date : 17
th
November 2006 Chairman & Managing Director
DR-10-37-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:05 AM 37
38 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
ANNEXURE TO THE DIRECTORS’ REPORT
ANNEXURE A
Effor ts made by BPC in regard to Conservation of Energy, Technology Absorption, Foreign Exchange Earnings & Outgo,
which are required to be given under Section 217 (1)(e) of the Companies Act,1956, are as under :-
A. CONSERVATION OF ENERGY
(i) Energy conservation measures taken:
Mumbai Refinery
Energy conservation effor ts received continuous focus, both in terms of improvement in operations/
maintenance, as well as development of new projects. Continuous monitoring of fuel consumption and
hydrocarbon loss is under taken, using sophisticated instruments and a data acquisition system. An elaborate
energy accounting system and Management Information System are impor tant features of Mumbai Refinery
operations.
Kochi Refinery
Energy conservation effor ts received continuous focus both in terms of improvement in operations/
maintenance as well as development of new projects. Continuous monitoring of fuel consumption,
hydrocarbon loss, flare loss, heater/boiler performances are carried out systematically with the help of
most sophisticated instruments. The analysis repor t and data compiled are communicated to the respective
sections and necessary actions are initiated in case of any abnormalities.
(ii) Additional investments and proposals, if any, being implemented and impact of the measures for reduction
of consumption of energy and consequential impact on the cost of production of goods.
Mumbai Refinery
The following energy conservation and loss control measures were adopted during the year, which have
resulted in significant fuel savings.
• Commissioning of new Hydrogen, Sulphur Recovery & Hydrocracker Units with all modern highly
energy efficient equipments.
• Anti-foulant injection in pre-heat exchanger trains of the Crude/Vacuum units to sustain pre-heat
temperatures.
• Cleaning of convection coils and decoking of two furnaces in the Crude Distillation complex using
modern pigging technique.
• Application of special insulating paint for open manways in CDU & FPU.
• Diversion of Plant gas ex FPU to FPU Furnace.
• Commissioning of HCP plant gas system for reducing flaring.
• Under taking steam insulation and steam leak surveys.
• Replacement of Insulation for various Steam Headers.
• Replacement of leaky steam traps and attending to steam leaks.
• Provision of still well sleeve assembly in one of the MS tanks on trial basis.
• Conducted electrical energy audit of refinery through M/s. Petroleum Conservation Research
Association.
• Replaced gland packing by mechanical seal in 2 pumps in the Catalytic Cracking Unit.
As a par t of Oil & Gas Conservation For tnight 2006, M/s. Center for High Technology had organised a
detailed furnace efficiency and insulation effectiveness survey for all Furnaces & Boilers at Mumbai Refinery,
along with external exper ts. In addition, various awareness programmes on the Oil Conservation theme were
conducted, both inside and outside the refinery, including free PUC check up for more than 5000 vehicles.
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39 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
Mumbai Refinery is implementing / planning to implement various energy conservation and loss control
projects as given below:
• Increasing condensate recovery from Sulphur Recovery Unit.
• Application of High Emissivity Ceramic Coating in High Vacuum Unit Heater.
• Application of special insulating paint for open manways in HCP, HVU & FCCU.
• Slops system study of refinery by M/s Engineers India Ltd. to minimize slops generation.
• Provision of still well sleeve assembly in MS & Naphtha tanks to reduce hydrocarbon losses.
Kochi Refinery
The following energy conservation and loss control measures were adopted during the year which have
resulted in significant fuel savings.
• Friction reducing coating of ARU cooling water pumps for improvement in efficiency.
• Decoking of FPU vacuum heater.
• Insulation of plant fuel tank 190.
• Conducting insulation survey and replacing damaged por tions with new insulation.
• Replacing mineral wool insulation with more efficient Perlite insulation.
• Conducting surveys on hydrocarbon leak and relief valve passing and attending to the leaks and
repairing the faulty relief valves.
• Replacement of leaky steam traps & attending to steam leaks.
• Repair of damaged APH of vacuum heater.
• Repair of air registers, dampers in heaters/boilers.
• Conversion of single seal arrangement to double seal arrangement in floating roof tanks in a phased
manner.
• Conducted energy audit of steam system and power generation through M/s. Petroleum Conservation
Research Association.
As a par t of Oil & Gas Conservation For tnight 2006, M/s. Centre for High Technology had organized a
detailed furnace efficiency and insulation effectiveness survey for all Furnaces & Boilers at Kochi Refinery
along with the assistance of external exper ts. To propagate better awareness of energy conservation among
the public, various programmes like quiz and essay writing competitions were conducted in schools and
colleges. Training for employees on energy management, OGCF pamphlet distribution to contract workers
and OGCF-Marathon were the other activities organized in connection with the Oil & Gas Conservation
Fortnight 2006.
Kochi Refinery is in the process of implementing various energy conservation and loss control projects as
given below:
• Additional condensate recovery from VR/Plant Fuel tank farm.
• Trial runs in KH1B heater and UB5 boiler with fireside cleaning chemical for efficiency improvement.
• Replacement of metallic blade air fin fans with FRP blade air fin fans for power reduction.
• Replacement of mineral wool insulation with more efficient Perlite insulation.
• Replacement of crude charge heaters CH1A/B with a single high efficiency heater.
• Application of High Emissivity Ceramic Coating in low efficiency heaters.
• Replacement of low efficiency LH1 heater with steam reboiler.
• Replacement of KH1B heater with a high efficiency heater.
(iii) Details regarding total energy consumption and energy consumption per unit of production etc, are given in
the prescribed Form A, annexed hereto.
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40 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
B. TECHNOLOGY ABSORPTION
Mumbai Refinery
The Refinery has implemented the following projects to obtain the benefits of the latest technological developments
and advances:
• As par t of the Refinery Modernization Project (RMP), the Hydrocracker unit was commissioned to produce
superior quality middle distillates and reduce overall SO
2
emissions from the Refinery. The following
technologies have been obtained for the project:
Hydrocracker : M/s. Chevron Lummus Global, USA
Hydrogen : M/s. Haldor Topsoe, Denmark
Sulphur Recovery : M/s. Delta Hudson, Canada
• Revamping of the Catalytic Reforming Unit (CRU) for production of high octane Motor Spirit blend stock and
for increasing capacity. The following technology has been obtained for the project:
Fixed Bed Platforming process: M/s. UOP, USA.
• Setting up facilities for production of high performance environment friendly Group-II Lube Oil Base Stock
(LOBS) facilities using unconver ted oil from the Hydrocracker. The following technology has been obtained
for the project:
Isodewaxing/ Hydrofinishing Technology : M/s. Chevron Lummus Global, USA.
Kochi Refinery
The Refinery has implemented the following projects to obtain the benefits of the latest technological developments
and advances:
• As par t of the Capacity Expansion cum modernization Project (CEMP-Phase 1), the DHDS unit was revamped
to enhance the capacity and to facilitate processing of high sulfur VGO, in a blocked out mode. Desulfurisation
of VGO was necessitated in order to meet BS II norms for MS. Par t quantities of Euro III (equivalent) quality
MS can also be produced.
The technology was supplied by the process licensor of the unit, M/s Axens, France
• As par t of the CEMP - Phase I, the Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit was revamped to increase the production of
value added products such as LPG and MS. Technology for revamp was obtained from M/s. Stone and
Webster, USA.
• Bitumen Emulsion unit from ENH Engineering A/S, Denmark was set up for production of different grades of
Bitumen Emulsion.
Details regarding the effor ts made in technology absorption as per the prescribed Form B are annexed hereto.
FOREIGN EXCHANGE EARNINGS / OUTGO
(i) Activities related to expor ts; initiatives taken to increase expor ts; development of new expor t markets for
products and services; and expor t plans :-
a. Exports
BPC expor ted 1384 TMT of products during the year, compared to 1286 TMT in the previous year registering
an increase of over 8%. The contribution to the foreign exchange earnings increased to USD 608 million
(Rs. 27,172.61 million) from USD 407 million (Rs. 18,298.10 million) during the previous year. This was
mainly due to the regular availability of Fuel Oil for expor t from the refineries.
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41 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
b. Hedging
BPC embarked on hedging its exposures on refinery margins as well as expor t realizations, based on the
Risk Management Policy approved by the BPC Board. The first trade was executed on 9th March 2005.
During 2005-06, BPC hedged 2.7 million barrels of refining margins and 40 TMT of expor ts. In line with
international best practices, a sound governance mechanism has been put in place. The volume and nature
of hedge to be under taken is determined by the Risk Management Committee appointed by the Board. The
overall risk management approach is approved by the Trading Risk Management Board.
Counterpar ties are enrolled through a rigorous evaluation process and trading is commenced only after
completion of registration and ISDA (International Swaps and Derivatives Association) negotiations are
concluded.
The first year of hedging operations saw net cash inflow of USD 9.45 million (Rs. 427.39 million) to counter
margin loss in physical volumes.
c. Import
The year 2005-06 saw imports of 11.86 MMT of crude oil for meeting the requirements of both Mumbai and Kochi
refineries. While there has been a small increase in the quantity of imports as compared to the previous year, the
sharp rise in prices has seen the value of imports at a record level of USD 4898.4 million (Rs. 217,833 million) as
against USD 3183.0 million (Rs. 142,789 million) for the year 2004-05.
With the implementation of the Refinery Modernization Project at the Mumbai Refinery, BPC maximized procurement
of heavy sour variety of crude and captured the price differential between heavy sour crude oils (benchmarked to
Oman/Dubai average) and light sweet grades (benchmarked to Dated Brent).
During the year, BPC had also imported 217 TMT of Euro III MS at USD 131 million (Rs. 5761.14 million) and
61 TMT of Euro II HSD at USD 30 million (Rs. 139.52 million) to meet the shortfall and comply with Euro III &
BS II emission norms. In addition, to meet the deficit in the availability of LPG, BPC had imported 202 TMT of LPG
at USD 102 million (Rs. 4517.98 million) during the year.
(ii) The details of foreign exchange earnings & outgo are given below :-
Rs. in Million
2005-06* 2004-05
Earnings in Foreign Exchange 42,866.71 19,445.63
— includes receipt of Rs 5,516.66 million (Rs 7,605.75 million) in Indian
currency out of the repatriable funds of foreign airline customers and
Rs. 81.44 million (previous year NIL) of INR expor ts to Nepal and Bhutan.
Foreign Exchange Outgo 237,379.43 74,254.15
— on account of purchase of Raw Materials, Capital Goods, Chemicals,
Catalysts, Spare Par ts, International Trading Activities.
* includes figures of the erstwhile KRL
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:57 PM 41
42 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
FORM A
Form for disclosure of particulars with respect to conservation of energy
1. MUMBAI REFINERY
A. Power & Fuel Consumption 2005 - 06 2004 - 05
1. Electricity
a) Purchased
Units (Million KWH) 17.50 5.13
Total Amount (Rs. Million)@ 157.05 79.09
Rate/Unit (Rs./KWH)* 8.97 15.43
b) Own Generation
Through Steam Turbine/ Generator
Units (Million KWH) 433.40 317.41
Units per Ton of Fuel 2,713.12 2,755.25
Cost/Unit (Rs./KWH) ** 4.91 3.94
2 Coal Nil Nil
3 Furnace Oil/Liquid Fuel
LSHS Qty - MT 1,76,746 1,77,981
Total amount (Rs. Million) 2,426.69 1,668.44
Avg. Rate (Rs./Unit) 13,729.81 9,374.27
IBP-60 Qty - MT 29,413 7,287
Total amount (Rs. Million) 751.01 129.23
Avg. Rate (Rs./Unit) 25,533.13 17,734.10
4 Others / Internal Generation
External Fuel :
Bombay High Associated Gas (BHAG)
Qty - (MT) 196 464
Total amount (Rs. Million) 1.50 2.01
Avg. Rate (Rs./Unit) 7,666.23 4,327.22
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:57 PM 42
43 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
Internal Fuel :
Refinery Gas Qty - (MT) 113,883 94,555
Total amount (Rs. Million) 1,563.59 886.38
Avg. Rate (Rs./Unit) 13,729.81 9,374.27
Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) Off Gas Qty - (MT) 67,438 17,051
Total amount (Rs. Million) 163.34 28.20
Avg. Rate (Rs./Unit) 2,422.09 1,653.72
FCC Units Coke Qty - MT 87,418 89,799
Total amount (Rs. Million) 1,200.23 841.80
Avg. Rate (Rs./Unit) 13,729.81 9,374.27
Notes:
@ Increase in power purchased cost is mainly due to planned shutdown of GT1, GT2, GT3 & higher power import for
commissioning RMP Hydrocracker Unit
* Cost per unit of Power Purchased has decreased due to higher purchase of power from Tata Power Company.
** Cost per unit of power generated in CPP has increased due to increase in fuel cost.
B. Energy consumption per unit of production
Unit Stds. if any# 2005-06 2004-05
Production of Petroleum products MT 9,626,716 8,597,737
Electricity KWH / MT 46.84 37.51
LSHS / IBP-60 Kg/MT 21.42 21.55
Gas (Excluding CPP) Kg/MT 18.86 13.03
FCC Units Coke Kg/MT 9.08 10.44
# No fixed consumption parameter can be attributed to a par ticular product as the product pattern of the Refinery
is governed by supply / demand scenario of products and Govt. directives. It is also a function of quantity / type
of crude processed, planned shutdown of processing units for maintenance / inspection and severity of operations
of processing units, which varies widely.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:57 PM 43
44 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
2. KOCHI REFINERY
2005-06 2004-05
A) Power & Fuel Consumption
1) Electricity
a) Purchased :
Units (Million KWH) 48.828 49.121
Total amount (Rs. Million) 220.29 238.03
Rate/Unit (Rs./KWH) 4.51 4.85
b) Own Generation
i) Through Gas Turbine generation in CPP (Million KWH) 143.47 118.40
Units (KWH) per Ton of fuel oil/gas 2,820.00 2,870.00
Cost/Unit (Rs./KWH) 5.31 4.00
ii) Through Steam Turbine Generation (Million KWH) 58.340 77.434
Cost/Unit (Rs./KWH) 5.46 3.81
2) FCC coke for steam generation :
Quantity (tonnes) 61,773 77,532
Total Cost (Rs. Million) 850.00 701.77
Average rate (Rs./MT) 13,760 9,051
3) LSHS :
Quantity (tonnes) 224,473 232,017
Total Cost (Rs. Million) 3,088.77 2,100.07
Average rate (Rs./MT) 13,760 9,051
4) DHDS Naphtha :
Quantity (tonnes) 36,221 20,568
Total Cost (Rs. Million) 760.55 314.28
Average rate (Rs./MT) 20,997 15,280
5) Others (Refinery Fuel Gas) :
(Excluding fuel used for Power Generation)
Quantity (tonnes) 82,953 75,958
Total Cost (Rs. Million) 1,141.44 687.52
Average rate (Rs./MT) 13,760 9,051
B) Energy Consumption per unit of production
Unit Stds. if any 2005-06 2004-05
#
Production of Petroleum products MT 6,456,965 7,445,293
Electricity KWH/MT 37.89 32.28
FCC Coke KG/MT 9.57 10.50
LSHS KG/MT 34.77 31.41
DHDS Naphtha and Refinery fuel gas KG/MT 18.46 13.07
Notes :
1. Fuel for CPP consisted of Intermediates and Refinery Fuel Gas
2. The purchased power is net of export to KSEB (181 MWH)
3. Cost of FCC coke, LSHS, Intermediates, Refinery Fuel Gas etc. are at average cost.
# No fixed consumption parameter can be attributed to a par ticular product as the product pattern of the Refinery
is governed by supply / demand scenario of products and Govt. directives. It is also a function of quantity / type
of crude processed, planned shutdown of processing units for maintenance / inspection and severity of operations
of processing units, which varies widely.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:57 PM 44
45 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
FORM B
FORM FOR DISCLOSURE OF PARTICULARS WITH RESPECT TO TECHNOLOGY ABSORPTION
A. MUMBAI REFINERY
RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT (R&D)
1. Specific areas in which R&D is been carried out by the Company :
i) Catalytic processes
ii) Clean Fuel Technology
iii) Residue Upgradation
iv) Detailed Crude Evaluations and Crude compatibility studies
v) Value added products
vi) Modelling and Simulation of refinery processes
vii) Corrosion and fouling
viii) Analytical methods development
ix) Alternate fuels
x) High Performance Diesel Engine Oil
xi) Long Life Rear Axle Oils
xii) Synthetic Gear Oils for Industrial gears
xiii) Metal Working Fluid
xiv) High Performance Greases
xv) Exclusive grades for Defence
xvi) Alternate formulations for existing grades
2. Benefits derived as a result of the above R&D :
i) Optimum catalyst/additives and conditions selected for Fluid Catalytic Cracking Units (FCCU) resulting
in improved yields of distillates.
ii) In-house simulation and optimization model for hydrodesulphurization of diesel refined to improve
predictions and the model installed in Mumbai Refinery for plant optimization.
iii) Cost effective LPG additive for cutting gas applications developed and its performance evaluated.
Ready for commercial launch.
iv) Detailed crude evaluations aided in enhancing value realization and enlarging crude basket. Crude
blend compatibility studies helped in processing oppor tunity crude.
v) Advanced Tech suppor t to Refinery and Marketing operations for resolving technical problems/effecting
improvements, such as, (a) disposal of spent platinum based catalyst, (b) revamp of bitumen plant at
Kochi Refinery, (c) manufacture of straight run bitumen at Mumbai Refinery post-RMP, (d) advanced
analytical method development, (e) launching of new modified bitumen products, viz., CRMB and
PMB.
vi) Usage of optimum antifoulants for crude and vacuum residue resulted in improved heat recovery.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:57 PM 45
46 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
vii) The following new products were developed:
a) High Performance Gasoline Engine Oil which would meet the lubricants requirements of the
latest generation passenger cars.
b) Long Life Oil that would help in extending the drain interval and life of the transmission system.
c) Synthetic Gear Oil to help in extending the lubricant drain interval and life of the gear system.
d) Grade of Metal Working Fluid developed would help in increasing the Metal Working Fluids
por tfolio and would help to increase market share in this segment.
e) New grades of greases would help core industries extend their equipment life, besides increasing
market share.
f) The exclusive grades developed would provide another indigenous alternative to Defence.
g) Alternate formulations for 9 existing grades, which would help in reducing the input cost/providing
flexibility in operation.
3. Future Plan of Action
a) Intensifying and enlargement of activities in the area of Refinery processes and residue upgradation
b) Development of new process technologies for clean fuels
c) Enlargement of crude basket and identification of oppor tunity crudes and crude blends
d) Value added Products/Solvents from the refinery streams
e) Bio-technological processes
f) Alternate Fuels e.g. Bio-diesel, Ethanol and Hydrogen
g) Coal/residue to clean liquid fuels
h) Extended R&D Services to other group refineries
i) Developing the following grades/products:
i) Customer Specific Cutting Oil
ii) Rolling Oil for Steel Industry
iii) Metal Working Oil for Aluminium
iv) Agricultural Spray Oil
v) Heat Treatment Oil
vi) Defence specific grade
vii) Alternate formulations for existing grades
B. KOCHI REFINERY
RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT (R&D)
1) Specific areas in which R&D has been carried out by the company :
a) Development of value added products from Refinery streams e.g. Rubber Spray Oil, Special Boiling
Point Spirit, Natural Rubber Modified Bitumen, Mineral Turpentine Oil, High Performance Diesel Additive
and various grades of Bitumen Emulsion.
b) Evaluation and selection of FCC Catalysts.
c) Evaluation of crude oil.
d) Formulation of specialty products. e.g. Bitumen Emulsion
e) Development of Bio-diesel
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:57 PM 46
47 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
2) Benefits derived as a result of the above R&D :
a) A commercial plant for specialty hydrocarbon solvent based on in-house R&D know-how has been
under regular production run.
b) Through laboratory and pilot plant studies, selection of new improved catalysts made for the commercial
FCC plant.
c) Selected FCC catalyst additives for enhancement of LPG & MS production.
d) A commercial plant for the production of Natural Rubber Modified Bitumen based on in-house R&D
know-how has been under regular production run.
e) A commercial plant has been set up to manufacture High Performance Diesel additive based on R&D
studies.
f) Technical suppor t to the existing FCC, crude and other Units in the following areas:
i) Crude oil evaluation
ii) Evolving different schemes by computer simulation and modelling
iii) Manufacture of Bitumen Emulsion
3) Future plan of action
a) To continue FCC related R&D studies using FCC Pilot Plant and other facilities.
b) To under take plant simulation and optimization studies
c) To pursue exploratory research for development of value added products
d) To develop process for sulfide removal from Liquid Effluent.
e) Formulation of different grades of bitumen emulsion.
f) To evaluate the performance of Gasoline Sulfur Reduction Additives.
C. EXPENDITURE ON R&D DURING 2005-06
(Rs. in million)
Total
Capital Expenditure 67.07
Revenue/Recurring Expenditure 121.68
Total 188.74
Total R&D Expenditure as a % of total turnover Negligible
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:58 PM 47
48 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
TECHNOLOGY ABSORPTION, ADAPTATION AND INNOVATION
A. MUMBAI REFINERY
1. Efforts, in brief, made towards technology absorption, adaptation and innovation
Mumbai Refinery has under taken the following projects to obtain the benefits of the latest technological
developments and advances:
• Revamping of the Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit (FCCU) by incorporating advanced Feed Injection Technology
from M/s.Stone & Webster, USA for improving FCCU yield.
• As a par t of the Refinery Modernization Project (RMP), the Hydrocracker unit and associated Hydrogen unit
& Sulphur recovery facilities have been set up to produce superior quality middle distillates and reduce
overall SO
2
emissions from the Refinery.
• The Catalytic Reforming Unit (CRU) was revamped using UOP’s fixed bed platforming technology for
production of high octane Motor Spirit blend stock and for increasing capacity.
• Setting up facilities for production of high performance environment friendly Group-II Lube Oil Base Stock
(LOBS) facilities using unconver ted oil from the Hydrocracker.
2. Benefits derived as a result of the above efforts, e.g. product improvement, cost reduction, product development,
import substitution, etc.
• Yield improvement
• Reduction of overall SO
2
emissions from the Refinery and manufacture of superior quality middle distillates
• Production of superior quality Motor Spirit (Petrol)
• Production of High Performance Group-II Lube Oil Base Stocks
3. Information regarding technology imported during last five years reckoned from the beginning of the financial
year:
(a) Technology Imported: Year of import
• FCC – Feed Injection Technology from M/s. Stone & Webster, USA for yield improvement. 2001
• Hydrocracker technology from M/s. Chevron Lummus Global, USA. 2001
• Technology for production of Hydrogen from M/s. Haldor Topsoe, Denmark. 2001
• Maximum Claus Recovery Concept (MCRC) technology for enhanced recovery of
sulfur from off-gases from M/s. Delta Hudson, Canada, through M/s. Engineers India
Limited (EIL). 2001
• Fixed Bed Platforming process from M/s UOP, USA for production of high octane
Motor Spirit blend stock and for increasing capacity. 2003
• Isodewaxing / Hydrofinishing technology from M/s Chevron Lummus Global, USA for
production of Group-II Lube Oil Base Stocks. 2003
(b) Has Technology been fully absorbed?
Yes.
(c) If not fully absorbed, areas where this has not taken place, reasons therefore and future plans of action:
Not applicable.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:58 PM 48
49 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
B. KOCHI REFINERY
1. Efforts, in brief, made towards technology absorption, adaptation and innovation
Kochi Refinery has under taken the following projects to obtain the benefits of the latest technological
developments and advances:
• Revamping of Diesel Hydro De-Sulfurisation Unit (DHDS) to facilitate processing of high sulfur VGO for
producing MS of BSII specification. VGO desulfurisation would also result in improved product pattern in
Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit (FCCU) operation.
• Revamping of FCCU by incorporating advanced Feed Injection Technology, Riser Termination Device, Stripper
Packing from M/s.Stone & Webster, USA for improving FCCU yield.
• Bitumen Emulsion Unit was set up with technology from ENH Engineering A/S, Denmark, incorporating
Colloidal mill for production of different grades of Bitumen Emulsion.
2. Benefits derived as a result of the above efforts, e.g. product improvement, cost reduction, product development,
import substitution, etc.
• Production of MS of BSII, Euro III ( Eqv. ) specification
• Yield improvement in FCCU
• Reduction of overall SO
2
emissions from the Refinery and manufacture of superior quality middle distillates
• Production of different grades of Bitumen Emulsion
3. Information regarding technology imported during last five years reckoned from the beginning of the financial
year:
(a) Technology Imported: Year of import
• FCC – Feed Injection Technology, Riser termination Device, Packed Stripper from
M/s. Stone & Webster, USA for yield improvement. 2003
• Colloidal Mill for production of Bitumen Emulsion from M/s. ENH Engineering, Denmark. 2004
• Process technology for blocked out mode operation of VGO in DHDS from 2003
M/s. Axens, France.
• Technology for revamp of FCCU from M/s. Stone & Webster, USA 2003
• Technology from M/s. ENH Engineering, Denmark for production of Bitumen Emulsion. 2004
(b) Has Technology been fully absorbed?
Yes.
(c) If not fully absorbed, areas where this has not taken place, reasons therefore and future plans of action:
Not applicable.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:58 PM 49
50 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
ANNEXURE B
Report on Corporate Governance
1. Company’s philosophy on Code of Governance
BPC’s corporate philosophy on Corporate Governance has been to ensure fairness to the stakeholders through
transparency, full disclosures, empowerment of employees and collective decision making.
2. Board of Directors
As per the Articles of Association of the Company, the number of Directors shall not be less than three and more than
sixteen.
BPC being a Government Company, the Government has decided the composition of the Board of BPC. As on
31
st
March 2006, the Board of BPC comprises five Whole-time (Executive) Directors including the Chairman & Managing
Director, two Part-time (Ex-Officio) Directors and three Part-time (Independent) Directors. Nomination of the additional
four Part-time (Independent) Directors, required under the revised terms of Clause 49 of the Listing Agreement, will be
made by the Government of India.
During the year, all meetings of the Board and the Annual General Meeting were chaired by the Chairman & Managing
Director.
During the year, none of the Non-Executive Directors of BPC had any pecuniary relationship / transaction with the
Company.
The Directors neither held membership of more than 10 Board Committees, nor Chairmanship of more than
5 Committees (as specified in Clause 49) across all the companies in which they were Directors.
The required information as indicated in Annexure I to the Clause 49 of the Listing Agreement was made available to the
Board of Directors.
Details regarding the Board Meetings; Directors attendance thereat and the Annual General Meeting; Directorships
and Committee positions held by the Directors are as under :-
Board Meetings
Ten Board Meetings were held during the financial year on the following dates:-
19
th
May 2005 29
th
June 2005 29
th
July 2005 23
rd
Sept 2005 17
th
Oct 2005
28
th
Oct 2005 23
rd
Dec 2005 30
th
Jan 2006 25
th
Feb, 2006 28
th
March, 2006
The Board has periodically reviewed the compliance of all laws applicable to the Company, including steps taken by the
Company to rectify instances of non-compliances.
The Board has adopted the Code of Conduct for the Directors and also for the senior management of the Company and
the same has been posted on the website of the Company. All the Board members and senior management of the
Company have affirmed compliance with the Code of Conduct in respect of the financial year ended 31
st
March 2006.
ANNEXURE TO THE DIRECTORS’ REPORT
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:58 PM 50
51 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
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PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:59 PM 53
54 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
3. Audit Committee
BPC took the initiative to introduce Corporate Governance in the organisation during the year 1996 itself, by constituting
the Audit Compliance Committee. The said Committee was reconstituted and renamed as the Audit Committee in the
year 2000 and the role, powers and functions of the Audit Committee were specified and approved by the Board.
The Audit Committee comprises all three Part-time (Independent) Directors. The quorum for the meetings of the
Committee is two members. Prof. A.H. Kalro is the Chairman of the Committee and Shri V.D. Gupta and Shri P. C. Sen are
members of the Committee. Prof. A.H.Kalro possesses the requisite knowledge of Finance & Accounting for effective
functioning of the Audit Committee. The Company Secretary acts as the Secretary of this Commttee.
Director (Finance) is a permanent invitee at the meetings of the Committee. ED (Audit) coordinates the meetings of the
Audit Committee and also attends the said meetings as invitee. In addition, the other Whole-time Directors attend the
meetings when the items pertaining to their functions are considered. The Statutory Auditors and Cost Auditors also
attend the meetings, on invitation.
The terms of reference of the Audit Committee cover all matters specified in Clause 49 of the Listing Agreement with
Stock Exchanges.
The role and responsibilities of the Committee include the following :-
1. Overseeing the company’s financial reporting process and the disclosure of its financial information to ensure that
the financial statements are correct, sufficient and credible.
2. Recommending to the Board, the appointment, re-appointment and, if required, the replacement or removal of the
Statutory Auditor and the fixation of audit fees.
3. Approval of payment to Statutory Auditors for any other services rendered by them.
4. Reviewing, with the management, the Annual Financial Statements before submission to the Board for approval,
with particular reference to:
a. Matters required to be included in the Director’s Responsibility Statement to be included in the Board’s
report in terms of Clause (2AA) of Section 217 of the Companies Act, 1956
b. Changes, if any, in accounting policies and practices and reasons for the same
c. Major accounting entries involving estimates based on the exercise of judgment by management
d. Significant adjustments made in the financial statements arising out of audit findings
e. Compliance with listing and other legal requirements relating to financial statements
f. Disclosure of any related party transactions
g. Qualifications in the draft audit report
5. Reviewing, with the management, the Quarterly Financial Statements before submission to the Board for approval
6. Reviewing, with the management, the performance of the Statutory and Internal Auditors and adequacy of the
internal control systems.
7. Reviewing the adequacy of the Internal Audit function, if any, including the structure of the Internal Audit
department, staffing and seniority of the official heading the department, reporting structure coverage and
frequency of internal audit.
8. Discussing with the Internal Auditors any significant findings and follow up thereon.
9. Reviewing the findings of any internal investigations by the Internal Auditors into matters where there is suspected
fraud or irregularity or a failure of internal control systems of a material nature and reporting the matter to the Board.
10. Discussing with the Statutory Auditors before the audit commences, about the nature and scope of audit as well as
post-audit discussion to ascertain any area of concern.
11. Looking into the reasons for substantial defaults in the payments to the depositors, debenture holders,
shareholders (in case of non-payment of declared dividends) and creditors.
12 Defining the significant related party transactions
13. Carrying out any other function as mentioned in the terms of reference of the Audit Committee.
Nine meetings of the Audit Committee were held during the financial year on the following dates:
5
th
May, 2005 19
th
May, 2005 29
th
July, 2005
2
nd
September, 2005 23
rd
September, 2005 28
th
October, 2005
30
th
January, 2006 27
th
February, 2006 28
th
March, 2006
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:59 PM 54
55 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
Attendance at the Audit Committee Meetings :-
Names of the members No. of meetings attended % Attendance at the Last
Annual General Meeting
Prof. A.H. Kalro, Chairman 8 89 Attended
Shri V.D. Gupta,Member 9 100 Attended
Shri P.C. Sen, Member 8 89 Attended
The Committee, at its meetings held on 29
th
July 2005, 28
th
October 2005, 30
th
January 2006 and 27
th
April 2006 reviewed
the Half Yearly / Quarterly Financial Statements as on 30
th
June 2005, 30
th
September 2005, 31
st
December 2005 and
31
st
March 2006 respectively. Further, Annual Financial Statements as on 31
st
March 2006 were reviewed by the
Committee at its meeting held on 26
th
September 2006, before the same were submitted to the Board for approval.
BPC has one unlisted subsidiary company i.e. Numaligarh Refinery Ltd. (NRL) which does not fall under the category of
‘material non-listed Indian subsidiary’ as indicated in Clause 49(III) of the Listing Agreement. Financial statements of
NRL, including investments made, if any, are reviewed by the Audit Committee/Board. The performance of NRL and the
minutes of the Board meeting of NRL are discussed at the Board meetings of the Company. Any significant transactions
or arrangement entered into by NRL is also reported to the Board of Directors of BPC.
4. Remuneration Committee
BPC being a Government Company, appointment and remuneration of Whole-time Directors are determined by the
Government, through the Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas. The Part-time (Ex-officio) Directors do not receive any
remuneration from the Company. The Part-time (Independent) Directors receive sitting fees of Rs. 10,000 for each
Board/Committee meeting attended by them.
However, BPC has constituted the Remuneration Committee comprising one Part-time (Ex-officio) Director as the
Chairman and two Part-time (Non-Official) Directors as members, to formulate and review policies related to
remuneration / perquisites / incentives to the Whole-time Directors and below Board level executives.
a) Details of remuneration paid to the Whole-time Directors during the financial year 2005-06 are as follows :-
Names of Directors All elements of Details of fixed Other Benefits
remuneration packages component and
of the Directors i.e. salary, performance linked
benefits, bonus, incentives
pension etc.
Rs. Rs. Rs.
Shri Ashok Sinha 1,195,534 Fixed Component : 768,093 205,755
Chairman & Managing Director PLIS : 221,686
Shri S.A.Narayan 1,126,704 Fixed Component : 752,114 162,219
Director (Human Resources) PLIS : 212,371
Shri S. Radhakrishnan 1,062,501 Fixed Component : 760,347 194,866
Director (Marketing) PLIS : 107,288
Shri S.K.Joshi 56,027* Fixed Component : 47,496 2,275
Director (Finance) PLIS : 6,256
(*w.e.f. 8.3.2006)
Shri R.K.Singh 56,183* Fixed Component : 47,496 2,431
Director (Refineries) PLIS : 6,256
(*w.e.f. 8.3.2006)
Shri M. Rohatgi 967,321 Fixed Component : 388,092 398,967
Director (Refineries) PLIS : 180,262
(upto 30.9.2005)
PLIS : Performance Linked Incentive Scheme
Service Contracts : Five years which is renewable for fur ther similar periods.
Notice period : Three months
BPC has not introduced any Stock Options Scheme. None of the Non-Executive Directors holds any share in BPC.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:59 PM 55
56 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
During the year, the Par t-time (Independent) Directors received sitting fees for attending the meetings of the
Board / Committees as follows:-
Name of Director Remuneration
(Rs.)
Shri V.D. Gupta 180,000
Shri P.C. Sen 170,000
Prof. A.H. Kalro 160,000
5. Investors’ Grievance Committee
The Committee, comprising Prof. A.H.Kalro, Director and Shri S. K. Joshi, Director (Finance), monitors the shareholders’/
investors’ complaints and redressal of their grievances. The Committee, at its meeting held on 28
th
March 2006,
reviewed the services to the shareholders /investors including response to complaints / communications and expressed
its satisfaction on the performance of the Investor Relations department of the Company.
The Company Secretary acts as the Compliance Officer for matters related to investor relations.
During the year, three complaints were received from investors through SEBI, BSE & ROC, which were attended to and
resolved on priority. One complaint, received through SEBI, for delay in transfer of shares and non-receipt of dividend,
remained unresolved, as the matter was subjudice and pending before the Court. SEBI has removed this complaint from
their records.
All valid share transfer requests received during the year were duly processed and approved within the stipulated
period of 30 days. There was no share transfer request in physical form pending as on 31
st
March 2006.
6. Annual / Extraordinary General Meetings
Date and Time of the Meeting Venue
50
th
Annual General Meeting 18
th
September, 2003 at 10.30 a.m.
Y.B. Chavan Auditorium,
51
st
Annual General Meeting 30
th
September, 2004 at 10.30 a.m. Yeshwantrao Chavan Pratishthan,
General Jagannath Bhosale Marg,
52
nd
Annual General Meeting 23
rd
September, 2005 at 10.30. a.m.
Mumbai 400021
During the year 2005-06, there was no occasion to resort to Postal Ballot as no proposal requiring Postal Ballot was
proposed for consideration of the shareholders.
The Special Resolution for Delisting of Equity Shares of BPC from the Stock Exchanges at Delhi, Chennai and Kolkata
was approved by the shareholders at an Annual General Meeting held on 23
rd
September 2005.
The shareholders, at the Extraordinary General Meeting held on 16
th
January 2006, approved the Scheme of
Amalgamation of Kochi Refineries Ltd. with BPC by an overwhelming majority.
Further, Special Resolutions for amendment to the Articles of Association for increasing the number of Directors and for
increase in the Borrowing Powers of the Company were approved by the shareholders at an Extraordinary General
Meeting held on 27
th
February 2006.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:59 PM 56
57 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
6A Brief Resumes of Directors Seeking Re-appointment
1. Shri V.D.Gupta
Shri V.D.Gupta is a B.Sc. Engg. (Hons). He has rich experience in various sectors such as Oil, Engineering and
Railways for the last 22 years. He retired as General Manager (Western Railways).
Shri V.D.Gupta was appointed as Additional Director w.e.f. 5
th
September, 2003, by the Board of Directors, under
the provisions of Article 77A of the Articles of Association of the Company, in accordance with the intention of the
Government of India. He was further reappointed at the AGM held on 30
th
August 2004. He is liable to retire by
rotation at the ensuing Annual General Meeting, and being eligible, offers himself for re-appointment.
2. Shri P.C. Sen
Shri P.C. Sen did his B.A.(History) (Hons) from St. Stephens College and M.A.(History) from Cambridge, U.K. He
joined the Indian Administrative Service in 1967 and has been in various senior posts in different Ministries of the
Govt. of India. He was also Managing Director of various Public Sector Undertakings, Chairman & Managing
Director of Indian Airlines and Chairman of Air India. He retired as Secretary to the Govt. of India. At present, he is
also a Director of India International Centre.
Shri P.C. Sen was appointed as Additional Director w.e.f. 5
th
September, 2003, by the Board of Directors, under the
provisions of Article 77A of the Articles of Association of the Company, in accordance with the intention of the
Government of India. He was further reappointed at the AGM held on 30
th
August 2004. He is liable to retire by
rotation at the ensuing Annual General Meeting, and being eligible, offers himself for re-appointment.
3. Prof. A.H. Kalro
Prof. A.H. Kalro is a B.Tech. (Hons) in Electrical Engineering from I.I.T. Kharagpur and MS and Ph.D in Industrial
Engineering from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA and is a recipient of several scholastic awards.
He was Asst. Professor at the University of Minnesota and joined IIM, Ahmedabad in August 1970. He has
co-authored three books and has extensive consulting experience with public and private sector organisations.
Presently, he is a Director of AES Post Graduate Institute of Business Management.
Prof. A.H.Kalro was appointed as Additional Director w.e.f. 5
th
September, 2003, by the Board of Directors, under
the provisions of Article 77A of the Articles of Association of the Company, in accordance with the intention of the
Government of India. He was reappointed at the AGM held on 30
th
August 2004. He is liable to retire by rotation at
the ensuing Annual General Meeting, and being eligible, offers himself for re-appointment.
4. Shri P. K.Sinha
Shri P. K.Sinha, Joint Secretary and Financial Advisor, Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas, is a senior IAS officer
belonging to the 1977 Batch of U.P. Cadre. He is a post-graduate in Economics from Delhi School of Economics and
M. Phil. in Social Sciences and has a Masters Diploma in Public Administration. In addition to BPC, he holds the
Directorship in Indian Oil Corporation Ltd. and Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Ltd.
Shri P. K.Sinha was appointed as Additional Director w.e.f. 21
st
February 2006, by the Board of Directors, under the
provisions of Article 77A of the Articles of Association of the Company, in accordance with the intention of the
Government of India. Being an Additional Director, he holds office up to the date of the Annual General Meeting. The
Company has received a notice, u/s 257 of the Companies Act, 1956, from a member, proposing his name as
Director of the Company.
5. Shri S.K.Joshi
Shri S K Joshi, Director (Finance) is a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India, and M.B. A. from
the University of Hull, United Kingdom. He has been heading the Corporate Treasury function as Executive Director,
and was responsible for the overall fund management, risk management, corporate accounts and budgeting. He
was also closely associated with key initiatives undertaken by the Corporation, including implementation of SAP
and drawing up of the corporate credit policy and commodity risk management policy.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:59 PM 57
58 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
Besides, Shri Joshi was closely associated with key initiatives impacting the oil industry in India. He was a
member of the study group formed for the purpose of preparing a long term perspective plan for the oil industry in
India which had come out with the report titled ‘Hydrocarbon Perspective : 2010 – Meeting the Challenges’.
In addition to BPC, he also holds the position of Director in Numaligarh Refinery Ltd., Bharat Oman Refineries Ltd,
Petronet CI Ltd., VI eTrans Pvt Ltd., Bharat PetroResources Ltd. and Bharat PetroResources JPDA Ltd.
Shri S.K.Joshi was appointed as Director (Finance) on 8
th
March 2006, by the Board of Directors, under the
provisions of Article 77A of the Articles of Association of the Company, in accordance with the intention of the
Government of India. Being an Additional Director, he holds office up to the date of the Annual General Meeting. The
Company has received a notice, u/s 257 of the Companies Act, 1956, from a member, proposing his name as
Director of the Company.
6. Shri R.K.Singh
Shri R.K.Singh, Director (Refineries) is a Mechanical Engineer and has held various assignments, both in Refinery
and Marketing divisions. He has attended a Management Development Programme at I.I.M, Ahmedabad,
Materials Management Programme at ASCI, Hyderabad and Logistics Management Course at University of
Tennessee in U.S.A. He has also headed a group constituted for transfer of technology of LPG equipment from
Denmark / Italy and he was closely associated with the World LPG Association as an active member of their
subcommittees. In addition to BPC, he also holds the position of Director in Numaligarh Refinery Ltd., Bharat
Oman Refineries Ltd. and Bharat PetroResources Ltd.
Shri R. K. Singh was appointed as Director (Refineries) on 8
th
March 2006, by the Board of Directors, under the
provisions of Article 77A of the Articles of Association of the Company, in accordance with the intention of the
Government of India. Being an Additional Director, he holds office up to the date of the Annual General Meeting. The
Company has received a notice, u/s 257 of the Companies Act, 1956, from a member, proposing his name as
Director of the Company.
7. Disclosures and Compliance
Except where the Company has incurred expenses on behalf of joint ventures as co-promoter and the same are
recoverable from the joint venture companies, there were no transactions of material nature that may have potential
conflict with the interests of the Company at large. The details of ‘Related Party Disclosures’ are shown in Note 17
forming part of Accounts.
BPC has been particular in adhering to the provisions of the laws and guidelines of regulatory authorities including SEBI
and covenants in the agreements with the Stock Exchanges and Depositories. During the last three years, there was no
instance of non-compliance of any provisions of law, guidelines from regulatory authorities and matters related to
capital markets.
The Company has complied with all mandatory requirements of Clause 49 of the Listing Agreement, except provisions
relating to the composition of the Board of Directors with respect to the number of Independent Directors as indicated in
Clause 49(I)(A)(ii) for which the Govt. of India is taking necessary action, as BPC is a Government Company. Out of the
non-mandatory requirements, the Company has adopted requirements with regard to constitution of the Remuneration
Committee and sending of quarterly / half yearly financial results to the shareholders of the Company.
The Chairman & Managing Director and Director (Finance) have certified to the Board in accordance with Clause 49 (V)
of the Listing Agreement pertaining to CEO/CFO Certification for the financial year 2005-06.
The Company has also laid down the Risk Management Policy and procedures thereof for periodically informing the
Board members about the risk assessment and minimising procedures.
8. Code of Conduct, Procedure and Disclosures for Prevention of Insider Trading and Code of Corporate Disclosure
Practices
Pursuant to the requirements of SEBI (Prohibition of Insider Trading) Regulations, 1992 as amended, the Company has
adopted the ‘Code of Conduct, Procedure and Disclosures for Prevention of Insider Trading in the Securities of Bharat
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:59 PM 58
59 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
Petroleum Corporation Limited’ and ‘Code of Corporate Disclosure Practices’. The Company Secretary has been
appointed as the Compliance Officer for implementation of the said Codes.
9. Means of Communication of Financial Performance
In order to give wider publicity and to reach the shareholders and other investing public across the nation, the half-yearly
and quarterly results were published in various editions of newspapers having wide circulation such as The Economic
Times, The Times of India, The Hindu, The Financial Express etc. Reports on Limited Review of the Financial Results
for the quarters ended 30
th
June 2005, 30
th
September 2005, 31
st
December 2005 and 31
st
March 2006 were obtained
from the Auditors of the Company and filed with the Stock Exchanges. The Financial Statements for the first quarter
ended June 2005, half year ended September 2005, third quarter ended December 2005 and fourth quarter ended
March 2006 were sent to the individual shareholders at their registered addresses.
Periodical financial performance of the Company is displayed on the website of the Company at www.bharatpetroleum.in
and on the Electronic Data Information Filing and Retrieval System (EDIFAR), website launched by SEBI, in collaboration
with National Informatics Centre.
10. Management Discussion & Analysis Report
A detailed chapter on Management Discussion & Analysis is enclosed to the Directors’ Report.
11. General Shareholders’ Information
SEBI has included BPC shares for compulsory trading in dematerialised form even for retail investors. Due to special
efforts made to educate the shareholders regarding the benefits of holding shares in dematerialised form, the Company
has achieved dematerialisation of 99.32% of its free float shares listed for trading on the Stock Exchanges.
Annual General Meeting : Monday, 18
th
December, 2006 at 10.30 a.m. at the Y.B. Chavan Auditorium,
Date, Time and Venue Yeshwantrao Chavan Pratishthan, General Jagannath Bhosale Marg,
Mumbai 400 021.
Financial Calendar BPC follows the financial year from April to March. The Unaudited Results for the
first four quarters were taken on record by the Board and published on the following
dates:-
Quarter Ended Date of Board Meeting Date of Publication
Apr-June 2005 29
th
July, 2005 30
th
July, 2005
July-Sept 2005 28
th
October, 2005 29
th
October, 2005
Oct-Dec 2005 30
th
January, 2006 31
st
January, 2006
Jan-March 2006 27
th
April, 2006 28
th
April, 2006
Dividend Payment Date The Board has recommended Dividend @ Rs. 2.50 per share for the consideration
of the shareholders at the ensuing Annual General Meeting. If approved by the
shareholders, the same will be paid on or before 26
th
December, 2006.
Date of Book Closure Friday, 17
th
November, 2006 to Thursday, 14
th
December, 2006 for the purpose of
determining the names of shareholders/beneficial owners who would be entitled
to the notice of Annual General Meeting and Dividend.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:59 PM 59
60 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
Listing on Stock Exchanges The Company's shares are listed on the following Stock Exchanges :
& Security Codes Name of Stock Exchange Security Code
The Stock Exchange, Mumbai 500547
Phiroze Jeejeebhoy Towers, Dalal Street,
For t, Mumbai 400 002
National Stock Exchange of India Ltd. BPCL
Exchange Plaza, 5th Floor, Bandra-Kurla Complex,
Bandra, Mumbai 400 051
The Calcutta Stock Exchange Association Ltd. 12072
7, Lyons Range, Kolkata 700 001
The Listing Fees have been paid for the year 2006-07 to all the above Exchanges.
ISIN Number
For National Securities
Depository Ltd. (NSDL) &
Central Depository Services
India Ltd. (CDSL) for
equity shares INE029A01011
Market Price Data : High, low
during each month in the last
financial year Please see Annexure I
Performance in comparison to
broad based indices i.e.BSE100 Please see Annexure II
Registrar and Transfer Agents Share Transfers were handled in-house till 31st August 2006 at the Investor Relations
Department, Bharat Bhavan III, Ground Floor, Walchand Hirachand Marg, Ballard
Estate, Mumbai 400001
Data Software Research Co. Pvt. Ltd. (DSRC) were appointed as Share Transfer
Agents for BPC w.e.f. 1.9.2006
The address of DSRC is as follows:-
Shri H.Krishnamoorthy,
General Manager (Operations),
Data Software Research Co. Pvt. Ltd.
‘Sree Sovereign Complex’
22, 4
th
Cross Street Trustpuram
Kodambakkam, Chennai 600024
Ph: +91-44-24833738 / 24834487
Fax: 91-44-2483 4646
Email : dsrcmd@vsnl.com
Share Transfer System A Committee comprising two Whole-time Directors considers the requests for transfer/
transmission of shares, dematerialisaton of shares etc. A Committee comprising four
Directors i.e. two Whole-time Directors and two Part-time (Official) Directors considers
requests for issue of share certificates. Transfers in physical form are registered after
ascertaining objections, if any, from the transferors and no valid transfer applications
are kept pending beyond the stipulated period of thir ty days. Requests for
dematerialization of shares are processed and confirmation is given to the respective
depositories viz. NSDL and CDSL within 15 days.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 7:59 PM 60
61 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
Distribution of shareholding Shareholder No. of Shares % of
as on 31
st
March, 2006 Held Holding
1) Government of India 198600060 66.20
2) Unit Trust of India 2476980 0.83
3) Life Insurance Corporation of India 26193474 8.73
4) Other Financial Institutions/Banks/Mutual Funds 12238484 4.08
5) Foreign Institutional Investors 52356868 17.45
6) Private Corporate Bodies 1625820 0.54
7) Non Resident Indians/Overseas Corporate Bodies 160382 0.06
8) Employees 2165477 0.72
9) Indian Public 4182455 1.39
300000000 100.00
Distribution of shareholding on number of shares held by shareholders and shareholding
pattern are given in Annexure III
Pursuant to the merger of KRL with BPC, vide order from Ministry of Company Affairs
dated 18.8.2006, the total paid-up share capital of BPC had increased to 36,15,42,124
equity shares of Rs. 10/- each and the shareholding of the Government of India in BPC
has reduced from 66.20 % to 54.93%. Further, 3,37,28,737 equity shares allotted to
BPC against the investment of 7,58,89,660 equity shares in KRL are deposited in the
“BPCL Trust for Investment in Shares.”
Dematerialization of shares Out of the shares held by the shareholders other than the Government, 99.32% are held
and liquidity in dematerialised form as on 31
st
March, 2006.
The Company has not issued any GDRs /ADRs/ Warrants etc.
Plant Locations Mumbai Refinery : Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
Mahul, Mumbai 400 074
Kochi Refinery : Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
Ambalamugal, Kochi
Lubricant : Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
Plants Wadilube Installation
Mallet Road, Mumbai - 400 009
Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
24, Parganas, Budge - Budge 743 319
Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
35, Vaidyanatha Mudali Street,
Tondiarpet, Chennai-600 081.
Address for correspondence Shri H.Krishnamoorthy,
General Manager (Operations),
Data Software Research Co. Pvt. Ltd.
‘Sree Sovereign Complex’
22, 4
th
Cross Street Trustpuram
Kodambakkam, Chennai 600024
Ph: +91-44-24833738 / 24834487
Fax: 91-44-2483 4646
Email : dsrcmd@vsnl.com
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:00 PM 61
62 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
Annexure I
Market Price Data : Prices of BPC shares traded on the Major Stock Exchanges
Month(s) Mumbai Stock Exchange National Stock Exchange
(April 2005 -
(March 2006)
High Low Monthly High Low Monthly
Volume Volume
(Rs. per (Rs. per (Rs. per (Rs. per
share) share) share) share)
April 383 344.60 1948453 381.75 344.60 8592 740
May 403 323.80 2404970 402 351 9055210
June 400 359.05 3100218 400 361.10 7947177
July 373.90 340 1402769 374.50 339 4905552
August 393.50 340 1789259 394 340 6984263
September 421 362 3384694 422 360.1 10671277
October 428.85 362.05 2196705 429.40 363 7393100
November 455 369 2680667 455 368.25 7858914
December 447.95 403 4284066 448 401.30 8025168
January 469.80 408 2398568 471.10 412.05 5115242
February 468 405.10 3392026 460 400 7756285
March 441.90 409 3228846 442 386.10 5270464
Shares traded during 1
st
April, 2005 to 31
st
March, 2006
BSE NSE
No. of Shares traded 32211241 89575392
Highest Share Price Rs. 469.80 Rs. 471.10
(as on 6.1.2006) (as on 18.1.2006)
Lowest Share Price Rs. 323.80 Rs. 339
(as on 20.5.2005 (as on 20.7.2005)
Closing Share price as on 31
st
March, 2006 Rs. 426.05 Rs.425.30
Market Capitalisation as on 31
st
March, 2006 Rs. 127,815 million Rs. 127,590 million
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:00 PM 62
63 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
Annexure III
Distribution of Shareholding as on 31
st
March, 2006
No. of equity shares held No. of Shareholders No. of Shares % to the total
Upto 5000 31823 6452066 2.151
From 5001 10000 35 244371 0.081
From 10001 50000 71 1655015 0.552
From 50001 100000 24 1721274 0.574
From 100001 500000 52 12324025 4.108
From 500001 1000000 14 11076692 3.692
From 1000001 2000000 13 18071768 6.024
From 2000001 3000000 4 10119658 3.373
From 3000001 & above 4 238335131 79.445
32040 300000000 100.00
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
7000
6500
6000
5500
5000
4500
4000
3500
3000
2500
2000
1500
1000
Apr-05 May-05 Jun-05 Jul-05 Aug-05 Sept-05 Oct-05 Nov-05 Dec-05 Jan-06 Feb-06 Mar-06
B
P
C

S
h
a
r
e

P
r
i
c
e
4773.3
66.20% Government of India
0.83% Unit Trust of India
8.73% Life Insurance Corporation of India
4.08% Other Financial Institutions / Banks / Mutual Funds
17.45% Foreign Institutional Investors
0.06% NRIs/Overseas Corporate Bodies
0.54% Private Corporate Bodies
2.11% Others including clearing members
B
S
E

1
0
0
SHAREHOLDING PATTERN OF BPC AS ON 31
ST

MARCH 2006 (Percentage)
BPC Share Price BSE 100
383
403 400
4112.89
4677.68
4976.02
5245.65
5451.4
5943.32
3566.63
3628
3829.03
373.9
393.5
421
428.85
455 447.95
441.9
Annexure II
Share Price / BSE 100 Monthly High Quotation
PERFORMANCE IN COMPARISON TO BROAD BASED INDICES i.e. BSE 100
4606.07
4248.89 469.8 468
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:00 PM 63
64 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
AUDITORS’ CERTIFICATE ON CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
To
The Members of
Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
We have examined the compliance of conditions of Corporate Governance by Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited for the
year ended 31
st
March, 2006, as stipulated in Clause 49 of the Listing Agreement of the said Company with Stock Exchanges.
The compliance of conditions of Corporate Governance is the responsibility of the management. Our examination was limited
to a review of the procedures and implementation thereof, adopted by the Company for ensuring the compliance of the
conditions of the Corporate Governance. It is neither an audit nor an expression of opinion on the financial statements of the
Company.
In our opinion and to the best of our information and according to the explanations given to us, we certify that the Company has
complied with the mandatory requirements of Corporate Governance as stipulated in Clause 49 of the abovementioned Listing
Agreement except for non-compliance of Clause 49(I)(A)(ii) relating to the number of Independent Directors on the Board of
Directors of the Company.
As required by the Guidance Note issued by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India, we have to state that as per the
records maintained by the Investor Grievance Committee, there were no investor grievances against the Company remaining
unattended / pending for more than 30 days except in two cases, wherein transfer of certain shares remains to be effected
consequent to restraint order and injunction of the Courts.
We further state that such compliance is neither an assurance as to the future viability of the Company nor the efficiency or
effectiveness with which the management has conducted the affairs of the Company.
For V. SANKAR AIYAR & CO
Chartered Accountants
Sd/-
S VENKATRAMAN
Partner
Place : Mumbai
Date : 31
st
October 2006
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:00 PM 64
65 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
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PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:00 PM 65
66 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
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PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:00 PM 66
67 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
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PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:00 PM 67
68 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
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PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:00 PM 68
69 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
COMMENTS OF THE COMPTROLLER & AUDITOR GENERAL OF INDIA
COMMENTS OF THE COMPTROLLER & AUDITOR GENERAL
OF INDIA UNDER SECTION 619 (4) OF THE COMPANIES
ACT, 1956 ON THE ACCOUNTS OF BHARAT PETROLEUM
CORPORATION LIMITED, FOR THE YEAR ENDED
31
ST
MARCH, 2006.
COMMENT
BALANCE SHEET
Application of Funds
Current Assets, Loans and Advances:
Inventories: (Schedule G)
Raw Materials : Rs. 20116.55 million
This includes Raw materials-in-transit amounting to
Rs. 2599.25 million which should have been shown
separately.
The Directors have received the comments of the
Comptroller and Auditor General of India under
Section 619 (4) of the Companies Act, 1956 on the Annual
Accounts for the year ended 31
st
March, 2006 vide their
letter no. MAB II/BPCL/ACCOUNTS/05-06/T-633/441 dated
3.11.2006.
The explanations of the Board of Directors are as under:
EXPLANATION
Noted. However, as per para 27 of AS-2 valuation of
Inventories, the common classification of inventories are
raw materials and components, work-in-progress, finished
goods, stores and spares and loose tools. Further as per
Schedule VI of the Companies Act, there is no specific
requirement for disclosure of raw materials in transit
separately.
For and on behalf of the Board of Directors
Sd/- Sd/-
REVATHY IYER ASHOK SINHA
Principal Director of Commercial Audit & Chairman & Managing Director
ex-officio Member, Audit Board II, Mumbai
Mumbai Mumbai
3
rd
November 2006 17
th
November 2006
ANNEXURE TO THE DIRECTORS’ REPORT
ANNEXURE D
ADDENDUM
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:00 PM 69
70 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
TOTAL FUNDS EMPLOYED (Rs. in Million)
Deferred Tax Liability (net)
Borrowings
Reserves
Equity
1,90,000
1,80,000
1,70,000
1,60,000
1,50,000
1,40,000
1,30,000
1,20,000
1,10,000
100,000
90,000
80,000
70,000
60,000
50,000
40,000
30,000
20,000
10,000
0
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06
3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000
60,884
38,817
6,989
7,465
8,224
9,690
85,450
93,618
87,798
1,12,391
32,859 38,487 26,897
36,974 44,474 55,497
3,615
87,779
83,736
13,559
1,88,689
Note: Previous years’ figures do not include the figures of erstwhile KRL and hence are not comparable to those of the current year.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:01 PM 70
71 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
2004-2005 2005-2006
82.36 82.54 Raw Materials, Purchase of Products for resale and packages
9.30 11.23 Duties, Taxes etc.
2.32 1.91 Transportation
1.53 1.63 Stores and other operating expenses
1.23 1.03 Employees’ remuneration and other benefits
0.22 0.29 Interest on Borrowings
0.93 0.90 Depreciation
0.61 0.13 Income Tax
0.66 0.12 Dividend (including Corporate Dividend Tax)
0.84 0.22 Retained Profits
DISTRIBUTION OF EACH RUPEE EARNED
Note: Previous years’ figures do not include the figures of erstwhile KRL and hence are not comparable to those of the current year.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:01 PM 71
72 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2002-03 2001-02 2000-01 1999-00 1998-99 1997-98
1. Crude Oil Processed (000 Tonnes)
Imported 11584 5093 4543 3230 3587 2743 2546 1731 1222
Indigenous 5653 4045 4214 5481 5183 5919 6323 7205 6720
TOTAL 17237 9138 8757 8711 8770 8662 8869 8936 7942
2. Production Quantity (000 KL) 19795 10314 10210 10291 10355 10348 10643 10861 9648
Light Distillates % 31.97 31.35 33.27 34.32 33.51 34.74 32.69 34.85 34.47
Middle Distillates % 50.43 49.89 49.13 50.73 50.45 49.43 53.45 53.90 54.29
Heavy Ends % 17.60 18.76 17.60 14.95 16.04 15.83 13.86 11.25 11.24
3. Fuel and Loss as % of Crude Processed 6.7 5.9 5.7 5.6 5.6 5.4 4.9 4.5 4.8
4. Aromatics Production (MT)
Benzene 61335 44243 43178 69798 56360 75293 76351 70496 57169
Toluene 43051 10042 12759 20013 16610 16344 19569 16990 18664
5. Market Sales (MMT) 21.63 21.03 20.37 19.86 19.15 19.35 18.68 17.50 16.37
6. Lubricants Production (MT) 100461 106287 101245 112730 99875 96624 100396 102684 86951
7. Market Participation % 23.07 21.9 22.1 22.0 21.5 21.4 20.7 20.6 20.5
8. Marketing Network
Installations 12 12 12 17 19 19 19 16 16
Depots 121 123 129 153 171 164 146 131 128
Aviation Service Stations 20 19 19 19 19 19 19 16 15
Total Tankages (Million KL) 3.01 3.05 3.08 3.13 3.23 2.94 2.88 2.72 2.3
Retail Outlets 7332 6426 5530 4854 4711 4562 4489 4423 4407
Number of LPG Bottling Plants 45 44 42 40 40 38 32 27 21
LPG Distributors 2123 2061 1922 1828 1729 1421 1345 1200 1179
LPG Customers (No. Million) 22.24 21.32 19.43 16.99 15.28 13.80 11.40 9.11 8.03
9. Manpower (Nos.) 13876 12029 12434 12494 12586 12670 12638 12264 12094
10. Sales and Earnings (Figures in Rs. Million)
i) Sales and Other Income * 829345 633430 529828 475844 425597 471532 358911 258299 209187
ii) Gross Profit before
Depreciation, Interest & Tax 14226 20922 33016 27204 21144 20332 17377 15568 12143
iii) Depreciation 7680 5960 5612 4809 4810 6645 6154 4040 3824
iv) Interest 2474 1398 1050 2459 3066 2556 1854 1745 1122
v) Profit before Tax 4072 13563 26355 19935 13268 11131 9369 9783 7197
vi) Tax 1166 4271 9284 7281 4911 2930 2330 2770 1870
vii) Excess/(Short) provision for Taxation
in earlier years written back/provided for 10 366 (125) (154) 141 126 (22) 48 (113)
viii) Profit after Tax # 2916 9658 16946 12500 8498 8327 7017 7061 5214
* Figures from 1986-87 includes Sales to Other Oil Companies.
# After adjusting prior period tax.
PERFORMANCE PROFILE
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:01 PM 72
73 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
1996-97 1995-96 1994-95 1993-94 1992-93 1991-92 1990-91 1989-90 1988-89 1987-88 1986-87 1985-86 1984-85 1980-81 1976
1486 1110 1891 2610 2685 2062 1397 1008 623 1204 105 67 175 1268 3596
6108 6240 5491 4596 4550 4900 5514 6024 5535 5352 5467 6311 5279 3603 159
7594 7350 7382 7206 7235 6962 6911 7032 6158 6556 5572 6378 5454 4871 3755
8986 8816 8788 8644 8653 8372 8329 8525 7367 7858 6667 7574 6619 5769 4312
32.54 33.27 32.29 31.20 31.49 32.29 30.87 31.09 29.29 27.83 27.78 28.08 25.75 22.22 19.97
55.23 54.74 54.62 53.59 53.88 54.95 55.70 57.07 60.12 59.38 60.39 59.35 54.36 55.66 55.93
12.23 11.99 13.09 15.21 14.63 12.76 13.43 11.84 10.59 12.79 11.83 12.57 19.89 22.12 24.10
4.8 5.6 5.4 4.7 4.2 4.2 4.5 4.5 5.6 5.6 5.8 6.2 4.5 4.9 5.7
81533 60575 57511 22037 56612 69564 68426 56499 59624 45928 18603 20112 - - -
20689 13182 13437 7047 11070 9048 10877 8843 7494 8414 4948 4455 - - -
15.76 14.78 13.23 12.10 11.41 10.71 10.38 10.18 9.31 8.56 7.93 7.57 7.05 5.29 3.63
69164 67876 66681 74154 82911 95091 87459 94672 92725 84691 74763 72414 69425 60813 40939
20.4 20.3 20.2 20.0 19.5 18.8 18.9 18.9 18.7 18.5 18.3 18.7 18.3 17.2 15.3
16 16 16 16 14 12 10 10 10 9 9 8 8 7 5
131 122 118 117 98 94 83 78 69 69 65 62 60 57 61
16 16 16 14 14 13 13 13 12 11 9 8 8 3 2
1.81 1.62 1.57 1.52 1.37 1.17 1.01 0.91 0.87 0.74 0.75 0.67 0.66 0.66 0.61
4373 4312 4214 4090 4040 4005 3965 3894 3822 3741 3663 3567 3486 3311 3183
19 18 16 16 15 15 15 15 14 8 4 2 2 - -
1146 1062 948 866 816 793 767 740 704 651 616 518 409 154 90
6.93 6.02 5.37 4.78 4.35 4.05 3.77 3.61 3.31 3.03 2.70 2.32 1.96 0.59 0.49
11704 11499 11207 11299 11167 11158 11029 10616 10578 10203 9397 8321 7894 5808 4847
181564 150234 133863 115203 102349 88828 73951 60816 54762 50797 44878 31650 26642 15124 6728
9775 9101 7618 5456 4735 4028 3488 3010 2424 1903 1843 1772 930 394 103
2258 2179 2603 1365 1431 1031 961 1030 789 635 816 776 533 125 24
821 394 437 467 383 442 372 314 334 338 342 307 189 38 19
6696 6528 4578 3624 2921 2555 2155 1666 1301 930 685 689 208 231 60
2370 2670 1690 1470 1220 1070 877 440 258 150 82 76 70 127 43
(250) - 33 21 - - - - - - - - - - -
4076 3858 2921 2175 1701 1485 1278 1226 1043 780 603 613 138 104 17
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:01 PM 73
74 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2002-03 2001-02 2000-01 1999-00 1998-99 1997-98
11. What the Company Owned (Rs. Million)
i) Gross Fixed Assets 185450 140174 125657 109351 97222 88235 76295 62228 50463
(including Capital Work-in-Progress)
ii) Net Fixed Assets 110855 83487 74535 63662 56016 51663 45916 37886 30050
(including Capital Work-in-Progress)
iii) Net Current Assets 77834 28904 19083 24136 29434 30712 14958 9004 9832
(including Investments)
Total Assets Net (ii + iii) 188689 112391 93618 87798 85450 82375 60874 46890 39882
12. What the Company Owed (Rs. Million)
i) Share Capital 3615 3000 3000 3000 3000 3000 1500 1500 1500
ii) Reserves and Surplus 87779 60884 55497 44474 36974 37794 33447 28718 23738
iii) Net Worth ( i +ii ) 91394 63884 58497 47474 39974 40794 34947 30218 25238
iv) Borrowings 83736 38817 26897 32859 38487 41581 25927 16672 14644
v) Deferred Tax Liability (net) 13559 9690 8224 7465 6989 - - - -
Total Funds Employed (iii + iv + v) 188689 112391 93618 87798 85450 82375 60874 46890 39882
13. Internal Generation (Rs. Million) 10614 12820 17399 12763 10998 12306 10894 8990 8227
14. Value Added (Rs. Million) 47808 48766 57743 52031 43716 41448 36925 30018 24447
15. Earnings in Foreign Exchange (Rs. Million) 42867 19446 13204 11913 6554 8700 5730 2993 3567
16. Ratios
i) Gross Profit before
Depreciation, Interest & Tax as
% age of Sales and Other Income 1. 7 3.3 6.1 5.6 5.3 4.4 5.2 7.1 10.1
ii) Profit after Tax as % age of
average Net Worth 3. 2 15.8 32.0 28.6 21.0 22.0 21.5 25.5 22.6
iii) Profit after Tax as % age of
Share Capital 80.7 321.9 564.9 416.7 283.3 277.5 467.8 470.7 347.6
iv) Average Net Worth as % age of
Share Capital 2527.8 2039.7 1766.2 1457.5 1346.1 1262.4 2172.2 1848.5 1536.2
v) Gross Profit before
Depreciation, Interest & Tax as
% age of Capital Employed 8. 0 21.2 41.5 34.8 26.1 26.7 31.1 38.5 34.0
vi) Profit before Tax as % age of
Capital Employed 2. 3 13.7 33.1 25.5 16.4 14.6 16.8 24.2 20.1
vii) Profit After Tax as % age of
Capital Employed (ROCE) 1. 6 9.8 21.3 16.0 10.5 10.9 12.5 17.4 14.6
viii) Debt Equity Ratio 0.92 0.61 0.46 0.69 0.96 1.02 0.7 0.6 0.6
17. Earnings per Share (Rupees)# 8.07 32.19 56.49 41.67 28.33 27.76* 46.78 47.07 34.76
18. Book Value per Share (Rupees) 252.79 212.95 194.99 158.25 133.25 135.98
@
232.98 201.45 168.25
# After adjusting prior period tax.
* Issue of Bonus Shares in the ratio 1:1
** Issue of Bonus Shares in the ratio 2:1
@ On Post-Bonus Capital.
Note: Previous years’ figures do not include the figures of erstwhile KRL and hence are not comparable to those of the current year.
PERFORMANCE PROFILE (Contd.)
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:01 PM 74
75 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
1996-97 1995-96 1994-95 1993-94 1992-93 1991-92 1990-91 1989-90 1988-89 1987-88 1986-87 1985-86 1984-85 1980-81 1976
39491 32502 27907 23685 20566 17525 15234 13246 11224 9549 7518 6005 4947 963 461
22762 17940 15455 13741 11928 10237 8940 7873 6832 5991 4276 3596 3292 471 226
11695 4622 2578 1838 839 1238 1139 802 314 142 908 1093 583 869 259
34457 22562 18033 15579 12767 11475 10079 8675 7146 6133 5184 4689 3875 1340 485
1500 1500 1500 500 500 500 500 500 279 279 279 279 166 145 145
19349 15818 12455 11021 9010 7475 6140 4962 4057 3070 2062 1496 1035 498 190
20849 17318 13955 11521 9510 7975 6640 5462 4336 3349 2341 1775 1201 643 335
13608 5244 4078 4058 3257 3500 3439 3213 2810 2784 2843 2914 2674 697 150
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
34457 22562 18033 15579 12767 11475 10079 8675 7146 6133 5184 4689 3875 1340 485
5782 5544 5032 3376 2967 2366 2139 2154 1855 1358 1425 1350 650 212 26
20769 19555 15622 9261 8886 7863 6820 4813 4994 3873 3405 2922 2235 1008 281
4172 3610 2724 2362 2042 1600 1971 1361 1199 1100 1156 1030 877 1 22
9.1 9.6 9.3 8.4 7.8 7.0 6.6 6.1 5.5 4.7 5.2 7.5 4.3 3.2 1.8
21.4 24.7 22.9 20.7 19.5 20.3 21.1 25.0 28.4 26.7 29.3 41.2 12.1 17.4 6.7
271.7 257.2 194.8 435.1 340.1 296.9 255.6 245.1 391.7 273.0 216.7 220.2 83.3 71.8 11.5
1272.2 1042.4 849.2 2103.1 1748.5 1461.5 1210.2 979.8 1379.7 1021.5 738.9 534.3 689.8 412.4 170.9
33.0 45.9 50.6 43.1 47.8 44.1 46.5 45.5 44.3 48.4 51.1 49.0 37.5 33.5 21.8
22.6 33.0 30.4 28.6 29.5 28.0 28.7 25.2 23.8 23.7 19.0 19.0 8.4 19.7 12.6
13.8 19.5 19.4 17.2 17.2 16.3 17.0 18.5 19.9 19.4 16.7 16.9 5.6 8.9 3.5
0.7 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.2 1.1 0.4
27.17 25.72 19.48** 43.51 34.02 29.69 25.56 24.51 37.45 28.01 21.71 22.01 6.07 4.68 0.72
139.00 115.45 93.04
@
230.42 190.21 159.49 132.80 109.24 155.69 120.23 84.04 63.74 52.23 27.97 14.56
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:02 PM 75
76 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2002-03 2001-02 2000-01 1999-00 1998-99 1997-98 1996-97
SOURCES OF FUNDS
OWN
Profit after Tax * 2,916 9658 16946 12500 8498 8326 7017 7061 5214 4076
Capital Grants received
(Net of amor tisation) 31 — — — — — — — — —
Depreciation 7,706 5966 5618 4785 4829 6459 6165 4011 3838 2251
Investment — 2998 1292 2332 — — 231 5139 — —
Shareholders’ Investment — — — — — — — —
Deferred Tax Provision 1,025 1466 758 477 971 — — — — —
BORROWINGS
Loans (net) 37,147 11919 — — — 15655 9254 2029 1036 8364
LPG Deposits 1,502 1702 2381 1827 1981 3847 3449 1683 2473 1205
Decrease in Working Capital — — 1379 1138 8618 — — — 7746 —
Adjustment on account of
Deletion/Re-classification etc. 73 170 34 63 59 141 28 17 25 18
50,400 33879 28409 23123 24956 34428 26144 19940 20332 15914
APPLICATION OF FUNDS
Capital Expenditure 20,091 15087 16525 12494 9241 12347 14223 11865 11151 7091
Dividend 904 3750 5250 4500 3300 2250 1875 1875 750 495
Tax on distributed profits 127 520 673 500 — 230 413 206 75 49
Repayment of Loans (net) — — 5961 5629 3094 — — — — —
Investment 27,882 — — — 9321 8638 — — 8356 790
Increase in Working Capital 1,396 14522 — — — 10963 9633 5994 — 7489
50,400 33879 28409 23123 24956 34428 26144 19940 20332 15914
* After adjusting prior period tax.
SOURCES AND APPLICATION OF FUNDS
Note: Previous years’ figures do not include the figures of erstwhile KRL and hence are not comparable to those of the current year.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:02 PM 76
77 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
1995-96 1994-95 1993-94 1992-93 1991-92 1990-91 1989-90 1988-89 1987-88 1986-87 1985-86 1984-85 1980-81 1976
(Rs. Million)
3858 2921 2175 1701 1485 1278 1226 1043 780 603 613 138 104 17
— — — — — — — — — — — — — —
2181 2605 1366 1431 1031 961 1028 868 634 861 776 535 128 24
765 — — — — — — — — — — — — —
— — — — — — — — — — — — — 171
— — — — — — — — — — — — — —
1166 20 802 — 62 226 403 25 — — 240 746 620 115
971 788 520 254 373 176 285 214 222 276 328 260 12 11
— — — 539 — — — — 546 — — — — —
51 38 8 41 12 2 26 19 5 — 27 3 1 (75)
8992 6372 4871 3966 2963 2643 2968 2169 2187 1740 1984 1682 865 263
4718 4348 3187 3162 2340 2030 2095 1728 2071 1538 1107 1544 231 26
495 495 165 165 150 100 100 56 56 39 39 23 20 15
— — — — — — — — — — — — — —
— — — 245 — — — — 60 71 — — — —
— 922 722 394 67 275 21 10 — — — 6 — 1
3779 607 797 — 406 238 752 375 — 92 838 109 614 221
8992 6372 4871 3966 2963 2643 2968 2169 2187 1740 1984 1682 865 263
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78 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2002-03 2001-02
Sales Market Sales Market Sales Market Sales Market Sales Market
Share Share Share Share Share
( %) ( %) ( %) ( %) ( %)
Light Distillates :
Naphtha 1307 25.5 1047 16.0 1373 19.4 1263 17.2 1379 17.2
LPG (Bulk & Packed) 2586 26.1 2593 26.1 2329 25.6 2030 24.9 1788 24.5
Motor Spirit 2475 29.9 2460 30.0 2453 30.9 2384 31.3 2192 31.2
Special Boiling Point Spirit/Hexane 36 25.6 24 16.9 30 19.0 34 38.2 36 37.2
Benzene 59 100.0 48 53.2 46 52.9 66 55.0 59 60.8
Toluene 44 91.4 11 20.3 8 20.7 19 30.2 17 31.5
Polypropylene Feedstock 38 49 17 5 3
Regasified - LNG 479 250 - - -
Others 122 79 51 26 11
Sub Total 7146 6561 6307 5827 5485
Middle Distillates :
Aviation Turbine Fuel 680 20.6 587 20.6 566 22.5 517 22.4 506 22.3
Superior Kerosene Oil 1626 17.0 1619 16.8 1614 16.7 1656 16.6 1653 15.9
High Speed Diesel 8551 23.5 9112 23.9 9023 24.3 8853 24.1 8743 23.9
Light Diesel Oil 156 18.7 158 14.5 146 12.3 181 12.6 132 10.9
Mineral Turpentine Oil 124 61.2 85 36.8 93 41.7 101 42.1 94 44.8
Others 7 21 17 5
Sub Total 11137 11568 11463 11325 11133
Others :
Furnace Oil 1944 23.7 1671 20.7 1366 19.1 1331 19.6 1281 18.5
Low Sulphur Heavy Stock 753 18.1 708 16.2 741 16.1 801 17.0 711 15.3
Bitumen 480 13.8 387 11.7 371 10.9 444 15.8 421 17.4
Lubricants 116 13.2 117 14.1 111 12.6 117 12.3 105 12.8
Others 54 14 10 11 14
Sub Total 3347 2897 2599 2704 2532
Grand Total 21630 23.07 21026 21.92 20369 22.07 19856 22.0 19150 21.5
Note 1 : Market Share is based on Sales Volumes of Public Sector Oil Companies.
Note 2 : Previous years’ figures do not include the figures of erstwhile KRL and hence are not comparable to those of the current year.
SALES VOLUME (’000 MT)
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79 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2002-03 2001-02
Light Distillates :
Naphtha 1957 1125 1106 1072 1085
LPG 739 359 367 377 353
Motor Spirit 1632 929 878 901 877
Special Boiling Point Spirit/Hexane 44 24 30 31 35
Benzene 61 44 43 70 56
Toluene 43 10 13 20 17
Polypropylene Feedstock 38 48 16 7 4
Others 3 0 5 7 0
Sub Total 4517 2539 2458 2485 2427
Middle Distillates :
Aviation Turbine Fuel 536 329 336 298 279
Superior Kerosene Oil 1551 772 762 807 811
High Speed Diesel 5785 2828 2746 2824 2938
Light Diesel Oil 165 164 132 199 112
Mineral Turpentine Oil 128 85 92 105 94
Sub Total 8165 4178 4068 4233 4234
Heavy Ends :
Furnace Oil 2209 1041 990 608 649
Low Sulphur Heavy Stock 706 518 455 522 601
Sulphur 48 15 10 12 14
Bitumen 439 307 278 361 354
Sub Total 3402 1881 1733 1503 1618
Grand Total 16084 8598 8259 8221 8279
Lubricants Production (MT)
2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2002-03 2001-02
100461 106287 101245 112730 99875
Quantity of LPG Filled in Cylinders (MT)
2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2002-03 2001-02
2322096 2330185 2111173 1871631 1708370
PRODUCTION (’000 MT)
Note: Previous years’ figures do not include the figures of erstwhile KRL and hence are not comparable to those of the current year.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:02 PM 79
80 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
Rs. Million
2005-06 2004-05
Value of Production (Refinery) 360813 152180
Less : Direct Materials Consumed 323189 135098
Added Value 37624 17082
Marketing Operations 33652 31684
Value added by Manufacturing &
Trading Operations 71276 48766
Add : Other Income (including P.Y.A) 4819 4486
Total Value Generated 76095 53252
HOW VALUE IS DISTRIBUTED
Rs. Million
2005-06 2004-05
1. OPERATIONS
Operating & Service Costs 29585 24401
2. EMPLOYEES’ BENEFITS
Salaries, Wages & Bonus 6529 5878
Other Benefits 2287 8816 2053 7931
3. PROVIDERS OF CAPITAL
Interest on Borrowings 2474 1398
Dividend 1031 3505 4270 5668
4. INCOME TAX 130 2439
5. RE-INVESTMENT IN BUSINESS
Depreciation 7680 5960
Deferred Tax 1025 1466
Retained Profit 25354 34059 5387 12813
Total Value Distributed 76095 53252
HOW VALUE IS GENERATED
Note: Previous years’ figures do not include the figures of erstwhile KRL and hence are not comparable to those of the current year.
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81 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
AUDITORS’ REPORT TO THE MEMBERS OF
BHARAT PETROLEUM CORPORATION LIMITED
1. We have audited the attached Balance Sheet of Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited, as at 31st March, 2006 and also
the Profit and Loss Account and Cash Flow Statement of the Company for the year ended on that date annexed thereto.
These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an
opinion on these financial statements based on our audit.
2. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in India. Those standards require that
we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of
material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures
in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates
made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit
provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
3. As required by the Companies (Auditor’s Report) Order, 2003 and read together with the Companies (Auditor’s Report)
Amendment Order, 2004, (hereinafter referred to as the Order), issued by the Central Government of India in terms of
sub-section (4A) of Section 227 of the Companies Act, 1956 and on the basis of such checks of the books and records
of the Company as we considered appropriate and according to the information and explanations given to us, we enclose
in the Annexure a statement on the matters specified in paragraphs 4 and 5 of the said Order.
4. Further to our comments in the Annexure referred to in Paragraph 3 above we report that:-
(i) We have obtained all the information and explanations, which to the best of our knowledge and belief were
necessary for the purposes of our audit;
(ii) In our opinion, proper books of accounts as required by law have been kept by the Company so far as appears from
our examination of those books;
(iii) The Branch Auditor’s report on the accounts of Kochi Refinery Unit, (the erstwhile subsidiary, Kochi Refineries Ltd.,
that has been amalgamated with the Company), has been forwarded to us and appropriately dealt with while
preparing our report.
(iv) The Balance Sheet, Profit and Loss Account and Cash Flow Statement dealt with by this report are in agreement
with the books of account;
(v) In our opinion, the Balance Sheet, Profit and Loss Account and Cash Flow Statement dealt with by this report
comply with the Accounting Standards referred to in sub-section (3C) of Section 211 of the Companies Act, 1956,
to the extent applicable;
(vi) On the basis of written representations received from the Directors, other than Government nominee Directors, as
on 31st March, 2006, and taken on record by the Board of Directors, we report that none of the Directors is
disqualified as on 31st March, 2006 from being appointed as Director in terms of Clause (g) of sub-section (1) of
Section 274 of the Companies Act, 1956. The Department of Company Affairs vide their General Circular No.8/2002
dated 22nd March, 2002 have clarified that Government nominated Directors are exempted from the provision of
Section 274(1)(g) of the Companies Act, 1956;
(vii) In our opinion and to the best of our information and according to the explanations given to us, the said accounts
read with the notes and the significant accounting policies thereon, give the information required by the Companies
Act, 1956, in the manner so required and give a true and fair view in conformity with the accounting principles
generally accepted in India;
(a) In the case of the Balance Sheet, of the state of affairs of the Company as at 31st March, 2006;
(b) In the case of the Profit and Loss Account, of the profit for the year ended on that date and
(c) In the case of the Cash Flow Statement, of the cash flows for the year ended on that date.
For V. SANKAR AIYAR & CO.
Char tered Accountants
Sd/-
S. VENKATRAMAN
Par tner
M. No. 34319
Place : Mumbai
Dated : September 26, 2006
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82 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
ANNEXURE TO AUDITORS’ REPORT
(Referred to in paragraph 3 of our report of even date)
i. (a) The Company has maintained proper records showing full particulars including quantitative details and situation
of fixed assets except for items like pipes, valves, meters, instruments and other similar items peculiar to a
continuous process industry.
In respect of Kochi Refinery unit, the Branch Auditor’s have reported that in respect of certain assets that were
acquired on turnkey basis under Refinery Construction Contract, quantitative particulars and cost of individual
assets are not available, though, the total cost of such assets is available and further they have reported that these
assets have almost been fully depreciated.
(b) We are informed that fixed assets, other than LPG cylinders with customers, are verified by the Marketing Division
over a two-year period and by the Refinery over a three-year period. In our opinion the frequency of verification is
reasonable. As per the information given to us by the management, the differences observed on physical verification
as compared to book records, which were not material, are under reconciliation.
In respect of Kochi Refinery Unit, the Branch Auditor’s have reported that there is a regular programme of
verification of fixed assets in a cycle of 5 years which, in their opinion, is reasonable having regard to the size of
the unit and the nature of assets and further they have reported that no material discrepancies were noticed on
such verification.
(c) Since there is no disposal of a substantial part of fixed assets during the year, the preparation of financial
statements on a going concern basis is not affected on this account.
ii. (a) The inventories of finished goods, stores, spare parts and raw materials, except those lying with contractors, in
transit and lying with third parties, have been physically verified during the year by the management. In respect of
inventories lying with third parties, these have substantially been confirmed by them. In our opinion, the frequency
of physical verification is reasonable.
The Branch Auditor’s have reported that the stock of stores and spare parts at Kochi Refinery Unit are physically
verified so as to complete the verification of all items over a period of 3 years, which frequency of physical
verification in their opinion is reasonable.
(b) In our opinion, the procedures of physical verification of inventories followed by the management are reasonable
and adequate in relation to the size of the Company and the nature of its business.
(c) In our opinion, the Company is maintaining proper records of inventories and no material discrepancies were
noticed on physical verification as compared to the record of inventories.
iii. Based on the audit procedures applied by us and according to the information and explanations given to us, the Company
has not granted or taken any loans, secured or unsecured, to / from companies, firms or other parties listed in the
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:02 PM 82
83 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
register maintained under Section 301 of the Companies Act, 1956. Therefore, the provisions of sub-clauses (b), (c) (d),
(e), (f) and (g) of sub-para (iii) of para 4 of the Order are not applicable to the Company.
iv. In our opinion and according to the information and explanations given to us, having regard to the explanation that some
of the items purchased are of a special nature and suitable alternative sources do not exist for obtaining comparable
quotations, there is an adequate internal control procedure commensurate with the size of the Company and the nature
of its business, for the purchase of inventories and fixed assets and for the sale of goods and services. During the course
of our audit, we have not observed any continuing failure to correct major weaknesses in the internal control system.
v. (a) Based on the audit procedures applied by us, to the best of our knowledge and belief and according to the
information and explanations given to us, there were no transactions that needed to be entered in the Register
maintained in pursuance of section 301 of the Companies Act, 1956.
(b) Sub-clause (b) of sub-para (v) of para 4 of the Order regarding reasonability of prices at which such transactions
have been entered into is not applicable, as there are no such transactions that needed to be entered in the Register
maintained pursuant to section 301 of the Companies Act, 1956.
vi. In our opinion and according to the information and explanations given to us, the Company has complied with the
provisions of sections 58A, 58AA and other relevant provisions of the Companies Act, 1956 and the rules framed
thereunder, with regard to deposits accepted from the public except for delay in filing the return of deposits as of 31st
March, 2006 with the authorities.
We are informed by the management that no order has been passed by the Company Law Board or National Company
Law Tribunal or Reserve Bank of India or any Court or any other Tribunal under Sections 58A and 58AA of the Companies
Act, 1956 on the Company.
vii. In our opinion the Company has an internal audit system commensurate with its size and nature of its business.
viii. We have broadly reviewed the books of account maintained by the Company pursuant to the rules made by the Central
Government for the maintenance of cost records in respect of petroleum industry and two products, namely Benzene
and Toluene, under Section 209(1)(d) of the Companies Act, 1956 and are of the opinion that, prima facie, the prescribed
accounts and records have been made and maintained. We have not, however, made a detailed examination of these
records with a view to determining whether they are accurate or complete.
ix. (a) According to the records of the Company, undisputed statutory dues including provident fund, investor education
and protection fund, employees’ state insurance, income tax, sales tax, wealth tax, service tax, custom duty, excise
duty, cess and other material statutory dues, that are required to be deposited regularly with authorities, have
generally been regularly deposited with the appropriate authorities.
(b) According to the information and explanations given to us, no undisputed amounts payable in respect of the
aforesaid statutory dues were in arrears, as at 31st March, 2006, for a period of more than six months from the date
they became payable.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:02 PM 83
84 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
(Amount in Million Rs.)
Name of the Statute / Period
Nature of Dues Block
Forum where Dispute is pending
Supreme High Appellate Appellate Adjudicating Joint Board of
Court Court Tribunal* Authority** Authority*** Secretary, Revenue
MOF
Customs Act, 1962 1995 to 2000 7.64 - 216.76 42.31 - - - 266.71
(Customs Duty including 2000 to 2005 - - 11.10 109.63 - - - 120.73
Penalty & Interest, 2005 to 2006 - - - 1.44 - - - 1.44
wherever applicable)
Customs Duty Total 7.64 - 227.86 153.38 - - - 388.88
Excise Act, 1944 1985 to 1990 - - 0.66 0.71 - - - 1.37
(Excise Duty Including 1990 to 1995 - - 3.38 4.20 18.59 0.47 - 26.64
Penalty & Interest, 1995 to 2000 7.38 - 429.27 4.16 - 15.78 - 456.59
wherever applicable) 2000 to 2005 - - 2,925.69 364.09 - 58.76 - 3,348.54
2005 to 2006 - - 0.21 - - - - 0.21
Excise Duty Total 7.38 - 3,359.21 373.16 18.59 75.01 - 3,833.35
Sales Tax Legislations 1980 to 1985 - 0.37 0.92 - - - - 1.29
(Sales Tax including 1985 to 1990 - 9.71 57.20 2.04 2.03 - 0.19 71.17
Penalty & Interest, 1990 to 1995 - 19.47 94.38 94.98 361.41 - - 570.24
wherever applicable) 1995 to 2000 - 3.18 2,882.85 642.09 757.64 - - 4,285.76
2000 to 2005 - 384.44 4.23 4,580.04 483.99 - - 5,452.70
2005 to 2006 - - - 5.81 - - - 5.81
Sales Tax Total - 417.17 3,039.58 5,324.96 1,605.07 - 0.19 10,386.97
Sales Tax Legislations
(Works Contract Tax
Including Penalty &
Interest, wherever
applicable) 1990 to 1995 - - - 0.74 - - - 0.74
Works Contract Tax Total - - - 0.74 - - - 0.74
Income Tax Act, 1961 2000 to 2005 - 4.47 - 12.22 - - - 16.69
(Income Tax Including 2005 to 2006 - 1.14 - - - - - 1.14
Penalty & Interest,
wherever applicable)
Income Tax Total - 5.61 - 12.22 - - - 17.83
Maharashtra Land 1975 to 1980 - 0.59 - - - - - 0.59
Revenue Code, 1966 1980 to 1985 - 0.68 - - - - - 0.68
(Land Revenue including 1985 to 1990 - 1.74 - - - - - 1.74
Penalty & Interest, 1990 to 1995 - 4.35 - - - - - 4.35
wherever Applicable) 1995 to 2000 - 5.51 - - - - - 5.51
2000 to 2005 - 10.70 - - - - - 10.70
2005 to 2006 - 2.71 - - - - - 2.71
Land Revenue Total - 26.28 - - - - - 26.28
Grand Total 15.02 449.06 6.626.65 5,864.46 1,623.66 75.01 0.19 14,654.05
* Appellate Tribunal includes Sales Tax Tribunal, CEGAT, CESTAT and ITAT
** Appellate Authority includes Commissioner Appeals, Assistant Commissioner Appeals, Deputy Commissioner Appeals, Joint Commissioner
Appeals and Deputy Commissioner Commercial Taxes Appeals
*** Adjudicating Authority includes Assistant Commissioner, Additional Commissioner, Chief Municipal Officer, Sales Tax Officer and Deputy
Commissioner Commercial Taxes.
(c) According to the information and explanations given to us and the records of the Company, the dues of sales tax /
income tax / custom duty / wealth tax / service tax / excise duty / cess, which have not been deposited on account
of any dispute are as follows:-
Grand
Total
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:02 PM 84
85 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
x. The Company does not have any accumulated losses at the end of the financial year. The Company has not incurred any
cash losses during the financial year covered by our audit and in the immediately preceding financial year.
xi. On the basis of verification of records and according to the information and explanations given to us, the Company has
not defaulted in repayment of dues to Financial Institutions / Banks or Debenture holders.
xii. The Company has not granted any loans and advances on the basis of security by way of pledge of shares, debentures
and other securities.
xiii. The Company is not a chit fund or a nidhi or a mutual benefit society. Therefore the provisions of sub para (xiii) of para
4 of the Order are not applicable to the Company.
xiv. (a) In our opinion, the Company is not dealing in or trading in shares, securities, debentures and other investments.
(b) The shares, securities, debentures and other investments are held by the Company in its own name except to the
extent of the exemption granted under section 49 of the Companies Act, 1956.
xv. According to the information and explanations given to us, the Company has not given any guarantee for loans taken by
others from Banks or financial institutions.
xvi. In our opinion, the term loans taken during the year have, prima facie, been applied for the purpose for which they were
raised.
xvii. According to the information and explanations given to us, based on an overall examination of the Balance Sheet of the
Company, related information made available to us and as represented to us by the Management, funds raised on short
term basis have, prima facie, not been used during the year for long term investment.
xviii. The Company has not made any preferential allotment of shares during the year to parties and companies covered in the
register maintained under section 301 of the Companies Act, 1956.
xix. The Company has not issued any debentures during the year and therefore the question of creating security or charge
in respect thereof does not arise.
xx. The Company has not made any public issue of any securities during the year and therefore the question of disclosing
the end-use of money raised by any public issue does not arise.
xxi. Concessional Sales Tax Forms received from a customer against products sold in the year 2002-03 on which sales tax
was not charged, were rejected by the Sales Tax authorities, since the original year reference 2001-02 had been struck
off and substituted with the year reference 2002-03 without proper endorsement. The aggregate amount of sales tax
recovered by the Sales Tax authorities from the Corporation in respect of such altered / defective forms reported during
the year is Rs.12.74 Crores. The Company has initiated appropriate legal action against the customer.
For V. SANKAR AIYAR & CO.
Char tered Accountants
Sd/-
S. VENKATRAMAN
Par tner
M. No. 34319
Place : Mumbai
Dated : September 26, 2006
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:03 PM 85
86 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
31/03/2005
SCHEDULE Rs. Million Rs. Million
I. SOURCES OF FUNDS
1. Shareholders’ funds :
Share Capital A 3,000.00 3,000.00
Share Capital Suspense Account AA 615.42 —
Share Application Money Suspense Account 0.02 —
3,615.44 3,000.00
Reserves and Surplus B 87,778.83 60,884.26
91,394.27 63,884.26
2. Loan funds : C
Secured Loans 30,713.17 11,734.17
Unsecured Loans 53,022.79 27,081.95
83,735.96 38,816.12
3. Deferred tax liability (net) 13,558.41 9,690.29
TOTAL 188,688.64 112,390.67
II. APPLICATION OF FUNDS
1. Fixed Assets : D
Gross block 173,768.44 126,688.37
Less : Depreciation and amortisation 74,594.79 56,687.16
Net block 99,173.65 70,001.21
Capital work-in-progress E 11,681.08 13,485.53
110,854.73 83,486.74
2. Investments F 38,774.20 16,771.38
3. Current assets, loans and advances :
Inventories G 90,447.73 62,585.56
Sundry debtors H 13,158.88 8,545.84
Cash and bank balances I 4,920.96 3,523.89
Other current assets J 7,735.90 96.78
Loans and advances K 16,865.91 29,060.46
133,129.38 103,812.53
Less : Current liabilities and provisions :
Liabilities L 88,944.81 88,209.93
Provisions M 5,124.86 3,470.05
94,069.67 91,679.98
Net current assets 39,059.71 12,132.55
TOTAL 188,688.64 112,390.67
Statement of Significant Accounting
Policies and Notes forming par t of
Accounts. X
BALANCE SHEET AS AT 31ST MARCH, 2006
For and on behalf of the Board of Directors As per our attached repor t of even date
Sd/- For and on behalf of
ASHOK SINHA V. SANKAR AIYAR & CO.
Chairman and Managing Director Char tered Accountants
Sd/- Sd/- Sd/-
S. K. JOSHI D. M. NAIK BENGRE S. VENKATRAMAN
Director (Finance) Company Secretary Par tner
Place : Mumbai
Membership No. 34319
Dated : 26th September, 2006
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:03 PM 86
87 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
2004-05
SCHEDULE Rs. Million Rs. Million
INCOME
Sale of products & related income N 851,496.22 638,570.03
Less : Excise Duty paid (81,136.98) (48,870.10)
770,359.24 589,699.93
Miscellaneous income O 4,653.19 4,513.65
Increase/(Decrease) in Inventory P 7,543.98 15,862.49
TOTAL 782,556.41 610,076.07
EXPENDITURE
Purchase of products for resale 389,844.37 407,426.24
Raw materials consumed Q 323,659.84 137,529.47
Packages consumed 669.87 553.08
Excise Duty on Inventory differential 2,207.07 (3,008.00)
Other Duties, taxes etc. and other charges applicable to products 12,819.18 13,933.94
Transpor tation 16,355.48 14,919.34
Consumption of stores, spares and materials R 439.82 207.80
Power and Fuel S 477.15 196.88
Employees’ remuneration and other benefits T 8,816.09 7,930.87
Interest U 2,474.14 1,398.03
Other operating and administration expenses V 13,207.33 9,367.20
Depreciation and amor tisation 7,680.06 5,960.39
TOTAL 778,650.40 596,415.24
Profit 3,906.01 13,660.83
Prior period income/(expenses) net W 165.94 (97.35)
Profit before tax 4,071.95 13,563.48
Provision for Taxation
- Current Tax 246.40 2,805.10
- Less: MAT Credit (refer note 3 of Schedule ‘X’ B) (240.00) —
- Fringe Benefit Tax 133.82 —
- Deferred Tax (Net) 1,025.34 1,466.34
Excess/(Short) provision for Taxation
in earlier years written back/provided for 10.07 365.92
Profit after tax 2,916.46 9,657.96
Transfer from / (to) Debenture Redemption Reserve (1,890.00) 1,860.00
Balance brought forward 6,281.74 0.01
Amount Transferred on Amalgamation:
(a) Balance of Profit & Loss Account as on 1st April 2004 14,145.27 —
(b) Profit After Tax for Financial Year 2004-05 8,421.17 —
(c) Interim Dividend (775.43) —
(d) Corporate Dividend Tax (105.71) —
(e) Transfer to General Reserve (842.12) —
20,843.18 —
Disposable Profit 28,151.38 11,517.97
Appropriations:
Interim dividend paid — 1,500.00
Second interim dividend — 2,250.00
Proposed dividend 903.86 —
Corporate Dividend Tax on interim and proposed dividend 126.77 520.43
1,030.63 4,270.43
Transfer to General Reserve 291.65 965.80
Balance Carried to Balance Sheet 26,829.10 6,281.74
Earnings per Share
- Basic 8.07 32.19
- Diluted 8.07 32.19
Statement of Significant Accounting Policies
and Notes forming part of Accounts X
PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST MARCH, 2006
For and on behalf of the Board of Directors As per our attached repor t of even date
Sd/- For and on behalf of
ASHOK SINHA V. SANKAR AIYAR & CO.
Chairman and Managing Director Char tered Accountants
Sd/- Sd/- Sd/-
S. K. JOSHI D. M. NAIK BENGRE S. VENKATRAMAN
Director (Finance) Company Secretary Par tner
Place : Mumbai
Membership No. 34319
Dated : 26th September, 2006
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:03 PM 87
88 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
SCHEDULE ‘A’ — SHARE CAPITAL
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Authorised
450 million equity shares of Rs.10 each 4,500.00 3,000.00
[refer note 1 (e) of Schedule ‘X’-B]
4,500.00 3,000.00
Issued, subscribed and paid-up
300 million equity shares of Rs.10 each fully paid-up * 3,000.00 3,000.00
Total 3,000.00 3,000.00
* Includes :
i) 22.95 million shares of Rs. 10 each on which Rs. 7.20 per share was paid in cash and were conver ted into fully
paid by capitalisation of Capital Reserve.
ii) 277 million shares of Rs. 10 each allotted as fully paid bonus shares by capitalisation of Capital Reserve and
General Reserve.
SCHEDULE ‘AA’ - SHARE CAPITAL SUSPENSE ACCOUNT
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
61,542,124 equity shares of Rs. 10 each to be issued as fully
paid-up to the Shareholders of erstwhile Kochi Refineries Limited
as per the Scheme of Amalgamation 615.42 —
[refer note 1 (d) of Schedule ‘X’-B]
Total 615.42 —
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:03 PM 88
89 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
SCHEDULE ‘B’ — RESERVES AND SURPLUS
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Capital Reserve
As per last Balance Sheet 7.72 8.22
Add : Grant received during the year 31.18 —
Less: Amor tisation of Capital Grant (0.42) (0.50)
Add : Transferred on Amalgamation 123.32 —
[refer note 1 (d) of Schedule ‘X’-B]
161.80 7.72
Debenture Redemption Reserve
As per last Balance Sheet 2,560.00 4,420.00
Less: Transfer to Profit & Loss Account — (2,500.00)
Add : Transfer from Profit & Loss Account 1,890.00 640.00
4,450.00 2,560.00
General Reserve
As per last Balance Sheet 52,034.80 51,069.00
Add : Transferred on Amalgamation:
(i) Balance as at 1st April 2004 2,400.08 —
(ii) Surplus on Amalgamation 769.28 —
[refer note 1 (d) of Schedule ‘X’-B] 3,169.36 —
(iii) Transfer from Profit & Loss Account in 2004-05 842.12 —
4,011.48 —
Add : Transfer from Profit & Loss Account 291.65 965.80
56,337.93 52,034.80
Surplus as per Profit & Loss Account 26,829.10 6,281.74
Total 87,778.83 60,884.26
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:03 PM 89
90 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Secured Loans
Bonds
BPCL Debentures 2008 - Redeemable at par on 1st June 2008 with put and
call option on 1st June 2006 * 4,450.00 4,450.00
(Secured by mor tgage created on cer tain immovable proper ties of the
Corporation) **
Banks
Working Capital Loans/Cash Credit 17,573.53 7,258.13
(Secured in favour of the par ticipating banks ranking pari passu inter-alia
by hypothecation of raw materials, finished goods, stock-in-process, book
debts, stores, components and spares and all movables both present and
future)
Collateralised Borrowing and Lending Obligation (CBLO) through Clearing
Corporation of India Ltd. 8,650.00 —
(Secured by Oi l Market i ng Compani es GOI Speci al Bonds of
Rs. 14,440.60 million)
Interest accrued and due 39.64 26.04
30,713.17 11,734.17
Unsecured Loans
Syndicated Loans from various banks (repayable in foreign currency) 4,539.44 4,703.13
[Due for repayment within one year Rs. Nil (previous year Rs. Nil)]
Public deposits 970.34 2,231.35
[Due for repayment within one year Rs. 351.63 million (previous year
Rs. 1,553.20 million)]
Short Term (From Banks)
Rupee Loans 22,740.00 11,500.00
Foreign Currency Loans 18,242.61 7,342.87
OIDB 6,530.40 1,304.60
[Due for repayment within one year Rs. 1,149.00 million (previous year
Rs. 326.15 million)]
53,022.79 27,081.95
Total 83,735.96 38,816.12
* Call option exercised.
** Interest payable at the rate of 9.95% per annum on Rs. 3,450 million and at 9.90% per annum on Rs. 1,000 million.
SCHEDULE ‘C’ — LOAN FUNDS
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:03 PM 90
91 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
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PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:03 PM 91
92 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Capital work-in-progress (at Cost)
Work-in-progress 7,837.80 10,840.66
Capital Advances (Unsecured, Considered good) 290.96 492.54
Capital stores including lying with contractors 2,295.61 1,208.78
Capital goods in transit 864.49 95.93
Intangible assets pending amor tisation (refer note 18 of Schedule ‘X’-B) 43.23 69.63
Construction period expenses 31/03/2005
Opening balance 777.99 738.27
Add : Transferred on Amalgamation 118.06 —
896.05 738.27
Add : Expenditure during the year
Establishment charges 137.96 139.38
Interest 142.85 321.38
Depreciation 3.35 —
Others 102.04 95.49
1,282.25 1,294.52
Less : Allocated to assets during
the year (933.26) (516.53)
Balance pending allocation at the
end of the year 348.99 777.99
Total 11,681.08 13,485.53
SCHEDULE ‘E’ — CAPITAL WORK-IN-PROGRESS
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:04 PM 92
93 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
SCHEDULE ‘F’ — INVESTMENTS
Face Book Value
No. Value 31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million Rs. Million
CURRENT
IN GOVERNMENT SECURITIES
NON TRADE - QUOTED
1. 6.96% Oil Marketing Companies GOI
Special Bonds 2009 370.00 370.00 2,580.00
(Transferred on Amalgamation - Rs. 370 million)
2. 7.00% Oil Marketing Companies GOI
Special Bonds 2012 13,083.90 13,083.90 —
3. 7.47% Oil Marketing Companies GOI
Special Bonds 2012 4,000.00 4,000.00 —
4. 7.61% Oil Marketing Companies GOI
Special Bonds 2015 3,008.10 3,008.10 —
5. 7.07% Oil Marketing Companies GOI
Special Bonds 2009 4,000.00 4,000.00 —
6. 7.44% Oil Marketing Companies GOI
Special Bonds 2012 4,000.00 4,000.00 —
7. 7.59% Oil Markeitng Companies GOI
Special Bonds 2015 2,623.10 2,623.10 —
31,085.10 2,580.00
Less : Provision for diminution in
value of investment
in 6.96% Oil Marketing Companies GOI
Special Bonds 2009 2.37 —
in 7.00% Oil Marketing Companies GOI
Special Bonds 2012 257.75 —
30,824.98 2,580.00
LONG TERM
IN GOVERNMENT SECURITIES
NON TRADE - QUOTED
1. Deposited with Local Authorities
7% Loan 2009 0.21 0.17 0.17
7 1/2% Loan 2010 0.19 0.19 0.19
8% Loan 2011 0.03 0.02 0.02
0.38 0.38
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:04 PM 93
94 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
SCHEDULE ‘F’ — INVESTMENTS (Contd.)
Face Book Value
No. Value 31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million Rs. Million
IN SHARES, DEBENTURES AND BONDS
TRADE - QUOTED
1. Equity Shares of Rs.10 each (fully paid up) 93,750,000 937.50 987.50 987.50
of Petronet LNG Limited @ (93,750,000)
2. Equity Shares of Rs.10 each (fully paid up) 31,500,080 315.00 315.00 315.00
of Indraprastha Gas Limited # (31,500,080)
TRADE - UNQUOTED
1. Equity Shares of Rs. 2.50 each (fully paid up) 98,000,000 245.00 245.00 245.00
of Bharat Shell Limited (98,000,000)
2. Equity Shares of Rs.10 each (fully paid up) 75,500,000 755.00 755.00 755.00
of Bharat Oman Refineries Limited (75,500,000)
3. Equity Shares of Rs.10 each (fully paid up) 16,000,000 160.00 160.00 160.00
of Petronet India Limited (16,000,000)
4. Equity Shares of Rs.10 each (fully paid up) 5,250,000 52.50 52.50 52.50
of Cochin International Airport Limited (5,250,000)
5. Equity Shares of Rs.10 each (fully paid up) 49,000,000 490.00 490.00 260.00
of Petronet CCK Limited (26,000,000)
(Transferred on Amalgamation -
Rs. 230.00 million)
6. Equity Shares of Rs.10 each (fully paid up) 451,000 4.51 4.51 4.51
of Petronet CI Limited (451,000)
7. Equity Shares of Rs.10 each (fully paid up) 100,000 1.00 1.00 1.00
of VI e Trans Private Limited (100,000)
8. Equity Shares of Rs.10 each (fully paid up) 7,500,000 75.00 75.00 75.00
of Petroleum Infrastructure Limited (7,500,000)
3,085.51 2,855.51
Less : Provision for diminution in value of investment
in Petroleum Infrastructure Limited 75.00 75.00
in Petronet CI Limited 4.51 4.51
3,006.00 2,776.00
@ 37,500,000 no. of shares has lock in period till 30.04.2007.
# 15,484,431 no. of shares has lock in period till 18.12.2006.
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:04 PM 94
95 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
SCHEDULE ‘F’ — INVESTMENTS (Contd.)
Face Book Value
No. Value 31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million Rs. Million
NON TRADE - QUOTED
1. 6.75% Tax Free US64 Bonds 8,874,580 88.75 88.75 88.75
of Rs.10 each (8,874,580)
88.75 88.75
NON TRADE - UNQUOTED
1. Debentures (Irredeemable - Fully Paid up)
- 5% debentures of East India Clinic
Limited 1 0.06 0.06 0.06
(1)
2. Ordinary Shares (Fully paid up) of Sindhu 6 0.01 0.02 0.02
Resettlement Corporation Ltd. (6)
3 Shares of Kochi Refineries Employees
Consumer Co-operative 500 * —
Society Limited (Fully paid up)
(500 units Transferred on Amalgamation)
0.08 0.08
IN SUBSIDIARY COMPANIES
QUOTED
1. Equity Shares of Rs. 10 each
(fully paid up) — — — 6,591.02
of erstwhile Kochi Refineries Limited (75,889,660)
UNQUOTED
2. Equity Shares of Rs.10 each
(fully paid up) 463,188,856 4,631.89 4,631.89 4,631.89
of Numaligarh Refinery Limited (463,188,856)
4,631.89 11,222.91
IN ASSOCIATION OF PERSONS
NON TRADE - UNQUOTED
Capital Contribution in Petroleum India
International 1.00 0.50
(Transferred on Amalgamation
Rs. 0.50 million)
Share in accumulated surplus of
Petroleum India 221.12 102.76
International as at 31st March 2005
(31st March 2004)
(Transferred on Amalgamation
Rs. 108.06 million) 222.12 103.26
Member Companies ##
Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
Bongaigaon Refinery & Petrochemicals Limited
Engineers India Limited
Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited
IBP Company Limited
Indian Petrochemicals Corporation Limited
Chennai Petroleum Corporation Limited
Total 38,774.20 16,771.38
* Value Rs. 5000
## The total capital of AOP is Rs. 5.00 million of which share of the corporation consequent to the merger of erstwhile
Kochi Refineries Limited with the corporation is Rs. 1.00 million and other members have equal share.
Aggregate value of Unquoted Securities Rs. 6,557.59 million (Rs. 6,208.73 million).
Aggregate value of Quoted Securities Rs. 32,216.61 million (Rs. 10,562.65 million).
Market value of Quoted Securities Rs. 40,735.04 million (Rs. 21,542.51 million).
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:04 PM 95
96 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
(As taken, valued and cer tified by the Management) @
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Stores and spares 1,385.74 520.07
Stores and spares in Transit 89.62 6.25
Raw materials 20,116.55 8,287.67
Stock-in-process 4,634.23 1,324.53
Finished products 64,163.25 52,393.26
Packages 58.34 53.78
Total 90,447.73 62,585.56
@ Inventory valuation is as per Significant Accounting Policy no. 8.
SCHEDULE ‘H’ — SUNDRY DEBTORS
(Unsecured, Considered good unless otherwise stated)
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Debts outstanding for over six months :
Considered good * 1,017.72 930.37
Considered doubtful 1,688.32 1,293.49
2,706.04 2,223.86
Other debts 12,141.16 7,615.47
14,847.20 9,839.33
Less : Provision for doubtful debts (1,688.32) (1,293.49)
Total 13,158.88 8,545.84
* Includes Rs. 68.29 million (previous year Rs. 9.06 million) which are secured.
SCHEDULE ‘G’ — INVENTORIES
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:04 PM 96
97 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Cash on Hand 2,309.54 1,550.89
[Includes drafts and cheques of Rs. 2,158.67 million
(previous year Rs. 1,451.75 million) on hand]
With Scheduled banks :
In current accounts 2,456.28 1,903.94
In deposit accounts* 9.09 8.90
Remittances in transit 146.05 60.16
Total 4,920.96 3,523.89
* Includes deposit of
(a) Rs. 0.04 million in the joint names with contractors towards Sales tax on works contract.
(b) Rs. 8.01 million (previous year Rs. 8.01 million) that have been pledged / deposited with local authorities.
SCHEDULE ‘I’ — CASH AND BANK BALANCES
SCHEDULE ‘J’ — OTHER CURRENT ASSETS
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Interest accrued on investments 110.48 2.41
Interest accrued on bank deposits 0.53 0.25
Deferred premium (foreign exchange forward contract) 1,033.87 94.12
Others [refer note 1(h) of Schedule ‘X’-B] 6,591.02 —
Total 7,735.90 96.78
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:04 PM 97
98 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
(Unsecured, Considered good unless otherwise stated)
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Loans (Secured) :
To companies
Considered doubtful 1.05 1.05
Less : Provision for doubtful loans (1.05) (1.05)
To staff * 6,215.49 5,215.34
Loans:
To companies
Considered doubtful 28.08 28.08
Less : Provision for doubtful loans (28.08) (28.08)
To others 249.44 139.73
Advances:
Share Application money pending allotment/Advance towards equity shares
Considered good 119.48 0.25
Considered Doubtful 11.33 11.33
Less : Provision towards share application money pending allotment (11.33) (11.33)
Advances recoverable in cash, or in kind or for value to be received 2,655.92 1,341.48
Advances considered doubtful 15.85 14.57
Less : Provision for doubtful advances (15.85) (14.57)
9,240.33 6,696.80
Material given on Loan (Secured) 4.64 5.83
Less : Deposits Received (4.64) (5.83)
Dues from Petroleum Planning & Analysis Cell - Government of India 321.88 11,075.55
Due from Subsidiaries — 5,841.78
Claims :
Considered good 2,953.31 1,238.40
Considered doubtful 211.99 251.32
Less : Provision for doubtful claims (211.99) (251.32)
2,953.31 1,238.40
Advance Income Tax ( Net of provision for taxation) 3,303.23 2,018.57
MAT Credit Entitlement (refer note 3 of Schedule ‘X’ B) 240.00 —
Deposits :
With Customs/Excise/Por t Trust etc. 401.70 1,843.56
Others** 405.46 345.80
807.16 2,189.36
Considered doubtful 0.19 0.19
Less: Provision for doubtful deposits (0.19) (0.19)
807.16 2,189.36
Total 16,865.91 29,060.46
* Includes :
Dues from Officers : Rs. 34.62 million (previous year Rs. 30.63 million)
Maximum balances : Rs. 40.69 million (previous year Rs. 33.66 million)
Dues from Directors : Rs. 0.41 million (previous year Rs. 1.16 million)
Maximum balances : Rs. 1.25 million (previous year Rs. 1.22 million)
** Includes Rs. 78.98 million (previous year Rs. 77.40 million) alongwith interest of Rs. 81.98 million (previous
year Rs. 80.85 million) deposited as per cour t order in Land Compensation cases for which appeals are pending.
SCHEDULE ‘K’ — LOANS AND ADVANCES
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:04 PM 98
99 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Current Liabilities :
Sundry creditors 31/03/2005
Total outstanding dues to Small Scale
Industries (SSI’s) 159.43 150.84
Total outstanding dues to creditors other
than SSI’s 40,443.15 40,478.44 40,602.58 40,629.28
Due to Subsidiaries 2,146.78 7,186.15
Materials taken on loan 0.05 0.05
Less : Deposits given (0.05) (0.05) — —
Deposits from Customers 68.29 12.88
Deposits for Containers 27,199.98 25,697.93
Investors Education & Protection Fund shall be
credited by the following amount*
Unclaimed Dividend 31.60 9.19
Unclaimed Deposits 13.00 22.54
Unclaimed Interest on Deposits 1.82 2.11
Second interim dividend — 2,250.00
Corporate dividend tax on interim dividend — 315.56
Other liabilities 18,438.24 11,598.69
Interest on loans (accrued but not due) 442.52 485.60
Total 88,944.81 88,209.93
* No amount is due at the end of the year for credit to Investors Education and Protection Fund.
SCHEDULE ‘L’ — LIABILITIES
SCHEDULE ‘N’ — SALE OF PRODUCTS
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Sales 824,691.91 628,916.46
Subsidy on LPG (Domestic) & SKO (PDS) 5,151.67 5,248.40
Receipt of Oil Marketing Companies GOI Special Bonds 21,631.20 —
(refer note 5 of Schedule ‘X’-B)
Net Recovery from/(payment to) Pool Account
(Petroleum Planning & Analysis Cell - Government of India) 21.44 4,405.17
Total 851,496.22 638,570.03
SCHEDULE ‘M’ — PROVISIONS
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Provision for Taxation (Net of Tax paid) 967.48 951.06
Proposed dividend 903.86 —
Corporate Dividend Tax on proposed dividend 126.77 —
Provision for retirement benefits 3,126.75 2,518.99
Total 5,124.86 3,470.05
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:05 PM 99
100 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Interest on bank deposits and others * 333.16 508.55
Tax deducted at source - Rs. 13.48 million (previous year Rs. 3.38 million)
Income from Investments
Current
Interest on Oil Marketing Companies GOI Special Bonds 645.12 333.46
Long Term
Interest 0.55 6.42
Dividend
Tax deducted at source - Rs. Nil (previous year Rs. Nil)
from subsidiaries 1,037.86 1,492.83
from others 80.61 54.85
From AOP (Petroleum India International) 20.58 6.69
Profit on sales/maturity of Investments (net) — 45.93
Write back (net) 2.05 46.69
Profit on sale / write off of fixed assets (net) 35.07 38.36
Other income # 2,498.19 1,979.87
Tax deducted at source - Rs. 31.03 million (previous year Rs. 25.66 million)
Total 4,653.19 4,513.65
* Includes interest received from Income tax authorities Rs. 18.82 million (previous year Rs. 271.79 million).
# Includes amor tisation of capital grants Rs 0.42 million (previous year Rs 0.04 million).
SCHEDULE ‘O’ — MISCELLANEOUS INCOME
SCHEDULE ‘Q’ — RAW MATERIALS CONSUMED
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Opening Stock 8,287.67 4,448.04
Add: Transferred on Amalgamation 5,682.22 —
Add : Purchases 329,806.50 141,369.10
Less: Closing Stock (20,116.55) (8,287.67)
Total 323,659.84 137,529.47
SCHEDULE ‘P’ — INCREASE/(DECREASE) IN INVENTORY
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
31/03/2005
Value of closing stock of
Finished goods 64,163.25 52,393.26
Stock in process 4,634.23 1,324.53 68,797.48 53,717.79
68,797.48 53,717.79
Less :
Value of opening stock of
Finished goods 52,393.26 37,037.83
Add: Transferred on Amalgamation 5,014.97 —
57,408.23 37,037.83
Stock in process 1,324.53 817.47
Add: Transferred on Amalgamation 2,520.74 —
3,845.27 817.47 61,253.50 37,855.30
Total 7,543.98 15,862.49
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:05 PM 100
101 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Stores, spares and materials 1,286.19 808.20
Less : Charged to other revenue accounts (846.37) (600.40)
Total 439.82 207.80
SCHEDULE ‘S’ — POWER AND FUEL
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Power and Fuel 16,722.85 5,300.36
Less : Consumption of fuel out of own production (16,245.70) (5,103.48)
Total 477.15 196.88
SCHEDULE ‘T’ — EMPLOYEES’ REMUNERATION AND OTHER BENEFITS
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Salaries and wages* 6,529.27 5,878.41
Contribution to provident fund and other funds 562.63 530.12
Contribution to gratuity fund 161.45 117.52
Welfare expenses 1,562.74 1,404.82
Total 8,816.09 7,930.87
* includes payment towards VRS compensation Rs. 2.64 million (previous year Rs. 407.97)
SCHEDULE ‘U’ — INTEREST
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
On Bonds 442.28 377.91
On Fixed Loans 633.70 159.01
Others 1,398.16 861.11
Total 2,474.14 1,398.03
SCHEDULE ‘R’ — CONSUMPTION OF STORES, SPARES AND MATERIALS
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:05 PM 101
102 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Repairs and maintenance :
Machinery 2,052.68 1,415.42
Building 166.32 139.14
Others 847.42 749.37
3,066.42 2,303.93
Insurance 345.32 199.72
Rent 1,123.71 974.03
Rates and taxes 377.36 161.77
Charities and donations 5.66 77.10
Remuneration to auditors 2.76 1.93
Utilities 755.09 673.50
Write off :
Bad debts and Claims 19.48 647.16
Less : Provision made earlier (2.65) (542.03)
Others 6.59 30.77
Provision for :
Doubtful debts and advances 353.35 (564.26)
Diminution in value of investments 260.12 —
Charges paid to other oil companies 778.19 621.45
Travelling and conveyance 868.52 703.76
Telephone, Telex, Cables, Postage etc. 237.61 293.04
Loss on sale/maturity of Investments (net) 4.70 —
Brokerage on Public Deposit 2.09 3.09
Other expenses 5,003.01 3,782.24
Total 13,207.33 9,367.20
SCHEDULE ‘V’ — OTHER OPERATING AND ADMINISTRATION EXPENSES
SCHEDULE ‘W’ — PRIOR PERIOD INCOME/(EXPENSES) (NET)
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Sale of products (65.46) (11.82)
Miscellaneous Income 65.39 7.50
Purchase of product for resale 106.69 24.10
Raw Materials Consumed 5.67 (2.64)
Duties taxes etc. and other product charges 74.09 (112.32)
Transpor tation (2.30) 1.19
Consumption of stores spares and materials 2.85 —
Rent, Rates & Taxes 0.31 6.48
Employees’ remuneration and other benefits (3.70) —
Other operating and administration expenses 23.26 (4.55)
Interest (18.38) —
Depreciation (22.48) (5.29)
165.94 (97.35)
PG-38-102-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 8:05 PM 102
103 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND
NOTES FORMING PART OF ACCOUNTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST MARCH, 2006
A. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
1. ACCOUNTING CONVENTION
The financial statements are prepared under historical cost convention in accordance with the mandatory Accounting
Standards issued by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India and the provisions of the Companies Act, 1956,
adopting accrual system of accounting except where otherwise stated.
2. USE OF ESTIMATES
The preparation of financial statements requires management to make certain estimates and assumptions that affect
the amounts reported in the financial statements and notes thereto. Differences between actual results and estimates
are recognised in the period in which they materialise.
3. FIXED ASSETS
3.1 LAND
Land acquired on lease where period of lease exceeds 99 years is treated as freehold.
3.2 FIXED ASSETS OTHER THAN LAND
Expenditure on assets, other than plant and machinery, LPG cylinders and pressure regulators, not exceeding
Rs.1,000 per item is charged to revenue.
3.3 Machinery spares that can be used only in connection with an item of fixed asset and their use is expected to
be irregular are capitalised. Replacement of such spares is charged to revenue.
3.4 EXPENDITURE DURING CONSTRUCTION PERIOD
Direct expenses including borrowing cost and crop compensation for laying pipelines incurred during construction
period on capital projects are capitalised. Indirect expenses of the project group are allocated only to the
projects costing Rs. 50 million and above.
3.5 INTANGIBLE ASSETS
3.5.1 Cost of right of way that are perennial in nature are not amortised.
3.5.2 Expenditure incurred for creating/acquiring other intangible assets of Rs. 5 million and above, from
which future economic benefits will flow over a period of time, is amortised over the estimated useful
life of the asset or five years, whichever is lower, from the time the intangible asset starts providing the
economic benefit.
3.5.3 In other cases, the expenditure is charged to revenue in the year the expenditure is incurred.
4. IMPAIRMENT OF ASSETS
The carrying values of fixed assets of the identified cash generating units (CGU) are reviewed for impairment at each
Balance Sheet date when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying values may not be recoverable.
If the carrying values exceed the estimated recoverable amount, the assets of the CGU are written down to the
recoverable amount and the impairment losses are recognized in the profit and loss account. The recoverable amount
is the greater of net selling price and value in use. In assessing value in use, the estimated future cash flows are
discounted to their present value based on an appropriate discount factor.
5. BORROWING COSTS
Borrowing costs attributable to acquisition, construction or production of qualifying asset are capitalised as part of the
cost of that asset, till the month in which the asset is ready for use. Other borrowing costs are recognised as an expense
in the period in which these are incurred.
6. DEPRECIATION
6.1 Premium paid for acquiring leasehold land for lease period not exceeding 99 years, is amortised over the
period of lease.
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:25 AM 103
104 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
6.2 LPG cylinders and pressure regulators and other fixed assets costing not more than Rs 5,000 each, are
depreciated @100 percent in the year of capitalisation.
6.3 Depreciation on assets not owned by the Corporation is amortised over a period of five years from the year of
capitalisation.
6.4 Computer equipments and peripherals, and mobile phones are depreciated over a period of 4 years. Furniture
provided at the residence of management staff is depreciated over a period of seven years.
6.5 Depreciation on other fixed assets is provided under the straight line method, at rates prescribed under
Schedule XIV to the Companies Act, 1956. Additions to fixed assets during the year are being depreciated on pro
rata basis from the beginning of the month in which such assets are capitalised.
7. INVESTMENTS
7.1 Current investments are valued at lower of cost or fair market value.
7.2 Long-term investments, other than investments in Government Securities and Public Sector Bonds, are valued
at cost. Provision for diminution is made to recognise a decline, other than of temporary nature, in the value of
such investments.
7.3 Government Securities and Public Sector Bonds are valued at lower of cost or redemption price.
8. INVENTORY
8.1 RAW MATERIAL AND INTERMEDIATE
Raw material and Intermediate are valued at cost. Cost is determined as follows:
8.1.1 Crude oil on first in first out basis.
8.1.2 Base oil and additives on weighted average cost.
8.1.3 Intermediate Stocks at raw material cost plus cost of conversion.
In case there has been a decline in the price of raw material and the realisable value of the finished products is
expected to be lower than the cost of the finished products, raw material and intermediate are valued at net
realisable value.
8.2 FINISHED PRODUCTS
8.2.1 Finished products other than Lubricants are valued at cost on first in first out basis or at net realisable
value, whichever is lower.
8.2.2 Lubricants are valued at weighted average cost or at net realisable value, whichever is lower.
8.3 Stores are valued at weighted average cost. Slow moving / obsolete items identified as surplus are valued at
Re. Nil.
8.4 Packages are valued at weighted average cost or at net realisable value, whichever is lower.
9. CENVAT
Cenvat credit on eligible Revenue/Capital purchase is recognised on receipt of such materials.
10. CLAIMS AND PROVISIONS
Claims/Surrenders on/to Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell, Government of India are booked on `in principle
acceptance' thereof on the basis of available instructions/clarifications subject to final adjustments after Pool audit, as
stipulated. Other claims are booked when there is a reasonable certainty of recovery. Provisions, as appropriate, are
made based on the merits.
11. SALES
Sales are net of trade discounts and include, inter alia, excise/customs duties/claim from Petroleum Planning and
Analysis Cell, Government of India and other elements allowed by the Government from time to time.
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105 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
12. RAW MATERIALS CONSUMED
Raw materials consumed is net of claims from Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell, Government of India.
13. CLASSIFICATION OF INCOME/EXPENSES
13.1 Expenditure on Research, other than capital expenditure, is charged to revenue in the year the expenditure is
incurred.
13.2 Being not material :
13.2.1 Income/expenditure upto Rs. 0.50 million in each case pertaining to prior years is charged to the
current year.
13.2.2 Prepaid expenses upto Rs. 0.01 million in each case, are charged to revenue as and when incurred.
13.2.3 Liabilities for expenses, other than for transportation, rent and property taxes are provided for only if the
amount exceeds Rs. 0.01 million in each case.
13.2.4 Deposits placed with Government agencies/ local authorities which are perennial in nature are charged
to revenue in the year of payment.
13.3 Income from sale of scrap is accounted for on realisation.
14. RETIREMENT BENEFITS
14.1. Contribution to Provident Fund is charged to revenue.
14.2. Gratuity, leave encashment and other retirement benefits are actuarially valued at the year end and provided for
in the accounts.
15. DUTIES ON BONDED STOCKS
15.1 Customs duty on Raw materials/Finished goods lying in bond are provided for at the applicable rates except
where liability to pay duty is transferred to consignee.
15.2 Excise duty on Finished stocks lying in bond is provided for, at the assessable value applicable at each of the
locations at maximum rates based on end use.
16. FOREIGN CURRENCY & DERIVATIVE TRANSACTIONS
16.1 Transactions in foreign currency are accounted at the exchange rate prevailing on the date of transaction.
16.2 Monetary items denominated in foreign currency are converted at exchange rates prevailing on the date of
Balance Sheet. Any profit/loss arising out of such conversion is charged to Profit and Loss Account.
16.3 Exchange fluctuations/hedging costs on borrowings in foreign currency for acquisition of fixed assets from a
country outside India are adjusted to the cost of assets and corresponding liability account. In other cases the
same is recognised in the Profit & Loss Account.
Premium/discount arising at the inception of the forward exchange contracts entered into to hedge foreign
currency risks are amortised as expense or income over the life of the contract. Exchange differences on such
contracts are recognised in the Profit & Loss account.
16.4 Derivative transactions entered into by the Corporation to manage the commodity price risk and exposures to
fluctuations in interest rates and foreign currencies are treated as off Balance Sheet transactions. Gain or
losses arising therefrom are recognised as and when settlement takes place in accordance with the terms of
the contract.
17. GOVERNMENT GRANTS
17.1 In case of depreciable assets, the cost of the asset is shown at gross value and grant thereon is taken to Capital
Reserve as deferred income, which is recognised in the Profit and Loss Account over the useful life of the asset.
17.2 Government grants of the nature of promoters' contributions are credited to Capital Reserve and treated as part
of Shareholders' Funds.
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
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106 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
18. PROVISIONS, CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL COMMITMENTS
18.1 Provision is recognised when there is a present obligation as a result of past event and it is probable that an
outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation in respect of which a reliable estimate can be made.
18.2 Disclosure for a contingent liability is made when there is a possible obligation that may, but probably will not,
require an outflow of resources.
18.3 Capital commitments and Contingent liabilities disclosed are those which exceed Rs. 0.10 million in each case.
18.4 Show cause notices issued by various Government authorities are considered for the evaluation of Contingent
liabilities only when converted into demand.
19. TAXES ON INCOME
19.1 Provision for current tax is made in accordance with the provisions of the Income Tax Act , 1961.
19.2 Deferred tax on account of timing difference between taxable and accounting income is provided using the tax
rates and tax laws enacted or substantially enacted by the Balance Sheet date.
20. OIL & GAS EXPLORATION ACTIVITIES
20.1 The Corporation follows “Successful Efforts Method” of accounting for Oil & Gas exploration and production
activities and accordingly survey costs are expensed in the year of incurrence.
20.2 The Corporation’s proportionate share in the assets, liabilities, income and expenditure of joint venture opera-
tions are accounted as per the participating interest in such joint venture operations.
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
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107 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
B. NOTES FORMING PART OF ACCOUNTS
1. Scheme of Amalgamation of Kochi Refineries Limited with the Corporation
(a) In accordance with the Scheme of Amalgamation (the Scheme) of the erstwhile subsidiary Kochi Refineries
Limited (hereinafter referred to as KRL) with the Corporation as approved by the members at a meeting held
on 16
th
January 2006 and subsequently sanctioned by the Ministry of Company Affairs vide its Order dated
18
th
August 2006, copies of which were filed with the respective Registrar of Companies on 21
st
August 2006,
the Undertaking of erstwhile KRL being all its assets and properties, and all its debts, liabilities, duties and
obligations has been transferred to and vested in the Corporation with effect from 1
st
April 2004 (the Appointed
Date). The Scheme has accordingly been given effect to in these accounts. However one shareholder of the
erstwhile KRL has challenged the amalgamation before the Delhi High Court, that is pending adjudication.
(b) KRL was engaged primarily in the refining of crude oil to produce various petroleum products.
(c) The amalgamation has been accounted for under the “pooling of interests” method as prescribed by
Accounting Standard (AS) 14 - “Accounting for Amalgamations” issued by The Institute of Chartered
Accountants of India. Accordingly, the assets, liabilities and reserves of erstwhile KRL as at 1
st
April 2004
have been taken over at their book values.
(d) As stipulated in the Scheme of Amalgamation, all reserves of erstwhile KRL have been transferred to the
corresponding Reserves account except for balance lying in the Profit and Loss Account as on
31
st
March 2004 that has been credited net of tax adjustments to the Profit and Loss Account of the merged
entity i.e. BPCL.
Accordingly, the amalgamation has resulted in transfer of assets, liabilities and reserves in accordance with
the terms of the scheme at the following summarized values:
Rs. Million
Fixed Assets (Net) 13,992.31
Investments 705.58
Current Assets 24,263.99
Less: Current Liabilities and Provisions 12,024.68 12,239.31
Total Assets 26,937.20
Less :
Loans 5,804.26
Deferred Tax Liability 3,079.55 8,883.81
Net Assets transferred 18,053.39
Consideration for Amalgamation:
Issue of shares pending allotment # 615.42
61,542,124 Equity Shares in the ratio of 4 Equity Shares of
Bharat Petroleum Corporation Ltd., for every 9 Equity Shares of KRL
Net Balance 17,437.97
Less :
Transfer of Capital Reserves of KRL to Capital Reserve Account 123.32
Transfer of Profit and Loss Account of KRL to Profit and Loss Account 14,145.27
Transfer of Share Application Money to Share Application Money
Suspense Account 0.02 14,268.61
Balance transferred to General Reserves 3,169.36
# Pending allotment, an amount of Rs. 615.42 million has been shown under the Share Capital Suspense
Account as at 31
st
March 2006 (Schedule ‘AA’)
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:25 AM 107
108 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
(e) In terms of the scheme, the Authorised Share Capital of the Corporation has been increased from Rs. 3,000.00
million to Rs.4,500.00 million as on 31.03.2006.
(f) In terms of the scheme, the Equity Shares when issued and allotted by the Corporation shall rank for dividend,
voting rights and in all respects pari-passu with the existing Equity Shares of the Corporation. Accordingly, the
appropriation for the proposed dividend includes dividend on 61,542,124 Equity Shares, which would be
allotted to the shareholders of erstwhile KRL (referred to in note (d) above.)
(g) The income accruing and expenses incurred by erstwhile KRL during the period 1
st
April 2004 to
31
st
March 2005 have also been incorporated in these accounts. During the period between the Appointed
Date and the Effective Date as erstwhile KRL carried on the existing business in “trust” on behalf of the
company, all vouchers, documents, etc., for the period are in the name of erstwhile KRL. The title deeds for
landed properties, licenses, agreements, loan documents, etc., are being transferred in the name of the
Corporation. However, credit has not been taken for claims in respect of levies/taxes arising as a conse-
quence of the amalgamation pending settlement.
(h) In terms of the scheme of amalgamation, the equity shares held by the Corporation in the erstwhile KRL will
be transferred to a proposed trust for the benefit of the Corporation. Accordingly, the equity shares to be
allotted, in the ratio of 4 equity shares for every 9 equity shares of the erstwhile KRL, aggregating to
33,728,738 equity shares are reflected as ‘Others’ (being the acquisition cost of Rs. 6,591.02 million) in
Schedule ‘J ’ - Other Current Assets as on 31
st
March 2006.
(i) The erstwhile KRL had made Rights Issue of shares in March 1988 and in March 1989 totalling to Rs. 646.89
million of which Rs. 27.54 million were unsubscribed. However, there are three cases pending before the
Courts/State Commission for 3,300 shares of Rs.10 each of erstwhile KRL. Against this, application money
of Rs. 0.02 million has been received for 2,100 shares of Rs.10 each that was appearing as Share Application
Money in the books of erstwhile KRL has been transferred to Share Application Money Suspense Account, as
the matter is subjudice. The balance un-subscribed portion has not been considered in the merged accounts.
(j) Previous year’s figures do not include the figures of erstwhile KRL and hence are not comparable to those of
the current year.
2. Deferred Tax Liability
As per the requirement of the Accounting Standard 22 on "Accounting for Taxes on Income" issued by the Institute
of Chartered Accountants of India the net deferred tax liability charged to Profit during the year is Rs. 1,025.34
million (previous year Rs. 1,466.34 million). The year end position of Deferred Tax Liability and Asset is given
below:
Rs. Million
31-3-2006 31-3-2005
DEFERRED TAX LIABILITY
Depreciation 15,702.37 10,984.09
Other Timing differences 16.42 3.26
Total 15,718.79 10,987.35
DEFERRED TAX ASSET
Provisions for doubtful debts/ claims/ investments 799.18 565.34
Disallowed u/s 43B of Income Tax Act, 1961 813.65 517.22
Expenditure on Voluntary Retirement Scheme 82.39 109.86
Unabsorbed Depreciation * 445.55 -
Other Timing differences 19.61 104.64
Tot al 2,160.38 1,297.06
Net Deferred Tax Liability 13,558.41# 9,690.29
* In view of the arrangements evolved by Government for compensating the oil marketing companies towards
subsidy losses suffered, Management is of the view that there is virtual certainty that future taxable income will be
sufficient to adjust the unabsorbed depreciation.
# Includes Rs. 2,842.78 million in respect of the erstwhile Kochi Refineries Ltd. transferred on amalgamation.
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
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109 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
3. Provision for income tax has been made in accordance with Section 115JB of the Income Tax Act, 1961. However,
management is confident that it would be in a position to pay normal tax within the period specified under the
Income Tax Act, 1961 and hence MAT credit has been recognised.
4. In respect of sharing of under-recoveries on sensitive petroleum products viz. MS, HSD, LPG (Domestic) and SKO
(PDS), as advised by the Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas, a part of the under-recovery suffered by the Oil
Marketing Companies during the year was compensated by ONGC and GAIL by offering discount on price of Crude
Oil, SKO and LPG purchased from them. Accordingly, the Corporation has accounted the discount received as
follows:
a) Rs. 30,209.22 million (previous year Rs. 5,759.50 million) discount received on crude oil purchased
from ONGC has been adjusted against raw material cost; and
b) Rs. 5,609.73 million (previous year Rs. 6,259.13 million) discounts received on SKO and LPG purchased
from ONGC/GAIL has been adjusted against “Purchase of product for resale”.
5. In lieu of the under-recoveries on sale of LPG (Domestic) and SKO (PDS) during 2005-06, the Corporation has
received Oil Marketing Companies GOI Special Bonds amounting to Rs. 21,631.20 million (previous year Nil)
from the Government of India during March 2006 that has been treated as income.
6. Impairment of Assets
Determination as to whether and how much an asset is impaired involve Management estimates of highly
uncertain matters such as international prices of crude oil and products, duty structure and Government policies.
On account of the communication received from the Government about the modalities for compensating the
marketing oil companies towards the subsidy losses for the year 2006-07, future cash flows have been worked out
based on the desired margins for deciding on impairment of related Cash Generating Units. No impairment is
therefore considered as at 31
st
March 2006. In view of the peculiar nature of the environment, in which the industry
operates and the assumptions being technical and dependent on Government policies, the auditors have relied on
the same.
7. Provision for taxation in the Profit and loss Account includes Rs. 6.40 million (previous year Rs. 5.10 million)
towards wealth tax.
8. During the year 2005-06, based on the Management’s review of the estimated useful lives of certain assets such
as computer equipments and peripherals, mobile phones, furniture provided at the residence of management, etc.
the Corporation has increased the rate of depreciation on these assets. This has resulted in additional depreciation
of Rs. 321.21 million during the year of which Rs. 249.30 million is for the period upto March 2005.
9. The erstwhile KRL had written back excess Income Tax provision of Rs. 155.00 million in the year 2000-01 towards
accumulated losses and unabsorbed depreciation of erstwhile Cochin Refineries Balmer Lawrie Ltd., which was
amalgamated with KRL. Based on the application by the erstwhile KRL, the Central Government has declared that
the amalgamation fulfils the conditions mentioned under the then Section 72A of the Income Tax Act. The disposal
of the matter is now pending with the Ministry of Commerce and Industry for enabling the company to get relief
from the Income Tax Department. Hence, no adjustment is considered necessary in the accounts for the year.
10. The Corporation has numerous transactions with other oil companies, which are reconciled on an ongoing basis
and are subject to confirmation. Adjustment, if any, arising therefrom are not likely to be material.
11. The Corporation follows open item system of maintaining customer accounts included in “Sundry Debtors”. The
transactions continue to appear in the customer accounts till such time the same are matched and cleared. This
is an ongoing process. The clearance of such open items is not likely to have a material impact on the outstandings
or classification in the accounts.
12. Sundry debtors include Rs. 618.94 million (previous year Rs. 618.94 million) (net) due from a customer, pertain-
ing to the period November 1992 to June 1996 and September 1997 to January 1999, towards price revision of a
product, disputed by the customer. The dispute was referred to an arbitrator who has awarded the case in favour
of the Corporation along with interest. Both single bench and division bench of Mumbai High Court confirmed the
award passed in favour of the Corporation. The Special Leave Petitions filed by the customer in the Supreme Court
challenging the division bench order have been admitted. In view of the pendency of the matter in the Supreme
Court, no effect is given in the accounts in respect of interest awarded by the arbitrator.
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:26 AM 109
110 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
13. Earnings per share
2005-06 2004-05
Profit after Tax Rs. Million 2,916.46 9,657.96
Weighted average shares
outstanding during the year
(a) Number of Shares million nos. 300.00 300.00
(b) Number of Shares to be issued to the
shareholders of erstwhile KRL million nos. 61.54 -
Total number of shares million nos. 361.54 300.00
Basic earnings per share Rs. 8.07 32.19
Diluted earnings per share Rs. 8.07 32.19
14. The Corporation has entered into upstream activities relating to Exploration and Production (Hydrocarbon) and has
started working on the exploration blocks which have been awarded during NELP IV, in consortium with other body
corporates. In compliance of Accounting Standard-17, “Segment Reporting” issued by the Institute of Chartered
Accountants of India, the segment information is as under:
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
Year ended 31st March 2006 Year ended 31st March 2005
Downstream Downstream
Petroleum E&P Total Petroleum E&P Total
Revenue
External Revenue 772,894.55 — 772,894.55 591,764.83 — 591,764.83
Inter Segment Revenue — — — — — —
Total Revenue 772,894.55 — 772,894.55 591,764.83 — 591,764.83
Result
Segment Results 4,838.41 (145.38) 4,693.03 12,515.65 (2.87) 12,512.78
Unallocated Corporate Expenses — — — — — —
Operating profit 4,838.41 (145.38) 4,693.03 12,515.65 (2.87) 12,512.78
Add:
Interest/Dividend Income 2,117.88 2,402.80
Profit on sale/maturity of Investments — 45.93
Less:
Interest Expenditure 2,474.14 1,398.03
Loss on sale/maturity of Investments 4.70 —
Diminution in value of Investments 260.12 —
Income Tax (including Deferred Tax) 1,155.49 3,905.52
Profit after Tax 2,916.46 9,657.96
Other Information
Segment Assets 233,849.86 — 233,849.86 185,280.70 — 185,280.70
Unallocated Corporate Assets 48,908.45 18,789.95
Total Assets 282,758.31 204,070.65
Segment Liabilities 88,883.43 61.38 88,944.81 85,641.50 2.87 85,644.37
Unallocated Corporate Liabilities 102,419.23 54,542.02
Total Liabilities 191,364.04 140,186.39
Capital Expenditure 20,190.84 — 20,190.84 15,087.40 — 15,087.40
Depreciation/Amor tisation 7,680.06 — 7,680.06 5,960.39 — 5,960.39
Non-cash expenses other than depreciation — —
Notes:
1) The Corporation is engaged in the following business segments:
a) Downstream petroleum i.e. Refining and Marketing of Petroleum Products
b) Exploration and Production of Hydrocarbons (E&P)
Segments have been identified taking into account the nature of activities and the nature of risks and returns.
2) Segment revenue comprises of the following:
a) Turnover (net of excise duties)
b) Subsidy received from Government of India
c) Net claim from/(surrender to) PPAC
d) Other income (excluding dividend income, interest income and investment income)
3) There are no geographical segments.
Rs. Million
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:26 AM 110
111 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
15. The names of the Small Scale Industrial Undertakings to whom the Corporation has outstandings for more than 30
days are as under:
A.K. Engineers & Contractors, Abasi Engineering Works, Acoustics India Pvt Ltd, Advance Cooling Towers Pvt Ltd,
Advance Petrochemicals Ltd., Airox Nigen Equipments Pvt. Ltd., Amarsingh & Sons Pvt. Ltd., Amit Mechanicals &
Equipments, Apex Forgings & Fittings, Aqua Chemicals & Systems (Mfg.) Ltd, Associated Uniforms, Balaji Electrical
Engg Works, Bangalore Spemach Pvt. Ltd., Bhuta Enterprise, BSJ Shau Manufacturers (India), C.S. Diesel Engg.
Pvt. Ltd., Chandawat Udyog Cyls. Ltd., Chandra Engg. & Mech. Pvt Ltd., Chemisol Adhesives Pvt. Ltd., Chemtrols
Engg. Ltd., Chennai Valves, Chhabi Electricals Pvt. Ltd., Commercial Supplying Agency, Cylinvalve Industries,
Daya Lubricants Pvt. Ltd., Deepthi Ads, Del Pd Pumps And Gears (P) Ltd., Delta Corporation, Dembla Valves Pvt
Ltd., Dencil Pumps & Systems Pvt. Ltd, De’S Technico, Dessma Engg Pvt Ltd., Detection Instruments (I) P. Ltd.,
Devraj V.R., Divya Constructions, Eby Fastners, Elgin Process Equipment Pvt. Ltd., Emerson Process Management,
Encon (India), Evergreen Engg. Co.Ltd., Explotech (India), FCG Power Industries P. Ltd., Fivebros Corporation,
Flameproof Equipments Pvt. Ltd., Flow Chem Industries, Francis Leslie & Co., G.D.R. Cylinders (P) Ltd., Gamzen
Plast P Ltd., Gannon Norton Engineering Pvt. Ltd, Garg Gas Appliances (Pvt.) Ltd., Global Gas Cylinders Ltd., Goel
Power Systems, Gokul Distributors, Grand Prix Fab (P) Ltd., Gratex Industries Ltd., Gujarat Gas Equips. Pvt Ltd.,
Gujarat Infrapipes Pvt Ltd., Gurunanak Engineering Works, Hyderabad Cylinders Pvt Ltd, ICP (India) Private
Limited, IGP Engineers Pvt. Ltd., Indcon Projects & Equipment Limited, Industrial Control & Appliance Ltd., Industrial
Engrs. & Fabricators, Inmarco Industries Private Limited, Intech Engineering & Services, International Cylinders
Pvt Ltd., J.Venkateswara Rao, Jesmajo Indtl. Fabrications - Karnat, Jindal Forging Pvt. Ltd., Joseph Leslie Drager
Manufacturing, Kanyaka Parameshwari Engg. Pvt Ltd., Kartik Steels Limited, Kiran Rubber Industries Pvt. Ltd.,
Konark Cylinders & Containers (P) Ltd, Krishna Die Casting, Kunj Forgings, Kurnool Cylinders Private Ltd., Liquid
Controls (India) Pvt. Ltd., Lunar Engineering Work, M Techno Engg (India) Pvt Ltd, M.Veeraiah, Madras Industrial
Product, Madras Metal Components Private Ltd, Mahaveer Cylinders Ltd., Mas Sealing Systems (P) Ltd., Megatech
Power Equipments Pvt. Ltd., Mercantile & Industrial, Mercury Enterprises, Metcraft Engg Corporation, Mikroflo
Filters (P) Ltd., Minar Prefab Pvt. Ltd., Minco India Pvt Ltd, Mipa Electronic & Electrical Co, Multitex Filteration
Engineers, Nagardas Kanji Shah, Nagman Instruments & Electronics, New Age Hose Manufacturing Co., Newage
Industries, Nirma Pipes & Fittings Industries, Nitin Fire Protection Industries, North Bengal Refrigeration, Nucon
Industries (P) Ltd., Nucon Zander (India) Pvt Ltd, Om Containers, Om D Signs, Orson Holdings Co Ltd, P.Obul Reddy
& Sons, P.Venkateswarlu, Padavi Engineers & Pressure Vessels, Pall India Private Limited, Paramount Forge,
Parmar Technoforge, Paws Pest Aways, PCP Chemicals Pvt. Ltd, Peedee Tiles, Pipe Supports India Private
Limited, Piping & Energy Products Pvt. Ltd., Placka Instruments India Pvt. Ltd, Plastools, Polycab Industries,
Prabha Electronics Ltd., Premier Grinders & Packers Pvt. Ltd., Presidency Rubber Mills Pvt. Ltd., R.K. Metal &
Plastic Pvt. Ltd., R.M. Cylinders (P) Ltd, R.V.Narayana Murthy, S.S. Industrial Corporation, Safess Quality
Management Pvt Ltd, Safety Services, Salico Trading Corporation, Samrat Cylinders & Heavy Engg Co., Sanghvi
Cylinders Ltd., Sapthagiri Contractors, Sarathi Engineering Enterprises, Shanti Metal Works, Shri Sainath Enterprises,
Shweta Enterprises, Siepmann’s Card Systems Pvt. Ltd., Sign And Display Systems, Southern Cylinders Pvt Ltd.,
Spanpak Systems, Spec Engineering, Special Steel Components Corp, Spiraseal Gaskets Private Limited, Sridhar
Constructions, Sridhar Engineering And Rubber, Standard Castings Pvt. Ltd., Starflex Sealing India Pvt. Ltd.,
Steelage Industries Limited, Sunrays Engineers Pvt Ltd., Super Fire Engineering Pvt. Ltd., Super Gasket Industries,
Super Precast & Granites, Supreme Electroplast Industries, Swastik Oil Product Mfg. Co. Pvt. Ltd., Swelore Engg
Pvt. Ltd, Syndicate Engineering Industries, T&D Galiakot Containers Pvt. Ltd., Tee Kay Metals Private Limited,
Teekay Tubes Pvt. Ltd., Texel India, The Punjab Steel Works, Tip Top Packaging, Toto Packaging Pvt. Ltd., Triangle
Simulation P. Ltd., Tribotech, Tube Bend (Calcutta) Pvt. Ltd., Unique Ceramic Industries, Vasu Chemicals, Venus
Enterprises, Verny Containers Private Limited, Victory Signarts, Vidarbha Gas Vessels Pvt Ltd, Vidhya Cyls Pvt.
Ltd., Vijay Sabre Safety Ltd., Vimal Fire Controls Pvt. Ltd., Vishnu Engineering, Vishvakarma Forging Ind. Pvt. Ltd,
Vitco Tiles, Voltamp Transformers Pvt. Ltd., Vyara Tiles Pvt. Ltd ., Vyasarpadi Valves, Waaree Instruments Ltd.,
Wadia Body Builders, Zenith Fire Services (India) Pvt. Ltd. Cresent Valves Mfg. Co. Pvt. Ltd., Castwell Industries,
Dil Udyog Electronics Pvt. Ltd., Flash Forge Pvt. Ltd., Gaskets (India) Pvt. Ltd., Goodrich Gasket Pvt. Ltd., Georgeson
Industrial Works, H.D. Fire Protect Company, H. Guru Instruments (S.I.) P. Ltd., Hyd-Air Engineering Works, IGA
Tech Industrial Electronics, Metal Forge (India), M.S. Flange Manufacturing Company, PEC Valves Pvt. Ltd.,
Pennant Engg. (P) Ltd., Procon Engineers, Sark Cables (P) Ltd., St. Francis Press, Shemil Laboratories, Shreyas
Instruments Pvt. Ltd., The Coimbatore Combustion Equipment, Union Power Solutions (P) Ltd., Varall Engineers,
Supreme Technology
The above information is given to the extent available with the Corporation.
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:26 AM 111
112 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
16. In compliance of AS – 27 ‘Financial Reporting of Interests in Joint Ventures’, the required information is as under:
a) Jointly controlled operations: The Corporation has entered into production sharing oil and gas exploration
contracts with the Government of India and other body corporates as follows:
Name Participating Interest of BPCL
31.03.2006 31.03.2005
IN INDIA
Under NELP – IV Block
KG/DWN/2002/1 10% 10%
MN/DWN/2002/1 10% 10%
CY/ONN/2002/2 40% 40%
OUTSIDE INDIA NIL NIL
b) Jointly controlled entities:
Country of Percentage of Percentage of
Incorporation ownership ownership
interest as on interest as on
31/03/2006 31/03/2005
Indraprastha Gas Limited India 22.50 22.50
Petronet India Limited India 16.00 16.00
Bharat Shell Limited India 49.00 49.00
Petronet CCK Limited India 49.00 49.00
Petronet CI Limited India 11.00 11.00
Petronet LNG Limited India 12.50 12.50
Bharat Oman Refineries Limited India 50.00 50.00
VI e Trans Private Limited India 33.33 33.33
Central UP Gas Limited India 22.50 22.50
Maharashtra Natural Gas Limited India 22.50 —
c) In respect of jointly controlled entities, the Corporation’s share of assets, liabilities, income, expenditure,
contingent liabilities and capital commitments as furnished below, have been included on the basis of
unaudited/audited financial statements received from these joint ventures :
(Rs. Million)
31.03.2006 31.03.2005
(i) Assets
– Long Term Assets 5,813.78 5,093.83
– Investments 444.33 312.13
– Current Assets 1,581.42 1,461.87
(ii) Liabilities
– Loans (Secured & Unsecured) 3,165.25 2,635.67
– Current Liabilities and Provisions 724.77 968.16
– Deferred Tax 141.48 57.80
(iii) Income 7,886.25 4,990.25
(iv) Expenses 7,403.88 4,815.77
(v) Contingent Liabilities 228.75 203.60
(vi) Capital Commitments 2,875.66 792.31
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:26 AM 112
113 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
17. Related Party Disclosures as per Accounting Standard 18
Names of the Related parties : Indraprastha Gas Limited, Petronet India Limited,
(JVC) Bharat Shell Limited, Petronet CCK Limited,
Petronet CI Limited, Petronet LNG Limited,
Bharat Oman Refineries Limited, VI e Trans Pvt. Limited,
Petroleum Infrastructure Limited,
Cochin International Airport Limited,
Maharashtra Natural Gas Limited, Central UP Gas Limited.
Key Management Personnel : M/s. Ashok Sinha (Chairman & Managing Director),
S. A. Narayan (Director HR),
S. Radhakrishnan (Director Marketing),
M. Rohatgi (Director Refineries) upto 30-09-2005,
S. K. Joshi (Director Finance - w.e.f 08-03-2006),
R. K. Singh (Director Refineries - w.e.f 08-03-2006)
Nature of Transactions
Rs. Million
2005-06 2004-05
Joint Venture Companies (JVC)
a. Purchase of goods 4,060.86 2,142.53
b. Sale of goods 4.00 3.79
c. Rendering of Services 4.48 0.46
d. Receiving of Services 338.01 372.84
e. Interest Income 16.51 9.12
f. Dividend Received 68.25 51.45
g. Equity contribution 119.23 0.25
h. Loans and advances 297.60 55.77
i. Outstandings as on 31.3.2006
- Receivables 421.69 164.45
- Payables 60.15 8.33
j. Management Contracts
(Employees on deputation to JVC) 24.94 22.65
k. Guarantees given — —
l. Rental Income 1.99 1.81
Key Management Personnel (Whole time directors)
Details of remuneration to directors are given in note 21 of Notes to Accounts.
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:26 AM 113
114 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
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PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:26 AM 114
115 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
19. Capital Commitments and Contingent Liabilities :
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
19.1 Capital Commitments :
Estimated amount of contracts remaining to be executed on
capital account and not provided for 7,227.51 5,829.66
19.2 Contingent Liabilities :
(a) In respect of taxation matters of prior years 268.46 108.80
(b) Other Matters :
(i) Surety bonds executed on behalf of other oil
companies for excise/customs duties for which BPCL
has signed as surety 1,317.45 1,275.75
(ii) Claims against the Corporation not acknowledged as debts :
(a) Excise and customs matters 1,834.79 4,254.81
(b) Sales tax matters 10,886.53 7,347.78
(c) Others 5,980.83 4,684.71
These include Rs. 4,114.34 million (previous year
Rs. 3,709.18 million) against which the Corporation has
a recourse for recovery and Rs. 1,122.94 million
(previous year Rs. 1,559.82 million) on capital account.
20. 20.1 The net amount of exchange difference debited to the Profit and Loss Account is Rs. 1,337.08 million
(previous year debited Rs. 8.67 million).
20.2 The amount of exchange difference credited to the carrying cost of fixed assets is Rs. 3.06 million (previous
year credited Rs. 16.74 million).
20.3 The exchange difference amounting to Rs. 1,033.88 million (previous year Rs. 94.11 million) in respect of
forward exchange contract will be recognised in the Profit and Loss Account of one or more subsequent
accounting periods.
20.4 The Corporation has on the Balance Sheet date, outstanding forward contracts amounting to USD 132.23
million (including USD 25 million in respect of long term loans) to hedge its foreign currency exposure
towards loans. The Corporation does not generally hedge the risks on account of foreign currency exposure
for the payment of crude oil. Following are the unhedged foreign currency exposure as on 31.03.2006:
Exposure Type USD Million
Impor t of Crude oil 451.60
Buyers Credit Loan (Shor t Term) 254.78
ECB (Long Term) 82.50
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:26 AM 115
116 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
20.5 The Corporation has on the Balance Sheet date the following outstanding commodity derivatives:
Instrument Description Purpose Quantity
OTCSwap Spread between Petroleum Hedging 0.45 miilion barrels
Products and Crude Oil
21. Managerial Remuneration : 2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Salary and allowances 2.29 2.97
Contributions to Provident Fund and other funds 0.50 0.35
Other benefits 2.33 2.26
5.12 5.58
22. Remuneration to Auditors : 2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
(a) Audit Fees
– Statutory Auditor 1.00 1.00
– Branch Auditor 0.35 —
(b) Fees for other services-cer tification
– Statutory Auditor 1.18 0.87
– Branch Auditor 0.15 —
(c) Reimbursement of out of pocket expenses
– Statutory Auditor 0.06 0.06
– Branch Auditor 0.02 —
2.76 1.93
23. Licensed Capacity, Installed Capacity (as certified by the Management) and actual production in respect of
goods manufactured :
Licensed Installed Actual
Capacity Capacity Production
(a) Fuel refinery
(i) In million metric tonnes p.a. NA 19.50 # 17.24
(NA) (6.90) (9.14)
(ii) Production in kilolitres (KL)
Light distillates — — 6,328,377
(3,233,377)
Middle distillates — — 9,983,289
(5,145,572)
Others — — 3,483,674
(1,935,370)
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:26 AM 116
117 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
Licensed Installed Actual
Capacity Capacity Production
(b) Aromatics (in MT)
(i) Benzene 185,500 192,900 61,335
(98,300) (105,700) (44,243)
(ii) Toluene 67,600 35,100 43,051
(17,600) (23,100) (10,042)
(iii) Mixed Aromatic Solvent 15,000 15,000 —
— — —
(iv) Petroleum Hydrocarbon Solvent 10,000 8,820 7,461
— — —
(v) Polybutene Feedstock 6,300 6,300 —
— — —
(vi) Poly Isobutene 5,000 5,000 2,534
— — —
(vii) Cable Jelly (Single Shift) 6,500 2,500 —
— — —
(viii) Others (Poly Isobutene Unit) 14,000 1,000 —
— — —
(c) MTBE in M.T. ** NA 30,000 23,837
(NA) (30,000) (26,877)
(d) New Solvent Unit
(i) Solvent (SBP 55-115) in M.T. NA 40,000 5,378
(NA) (40,000) (5,624)
(ii) Solvent (Food Grade Hexane) in M.T. NA 25,000 30,462
(NA) (25,000) (17,793)
(e) Poly Propylene Feedstock in M.T. NA 60,000 38,120
(NA) (60,000) (48,482)
(f) Lubricants in M.T. NA 181,000 100,461
(NA) (181,000) (106,287)
(g) Sulphur in M.T. NA 30,000 27,800
(NA) (30,000) (15,000)
(h) Natural Rubber Modified Bitumen in M.T. NA 65,000 —
(NA) — —
(i) Bitumen Emulsion (Single Shift) in M.T. 50,000 27,600 —
— — —
(j) Diesel Additive (Single Shift) in M.T. 5,000 1,500 —
— — —
# The installed capacity of Mumbai Refinery has increased from 6.90 MMTPA to 12.00 MMTPA on account of
commissioning of the new facilities including Hydrocracker Unit under Refinery Modernisation Project in
August 2005.
** MTBE is used for own manufacture of Motor Spirit.
24. Raw materials consumed :
Quantity Value
KL MT Rs. Million
Crude Oil — 17,221,007 319,646.42
(9,142,601) (133,170.48)
Others — 23,478 714.88
(41,762) (1,142.64)
Base oil 97,316 — 2,638.08
(100,889) (2,423.60)
Additive 8,454 660.46
(11,866) (792.75)
323,659.84
(137,529.47)
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:26 AM 117
118 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
25. Finished goods purchased, sold and stocked :
Opening Stock Purchases
Petroleum Quantity Value Quantity Value
Products MT Rs. Million MT Rs. Million
Light Distillates 610,272 19,032.01 4,448,049 132,217.02
(400,969) (10,341.63) (5,179,089) (130,270.81)
Middle Distillates 1,397,994 34,847.83 7,806,625 249,427.28
(1,276,847) (23,749.48) (11,363,497) (262,869.56)
Others 212,744 2,491.85 290,415 5,035.10
(206,770) (2,077.76) (942,511) (11,013.97)
Aromatics
(a) Benzene 1,551 55.11 — —
(2,469) (63.02) (2,030) (97.03)
(b) Toluene 2,603 86.71 8 0.38
(476) (11.37) (21) (1.05)
(c) Petroleum Hydrocarbon Solvent 396 13.30 — —
— — — —
(d) Polyisobutene, Slop Cut & Others 45 1.99 — —
— — — —
Lubricants 16,592 877.91 9,552 380.64
(16,149) (792.08) (7,192) (290.23)
Crude Oil — — 156,480 2,881.52
— — (207,603) (2,841.59)
Others (Grocery) — 1.52 — 11.06
— (2.49) — (31.42)
57,408.23 389,953.00
(37,037.83) (407,415.66)
Sales Closing Stock
Petroleum Quantity Value Quantity Value
Products MT Rs. Million MT Rs. Million
Light Distillates 8,855,785 283,893.31 704,469 22,013.78
(7,571,540) (216,211.71) (525,906) (16,810.96)
Middle Distillates 16,143,082 473,939.33 1,337,455 36,105.12
(15,502,776) (375,014.96) (1,296,199) (32,658.46)
Others 3,624,348 57,075.20 281,065 4,839.05
(2,874,290) (34,610.05) (168,116) (2,029.51)
Aromatics
(a) Benzene 58,366 2,357.95 4,521 170.19
(48,325) (2,196.20) (380) (13.72)
(b) Toluene 43,602 1,733.27 2,011 76.01
(10,470) (393.55) (47) (1.18)
(c) Petroleum Hydrocarbon Solvent 7,029 356.62 828 35.18
— — — —
(d) Polyisobutene, Slop Cut & Others 112 9.70 270 17.53
— — — —
Lubricants 115,717 7,609.52 15,803 904.65
(116,871) (7,265.47) (16,592) (877.91)
Crude Oil 156,480 2,881.52 — —
(207,603) (2,841.59) — —
Others (Grocery) — 8.61 — 1.75
— (36.50) — (1.52)
829,865.02 64,163.25
(638,570.03) (52,393.26)
(a) Purchases excludes inter product transfers.
(b) Purchases of petroleum products exclude payments to third parties for processing fees Rs. 229.63 million
(previous year Rs. 141.96 million) but include own consumption and samples Rs. 338.26 million (previous year
Rs.131.38 million).
(c) Sales exclude Oil Marketing Companies GOI Special Bonds worth Rs. 21,631.20 million (previous year Rs.Nil)
issued by Government of India.
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:26 AM 118
119 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
26. Value of imports calculated on C.I.F. basis (excludes imports through canalising agents) :
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
(a) Raw Materials (including crude oil) 222,368.44 68,195.59
(b) Capital goods 1,151.75 858.54
(c) Components and spare par ts (including packages, chemicals
and catalysts) 266.53 165.56
27. Expenditure in foreign currency (on cash basis) :
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
(a) Purchase of products 11,208.20 4,679.91
(b) Know-how 26.95 52.82
(c) Professional Consultancy Fees 51.81 47.46
(d) Royalty 141.44 36.61
(e) Interest 157.44 163.67
(f) Other matters 2,006.86 54.01
28. Value of raw materials, stores/spare parts and components including packages, chemicals & catalysts consumed
(on derived basis) :
(Import includes import through canalisation.)
Imported Indigenous Total
Rs. Million % Rs. Million % Rs. Million
Crude Oil 231,123.10 72.31 88,523.32 27.69 319,646.42
(75,261.79) (56.52 ) (57,908.69) (43.48) (133,170.48)
Others 81.12 11.35 633.76 88.65 714.88
(41.78) (3.66) (1,100.86) (96.34) (1,142.64)
Base Oil 239.70 9.09 2,398.38 90.91 2,638.08
(522.25) (21.55 ) (1,901.35) (78.45) (2,423.60)
Additive 49.89 7.55 610.58 92.45 660.46
(67.10) (8.46 ) (725.65) (91.54) (792.75)
Stores/Spare parts and
Components (including 266.92 14.45 1,580.85 85.55 1,847.78
packages, chemicals & catalysts) (205.59) (15.10) (1,155.68) (84.90) (1,361.27)
29. Earnings in foreign exchange :
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Expor ts at F.O.B. value on own account # 42,856.39 19,434.12
Management contract 10.33 11.50
# Includes receipt of Rs. 5516.66 million (previous year Rs. 7,605.75 million)
in Indian currency out of the repatriable funds of foreign airline customers.
and Rs. 81.44 million (previous year Nil) of INR expor ts to Nepal and Bhutan
30. Expenditure on social overheads :
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
(a) Expenditure on township 14.84 6.83
[net of recovery Rs. 6.59 million (previous year Rs. 9.50 million)]
(b) Medical facilities over and above statutory requirements 9.76 3.32
(c) Social and cultural activities 33.36 62.49
(d) Depreciation on capital assets 12.76 7.90
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:27 AM 119
120 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
31. Profit and Loss Account includes expenditure on :
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
(a) Enter tainment 5.75 5.04
(b) Public relations and publicity 45.58 35.62
(c) Remuneration to staff employed for public relations work 13.47 9.62
32. Research and development :
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
(a) Revenue expenditure 121.68 154.87
(b) Capital expenditure 67.07 119.66
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
33. Value Added 47,807.86 48,765.66
34. STATUTORY INFORMATION PURSUANT TO PART-IV OF SCHEDULE-VI TO THE COMPANIES ACT, 1956
BALANCE SHEET ABSTRACT AND COMPANIES GENERAL BUSINESS PROFILE
I. Registration Details
Registration No. 8931/TA/III of 1952 - 53 State Code 1 1
Balance Sheet Date 3 1 0 3 2 0 0 6
Date Month Year
II. Capital raised during the year (Rs. million)
Public Issue Right Issue
N I L N I L
Bonus Issue Private Placement
N I L N I L
III. Position of Mobilisation and Deployment of Funds (Rs. million)
Total Liabilities Total Assets
2 8 2 7 5 8 . 3 1 2 8 2 7 5 8 . 3 1
Sources of Funds Paid-up Capital Reserves & Surplus
(excluding deferred tax
3 6 1 5 . 4 4 # 8 7 7 7 8 . 8 3
liability)
Secured Loans Unsecured Loans
3 0 7 1 3 . 1 7 5 3 0 2 2 . 7 9
# Including Share Capital Suspense Account Rs. 615.42 million and Share Application Money Suspense
Rs. 0.02 million
Application of Funds: Net Fixed Assets Investments
1 1 0 8 5 4 . 7 3 * 3 8 7 7 4 . 2 0
Net Current Assets Misc. Expenditure
3 9 0 5 9 . 7 1 N I L
Accumulated Losses
N I L *Includes Capital work-in-progress
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:27 AM 120
121 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
IV. Performance of Company (Rs. million)
Turnover Total Expenditure
8 5 6 1 4 9 . 4 1 * 8 5 2 0 7 7 . 4 6
+ - Profit/Loss Before Tax + - Profit/Loss After Tax
+ 4 0 7 1 . 9 5 + 2 9 1 6 . 4 6
Earning per Share in Rs. Dividend rate %
8 . 0 7 2 5
* Includes miscellaneous income
V. Generic Names of Three Principal Products/Services of Company (as per monetary terms)
Item Code No. (ITC Code) 2 7 1 0
Product Description PETROLEUM PRODUCTS
Item Code No. (ITC Code) 2 9 0 2
Product Description BENZENE
Item Code No. (ITC Code) 2 7 1 0
Product Description LUBRICANTS
Note : ITC code of products as per Indian Trade Classification based on harmonised commodity description and
coding system by Ministry of Commerce, Directorate General of Commercial Intelligence & Statistics.
35. Figures of the previous year have been regrouped wherever necessary, to conform to current year presentation.
Signature to Schedules ‘A’ to ‘X’
For and on behalf of the Board of Directors
Sd/-
ASHOK SINHA
Chairman and Managing Director
Sd/- Sd/-
S. K. JOSHI D. M. NAIK BENGRE
Director (Finance) Company Secretary
Place : Mumbai
Dated : 26th September, 2006
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (Contd.)
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:27 AM 121
122 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
For the year ended 31st March 2006 2005
Notes Rs. Million Rs. Million
A Cash Flow from Operating Activities
Net Profit Before tax and prior period items 3,906.01 13,660.83
Adjustments for :
Depreciation 7,680.06 5,960.39
Interest paid 2,474.14 1,398.03
Foreign Exchange Fluctuations Note 3 490.21 14.73
(Profit)/Loss on Sale of fixed assets (35.07) (38.36)
(Profit)/Loss on Sale of investments 4.70 (45.93)
Income from Investments (666.25) (392.50)
Dividend Received (1,118.47) (1,547.68)
Other Non-Cash items Note 4 636.47 (428.85)
Operating Profit before Working Capital Changes 13,371.80 18,580.66
Invested in :
Trade Receivables 6,099.56 128.79
Other receivables 18,179.17 (2,839.24)
Inventory (14,037.92) (19,756.10)
Current Liabilities & Payables (8,663.46) 10,678.64
Cash generated from Operations 14,949.15 6,792.75
Direct Taxes paid (1,638.39) (4,360.33)
Cash flow before prior period items 13,310.76 2,432.42
Prior Period Items 165.94 (97.35)
Non-Cash items 22.48 5.29
Net Cash from Operating Activities 13,499.18 2,340.36
CASH FLOW STATEMENT
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:27 AM 122
123 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
For the year ended 31st March 2006 2005
Notes Rs. Million Rs. Million
B Net Cash Flow on Investing Activities
Purchase of fixed assets Note 5 (19,945.49) (14,766.02)
Sale of fixed assets 108.26 208.13
Capital Grant Received 31.18 —
Investment in Joint Venture Companies
Petroleum India International (6.60) (1.68)
Purchase of Investments (34,715.10) —
Sale of Investments 6,575.30 3,045.94
Income from Investment 666.25 392.50
Dividend Received 1,118.47 1,547.68
(46,167.73) (9,573.45)
C Net Cash Flow on Financing Activities
Long term Borrowings 1,649.34 5,091.69
Repayment of loans (2,105.78) (3,488.90)
Interest Paid (2,646.76) (1,825.38)
Interim Dividend Paid — (1,500.00)
Dividend Paid (2,684.54) (3,450.32)
Corporate Dividend Tax (379.65) (646.90)
Realised gains of exchange differences on foreign
currency loans (93.83) (160.78)
Net Cash Flow on Financing Activities (6,261.22) (5,980.59)
D Net Increase/(Decrease) in Cash and
Cash equivalents (A+B+C) (38,929.77) (13,213.68)
CASH FLOW STATEMENT — (Contd.)
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:27 AM 123
124 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
Cash and Cash equivalents as at 31st March 2005 2004
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Cash in Hand 1,550.89 4,049.45
Cash at Bank 1,912.84 2,093.41
Cash in transit 60.16 123.19
Cash Credit from scheduled banks (7,258.13) (12,761.80)
CBLOs — —
Unsecured loans from scheduled banks/ICDs/CPs (18,842.87) (2,867.68)
(22,577.11) (9,363.43)
Cash and Cash equivalents as at 31st March of erstwhile
KRL consequent to amalgamation (778.30) —
(23,355.41) (9,363.43)
Cash and Cash equivalents as at 31st March 2006 2005
Cash in Hand 2,309.54 1,550.89
Cash at Bank 2,465.37 1,912.84
Cash in transit 146.05 60.16
Cash Credit from scheduled banks (17,573.53) (7,258.13)
CBLOs (8,650.00) —
Unsecured loans from scheduled banks/ICDs/CPs (40,982.61) (18,842.87)
(62,285.18) (22,577.11)
Net change in Cash and Cash equivalents (38,929.77) (13,213.68)
Explanatory notes to Cash Flow Statement
1. The Cash Flow Statement is prepared in accordance with the format prescribed by Securities and Exchange Board of
India and as per Accounting Standard 3 issued by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India.
2. In Part-A of the Cash Flow Statement, figures in brackets indicate deductions made from the Net Profit for deriving the net
cash flow from operating activities. In Part-B and Part-C, figures in brackets indicate cash outflows.
3. The net profit/loss arising due to conversion of current assets/current liabilities/receivable/payable in foreign currency
is furnished under the head "Foreign Exchange Fluctuations".
4. “Other Non-Cash items” include excess provisions written back, foreign exchange adjustments, diminution in value
of investment, transfer to Capital reserve, Bad debts and materials written off and miscellaneous adjustments not
affecting cash flow.
5. “Purchase of Fixed Assets” include reduction in liability of Rs. 3.06 million (2004-05 reduction in liability of Rs. 16.74
million) arising on account of exchange rate variation during the year.
6. Figures of the previous year have been regrouped wherever necessary, to conform to current year’s presentation.
CASH FLOW STATEMENT — (Contd.)
For and on behalf of the Board of Directors As per our attached repor t of even date
Sd/- For and on behalf of
ASHOK SINHA V. SANKAR AIYAR & CO.
Chairman and Managing Director Char tered Accountants
Sd/-
S. VENKATRAMAN
Par tner
Membersiip No. 34319
Place : Mumbai
Dated : 26th September, 2006
PG-103-124-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:27 AM 124
125 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF
BHARAT PETROLEUM CORPORATION LIMITED
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:28 AM 125
126 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
AUDITORS’ REPORT ON CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The Board of Directors
Bharat Petroleum Corporation Ltd.
1. We have examined the attached Consolidated Balance Sheet of Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited (the Company),
its subsidiaries and its joint ventures as at 31
st
March, 2006 and also the Consolidated Profit and Loss Account and the
Consolidated Cash Flow Statement for the year ended on that date annexed thereto. These consolidated financial
statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these
consolidated financial statements based on our examination.
2. We did not audit the financials statements of the Company’s Subsidiary and seven joint ventures, whose financial
statements in the aggregate, reflect total assets of Rs.38,713.15 million (net) as at 31
st
March, 2006 and total revenues
of Rs.61,983.32 million for the year ended on that date. The financial statements and other information of the subsidiary
company and joint ventures have been audited by other auditors and we have relied upon such audited financial
statements for the purpose of our examination of the consolidated financial statements. The reports on these audited
financial statements have been furnished to us and our opinion, in so far as it relates to the amounts included in respect
of the Subsidiary Company and in respect of the interests in these joint ventures, is based solely on the reports of the
other auditors.
3. We conducted our audit in accordance with the generally accepted auditing standards in India. These standards require
that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are prepared,
in all material respects, in accordance with an identified financial reporting framework and are free of material
misstatement. An audit includes, examining on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the
financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made
by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statements presentation. We believe that our audit provides
a reasonable basis for our opinion.
4. We report that the consolidated financial statements have been prepared by the Company in accordance with the
requirements of Accounting Standard (AS-21) on “Consolidated Financial Statements” and Accounting Standard (AS-
27) on “Financial Reporting of Interests in Joint Ventures”, issued by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India and
on the basis of the separate audited financial statements of Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited, its subsidiary and
joint ventures included in the Consolidated Financial Statements.
5. On the basis of the information and explanations given to us and on consideration of the separate audit reports on
individual audited financial statements of the Company, its subsidiary and joint ventures, in our opinion the consolidated
financial statements together with the notes thereon and attached thereto give a true and fair view in conformity with the
accounting principles generally accepted in India:-
(i) in the case of the Consolidated Balance Sheet, of the consolidated state of affairs of Bharat Petroleum Corporation
Limited, its subsidiary and its interests in joint ventures as at 31
st
March, 2006;
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:28 AM 126
127 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
(ii) in the case of the Consolidated Profit and Loss Account, of the consolidated results of operations of Bharat
Petroleum Corporation Limited, its subsidiary and its interests in joint ventures for the year ended on that date; and
(iii) in the case of the Consolidated Cash Flow Statement, of the consolidated cash flows of Bharat Petroleum Corporation
Limited, its subsidiary and its interests in joint ventures for the year ended on that date.
For V. SANKAR AIYAR & CO.
Chartered Accountants
Sd/-
(S. Venkatraman)
Partner
Membership No. 34319
Place: New Delhi
Date: October 31, 2006.
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:28 AM 127
128 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET AS AT 31ST MARCH, 2006
For and on behalf of the Board of Directors As per our attached repor t of even date
Sd/- For and on behalf of
ASHOK SINHA V. SANKAR AIYAR & CO.
Chairman and Managing Director Char tered Accountants
Sd/-
S. VENKATRAMAN
Par tner
Place : New Delhi Membership No. 34319
Dated : 31st October, 2006
31/03/2005
SCHEDULE Rs. Million Rs. Million
I. SOURCES OF FUNDS
1. Shareholders' funds :
Share Capital A 3,000.00 3,000.00
Share Capital Suspense Account AA 615.42 —
Share Application Money Suspense Account 0.02 —
3,615.44 3,000.00
Reserves and Surplus B 95,575.25 73,559.57
99,190.69 76,559.57
2. Minority Interest :
Share Capital 2,724.43 3,350.25
Reserves and Surplus 3,539.79 13,407.16
6,264.22 16,757.41
3. Loan funds : C
Secured Loans 38,088.36 18,346.37
Unsecured Loans 54,593.86 37,131.87
92,682.22 55,478.24
4. Deferred tax liability (net) 17,655.18 16,697.37
TOTAL 215,792.31 165,492.59
II. APPLICATION OF FUNDS
1. Fixed Assets : D
Gross block 206,421.67 182,213.25
Less : Depreciation and amor tisation 83,150.57 74,118.97
Net block 123,271.10 108,094.28
Capital work-in-progress E 15,736.64 17,304.71
139,007.74 125,398.99
2. Investments F 32,207.41 3,780.53
3. Current assets, loans and advances :
Inventories G 98,958.66 83,557.70
Sundry debtors H 14,060.17 14,500.80
Cash and bank balances I 5,623.02 7,101.98
Other current assets J 7,743.51 111.29
Loans and advances K 17,643.98 30,648.46
144,029.34 135,920.23
Less : Current liabilities and provisions :
Liabilities L 93,506.67 94,957.34
Provisions M 5,953.17 4,657.91
99,459.84 99,615.25
Net current assets 44,569.50 36,304.98
4. Miscellaneous Expenditure to the extent 7.66 8.09
not written off or adjusted
TOTAL 215,792.31 165,492.59
Statement of Significant Accounting
Policies and Notes forming par t of Accounts X
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:28 AM 128
129 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
2004-05
SCHEDULE Rs. Million Rs. Million
INCOME
Sale of products & related income N 862,229.01 720,366.03
Less: Excise Duty Paid (87, 068. 28) (76,117.60)
775, 160. 73 644,248.43
Miscellaneous income O 3, 994. 42 3,504.58
Increase/(Decrease) in Inventory P 8, 517. 68 20,198.32
TOTAL 787, 672. 83 667,951.33
EXPENDITURE
Purchase of products for resale 334,948.52 286,849.55
Raw materials consumed Q 371,703.39 286,855.85
Packages consumed 784.97 777.44
Excise Duty on Inventory differential 2, 257. 81 (2,492.70)
Other Duties, taxes etc. and other charges applicable to products 14, 395. 04 16,822.27
Transpor tation 17, 577. 76 16,075.10
Consumption of stores, spares and materials R 727.39 546.98
Power and Fuel S 563.87 507.72
Employees’ remuneration and other benefits T 9, 351. 64 9,551.10
Interest U 3, 052. 22 2,468.94
Other operating and administration expenses V 14, 326. 23 11,191.31
Depreciation and amor tisation 9, 457. 92 8,809.71
Miscellaneous Expenditure Written off 0.79 3.07
TOTAL 779,147.55 637,966.34
Profit 8, 525. 28 29,984.99
Prior period income/(expenses) net W 191.33 (230.71)
Profit before tax 8, 716. 61 29,754.28
Provision for Taxation
- Current Tax 815.83 7,823.91
- MAT Credit (240. 00) —
- Fringe Benefit Tax 157.22 —
- Deferred Tax (Net) 957.81 2,255.65
Excess/(Shor t) provision for Taxation in earlier years
written back/provided for 10.07 1,065.93
Profit after tax 7, 035. 82 20,740.65
Minority Interest 1, 662. 85 5,321.03
Net Income of the Group 5, 372. 97 15,419.62
Transfer from / (to) Debenture Redemption Reserve (1,890.00) 1,860.00
Balance brought forward 7, 340. 23 9,123.03
Amount Transferred on Amalgamation:
(a) Balance of Profit & Loss Account as on 1st April 2004 14, 145. 27 —
(b) Profit After Tax for Financial Year 2004-05 8, 421. 17 —
(c) Interim Dividend (775. 43) —
(d) Corporate Dividend Tax (105. 71) —
(e) Transfer to General Reserve (842. 12) —
Disposable Profit 33, 329. 23 31,723.68
Appropriations:
Interim dividend paid — 1,643.92
Second interim dividend — 2,456.50
Proposed dividend 1, 421. 57 463.21
Corporate Dividend Tax on interim and proposed
dividend 333.84 812.15
1, 755. 41 5,375.78
Transfer to General Reserve 3, 211. 14 4,487.46
Balance Carried to Balance Sheet 28, 362. 68 21,860.44
Earnings per Share
- Basic 14.86 51.40
- Diluted 14.86 51.40
Statement of Significant Accounting Policies
and Notes forming par t of Accounts X
CONSOLIDATED PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST MARCH, 2006
For and on behalf of the Board of Directors As per our attached repor t of even date
Sd/- For and on behalf of
ASHOK SINHA V. SANKAR AIYAR & CO.
Chairman and Managing Director Char tered Accountants
Sd/-
S. VENKATRAMAN
Par tner
Place : New Delhi Membership No. 34319
Dated : 31st October, 2006
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:29 AM 129
130 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Authorised
450 million equity shares of Rs.10 each 4,500.00 3,000.00
4,500.00 3,000.00
Issued, subscribed and paid-up
300 million equity shares of Rs.10 each fully paid-up 3,000.00 3,000.00
Total 3,000.00 3,000.00
SCHEDULE ‘A’ — SHARE CAPITAL (CONSOLIDATED)
SCHEDULE ‘AA’ — SHARE CAPITAL SUSPENSE ACCOUNT (CONSOLIDATED)
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
61,542,124 equity shares of Rs. 10 each to be issued as fully paid-up
to the Shareholders of erstwhile Kochi Refineries Limited as per
the Scheme of Amalgamation
[refer note 1 (d) of Schedule ‘X’ - B] 615.42 —
Total 615.42 —
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:29 AM 130
131 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Capital Reserve
As per last Balance Sheet
[refer note 1 (j) (ii) of Schedule ‘X’ - B] 378.02 433.97
Add: Grant received during the year 31.18 —
Less : Amor tisation of Capital Grant (0.42) (0.50)
Add : Transferred on Amalgamation 123.32 —
532.10 433.47
Capital Reserve on acquisition of subsidiaries 678.64 1,729.88
Debenture Redemption Reserve
As per last Balance Sheet 2,560.00 4,420.00
Less: Transfer to Profit & Loss Account — (2,500.00)
Add : Transfer from Profit & Loss Account 1,890.00 640.00
4,450.00 2,560.00
General Reserve
As per last Balance Sheet
[refer note 1 (j) (ii) of Schedule ‘X’ - B] 57,696.05 55,738.16
Add : Transferred on Amalgamation:
(i) Balance as at 1st April 2004 2,400.08 —
(ii) Surplus on Amalgamation 769.28 —
3,169.36 —
(iii)Transfer from Profit & Loss Account in 2004-05 842.12 —
4,011.48 —
Add : Transfer from Profit & Loss Account 3,187.26 4,471.82
64,894.79 60,209.98
Surplus as per Profit & Loss Account 27,658.64 21,478.07
98,214.17 86,411.40
Less: Minority Interest
[refer note 1 (j) (i) of Schedule ‘X’ - B] 3,539.79 13,407.16
94,674.38 73,004.24
Share of interest in Joint Ventures
General Reserve 48.76 24.89
Surplus as per Profit & Loss Account 704.04 382.37
Special Reserve 3.73 3.73
Securities Premium 144.34 144.34
900.87 555.33
Total 95,575.25 73,559.57
SCHEDULE ‘B’ — RESERVES AND SURPLUS (CONSOLIDATED)
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:29 AM 131
132 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Secured Loans
Bonds
BPCL Debentures 2008 - Redeemable at par on 1st June 2008 with put and
call option on 1st June 2006* (Secured by mor tgage created on cer tain
immovable proper ties of the Corporation) ** 4,450.00 4,450.00
Banks
Term Loans 3,075.00 —
(Secured in favour of par ticipating banks ranking pari-passu inter-alia
by hypothecation of Plant & Machinery, Office Equipments, Electrical fittings
and other Fixed Assets)
[Due for repayment within one year Rs 1,800 million (previous year
Rs Nil)]
Working Capital Loans/Cash Credit 19,205.42 11,513.24
(Secured in favour of the par ticipating banks ranking pari-passu inter-alia
by hypothecation of raw materials, finished goods, stock-in-process, book
debts, stores, components and spares and all movables both present and
future)
Collateralised Borrowing and Lending Obligation (CBLO) through
Clearing Corporation of India Ltd.
(Secured by Oil Marketing Companies GOI Special Bonds of
Rs. 14,440.06 million) 8,650.00 —
Interest accrued and due 56.34 26.04
35,436.76 15,989.28
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 2,651.60 2,357.09
38,088.36 18,346.37
* Call option exercised.
** Interest payable at the rate of 9.95% per annum on Rs. 3,450 million
and at 9.90% per annum on Rs. 1,000 million
SCHEDULE ‘C’ — LOAN FUNDS (CONSOLIDATED)
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:29 AM 132
133 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Unsecured Loans
Syndicated Loans from various banks (repayable in foreign currency) 4,539.44 4,703.13
[Due for repayment within one year Rs. Nil (previous year Rs. Nil)]
Public deposits 970.34 2,231.35
[Due for repayment within one year Rs. 351.63 million (previous year
Rs. 1,553.20 million)]
Short Term (From Banks)
Rupee Loans 22,751.86 12,181.18
Foreign Currency Loans 18,242.61 7,342.87
Packing Credit — 830.21
OIDB 7,768.70 9,629.26
[Due for repayment within one year Rs. 1,349.00 million (previous year
Rs. 2,092.23 million)]
54,272.95 36,918.00
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 320.91 213.87
54,593.86 37,131.87
Total 92,682.22 55,478.24
SCHEDULE ‘C’ — LOAN FUNDS (CONSOLIDATED)(CONTD.)
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:29 AM 133
134 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
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PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:29 AM 134
135 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Capital work-in-progress (at Cost)
Work-in-progress 9,770.57 12,995.29
Capital Advances (Unsecured, Considered good ) 664.45 935.74
Capital Stores including lying with contractors 2,780.51 1,208.78
Capital goods in transit 864.49 183.65
Intangible assets pending amor tisation (refer note 15 (b) of Schedule ‘X’ - B) 43.23 69.63
Construction period expenses
Opening balance 971.08 1,157.48
Add : Expenditure during the year
Establishment charges 173.22 201.73
Interest 205.81 350.76
Depreciation 3.35 3.86
Others 114.09 116.13
1,467.55 1,829.96
Less : Allocated to assets during the year (939.11) (858.88)
Balance pending allocation at the end of the year 528.44 971.08
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 1,084.95 940.54
Total 15,736.64 17,304.71
SCHEDULE ‘E’ — CAPITAL WORK-IN-PROGRESS (CONSOLIDATED)
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:29 AM 135
136 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
SCHEDULE ‘F’ — INVESTMENTS (CONSOLIDATED)
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
CURRENT
IN GOVERNMENT SECURITIES
NON TRADE - QUOTED 31,085.10 2,950.00
Less : Provision for dimiuntion in value of investment 260.12 —
30,824.98 2,950.00
LONG TERM
IN GOVERNMENT SECURITIES
NON TRADE - QUOTED 643.47 0.38
IN SHARES, DEBENTURES AND BONDS
TRADE - UNQUOTED 132.01 362.01
Less : Provision for dimiuntion in value of investment 79.51 79.51
52.50 282.50
IN OTHER SECURITIES
NON TRADE - QUOTED 88.75 88.75
88.75 88.75
NON TRADE - UNQUOTED 0.08 0.08
IN ASSOCIATION OF PERSONS
NON TRADE - UNQUOTED
Capital Contribution in Petroleum India International 1.00 1.00
Share in accumulated surplus of Petroleum India 221.12 214.52
International as at 31st March 2005 (31st March 2004)
31,831.90 3,537.23
Share of interest in Joint Ventures - UNQUOTED 375.51 243.30
Total 32,207.41 3,780.53
Aggregate value of Unquoted Securities Rs. 650.21 million (previous year Rs. 741.40 million).
Aggregate value of Quoted Securities Rs. 31,557.20 million (previous year Rs. 3,039.13 million).
Market value of Quoted Securities Rs. 31,633.75 million (previous year Rs. 3,068.41 million).
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:29 AM 136
137 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
(As taken, valued and cer tified by the Management) @
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Stores and spares 1,812.67 1,584.74
Stores and spares in Transit 150.32 229.87
Raw materials 21,066.28 14,857.77
Stock in process 5,424.44 4,823.76
Finished products 69,915.10 61,487.85
Packages 58.34 59.12
98,427.15 83,043.11
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 531.51 514.59
Total 98,958.66 83,557.70
@ Inventory valuation is as per Significant Accounting Policy no.10
SCHEDULE ‘H’ — SUNDRY DEBTORS (CONSOLIDATED)
(Unsecured, Considered good unless otherwise stated)
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Debts outstanding for over six months :
Considered good * 1,020.61 939.72
Considered doubtful 1,688.32 1,297.16
2,708.93 2,236.88
Other debts 12,667.81 13,230.53
15,376.74 15,467.41
Less : Provision for doubtful debts (1,688.32) (1,297.16)
13,688.42 14,170.25
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 371.75 330.55
Total 14,060.17 14,500.80
* Includes Rs. 68.29 million (previous year Rs. 9.06 million) which are secured
SCHEDULE ‘G’ — INVENTORIES (CONSOLIDATED)
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:29 AM 137
138 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
SCHEDULE ‘I’ — CASH AND BANK BALANCES (CONSOLIDATED)
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Cash on Hand 2,309.73 1,552.56
[Includes drafts and cheques of Rs. 2,158.67 million
(previous year Rs. 1,451.99 million) on hand]
With Scheduled banks :
In current accounts 2,465.11 1,970.47
In deposit accounts * 309.09 3,069.04
Remittances in transit 146.05 65.42
5,229.98 6,657.49
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 393.04 444.49
Total 5,623.02 7,101.98
* Includes deposit of
(a) Rs. 0.04 million in the joint names with contractors towards Sales tax on works contract.
(b) Rs. 8.01 million (previous year Rs. 8.01 million) that have been pledged / deposited with local authorities.
SCHEDULE ‘J’ — OTHER CURRENT ASSETS (CONSOLIDATED)
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Interest accrued on investments 113.13 15.24
Interest accrued on bank deposits 0.64 0.25
Deferred premium (foreign exchange forward contract) 1,033.87 94.12
Others [refer Note 1 (h) of Schedule ‘X’ - B] 6,591.02 —
7,738.66 109.61
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 4.85 1.68
Total 7,743.51 111.29
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:29 AM 138
139 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
(Unsecured, Considered good unless otherwise stated)
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Loans (Secured) :
To companies
Considered doubtful 1.05 1.05
Less: Provision for doubtful loans (1.05) (1.05)
To staff * 6,393.47 6,095.47
Loans:
To companies
Considered doubtful 28.08 28.08
Less: Provision for doubtful loans (28.08) (28.08)
To Staff — 64.78
To others 249.44 141.52
Advances:
Share Application money pending allotment/Advance towards equity shares
Considered good 82.97 0.25
Considered Doubtful 11.33 11.33
Less: Provision towards share application money pending allotment (11.33) (11.33)
Advances recoverable in cash, or in kind or for value to be received 2,483.05 2,807.44
Advances considered doubtful 15.85 14.57
Less : Provision for doubtful advances (15.85) (14.57)
9,208.93 9,109.46
Material given on Loan (Secured) 4.64 5.83
Less : Deposits Received (4.64) (5.83)
Dues from Petroleum Planning & Analysis Cell - Government of India 321.88 13,718.86
Claims :
Considered good 3,064.37 2,754.08
Considered doubtful 230.18 1,800.00
Less : Provision for doubtful claims (230.18) (1,800.00)
3,064.37 2,754.08
Advance Income Tax ( Net of provision for taxation) 3,275.75 2,333.51
MAT Credit Entitlement 240.00 —
Deposits :
With Customs/Excise/Por t Trust etc. 401.70 2,105.97
Others** 809.34 389.69
1,211.04 2,495.66
Considered doubtful 0.19 0.19
Less: Provision for doubtful deposits (0.19) (0.19)
1,211.04 2,495.66
17,321.97 30,411.57
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 322.01 236.89
Total 17,643.98 30,648.46
* Include :
Due from Officers : Rs. 167.51 million (previous year Rs. 149.13 million)
Maximum balances : Rs 179.45 million (previous year Rs. 154.58 million)
Due from Directors : Rs 1.16 million (previous year Rs. 2.68 million)
Maximum balances : Rs 2.80 million (previous year Rs. 3.16 million)
** Includes an amount of Rs. 78.98 million (previous year Rs. 77.40 million)
alongwith interest of Rs. 81.98 million (previous year Rs. 80.85 million) deposited
as per cour t order in Land Compensation cases for which appeals are pending.
SCHEDULE ‘K’ — LOANS AND ADVANCES (CONSOLIDATED)
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:30 AM 139
140 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Current Liabilities :
Sundry creditors
Total outstanding dues to Small Scale Industries (SSI’s) 159.43 151.71
Total outstanding dues to creditors other than SSI’s 45,371.36 50,271.01
Materials taken on loan 0.05 0.05
Less : Deposits given (0.05) (0.05)
Deposits from Customers 68.29 12.88
Deposits for Containers 27,199.98 25,697.93
Investors Education & Protection Fund shall be credited by the following amount*
Unclaimed Dividend 31.60 48.36
Unclaimed Deposits 13.00 22.54
Unclaimed Interest on Deposits 1.82 2.11
Second interim dividend — 2,456.50
Corporate dividend tax on interim dividend — 379.65
Other liabilities 19,629.73 14,552.35
Interest on loans (accrued but not due) 442.52 488.43
92,917.73 94,083.47
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 588.94 873.87
Total 93,506.67 94,957.34
* No amount is due at the end of the year for credit to Investors Education and Protection Fund
SCHEDULE ‘M’ — PROVISIONS (CONSOLIDATED)
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Provision for Taxation (Net of Tax paid) 967.48 1,213.88
Proposed dividend 1,421.57 463.21
Corporate Dividend Tax on proposed dividend 322.80 175.39
Provision for retirement benefits 3,192.31 2,789.79
5,904.16 4,642.27
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 49.01 15.64
Total 5,953.17 4,657.91
SCHEDULE ‘N’ — SALE OF PRODUCTS (CONSOLIDATED)
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Sales 827,856.60 705,838.02
Subsidy on LPG (Domestic) & SKO (PDS) 5,151.67 5,248.40
Receipt of Oil Marketing Companies GOI Special Bonds 21,631.20 —
Net Recovery from/(payment to) Pool Account
(Petroleum Planning & Analysis Cell - Government of India) 64.95 4,375.76
854,704.42 715,462.18
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 7,524.59 4,903.85
Total 862,229.01 720,366.03
SCHEDULE ‘L’ — LIABILITIES (CONSOLIDATED)
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:30 AM 140
141 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Interest on bank deposits and others * 339.22 1,011.29
Tax deducted at source - Rs. 13.48 million ( previous year Rs. 24.31 million)
Income from Investments
Current
Interest on Oil Marketing Companies GOI Special Bonds 645.12 359.21
Long Term
Interest 25.71 6.42
Dividend 268.05 15.25
From AOP (Petroleum India International) 20.58 13.38
Profit on Sales/Maturity — 51.40
Excess provision for expenses written back 32.47 —
Write back (net) 2.05 46.69
Profit on sale / write off of fixed assets (net) 28.48 38.36
Other income # 2,557.96 1,900.10
3,919.64 3,442.10
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 74.78 62.48
Total 3,994.42 3,504.58
* Includes interest received from Income tax authorities Rs. 18.82 million (previous year Rs. 589.31 million)
# Includes amor tisation of capital grants Rs. 0.42 million ( previous year Rs. 0.04 million)
SCHEDULE ‘P’ — INCREASE/(DECREASE) IN INVENTORY (CONSOLIDATED)
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Value of closing stock of
Finished goods 69,915.10 61,487.85
Stock in process 5,424.44 4,823.76
75,339.54 66,311.61
Less :
Value of opening stock of
[refer note 1 (j) (ii) of Schedule ‘X’ - B]
Finished goods 62,033.95 43,561.52
Stock in process 4,823.76 2,584.75
66,857.71 46,146.27
8,481.83 20,165.34
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 35.85 32.98
Total 8,517.68 20,198.32
SCHEDULE ‘Q’ — RAW MATERIALS CONSUMED (CONSOLIDATED)
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Opening Stock 14,857.77 9,062.36
Add : Purchases 372,474.50 289,426.35
Less: Closing Stock (21,066.28) (14,857.77)
366,265.99 283,630.94
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 5,437.40 3,224.91
Total 371,703.39 286,855.85
SCHEDULE ‘O’ — MISCELLANEOUS INCOME (CONSOLIDATED)
PG-125-143-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:30 AM 141
142 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Stores, spares and materials 1593.28 1,376.06
Less : Charged to other revenue accounts (899.99) (852.08)
693.29 523.98
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 34.10 23.00
Total 727.39 546.98
SCHEDULE ‘S’ — POWER AND FUEL (CONSOLIDATED)
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Power and Fuel 18,809.12 11,820.29
Less: Consumption of fuel out of own production (18,319.71) (11,372.80)
489.41 447.49
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 74.46 60.23
Total 563.87 507.72
SCHEDULE ‘T’ — EMPLOYEES’ REMUNERATION AND OTHER BENEFITS
(CONSOLIDATED)
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Salaries and wages* 6,810.81 6,855.24
Contribution to provident fund and other funds 585.50 617.43
Contribution to gratuity fund 164.15 140.98
Welfare expenses 1,629.76 1,801.61
9,190.22 9,415.26
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 161.42 135.84
Total 9,351.64 9,551.10
*includes payment towards VRS compensation Rs. 2.64 million (previous year Rs. 407.97 million)
SCHEDULE ‘U’ — INTEREST (CONSOLIDATED)
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
On Bonds 442.28 377.91
On Fixed Loans 843.68 943.04
Others 1,535.29 956.04
2,821.25 2,276.99
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 230.97 191.95
Total 3,052.22 2,468.94
SCHEDULE ‘R’ — CONSUMPTION OF STORES, SPARES AND MATERIALS
(CONSOLIDATED)
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143 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Repairs and maintenance :
Machinery 2,189.17 1,998.82
Building 175.78 180.68
Others 1,059.69 796.39
3,424.64 2,975.89
Insurance 413.95 377.25
Rent 1,138.95 1,130.33
Rates and taxes 375.04 170.93
Charities and donations 20.61 112.59
Remuneration to auditors 3.02 2.59
Utilities 758.90 687.69
Write off :
Bad debts and Claims 19.48 647.16
Less : Provision made earlier (2.65) (542.03)
Others 6.59 30.77
Provision for :
Doubtful debts and advances 353.35 (564.26)
Diminution in value of investments 260.12 —
Charges paid to other oil companies 778.19 772.19
Travelling and conveyance 934.77 869.32
Telephone, Telex, Cables, Postage etc. 245.30 313.04
Loss on sale / maturity of Investments (net) 4.70 —
Loss on sale / write off of Fixed Assets(net) — 0.17
Brokerage on Public Deposit 2.09 3.09
Other expenses 5,170.12 3,783.25
13,907.17 10,769.97
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 419.06 421.34
Total 14,326.23 11,191.31
SCHEDULE ‘W’ — PRIOR PERIOD INCOME/(EXPENSES) (NET) (CONSOLIDATED)
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Sale of products (65.46) (9.32)
Miscellaneous Income 65.39 7.50
Purchase of product for resale 106.69 24.10
Raw Materials Consumed 5.67 1.53
Duties taxes etc. and other product charges 74.09 (112.32)
Transpor tation (2.30) 1.19
Consumption of stores spares and materials (1.01) (25.39)
Rent, Rates & Taxes 0.31 6.48
Employees’ remuneration and other benefits (3.70) —
Other operating and administration expenses 36.36 (3.91)
Excise Duty Refund — 1.86
Interest (18.38) —
Depreciation (3.67) (123.57)
193.99 (231.85)
Share of interest in Joint Ventures (2.66) 1.14
Total 191.33 (230.71)
SCHEDULE ‘V’ — OTHER OPERATING AND ADMINISTRATION EXPENSES
(CONSOLIDATED)
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144 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND NOTES
FORMING PART OF ACCOUNTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST MARCH, 2006 (CONSOLIDATED)
A) STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
1. Basis of Consolidation:
The Consolidated Financial Statements relate to Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited (the Company), its
subsidiary companies and the interest of the Company in joint ventures, in the form of jointly controlled
entities.
(a) Basis of accounting:
(i) The Financial Statements of the subsidiary companies and the joint venture companies (JVCs)
used in the preparation of the Consolidated Financial Statements are drawn upto the same
repor ting date as that of the Company i.e. 31st March, 2006.
(ii) The Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with the Accounting
Standards issued by the Institute of Char tered Accountants of India, and generally accepted
accounting principles.
(b) Principles of Consolidation:
The Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared on the following basis:-
(i) The Financial Statements of the Company and its subsidiary companies (which are not in the
nature of joint ventures) have been consolidated on a line–by-line basis by adding together the
book values of like items of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. The intra group balances
and intra group transactions and unrealised profits or losses resulting from intra group
transactions are fully eliminated.
(ii) The Consolidated Financial Statements include the interest of the Company in JVCs, which has
been accounted for using the propor tionate consolidation method of accounting and repor ting
whereby the Company’s share of each of the assets, liabilities, income and expenses of a
jointly controlled entity is considered as separate line items in the Consolidated Financial
Statements.
(iii) The share of equity in the subsidiary companies as on the date of investment, being in excess
of the cost of investment of the Company, the difference is recognised as “Capital Reserve on
Acquisition of Subsidiaries” and shown under the head “Reserves and Surplus” in the
Consolidated Financial Statements.
(iv) Minority interest in the Net Asset of consolidated subsidiaries consists of the amount of equity
attributable to the minority shareholders as on the dates on which investments are made by the
Company in the subsidiary companies and fur ther movements in their share in the equity
subsequent to the dates of investments as stated above.
(c) The subsidiary companies and the JVCs which are included in consolidation and the percentage of
ownership interest therein of the Company as on 31st March 2006 are as under :
Percentage of ownership Country of
interest as on Incorporation
31/03/2006 31/03/2005
Subsidiaries
Kochi Refineries Limited (KRL)* — 54.81 India
Numaligarh Refinery Limited (NRL) 62.96 62.96 India
Joint Venture Companies (JVC)
Indraprastha Gas Limited 22.50 22.50 India
Petronet India Limited 16.00 16.00 India
Bharat Shell Limited 49.00 49.00 India
Petronet CCK Limited 49.00 26.00 India
Petronet LNG Limited 12.50 12.50 India
Bharat Oman Refineries Limited 50.00 50.00 India
VI eTrans Private Limited 33.33 33.33 India
Central UP Gas Limited 22.50 22.50 India
Maharashtra Natural Gas Limited# 22.50 — India
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145 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
* Consequent to merger of KRL with Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited (BPCL), KRL ceases to
exist as a subsidiary on 31.03.2006.
# JV incorporated on 13.01.2006 and since the first financial result would be for period ending
31.03.2007, no effect to the Consolidated Financial Statement for the year ended 31.03.2006 has been
given.
2. ACCOUNTING CONVENTION
The financial statements are prepared under historical cost convention in accordance with the mandatory
Accounting Standards issued by the Institute of Char tered Accountants of India and the provisions of the
Companies Act, 1956, adopting accrual system of accounting except where otherwise stated.
3. USE OF ESTIMATES
The preparation of financial statements requires management to make cer tain estimates and assumptions
that affect the amounts repor ted in the financial statements and notes thereto. Differences between actual
results and estimates are recognised in the period in which they materialise.
4. FIXED ASSETS
4.1 LAND
Land acquired on lease where period of lease exceeds 99 years is treated as freehold.
4.2 FIXED ASSETS OTHER THAN LAND
Expenditure on assets, other than plant and machinery, LPG cylinders and pressure regulators, not
exceeding Rs. 1,000 per item is charged to revenue.
4.3 Machinery spares that can be used only in connection with an item of fixed asset and their use is
expected to be irregular are capitalised. Replacement of such spares is charged to revenue.
4.4 EXPENDITURE DURING CONSTRUCTION PERIOD
Direct expenses including borrowing cost and crop compensation for laying pipelines incurred during
construction period on capital projects are capitalised. Indirect expenses of the project group are
allocated only to the projects costing Rs. 50 million and above.
5. INTANGIBLE ASSETS
5.1 Cost of right of way that are perennial in nature are not amor tised.
5.2 Expenditure incurred for creating / acquiring other intangible assets of Rs. 5 million and above, from
which future economic benefits will flow over a period of time, is amor tised over the estimated
useful life of the asset or five years, whichever is lower, from the time the intangible asset star ts
providing the economic benefit.
5.3 In other cases, the expenditure is charged to revenue in the year the expenditure is incurred.
6. IMPAIRMENT OF ASSETS
The carrying values of fixed assets of the identified cash generating units (CGU), are reviewed for impairment
at each Balance Sheet date when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying values may
not be recoverable. If the carrying values exceed the estimated recoverable amount, the assets of the CGU
are written down to the recoverable amount and the impairment losses are recognized in the profit and loss
account. The recoverable amount is the greater of net selling price and value in use. In assessing value in
use, the estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present value based on an appropriate discount
factor.
7. BORROWING COSTS
Borrowing costs attributable to acquisition, construction or production of qualifying asset are capitalised as
par t of the cost of that asset, till the month in which the asset is ready for use. Other borrowing costs are
recognised as an expense in the period in which these are incurred.
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146 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
8. DEPRECIATION
8.1 Premium paid for acquiring leasehold land for lease period not exceeding 99 years, is amor tised
over the period of lease.
8.2 LPG cylinders and pressure regulators and other fixed assets costing not more than Rs. 5,000 each,
are depreciated @100 percent in the year of capitalisation.
8.3 Depreciation on assets not owned by the Corporation is amor tised over a period of five years from
the year of capitalisation.
8.4 Computer equipments and peripherals, and mobile phones are depreciated over a period of 4 years.
Furniture provided at the residence of management staff is depreciated over a period of seven years.
8.5 In case of Indraprastha Gas Limited, the depreciation in case of the following assets has been
provided using the straight line method over the useful life of the assets:
(a) Mother compressors, Online compressors and Booster compressors – 7 years
(b) Bunkhouses – 5 years
(c) Signages - 10 years
8.6 In case of Bharat Shell Ltd., the depreciation in case of the following assets has been provided using
the straight line method over the useful life of the assets estimated by the Management:
(a) Workshop Equipments – 3 years
(b) Bulk Tankages – 5 years
(c) Vehicles (Other than Road Tankers) – 5 years
(d) Computers – 4 years
(e) Furniture – 6.67 years
(f) Equipment – 6.67 years
8.7 Depreciation on fixed assets other than those stated above, is provided under the straight line
method, at rates prescribed under Schedule XIV to the Companies Act, 1956. However, in case of two
joint venture companies i.e., Bharat Oman Refineries Limited and VI eTrans Private Limited
depreciation has been provided under the written down value method. Additions to fixed assets
during the year are being depreciated on pro rata basis from the beginning of the month in which such
assets are capitalised.
9. INVESTMENTS
9.1 Current investments are valued at lower of cost or fair market value.
9.2 Long-term investments, other than investments in Government Securities and Public Sector Bonds,
are valued at cost. Provision for diminution is made to recognise a decline, other than of temporary
nature, in the value of such investments.
9.3 Government Securities and Public Sector Bonds are valued at lower of cost or redemption price.
10. INVENTORY
10.1 RAW MATERIAL AND INTERMEDIATE
Raw material and Intermediate are valued at cost. Cost is determined as follows:
10.1.1 Crude oil on first-in first-out basis.
10.1.2 Base oil, additives and LNG on weighted average cost.
10.1.3 Intermediate Stocks at raw material cost plus cost of conversion.
In case there has been a decline in the price of raw material and the realisable value of the finished
products is expected to be lower than the cost of the finished products, raw material and intermediate
are valued at net realisable value.
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147 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
10.2 FINISHED PRODUCTS
10.2.1 Finished products other than Lubricants are valued at cost on first-in first-out basis or at net
realisable value, whichever is lower.
10.2.2 Lubricants are valued at weighted average cost or at net realisable value, whichever is
lower.
10.3 Stores are valued at weighted average cost except in case of Indraprastha Gas Limited where the
valuation is on the basis of first-in first-out. Slow moving / obsolete items identified as surplus are
valued at Re. nil.
10.4 Packages are valued at weighted average cost or at net realisable value, whichever is lower.
11. CENVAT
Cenvat credit on eligible Revenue/Capital purchase is recognised on receipt of such materials.
12. CLAIMS AND PROVISIONS
Claims/Surrenders on/to Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell, Government of India are booked on ‘in
principle acceptance’ thereof on the basis of available instructions/clarifications subject to final adjustments
after Pool audit, as stipulated. Other claims are booked when there is a reasonable cer tainty of recovery.
Provisions, as appropriate, are made based on the merits.
13. SALES
Sales are net of trade discounts and include, inter alia, excise/customs duties, claim from Petroleum
Planning and Analysis Cell, Government of India and other elements allowed by the Government from time
to time.
14. RAW MATERIALS CONSUMED
Raw materials consumed are net of claims from Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell, Government of
India.
15. CLASSIFICATION OF INCOME/EXPENSES
15.1 Expenditure on Research, other than capital expenditure, is charged to revenue in the year the
expenditure is incurred.
15.2 Being not material :
15.2.1 Income/expenditure upto Rs. 0.50 million in each case per taining to prior years is charged to
the current year except in case of Bharat Shell Ltd., Indraprastha Gas Ltd., Petronet India Ltd.,
Petronet LNG Ltd., Petronet CCK Ltd., Bharat Oman Refineries Ltd., VI eTrans Private Ltd. and
Central UP Gas Ltd. wherein no such policy exists.
15.2.2 Prepaid expenses upto Rs. 0.01 million in each case, are charged to revenue as and when
incurred except in case of Indraprastha Gas Ltd., Petronet India Ltd., Petronet LNG Ltd.,
VI eTrans Private Ltd. and Central UP Gas Ltd. wherein no such policy exists.
15.2.3 Liabilities for expenses, other than for transpor tation, rent and proper ty taxes are provided
for only if the amount exceeds Rs. 0.01 million in each case except in case of Indraprastha
Gas Ltd., Petronet India Ltd., Petronet LNG Ltd., VI eTrans Private Ltd. and Central UP Gas Ltd.
wherein no such policy exists.
15.2.4 Deposits placed with Government agencies/ local authorities which are perennial in nature
are charged to revenue in the year of payment except in case of NRL, Bharat Shell Ltd.,
Petronet India Ltd., Petronet LNG Ltd., Petronet CCK Ltd., VI eTrans Private Ltd. and Central
UP Gas Ltd. wherein no such policy exists.
15.3 Income from sale of scrap is accounted for on realisation.
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148 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
16. RETIREMENT BENEFITS
16.1 Contribution to Provident Fund is charged to revenue.
16.2 Gratuity, leave encashment and other retirement benefits are actuarially valued at the year end and
provided for in the accounts except in case of:
(a) Bharat Shell Ltd., Petronet CCK Ltd. and Petronet LNG Ltd. towards superannuation, and
(b) Petronet India Ltd. towards leave encashment and gratuity, where the method of valuation is
other than acturial.
17. DUTIES ON BONDED STOCKS
17.1 Customs duty on Raw materials/Finished goods lying in bond are provided for at the applicable rates
except where liability to pay duty is transferred to consignee.
17.2 Excise duty on Finished stocks lying in bond is provided for, at the assessable value applicable at
each of the locations at maximum rates based on end use.
18. FOREIGN CURRENCY & DERIVATIVE TRANSACTIONS
18.1 Transactions in foreign currency are accounted at the exchange rate prevailing on the date of
transaction.
18.2 Monetary items denominated in foreign currency are conver ted at exchange rates prevailing on the
date of Balance Sheet. Any profit/loss arising out of such conversion is charged to Profit and Loss
Account.
18.3 Exchange fluctuations / hedging costs on borrowings in foreign currency for acquisition of fixed
assets from a country outside India are adjusted to the cost of assets and corresponding liability
account. In other cases the same is recognised in the Profit & Loss Account.
Premium/discount arising at the inception of the forward exchange contracts entered into to hedge
foreign currency risks are amor tised as expense or income over the life of the contract. Exchange
differences on such contracts are recognised in the Profit & Loss account.
18.4 Derivative transactions entered into by the Corporation to manage the commodity price risk and
exposures to fluctuations in interest rates and foreign currencies are treated as off Balance Sheet
transactions. Gain or losses arising there from are recognised as and when settlement takes place
in accordance with the terms of the contract.
19. GOVERNMENT GRANTS
19.1 In case of depreciable assets, the cost of the asset is shown at gross value and grant thereon is taken
to Capital Reserve as deferred income, which is recognised in the Profit and Loss Account over the
useful life of the asset.
19.2 Government grants of the nature of promoters’ contributions are credited to Capital Reserve and
treated as par t of Shareholders’ funds.
20. PROVISIONS, CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL COMMITMENTS
20.1 Provision is recognised when there is a present obligation as a result of past event and it is probable
that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation in respect of which a reliable
estimate can be made.
20.2 Disclosure for a contingent liability is made when there is a possible obligation that may, but probably
will not, require an outflow of resources.
20.3 Capital commitments and Contingent liabilities disclosed are those which exceed Rs. 0.10 million in
each case except:
a) in case of Petronet LNG Ltd. wherein Contingent liabilities, which are considered significant and
material by the company, are disclosed
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149 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
b) in case of Bharat Shell Ltd., Indraprastha Gas Ltd., Petronet India Ltd., Petronet CCK Ltd.,
VI eTrans Private Ltd. the same are disclosed in full.
20.4 Show cause notices issued by various Government authorities are considered for the evaluation of
Contingent Liabilities only when conver ted into demand.
21. TAXES ON INCOME
21.1 Provision for current tax is made in accordance with the provisions of the Income Tax Act , 1961.
21.2 Deferred tax on account of timing difference between taxable and accounting income is provided
using the tax rates and tax laws enacted or substantially enacted by the Balance Sheet date.
22. OIL & GAS EXPLORATION ACTIVITIES
22.1 “Successful Effor ts Method” of accounting is followed for Oil & Gas exploration and production
activities and accordingly survey costs are expensed in the year of incurrence.
22.2 The propor tionate share in the assets, liabilities, income and expenditure of joint venture operations
are accounted as per the par ticipating interest in such joint venture operations.
B. NOTES FORMING PART OF ACCOUNTS
1. Scheme of Amalgamation of Kochi Refineries Limited with BPCL
(a) In accordance with the Scheme of Amalgamation (the Scheme) of the erstwhile subsidiary Kochi
Refineries Limited (hereinafter referred to as KRL) with Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited (BPCL)
as approved by the members at a meeting held on 16
th
January 2006 and subsequently sanctioned by
the Ministry of Company Affairs vide its Order dated 18
th
August 2006, copies of which were filed with
the respective Registrar of Companies on 21
st
August 2006, the Under taking of erstwhile KRL being
all its assets and proper ties, and all its debts, liabilities, duties and obligations has been transferred
to and vested in BPCL with effect from 1
st
April 2004 (the Appointed Date). The Scheme has accordingly
been given effect to in these accounts. However one shareholder of the erstwhile KRL has challenged
the amalgamation before the Delhi High Cour t, that is pending adjudication.
(b) KRL was engaged primarily in the refining of crude oil to produce various petroleum products.
(c) The amalgamation has been accounted for under the “pooling of interests” method as prescribed by
Accounting Standard (AS) 14 - “Accounting for Amalgamations” issued by The Institute of Char tered
Accountants of India. Accordingly, the assets, liabilities and reserves of erstwhile KRL as at 1
st
April
2004 have been taken over at their book values.
(d) As stipulated in the Scheme of Amalgamation, all reserves of erstwhile KRL have been transferred to
the corresponding Reserves account except for balance lying in the Profit and Loss Account as on
31
st
March 2004 that has been credited net of tax adjustments to the Profit and Loss Account of the
merged entity i.e. BPCL.
Accordingly, the amalgamation has resulted in transfer of assets, liabilities and reserves in accordance
with the terms of the scheme at the following summarized values:
Rs. Million
Fixed Assets (Net) 13,992.31
Investments 705.58
Current Assets 24,263.99
Less: Current Liabilities and Provisions 12,024.68 12,239.31
Total Assets 26,937.20
Less :
Loans 5,804.26
Deferred Tax Liability 3,079.55 8,883.81
Net Assets transferred 18,053.39
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150 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
Rs. Million
Consideration for Amalgamation:
Issue of shares pending allotment # 615.42
61,542,124 Equity Shares in the ratio of 4 Equity Shares of
Bharat Petroleum Corporation Ltd., for every 9 Equity
Shares of KRL
Net Balance 17,437.97
Less :
Transfer of Capital Reserves of KRL to Capital Reserve Account 123.32
Transfer of Profit and Loss Account of KRL to Profit and
Loss Account 14,145.27
Transfer of Share Application Money to Share Application Money
Suspense Account 0.02 14,268.61
Balance transferred to General Reserves 3,169.36
# Pending allotment, an amount of Rs. 615.42 million has been shown under the Share Capital
Suspense Account as at 31
st
March 2006 (Schedule ‘AA’)
(e) In terms of the scheme, the Authorised Share Capital of BPCL has been increased from Rs. 3,000.00
million to Rs.4,500.00 million as on 31.03.2006.
(f) In terms of the scheme, the Equity Shares when issued and allotted by BPCL shall rank for dividend,
voting rights and in all respects pari-passu with the existing Equity Shares of BPCL. Accordingly, the
appropriation for the proposed dividend includes dividend on 61,542,124 Equity Shares, which would
be allotted to the shareholders of erstwhile KRL (referred to in note (d) above.)
(g) The income accruing and expenses incurred by erstwhile KRL during the period 1
st
April 2004 to
March 31, 2005 have also been incorporated in these accounts. During the period between the
Appointed Date and the Effective Date as erstwhile KRL carried on the existing business in “trust” on
behalf of the company, all vouchers, documents, etc., for the period are in the name of erstwhile KRL.
The title deeds for landed properties, licenses, agreements, loan documents, etc., are being transferred
in the name of BPCL. However, credit has not been taken for claims in respect of levies/taxes arising
as a consequence of the amalgamation pending settlement.
(h) In terms of the scheme of amalgamation, the equity shares held by BPCL in the erstwhile KRL will be
transferred to a proposed trust for the benefit of BPCL. Accordingly, the equity shares to be allotted,
in the ratio of 4 equity shares for every 9 equity shares of the erstwhile KRL, aggregating to 33,728,738
equity shares are reflected as ‘Others’ (being the acquisition cost of Rs. 6,591.02 million) in Schedule
‘J ’ - Other Current Assets as on 31
st
March 2006.
(i) The erstwhile KRL had made Rights Issue of shares in March 1988 and in March 1989 totalling to
Rs. 646.89 million of which Rs. 27.54 million were unsubscribed. However, there are three cases
pending before the Cour ts/State Commission for 3,300 shares of Rs. 10 each of erstwhile KRL.
Against this, application money of Rs. 0.02 million has been received for 2,100 shares of Rs. 10 each
that was appearing as Share Application Money in the books of erstwhile KRL has been transferred
to Share Application Money Suspense Account, as the matter is subjudice. The balance un-subscribed
por tion has not been considered in the merged accounts.
(j) The merger has been given effect to in the accounts of BPCL for the year 2005-06 and, therefore:
i) The Minority Interest as on 31
st
March 2006 will not be comparable with previous year.
ii) Opening balance of current year may not match with previous year’s figures.
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151 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
2. Deferred Tax Liability
As per the requirement of the Accounting Standard 22 - “Accounting for Taxes on Income” issued by the
Institute of Char tered Accountants of India the net deferred tax liability charged to Profit during the year is
Rs. 957.81 million (previous year Rs. 2,255.65 million). The year end position of Deferred Tax Liability and
Assets is given below :
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
DEFERRED TAX LIABILITY
Depreciation 19,666.63 17,992.53
Other Timing Differences 16.42 13.36
Share of Interest in Joint Ventures 306.92 379.54
Total 19,989.97 18,385.43
DEFERRED TAX ASSETS
Provisions for doubtful debts / claims / investments 805.30 593.58
Provisions for medical benefits — —
Disallowances u/s 43B of Income Tax Act,1961 816.50 522.16
Expenditure on Voluntary Retirement Scheme 82.39 109.86
Unabsorbed Depreciation* 445.55 —
Other Timing Differences 19.61 140.72
Share of Interest in Joint Ventures 165.45 321.74
Total 2,334.80 1,688.06
Net Deferred Tax Liability 17,655.18 16,697.37
* In view of the arrangements evolved by Government for compensating the oil marketing companies
towards subsidy losses suffered, Management of BPCL is of the view that there is vir tual cer tainty that
future taxable income will be sufficient to adjust the unabsorbed depreciation.
3. Provision for income tax has been made in accordance with Section 115JB of the Income Tax Act, 1961.
However, management of BPCL is confident that it would be in a position to pay normal tax within the period
specified under the Income Tax Act, 1961 and hence MAT credit has been recognised.
4. Provision for current taxation includes Rs. 240.00 million (previous year Rs. NIL) in respect of BPCL,
Rs. 406.30 million (previous year Rs. 439.68 million) in respect of NRL, Rs. 3.97 million (previous year
Rs. 1.91 million) (propor tionate share) in respect of Bharat Shell Limited and Rs. 31.25 million (previous
year Rs. NIL ) (propor tionate share) in respect of Petronet LNG Limited towards Minimum Alternate Tax
(MAT), as per the requirements of the provisions of Section 115 JB of the Income Tax Act, 1961.
5. In respect of sharing of under-recoveries on sensitive petroleum products viz. MS, HSD, LPG (Domestic)
and SKO (PDS), as advised by the Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas, a par t of the under-recovery
suffered by the Oil Marketing Companies during the year was compensated by ONGC and GAIL by offering
discount on price of Crude Oil, SKO and LPG purchased from them. Accordingly, BPCL has accounted the
discount received as follows:
a) Rs. 30,209.22 million (previous year Rs. 5,759.50 million) discount received on crude oil purchased
from ONGC has been adjusted against raw material cost; and
b) Rs. 5,609.73 million (previous year Rs. 6,259.13 million) discounts received on SKO and LPG
purchased from ONGC/GAIL has been adjusted against “Purchase of product for resale”.
PG-144-164-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:31 AM 151
152 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
6. In lieu of the under-recoveries on sale of LPG (Domestic) and SKO (PDS) during 2005-06, BPCL has
received Oil Marketing Companies GOI Special Bonds amounting to Rs. 21,631.20 million (previous year
Nil) from the Government of India during March 2006 that has been treated as income.
7. Impairment of Assets
Determination as to whether and how much an asset is impaired involve Management estimates of highly
uncer tain matters such as international prices of crude oil and products, duty structure and Government
policies. On account of the communication received from the Government about the modalities for
compensating the marketing oil companies towards the subsidy losses for the year 2006-07, future cash
flows have been worked out based on the desired margins for deciding on impairment of related Cash
Generating Units. No impairment is therefore considered as at 31
st
March 2006. In view of the peculiar
nature of the environment, in which the industry operates and the assumptions being technical and dependant
on Government policies, the auditors have relied on the same.
8. Provision for taxation in the Profit and Loss Account of the group includes Rs. 7.48 million (previous year
Rs. 6.41 million) towards wealth tax.
9. Change in Depreciation / Amortisation Policy:
a) During the year 2005-06, based on the Management’s review of the estimated useful lives of cer tain
assets such as computer equipments and peripherals, mobile phones, furniture provided at the
residence of management, etc. BPCL has increased the rate of depreciation on these assets. This has
resulted in additional depreciation of Rs. 321.21 million during the year of which Rs. 249.30 million is
for the period upto March 2005.
b) During the year 2005-06, the Management of Bharat Shell Limited has re-estimated the useful life of
Equipments and Furniture & fittings to be 6.67 years against the earlier policy of providing depreciation
at the rates in Schedule XIV of Companies Act, 1956 and has provided depreciation prospectively over
the balance useful life of the asset. Had the previous rates been followed, the profit for the year would
have been higher by Rs. 17.56 million.
c) As a result of reduction in amor tization period of intangible assets from 10 years to 5 years, the profit
for the year of NRL is lower by Rs. 5.70 million with corresponding reduction in intangible assets.
10. BPCL and NRL have numerous transactions with the other oil companies, which are reconciled on an
ongoing basis and are subject to confirmation. Adjustment if any, arising therefrom are not likely to be
material.
11. Sundry debtors include Rs. 618.94 million (previous year Rs. 618.94 million) (net) due from a customer, in
respect of BPCL, per taining to the period November 1992 to June 1996 and September 1997 to January 1999,
towards price revision of a product, disputed by the customer. The dispute was referred to an arbitrator who
has awarded the case in favour of BPCL along with interest. Both single bench and division bench of
Mumbai High Cour t confirmed the award passed in favour of BPCL. The customer has filed Special Leave
Petition in the Supreme Cour t challenging the division bench order. In view of the pendency of the matter in
the Supreme Cour t, no effect is given in the accounts in respect of interest awarded by the arbitrator.
12. Earnings per share
2005-06 2004-05
Profit after Tax Rs. Million 5,372.97 15,419.62
Weighted average shares outstanding during the year
(a) Number of Shares million nos. 300.00 300.00
(b) Number of Shares to be issued to shareholders
of the erstwhile KRL million nos. 61.54 —
Total number of shares million nos. 361.54 300.00
Basic earnings per share Rs. 14.86 51.40
Diluted earnings per share Rs. 14.86 51.40
PG-144-164-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:32 AM 152
153 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
13. BPCL has entered into upstream activities relating to Exploration and Production (Hydrocarbon) and has
star ted working on the exploration blocks which have been awarded during NELP IV, in consor tium with
other body corporates. In compliance of Accounting Standard-17, “Segment Repor ting” issued by the
Institute of Char tered Accountants of India, the segment information is as under :
Rs. Million
Year ended 31st March 2006 Year ended 31st March 2005
Downstream Downstream
Petroleum E&P Total Petroleum E&P Total
Revenue
External Revenue 777,856.47 — 777,856.47 646,296.06 — 646,296.06
Inter Segment Revenue — — — — — —
Total Revenue 777,856.47 — 777,856.47 646,296.06 — 646,296.06
Result
Segment Results 10,880,35 (145.38) 10,734.97 30,769.14 (2.87) 30,766.27
Unallocated Corporate
Expenses — —
Operating profit 10,888.35 (145.38) 10,734.97 30,769.14 (2.87) 30,766.27
Add:
Interest / Dividend income 1,298.68 1,405.55
Profit on sale / maturity of investments — 51.40
Less:
Interest Expenditure 3,052.22 2,468.94
Loss on sale / maturity of Investments 4.70 —
Diminution in value of investments 260.12 —
Income Tax (including Deferred Tax) 1,680.79 9,013.63
Profit after Tax 7,035.82 20,740.65
Other Information
Segment Assets 2,72,930.31 — 272,930.31 258,985.71 — 258,985.71
Unallocated Corporate Assets 42,321.84 6,122.13
Total Assets 315,252.15 265,107,84
Setment Liabilities 93,445.29 61.38 93,506.67 92,118.32 2.87 92,121.19
Unallocated Corporate Liabilities 116,290.57 79,669.67
Total Liabilities 209,797.24 171,790.86
Capital Expenditure 22,555.19 — 22,555.19 19,240.43 — 19,240.43
Depreciation / Amortisation 9,457.92 — 9,457.92 8,809.71 — 8,809.71
Non-cash expenses other than
depreciation 0.79 3.07
Notes:
1) The Corporation is engaged in the following business segments:
a) Downstream petroleum i.e. Refining and Marketing of Petroleum Products
b) Exploration and Production of Hydrocarbons (E&P)
Segments have been identified taking into account the nature of activities and the nature of risks and
returns.
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154 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
2) Segment revenue comprises of the following:
a) Turnover (net of excise duties)
b) Subsidy received from Government of India
c) Net claim from / (surrender to) PPAC
d) Other income (excluding dividend income interest income and investment income).
3) There are no geographical segments.
14. Related Party Disclosures as per Accounting Standard 18
i) Key Management Personnel M/s. Ashok Sinha (Chairman & Managing Director), S. A. Narayan
(Whole Time Directors) (Director HR), S. Radhakrishnan (Director Marketing), M. Rohatgi
(Director Refineries) upto 30-09-2005, S.K. Joshi (Director
Finance - w.e.f 08-03-2006), R. K. Singh (Director Refineries - w.e.f
08-03-2006).
ii) Remuneration to key management personnel: Rs. 5.25 million (previous year Rs. 5.73 million)
15. INTANGIBLE ASSETS
In accordance with Accounting Standard 26 , details of Intangible Assets recognised and amortised during the
year are given below:
a) Intangible assets - being amortised
Rs. Million
USEFUL LIFE GROSS AMOUNT AMORTISATION NET AMOUNT
Particulars (No. of As At Additions Dele- As at Upto This year Upto As at As at
Months) 01-04-05 tions/ 31-03-06 31-03-05 31-03-06 31-03-06 31-03-05
Reclassi-
fication
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
1. Right of Way Perennial 100.03 — — 100.03 — — — 100.03 100.03
2. Software 36 111.87 — — 111.87 64.61 40.11 104.72 7.15 47.26
3. Software 60 — 128.85 — 128.85 — 20.39 20.39 108.46 —
4. Development Rights 60 14.97 — — 14.97 0.75 2.99 3.74 11.23 14.22
5. Process License 60 8.70 130.95 — 139.65 0.43 19.28 19.71 119.94 8.27
Total 235.57 259.80 — 495.37 65.79 82.77 148.56 346.81 169.78
Share Of Interest In
Joint Venture 87.00 — 0.28 86.72 0.59 1.42 2.00 84.72 86.41
Grand Total 322.57 259.80 0.28 582.09 66.38 84.19 150.56 431.53 256.19
Previous Year 193.56 40.06 — 233.62 24.50 40.31 64.81 168.81 169.06
Share Of Interest In
Joint Venture 2004-05 43.89 4.27 — 48.16 — 0.59 0.59 47.57 43.89
Grand Total 2004-05 237.45 44.33 — 281.78 24.50 40.90 65.40 216.38 212.95
b) Intangible Assets- Pending Amortisation*
Rs. Million
USEFUL LIFE GROSS AMOUNT AMORTISATION NET AMOUNT
Particulars (No. of As At Additions Capitali- As at Upto This year Upto As at As at
Months) 01-04-05 sations 31-03-06 31-03-05 31-03-06 31-03-06 31-03-05
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)
1. Process License 43.23 — — 43.23 — — — 43.23 43.23
2. Software 26.40 — 26.40 — — — — — 26.40
Total 69.63 — 26.40 43.23 — — — 43.23 69.63
Previous Year 1.34 73.58 5.29 69.63 — — — 69.63 1.34
* To be amortised from the time the Intangible Asset starts providing economic benefits
Note: There are no internally generated Intangible Assets
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
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155 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
16. Capital Reserve on acqusition of subsidiaries includes Rs. 629.60 million being the share of the group out
of grant of Rs. 1,000 million received by NRL from the Government of India during the project period.
17. Raw material consumption is after adjustment of the following in respect of NRL:
a) The additional transpor tation cost of crude oil supplied from Ravva Oil Field to Bongaigaon Refinery
and Petrochemicals Limited. This was required to be shared equally by all the refineries in Assam.
NRL’s share of the said transpor tation cost has been treated as crude cost and also considered for
valuation of stock.
b) Based on the revised billing by BRPL on account of sharing of Ravva crude transpor tation cost, entry
tax and other incidentals thereof, for financial years 2003-04 and 2004-05, a credit amounting to
Rs.1051.16 millions has been taken in the accounts for the year and adjusted in the crude price.
18. In case of Petronet CCK Limited, income has been accounted based on traiff rates for usage of pipeline
facilities by Oil Companies that are provisional and are under consideration with the Oil companies.
19. Petronet India Limted (PIL) has invested Rs. 260.00 million (propor tionate share Rs. 41.60 million) in the
equity of Petronet VK Limited (PVKL) and Rs. 3.30 million (propor tionate share Rs. 0.53 million) in the
equity shares of Petronet MHB Limited. Though the auditors of PIL have qualified their audit repor t towards
non-provision for diminution in the value of investment in PVKL and Petronet MHB Limited (amount not
ascer tained), no adjustments are considered necessary in view of the options being explored for usage of
the pipeline facilities of PVKL and Petronet MHB Limited.
20. Petronet LNG has raised Rs. 3,914.70 million through public issue of shares in the year 2003-04 and till
31.3.2006 had utilised Rs. 2,364.70 million (previous year Rs. 2,178.80 million) for project payments and
balance of Rs. 1,550.00 million deposited in debt based mutual funds (previous year Rs.1,735.90 million in
shor t term deposits with a scheduled bank).
21. As indicated in Significant Accounting Policies in respect of cer tain JVCs cer tain accounting policies
followed towards Depreciation, Inventory Valuation, Retirement Benefits and Classification of Income/
Expenses are not in line with that followed by BPCL. However considering the nature of transactions the
impact is not expected to be material had the accounting policy of BPCL been followed.
22. The accounts of Central UP Gas Limited have been drawn for the period 13 months and 4 days i.e. from the
date of incorporation 25.02.2005 to 31.03.2006.
23. Jointly Controlled Operations
BPCL has entered into production sharing oil and gas exploration contracts with the Government of India and
other body corporates as follows:
Name Participating Interest of BPCL (%)
31.03.2006 31.03.2005
IN INDIA
Under NELP – IV Block
KG/DWN/2002/1 10% 10%
MN/DWN/2002/1 10% 10%
CY/ONN/2002/2 40% 40%
OUTSIDE INDIA NIL NIL
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
PG-144-164-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:32 AM 155
156 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
24. Interests in Joint Ventures
The Group’s interest in Joint Ventures, accounted for using propor tionate consolidation are:
(Rs. in Million)
As at As at
31/03/2006 31/03/2005
I ASSETS
1. Fixed Assets
- Gross Block 5,899.35 4,878.71
- Less: Depreciation 1,170.54 725.43
- Net Block 4,728.81 4,153.28
2. Capital work-in-progress 1,084.95 940.54
3. Investments 375.51 243.30
4. Current Assets, Loans and Advances
a) Inventories 531.51 514.59
b) Sundry Debtors 371.75 330.55
c) Cash and Bank Balances 393.04 444.49
d) Other Current Assets 4.85 1.68
e) Loans & Advances 322.01 236.89
5. Miscellaneous Expenditure to the extent not written off or adjusted 7.66 8.09
II LIABILITIES
1. Shareholders Funds – Reserves & Surplus 900.87 555.33
2. Loan Fund
a) Secured Funds 2,651.60 2,357.09
b) Unsecured Funds 320.91 213.87
3. Deferred Tax – Liability 141.48 57.80
4. Current Liabilities & Provisions
a) Liabilities 588.94 873.87
b) Provisions 49.01 15.64
(Rs. in Million)
2005-06 2004-05
III INCOME
1. Sales and related income 7,524.59 4,903.85
Excise Duty (408.04) (372.29)
7,116.55 4,531.56
2. Miscellaneous Income 74.78 62.48
3. Increase/(Decrease) in Inventory 35.85 32.98
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
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157 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
(Rs. in Million)
2005-06 2004-05
IV EXPENSES
1. Purchase of Products for Resale 225.41 176.72
2. Raw Material Consumed 5,437.40 3,224.91
3. Packages Consumed 115.10 100.10
4. Excise Duty on Inventory differential 11.32 4.08
5. Transpor tation 91.32 82.10
6. Consumption of stores, spares and materials 34.10 23.00
7. Power and Fuel 74.46 60.23
8. Employees’ remuneration and other benefits 161.42 135.84
9. Interest 230.97 191.95
10. Other operating and administration expenses 419.06 421.34
11. Depreciation / Amor tisation 371.84 302.83
12. Miscellaneous Expenditure Written off 0.79 3.07
13. Prior period income/(expenses) net (2.66) 1.14
14. Profit before Taxation 51.34 (98.01)
15. Provision for Taxation
a) Current Tax 163.13 107.83
b) Fringe Benefit Tax 11.49 —
c) Deferred Tax (Net) 83.68 (14.02)
16. Excess/(Shor t) provision for Taxation in earlier years
written back/provided for 0.00 0.01
17. Profit after Taxation (206.96) (191.81)
(Rs. in Million)
As at As at
31/03/2006 31/03/2005
V OTHER MATTERS
1. Contingent Liabilities 225.79 203.60
2. Capital Commitments 2,875.66 792.31
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
25. Capital Commitments and Contingent Liabilities :
25.1 Capital Commitments :
Estimated amount of contracts remaining to be executed on
capital account and not provided for 8,207.29 8,496.10
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 2,875.66 792.31
Total 11,082.95 9,288.41
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
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158 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
25.2 Contingent Liabilities :
(a) In respect of taxation matters of prior years 1,799.25 263.80
(b) Other Matters :
(i) Surety bonds executed on behalf of other oil companies
for excise/customs duties for which BPCL has signed as surety 1,317.45 1,275.75
(ii) Claims against the Corporation not acknowledged as debts :
(a) Excise and customs matters 1,834.79 4,273.31
(b) Sales tax matters 10,886.53 7,687.57
(c) Others 7,430.24 6,953.37
These include Rs. 4,111.34 million (previous year
Rs. 3,727.68 million) against which the Corporation has a
recourse for recovery and Rs. 1,122.94 million (previous year
Rs. 1,559.82 million) on capital account.
(c) Share of interest in Joint Ventures 225.79 203.60
26. 26.1 The net amount of exchange difference debited to the Profit and Loss Account is Rs. 1,337.67 million including
Rs. Nil pertaining to share of interest in joint ventures (previous year credited Rs. 39.85 million including Rs. NIL
pertaing to share of interest in joint venture)
26.2 The amount of exchange difference credited to the carrying cost of fixed assets is Rs. 3.06 million (previous year
debit Rs. 16.77 million)
26.3 The exchange difference amounting to Rs. 1,033.88 million including Rs. Nil pertaining to share of interest in
joint ventures (previous year Rs. 94.11 million including Rs. Nil pertaining to share of interest in joint ventures) in
respect of forward exchange contract will be recognised in the Profit and Loss Account of one or more accounting
periods.
27. Managerial Remuneration : 2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Salary and allowances 4.67 8.17
Contributions to Provident Fund and other funds 0.71 0.86
Other benefits 3.64 4.10
Share of interest in Joint Ventures 6.73 5.65
15.75 18.78
28. Remuneration to Auditors : 2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
(a) Audit fees
— Statutory Auditor 1.08 1.38
— Branch Auditor 0.35 —
(b) Fees for other services-certification.
— Statutory Auditor 1.24 1.04
— Branch Auditor 0.15 —
(c) Reimbursement of out of pocket expenses
— Statutory Auditor 0.12 0.17
— Branch Auditor 0.02 —
(d) Share of Interest in Joint Ventures 0.84 0.89
3.80 3.48
29. Research and development :
2004-05
Rs. Million Rs. Million
(a) Revenue Expenditure 121.68 169.36
(b) Capital Expenditure 67.07 123.13
188.75 292.49
30. Figures have been regrouped wherever necessary
SCHEDULE ‘X’ — (CONSOLIDATED) (Contd.)
31/03/2005
Rs. Million Rs. Million
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159 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
CASH FLOW STATEMENT (CONSOLIDATED)
For the year ended 31st March 2006 2005
Notes Rs. Million Rs. Million
A Cash Flow from Operating Activities
Net Profit Before tax and prior period items 8,525.28 29,984.99
Adjustments for :
Depreciation 9,457.92 8,809.71
Interest paid 3,052.22 2,468.94
Foreign Exchange Fluctuations Note 3 490.12 (28.68)
(Profit) / Loss on Sale of fixed assets (28.12) (38.86)
(Profit) / Loss on Sale of investments 4.70 —
Income from Investments (721.41) (952.32)
Dividend Received (268.05) (15.25)
Other Non-Cash items 701.56 (352.79)
Interest Income (5.31) —
Operating Profit before Working Capital Changes 21,208.91 39,875.73
Invested in :
Trade Receivables 7,265.66 679.10
Other receivables 19,149.43 (3,764.96)
Inventory (15,439.45) (26,166.46)
Current Liabilities & Payables (10,958.44) 11,668.96
Cash generated from Operations 21,226.11 22,292.37
Direct Taxes paid (2,181.26) (8,863.19)
Cash flow before prior period items 19,044.85 13,429.17
Prior Period Items 191.33 (108.28)
Net Cash from Operating Activities 19,236.18 13,320.89
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160 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
CASH FLOW STATEMENT (CONSOLIDATED) — (Contd.)
For the year ended 31st March 2006 2005
Notes Rs. Million Rs. Million
B Net Cash Flow on Investing Activities
Purchase of fixed assets (22,120.41) (19,208.99)
Adjustment for retirement/reclassification of Fixed Assets (68.57) (2.13)
Sale of fixed assets 111.70 210.64
Capital Grant Received 31.18 —
Adjustments to Pre Operating Expenses (77.03) 280.03
Investment in Petroleum India International (AOP) (6.60) (8.36)
Purchase of Investment (35,506.75) (22.36)
Sale of Investments 6,574.02 3,000.01
Income from Investment 721.41 921.27
Interest Received 5.31 —
Dividend Received 268.05 15.25
Net Cash Flow on Investing Activities (50,067.69) (14,814.64)
C Net Cash Flow on Financing Activities
Increase in Share Capital 11.31 —
Long term Borrowings 6,361.04 6,639.10
Repayment of loans (6,767.39) (11,265.82)
Interest paid (3,480.23) (2,893.24)
Interim Dividend Paid — (1,500.00)
Dividend Paid (3,156.53) (4,567.80)
Corporate Dividend Tax (555.04) (986.02)
Exchange difference on forward contracts (93.82) (160.78)
Net Cash Flow on Financing Activities (7,680.66) (14,734.56)
D Net Increase / (Decrease) in Cash and Cash equivalents (38,512.17) (16,228.31)
(A+B+C)
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161 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
CASH FLOW STATEMENT (CONSOLIDATED) — (Contd.)
Rs. Million Rs. Million
Cash and Cash equivalents as at 31st March 2005 2004
Cash in Hand 1,551.23 4,265.34
Cash at Bank 5,631.58 5,840.82
Cash in transit 65.64 123.19
Cash Credit from scheduled banks (11,513.24) (14,811.51)
Unsecured loans from scheduled banks / ICDs / CPs (20,354.26) (3,817.84)
(24,619.05) (8,400.00)
Cash and Cash equivalents as at 31st March 2006 2005
Cash in Hand 2,309.80 1,551.23
Cash at Bank 3,262.82 5,622.31
Cash in transit 146.05 65.64
Cash Credit from scheduled banks (19,205.42) (11,513.24)
Unsecured loans from scheduled banks / ICDs / CPs (40,994.47) (20,354.26)
CBLOs (8,650.00)
(63,131.22) (24,628.31)
Net change in Cash and Cash equivalents (38,512.17) (16,228.31)
Explanatory Notes to Cash Flow Statement
1. The Cash Flow Statement is prepared in accordance with the format prescribed by Securities and Exchange
Board of India and as per Accounting Standard 3 issued by the Institute of Char tered Accountants of India.
2. In Par t-A of the Cash Flow Statement, figures in brackets indicate deductions made from the Net Profit for
deriving the net cash flow from operating activities. In Par t-B and Par t-C, figures in brackets indicate cash
outflows.
3. The net profit / loss arising due to conversion of current assets / current liabilities / receivable / payable in
foreign currency is furnished under the head “Foreign Exchange Fluctuations” .
4. “Other Non-Cash items” include excess provisions written back, foreign exchange adjustments, diminution in
value of investment, transfer to Capital reserve, Bad debts and materials written off and miscellaneous
adjustments not affecting cash flow.
5. “Purchase of Fixed Assets” include the reduction in liability of Rs. 3.06 million (2004-05 - additional liability
Rs. 16.74 million) arising on account of exchange rate variation during the year.
6. Figures of the previous year have been regrouped wherever necessary, to conform to current year’s
presentation.
7. Opening balance of the current year may not match with previous year’s figures on account of merger of
erstwhile KRL with BPCL
For and on behalf of the Board of Directors As per our attached repor t of even date
Sd/- For and on behalf of
ASHIK SINHA V. SANKAR AIYAR & CO.
Chairman and Managing Director Char tered Accountants
Sd/-
S. VENKATRAMAN
Par tner
Place : New Delhi Membership No. 34319
Dated : 31st October, 2006
PG-144-164-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:33 AM 161
162 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
DETAILS OF SUBSIDIARY COMPANY
NUMALIGARH REFINERY LIMITED
BALANCE SHEET AS AT 31ST MARCH, 2006
Rs. Million
I. SOURCES OF FUNDS
1. Shareholders’ funds :
Share Capital 7,356.32
Reserves and Surplus 9,556.96
16,913.28
2. Loan funds :
Secured Loans 4,723.59
Unsecured Loans 1,238.30
5,961.89
3. Deferred tax liability (net) 3,955.29
TOTAL 26,830.46
II. APPLICATION OF FUNDS
1. Fixed Assets :
Gross block 26,753.87
Less : Depreciation and amortisation 7,385.25
Net block 19,368.62
Capital work-in-progress 2,970.61
22,339.23
2. Investments 643.09
3. Current assets, loans and advances :
Inventories 7,980.93
Sundry debtors 2,680.03
Cash and bank balances 309.02
Other current assets 2.76
Loans and advances 1,846.23
12,818.97
Less : Current liabilities and provisions :
Liabilities 6,163.64
Provisions 2,807.19
8,970.83
Net current assets 3,848.14
TOTAL 26,830.46
ANNEXURE TO THE DIRECTORS’ REPORT
ANNEXURE E
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163 Annual Repor t 2005-2006
PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST MARCH, 2006
Rs. Million
INCOME
Sale of products & related income 58,203.67
Less : Excise Duty Paid (5,523.25)
52,680.42
Miscellaneous income 187.78
Increase/(Decrease) in Inventory 938.68
TOTAL 53,806.88
EXPENDITURE
Purchase of products for resale 395.00
Raw materials consumed 42,606.15
Excise Duty on Inventory differential 39.42
Other Duties, taxes etc. and other charges applicable to products 1,575.86
Transportation 1,296.09
Consumption of stores, spares and materials 260.81
Power and Fuel 12.26
Employees’ remuneration and other benefits 384.26
Interest 347.11
Other operating and administration expenses 767.01
Depreciation 1,394.62
TOTAL 49,078.59
Profit 4,728.29
Prior period income/(expenses) net 28.05
Profit before tax 4,756.34
Provision for Taxation
- Current Tax 406.30
- Fringe Benefit Tax 11.91
- Deferred Tax (Net) (151.21)
Profit after tax 4,489.34
Balance brought forward 0.10
Disposable Profit 4,489.44
Appropriations:
Proposed dividend 1,397.70
Corporate Dividend Tax on proposed dividend 196.03
1,593.73
Transfer to General Reserve 2,895.61
Balance Carried to Balance Sheet 0.10
Earnings per Share
- Basic & Diluted 6.10
DETAILS OF SUBSIDIARY COMPANY
NUMALIGARH REFINERY LIMITED
PG-144-164-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:33 AM 163
164 Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
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PG-144-164-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:33 AM 164
BHARAT PETROLEUM CORPORATION LIMITED
Regd. Office : Bharat Bhavan, 4 & 6 Currimbhoy Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai – 400 001.
FORM OF PROXY
Folio/Client ID No.
DP ID No.
I/We,
of
in the district of
being a shareholder/s of the above named Company hereby appoint
of in the district of
or failing him of
in the district of
as my/our proxy to attend and vote for
me/us on my/our behalf at the 53
rd
Annual General Meeting of the Company to be held on Monday, 18th December, 2006 and at any adjournments thereof.
Signed this day of 2006
(Shareholder)
Note : Proxy must be deposited at the Registered Office of the Corporation not less than 48 hours before the time for holding the Meeting.
BHARAT PETROLEUM CORPORATION LIMITED
Regd. Office : Bharat Bhavan, 4 & 6 Currimbhoy Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai – 400 001.
ADMISSION CARD/ATTENDANCE SLIP
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING TO BE HELD ON MONDAY, 18TH DECEMBER, 2006 AT 10.30 A.M. IN THE Y.B. CHAVAN AUDITORIUM AT
YESHWANTRAO CHAVAN PRATISHTHAN, GENERAL JAGANNATH BHOSALE MARG, MUMBAI 400 021.
Name of the Shareholder :
Folio /Client ID No. :
No. of Shares held :
Name of the Proxy :
I/We hereby record my/our presence at the 53RD ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING of the Company on Monday, 18th December, 2006 at 10.30 a.m.
in the Y. B. Chavan Auditorium, at Yeshwantrao Chavan Pratishthan, General Jagannath Bhosale Marg, Mumbai 400 021.
Signature of the Shareholder/Proxy
Name :
(Shareholder/Representative of Body Corporate/Proxy attending the Meeting must bring the above Admission Card/Attendance Slip to the Meeting
and handover at the entrance, after duly signing)
Affix
15 Paise
Revenue
Stamp
PROXY 2006-1-2-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:34 AM 1
IN CASE SHAREHOLDER IS A BODY CORPORATE/INSTITUTION
Name of the Body Corporate Name of the Representative
(Shareholder)
Folio / Client ID No. Designation
I hereby record my presence at the 53
rd
Annual General Meeting of the Company on Monday, 18th December 2006, at 10.30 a.m. in the Y.B. Chavan
Auditorium at Yeshwantrao Chavan Pratishthan, General Jagannath Bhosale Marg, Mumbai 400 021.
Signature of the representative of the
Body Corporate Shareholder
In case the Shareholder is a Body Corporate, certified copy of a Resolution of the Board of Directors or a governing body of the Institution regarding
appointment of a Representative to attend the Meeting be enclosed or be sent in advance. The Representative should sign the above Attendance Slip
on behalf of the Body Corporate/Institution represented by him.
(Shareholder/Representative of Body Corporate/Proxy attending the Meeting must bring the above Admission Card/Attendance Slip to the Meeting
and handover at the entrance, after duly signing)
PROXY 2006-1-2-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:34 AM 2
Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited
Regd Office: Bharat Bhavan, 4 & 6, Currimbhoy Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai 400 001.
Yeejle Hesì^esefue³ece keÀe@HeexjsMeve efueefceìs[
UNAUDITED FINANCIAL RESULTS (PROVISIONAL) FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 30TH SEPTEMBER 2006
Unaudited Audited Consolidated results for
Sr. Particulars Three Months Three Months Half Year Half Year Accounting Half Year Half Year Accounting
No. ended ended ended ended Year ended ended ended Year ended
30-09-2006 30-09-2005 30-09-2006 30-09-2005 31-03-2006 30-09-2006 30-09-2005 31-03-2006
(Unaudited) (Unaudited) (Audited)
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
A Physical Performance
1. Crude Throughput (Million tonnes) 5.00 4.03 9.85 7.40 17.24 11.14 8.30 19.37
2. Market Sales (Million tonnes) 5.42 4.99 11.20 10.39 21.63 11.29 10.43 21.79
3. Sales Growth (%) 8.62 (0.60) 7.80 (1.23) (0.09) 8.25 (1.14) (0.05)
4. Export Sales (Million tonnes) 0.66 0.21 1.05 0.36 1.39 1.05 0.37 1.39
B Financial Performance (Rs. in Million)
1. Sales/Income from Operations 288,323 189,565 542,661 376,108 851,496 550,235 381,142 862,229
Less: Excise Duty paid 23,149 19,167 50,380 34,719 81,137 53,945 36,811 87,068
Net Sales/Income from Operations 265,174 170,398 492,281 341,389 770,359 496,290 344,331 775,161
2. Other Income 2,207 1,503 3,298 2,393 4,653 2,412 1,388 3,994
3. Total Expenditure 248,036 169,176 477,752 341,293 760,786 477,285 340,867 757,928
a) (Increase)/Decrease in stock in trade (4,609) (20,400) (447) (14,395) (7,544) (2,169) (15,790) (8,518)
b) Consumption of raw materials 120,207 76,843 226,186 131,481 323,660 261,353 151,805 371,703
c) Staff cost 2,087 1,864 4,501 3,942 8,816 4,796 4,193 9,352
d) Purchase of products for resale 118,179 98,057 223,980 196,864 389,844 187,259 175,086 334,949
e) Other expenditure 12,172 12,812 23,532 23,401 46,010 26,046 25,573 50,442
4. Interest 920 461 1,828 931 2,474 2,029 1,224 3,052
5. Depreciation and Amortisation 1,964 1,798 3,778 3,627 7,680 4,668 4,482 9,458
6. Profit /(Loss) before Tax (1+2-3-4-5) 16,461 466 12,221 (2,069) 4,072 14,720 (854) 8,717
7. Provision for Taxation - Current including Fringe Benefit Tax 3,127 38 3,152 62 141 3,584 1,811 733
8. Profit /(Loss) after Current tax (6-7) 13,334 428 9,069 (2,131) 3,931 11,136 (2,665) 7,984
9. Provision for Taxation - Deferred 749 240 749 484 1,025 835 (82) 958
10. Excess / (Short) provision for Taxation in earlier
years written back / provided for — — — 10 10 — 10 10
11. Net Profit / (Loss) (8-9+10) 12,585 188 8,320 (2,605) 2,916 10,301 (2,573) 7,036
12. Minority interest 992 584 1,663
13. Net Profit / (Loss) for the group (11-12) 9,309 (3,157) 5,373
14. Paid-up Equity Share Capital** 3,615 3,615 3,615 3,615 3,615 3,615 3,615 3,615
(face value of Rs. 10 per share)
15. Reserves excluding revaluation reserves
(as per balance sheet) 87,779 95,575
16. Earnings per share (Rs.) - Basic & Diluted 34.81 0.52 23.01 (7.21) 8.07 25.75 (8.73) 14.86
17. Aggregate of Public Shareholding
- Number of Shares 129,213,326 129,213,326 129,213,326 129,213,326 129,213,326 129,213,326 129,213,326 129,213,326
- Percentage of Shareholding 35.74 35.74 35.74 35.74 35.74 35.74 35.74 35.74
**(Includes 61.54 million shares issued on 13-10-06 to shareholders of erstwhile Kochi Refineries Ltd.)
Notes:
1 The amalgamation of Kochi Refineries Limited (KRL) with BPCL with effect from 1
st
April 2004
(the Appointed Date) has been approved by the Ministry of Company Affairs (MCA) on
18
th
August 2006. The effect of merger has been given in the financial statements for the year
ended 31.03.2006. The accounts for the quarter/ half year ended 30
th
September 2006 have
been compiled on merged basis. The figures for the corresponding period of the previous year
have been suitably recasted to make them comparable.
One of the shareholders has filed a petition challenging the MCA’s order, in the Delhi High Court,
that is pending adjudication.
2 The market sales during the half year ended 30
th
September 2006 have increased to 11.20 MMT
from 10.39 MMT achieved during the corresponding period of the previous year. The increase
is mainly in ATF (37.53%), LPG (4.79%), MS Retail (5.50%), HSD Retail (15.45%), SKO Retail
(0.15%), HSD Direct (17.63%), Furnace Oil (5.90%), Lubricants (11.79%) and LNG (22.20%)
offset by reduction in LSHS (-31.44%) and Naphtha (-19.78%).
3 During the half year ended 30
th
September 2006, subsidy claim towards sale of SKO (PDS), and
LPG (Domestic) has been provisionally accounted at 1/3
rd
of the rates approved by Government
of India for 2002-03.
4 Financial results of the half year have been affected due to impact on account of high crude oil
and product prices which could not be fully passed on to the consumers. The under recovery
on HSD, MS, SKO (PDS) and LPG (Domestic) was partially compensated by the upstream oil
companies as advised by the Government of India. Accordingly Rs.27,187 million has been
accounted towards discount received for purchase of Crude Oil, LPG and SKO from ONGC and
GAIL.
Further, under arrangement for sharing of under recovery on SKO (PDS) and LPG (Domestic)
by Refineries Rs.299.16 million (net) has been provisionally accounted during the period as
discount on purchase from the refineries and an amount of Rs.32,120.50 million has been
accounted for in the current period under Sales/ Income from operations as per approval received
from the Government of India for issuance of Special Oil bonds in lieu of the under realisation
suffered by the Company.
5 The Gross Refining Margin (GRM) during the half year ended 30
th
September 2006 (net of
discounts) was USD 2.94 per barrel (April-September 2005 USD 3.77 per barrel) for Mumbai
Refinery and USD 2.37 per barrel (April-September 2005 USD 6.34 per barrel) for Kochi Refinery.
6 Depreciation includes Rs. 589.63 million on account of LPG cylinders as compared to
Rs. 833.64 million during the previous year. LPG cylinders continued to be depreciated at 100%.
7 During the quarter ended 30
th
September 2006, there was no complaint received from any
investor through SEBI/ Stock Exchanges. No complaint was pending at the beginning or end of
the quarter
8 In view of amalgamation of Kochi Refineries Limited (KRL) with BPCL, the allotment of 61.54
million shares of BPCL in the swap ratio of 4 fully paid up equity shares of BPCL for every 9 fully
paid up equity shares of KRL, as per the Scheme of Amalgamation, was approved on
13-10-2006 and necessary action for listing of the shares are being taken by the company.
9 The Auditors have completed limited review of the stand alone financial results of the Corporation
for the quarter ended 30
th
September 2006. Further, the Accounts were reviewed by the Audit
Committee on 31
st
October, 2006 before submission to the Board.
10 The accounts for the year ended 31
st
March 2006 are subject to review by the Comptroller and
Auditor General of India under Section 619(4) of the Companies Act, 1956.
Notes on un-audited Consolidated Financial Results:
1 The Consolidated Financial Results for the half year ended 30
th
September 2006 are unaudited
and have been prepared in line with the requirements of Accounting Standard 21 – ‘Consolidated
Financial Statements’ and Accounting Standard 27 – ‘Financial Reporting of Interests in Joint
Ventures’.
UDF PAGES 1-2-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:37 AM 2
SEGMENT-WISE REVENUE, RESULTS AND CAPITAL EMPLOYED
Unaudited Audited
Sr. Particulars Three Months Three Months Half Year Half Year Accounting
No. ended ended ended ended Year ended
30-09-2006 30-09-2005 30-09-2006 30-09-2005 31-03-2006
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7)
(Rs. in Million)
1 SEGMENT REVENUE
a) Downstream Petroleum 265,752 170,906 493,316 342,387 772,895
b) Exploration & Production of Hydrocarbons — — — — —
Sub-Total 265,752 170,906 493,316 342,387 772,895
Less: Inter-Segment Revenue — — — — —
TOTAL REVENUE 265,752 170,906 493,316 342,387 772,895
2 SEGMENT RESULTS
a) Profit before Tax, Interest Income, Interest Expediture and Dividend from each Segment
i) Downstream Petroleum 15,488 (5) 12,259 (2,467) 4,838
ii) Exploration & Production of Hydrocarbons (139) (63) (163) (66) (145)
Sub-Total of (a) 15,349 (68) 12,096 (2,533) 4,693
b) Interest Expenditure 920 461 1,828 931 2,474
c) Other Un-allocable Expenditure Net of Un-allocable Income (2,032) (995) (1,953) (1,395) (1,853)
Profit before Tax (a - b - c) 16,461 466 12,221 (2,069) 4,072
3 CAPITAL EMPLOYED
(Segment Assets - Segment Liabilities)
a) Downstream Petroleum 130,487 121,627 130,487 121,627 144,966
b) Exploration & Production of Hydrocarbons (82) (60) (82) (60) (61)
c) Others (Unallocated - Corporate) (30,691) (34,694) (30,691) (34,694) (53,511)
TOTAL 99,714 86,873 99,714 86,873 91,394
NOTES:
1 The Corporation is engaged in the following business segments:
a) Downstream petroleum i.e. Refining and Marketing of Petroleum Products
b) Exploration and Production of Hydrocarbons (E & P)
Segments have been identified taking into account the nature of activities and the nature of risks and returns.
2 Segment Revenue comprises of Turnover (net of excise duties), subsidy received from Government of India, Net claim from / (surrender to ) PPAC, Other income (excluding dividend income, interest
income and investment income).
3 There are no geographical segments.
Figures have been regrouped wherever necessary.
The above unaudited quarterly results of Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited and the unaudited half yearly Consolidated Financial results have been taken on record by the Board at its meeting held on
31st October 2006.
For and on behalf of the Board of Directors
Sd/-
Place : New Delhi S.K.Joshi
Date : 31.10.2006 Director (Finance)
UDF PAGES 1-2-FINAL.p65 12/1/2006, 2:37 AM 3
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If not delivered please return to : BHARAT PETROLEUM CORPORATION LIMITED, Secretarial Department, Fourth Floor,
Bharat Bhavan, 4 & 6 Currimbhoy Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai - 400 001.
BOOK POST
UNDER CERTIFICATE OF POSTING
flÊÁ·¸∑§ Á⁄U¬Ù≈¸U
ANNUAL REPORT
2005-2006
ENVELOPE-FINAL.P65 12/1/2006, 2:38 AM 1