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Characterization

SEDDS/SMEDDS:-

of

The
various
ways
characterize
SEDDS
compiled below.

to
are

1. Equillibrium Phase Diagram.


Although self-emulsification is
a dynamic nonequilibrium
process involving interfacial
phenomena, information can be
obtained
about
selfemulsification
using
equilibrium phase behavior.[1]
It
is
constructed
for
development of SEDDS that
help in determining optimum
concentration
of
different
excipients necessary to obtain
homogenous pre concentrates,
self-emulsification ability and
drug loading. Each corner of
phase diagram represents 100%
of particular component.[2] An
equilibrium phase diagram
enables comparison of different
of different surfactants and their
synergy with co solvent or co
surfactant.
2. Turbidity measurement.

It measures whether dispersion


reaches equilibrium rapidly and
in reproducible time. The
measurement is carried out on
Hatch turbidity meter which is
attached
to
dissolution
apparatus and optical clarity of
formulation is taken every 15
sec. to determine clarity of
emulsion formed.[2]
3. Droplet size.
Droplet size is important factor
in
self-emulsification
performances
because
it
determines rate and extent of
drug release as well as stability
of emulsion. Photon correlation
spectroscopy, microscopy or
coulter counter methods can be
used to determine droplet
size.[2] More detailed analysis
of droplet size and distribution
can be done by cryogenic
transmission
electron
microscopy (cryo-TEM).
4. Electron microscope studies.
Freeze-fracture
electron
microscopy has been used to
study surface characteristics of
such
dispersed
systems.
Because of the high lability of

the samples and the possibility


of artifacts, electron microscopy
is considered a somewhat
misleading technique.[1]
5.Zeta potential measurement.
This is used to identify the
charge of the droplets. In
conventional
SEDDS,
the
charge on an oil droplet is
negative because of the
presence of free fatty acids. But
incorporation of cationic lipids
(oleyamines) yields cationic
SEDDS/SMEDDS.[2]
6. Emulsification time.
It can be determined by mixing
the preconcentrates of Tween
85
or
medium
chain
triglycerides
system
using
rotating paddle to promote
emulsification.
Once
emulsification was complete,
samples were taken for particle
sizing by photon correlation
spectroscopy,
and
selfemulsified
systems
were
compared with homogenized
systems. The process of selfemulsification was observed
using light microscopy. By this
method mechanism of self-

emulsification
identified.[1]

can

be

7. Liquification time.
It is estimated time required by
solid SEDDS to melt in vivo in
absence
of
agitation
to
simulated GI condition. One
dosage form is covered in a
transparent polyethylene film
and tied to the bulb of a
thermometer by means of a
thread. The thermometer with
attached tablets is placed in a
round bottom flask containing
250 ml of simulated gastric
fluid without pepsin maintained
at
37
18C. The time taken for
liquefaction is subsequently
noted.[1]
8. Conductivity measurement.
It is able to determine the point
of aqueous phase addition
where system changes from oil
continuous
to
aqueous
continuous phase.[2]

Branded
technology
SEDDS/SMEDDS:-

for

Reference:1.

2.

Kohli, K., et al., Self-emulsifying


drug delivery systems: an approach
to enhance oral bioavailability. Drug
Discovery Today, 2010. 15(2122): p.
958-965.
Sarpal, K., Y.B. Pawar, and A.K.
Bansal, Self-Emulsifying drug deliery
system: A strategy to improve oral
bioavailability. CRIPS, 2010. 11(3): p.
42-49.