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Addressing Modes

Addressing
g Modes

The way the operands are chosen during


program execution is dependent on the
addressing mode of the instructions.

The addressing mode specifies a rule for


i t
interpreting
ti or modifying
dif i th
the address
dd
fifield
ld off th
the
instruction before the operand is actually
referenced.

Addressing Modes

Computers use addressing mode techniques


for the purpose of accommodating one or both
of the following provisions:

1.

to give programming versatility to the user by


providing
idi such
h ffacilities
iliti as pointers
i t
tto memory,
counters for loop control, indexing of data and
program
p
g
relocation.
To reduce the number of bits in the addressing
field of the instruction.

2.

Addressing Modes

Immediate
Direct
Indirect
Register
Register Indirect
Displacement (Indexed)
Stack
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Immediate Addressing
g

Operand is part of instruction


Operand = address field
e.g. ADD 5

Add 5 to contents of accumulator


5 is operand

No memoryy reference to fetch data


Fast
Limited range
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Immediate Addressing Diagram


Instruction
i
Opcode

Operand

Direct Addressing
g

Address field contains address of operand


Effective address (EA) = address field (A)
e g ADD A
e.g.

Add contents of cell A to accumulator


Look
L k iin memory at address
dd
A ffor operand
d
Single memory reference to access data

No additional calculations to work out


effective address
Limited address space
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Direct Addressing Diagram


Instruction
i
Opcode

Address A
Memory

O
Operand
d

Indirect Addressing (1)

Memory cell pointed to by address field contains


the address of (pointer to) the operand
EA = (A)

Look in A, find address (A) and look there for operand


e.g. ADD (A)
Add contents of cell pointed to by contents of A to
accumulator

Indirect Addressing (2)

Large address space


2n where n = word length
May be nested, multilevel, cascaded

e.g. EA = (((A)))

Draw the diagram yourself

Multiple
M
lti l memory accesses tto fifind
d operand
d
Hence slower
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Indirect Addressing Diagram


Instruction
Opcode

Address A
Memory
Pointer to operand

Operand

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Register Addressing (1)

Operand is hold in register named in


address field
EA = R
Limited number of registers
Very small address field needed

Shorter instructions
Faster instruction fetch
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Register Addressing (2)

No memory access
Very fast execution
Very limited address space
Multiple registers helps performance

Requires good assembly programming or


compiler writing
N.B. C programming

register int a;

Like Direct addressing


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Register Addressing Diagram


Instruction
i
Opcode

Register Address R
Registers

O
Operand
d

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Register
g
Indirect Addressing
g

Like indirect addressing


EA = (R)
( )
Operand is in memory cell pointed to by
g
R
contents of register
Large address space (2n)
One fewer memory access than indirect
addressing
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Register Indirect Addressing Diagram


Instruction
i
Opcode

Register Address R

Memoryy

Registers

Pointer to Operand

Operand

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Displacement Addressing

EA = A + (R)
Address field hold two values

A = base value
R = register that holds displacement
or vice versa

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Displacement Addressing Diagram


Instruction
i
Opcode Register R Address A
Memory
Registers

Pointer to Operand

O
Operand
d

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Relative Addressing

A version of displacement addressing


R = Program counter,
counter PC
EA = A + (PC)
i gett operand
i.e.
d ffrom A cells
ll ffrom currentt
location pointed to by PC

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Base-Register
Base
Register Addressing

A holds displacement
R holds pointer to base address
R may be explicit or implicit
e.g. segmentt registers
i t
in
i 80x86
80 86

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Indexed Addressing

A = base
R = displacement
EA = A + R
G d for
Good
f accessing
i arrays

EA = A + R
R++

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Combinations

Postindex
EA = ((A)) + (R)
( )

Preindex
EA = (A+(R))

(Draw the diagrams)

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Stack Addressing

Operand is (implicitly) on top of stack


eg
e.g.

ADD Pop top two items from stack


and add

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