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Plant Layout

Submitted ByAnil Yadav Kavita Yadav Ridhi Jain G. S. Subramanium Varundeep Singh
Umakant

INDEX
Statement of Study Introduction Factors Considered for Layout Construction Steps
in Facility Design 1) Procure the Basic Data 2) Analyze the Basic Data 3) Desig
n the Production Process Operation Break Down For COTTON SHIRT Machine Requireme
nt Calculation 4) Plan Material Flow Pattern 5) Material Flow for Each Departmen
t 6) Consider General Material Handling Plan 7) Calculate the Equipment Requirem
ents 8) Plan Individual Work Areas 9) Select the Specific Material Handling Equi
pment 10) Coordinate the Group of Related Operations 10) Design Activity Relatio
nships 11) Determine the Space requirements 13) Determine the Storage requiremen
ts 14) Allocate Activity Area to Total Space 15) Consider Building Types 16) MAS
TER LAYOUT 17) Evaluation 18) Installation & Implementation Check List Conclusio
n 3 3 5 7 13 13 20 21 24 25 31 40 42 45 50 57 57 66 69 80 82 82 83 83 84 85

Statement of the study: To prepare a plant layout for a shirt manufacturing unit
with a capacity of 1250 shirts per day. Objective: Preparation of a layout plan
for a shirt manufacturing unit. Need of the study: Designing an efficient layou
t helps a lot in reducing the time taken by the material to travel in the depart
ment. It helps in:
Optimum flow of the material through each department
Efficien
t operation of the various related processes. Increase in efficiency.
Introduction The design of a process plant is a complex activity that will usual
ly involve many different disciplines over a considerable period of time.
The de
sign may also go through many stages from the original research and development
phases, through conceptual design, detailed process design and onto detailed eng
ineering design and equipment selection. Many varied and complex factors includi
ng safety, health, the environment, economic and technical issues may have to be
considered before the design is finalized.
At each stage it is important that t
he personnel involved have the correct combination of technical competencies and
experience in order to ensure that all aspects of the design process are being
adequately addressed. Evidence of the qualifications, experience and training of
people involved in design activities should be presented in the Safety Report t
o demonstrate that the complex issues associated with design have been considere
d and a rigorous approach has been adopted.
The process design will often be an
iterative process with many different options being investigated and tested befo
re a process is selected. In many occasions a number of different options may be
available and final selection may depend upon a range of factors.

Factors considered for layout construction A. Movement


This factor includes inter and interdepartmental transport and handling at vario
us operations, at storage, at inspections, the type of equipments and methods fo
r material handling. This remains the most important factor while deciding upon
the selection of layout and utilization of available land. The various support d
epartments are planned such that they are near to their requisite sections of th
e plant, so that lesser material handling takes place as well as time is saved.
The material handling equipments are selected and designed as per departments req
uirement and interdepartmental movement. B. Product
This factor includes type of product, the range and variety it covers, the quant
ity in a shift, the number of shifts, necessary operations and their sequence. T
he product to be made is high quality dress shirt for export. There are various
variations of the dress shirt which have been covered while selecting the type o
f machinery. The operation breakdown was done along with the time study and the
final sequence of operations is decided by elimination of unnecessary operations
. C. Machinery
This factor includes the process, production equipments / furniture type, specia
l precautions to be taken, tools - their utilization and service net-work relate
d to the same. During selection of machinery, the type, productivity, price and
service provided by the supplier was kept in mind, so that no hassles are met in
future. D. Waiting
This factor includes permanent and temporary storage and delays and their locati
ons. The stores and warehouse are planned such that there is minimum amount of m
aterial handling happening between various departments and the store/warehouse.
Proper amount of inventory storage capacity is planned so that inventory cost ne
ver goes higher.

E. Man This factor includes direct workers, supervision and service help persona
ls, working hours, safety and manpower utilization method. Standard aisle space
for movement is provided, so that there is no problem in movement or supervision
. Proper amount of area for each workstation is provided so that the direct work
ers have no problem while doing the operations or during movement. All the safet
y precautions are undertaken while designing the layout like exits, emergency ex
its, fire extinguishers. F. Service
This factor includes service relating to employee facilities such as parking, lo
ckers, rooms, toilets, waiting rooms etc, service related to materials in terms
of quality, production controls, scheduling, dispatching, waste control etc and
service related to maintenance and repair, its schedule, frequency and intensity
. G. Building
This factor includes outside, inside building features, utility distribution, na
ture of service integration. The various blocks are planned as per their require
ment like of height, inside features, type of shedding, flooring etc. The final
building is to be done in two floors with Kirby sheds while the administration,
canteen and other utilities block would be an RCC structure.

Steps in facility design


1. Procure the basic data a) Sales forecast b) Quantity to be produced c) Produc
tion schedule d) Inventory policy e) Production routing f) Operations to be perf
ormed g) Production time standards h) Scrap percentages 2. Analyze the basic dat
a Above data is analyzed by the designer to determine the desired interrelations
hips and then preparing for subsequent planning steps. Assembly charts give a qu
ick and early glimpse of the possible flow of materials.
3. Design the production process The next is to decide how the raw material woul
d be converted to final part or product. Herein the production engineer designs
an OPERATION SHEET or PRODUCTION ROUTING, which is the tabulation of the steps i
nvolved in the production of a particular part and necessary details on related
items. Information on routing may include: i. Part names and number ii. Operatio
n numbers and sequence iii. Operations name and descriptions iv. Machine names a
nd numbers v. Production standards vi. Number of operators

vii. Space requirements viii. Material With the above information along with the
Assembly chart, an OPERATION PROCESS CHART is constructed, which provides a bet
ter impression of the potential material flow pattern. 4. Plan material flow pat
tern
Overall material flow pattern must be carefully designed to assure minimum movem
ent and expeditious interrelation of the several components part flow paths. Asse
mbly chart and production routing along with data on quantity and frequency of m
aterial movement, a preliminary material flow pattern should be developed, which
is then worked upon keeping in mind the factors affecting material flow to reac
h to a finalized pattern of flow of material in a particular unit. Flexibility f
or future expansion or any changes 5. Consider general material handling plan
Th
e material handling system converts the static flow pattern into a dynamic flow
of material through the plant. The ideal system consists of an integrated combin
ation of methods and effective methods of performing every handling task- from u
nloading of material to shipping of the final product. This involves both manual
and mechanical methods. Detailed handling methods should only after individual
work stations have been planned.
6. Calculate the equipment requirements
Any layout is incomplete w/o estimation
of how many pieces of each type of equipment (manufacturing, service and auxilia
ry) will be required. Preliminary requirement has been made while tabulating pro
duction routing. Here final decisions must be made as to the quantity of the equ
ipment as a basis for planning individual workstations and planning space requir
ements for each activity area.

Also the number of operators must also be determined. If final decisions regardi
ng above , have not been made, at least an estimation should be available.
7. Plan individual work areas
At this point, each operation , work station , are
a , process etc. must be planned in detail.
The interrelationships between machi
nes, operators and auxiliary equipment must be worked out. Each workstation must
be tied into the overall flow pattern and flow through each work station must b
e planned as an integral part of the overall plan.
8. Select the specific material handling equipment Specific methods of material
handling must be decided upon for each move of material or item. Many factors ne
ed to need to be considered in the selection of handling methods.
9. Coordinate the group of related operations Once the workplaces have been desi
gned, interrelationships between the work areas, related group of operations or
activities should also be planned. LAYOUT PLANNING CHART is a useful technique a
t this point.
10. Design activity relationships Production activities need to be inter-related
with auxiliary and service activities with respect to the degree of closeness r
equired by material, personnel and information flow.
11. Determine the storage requirements
Plans should now be crystallized in terms
of storage of raw material, WIP and finished products. Square foot and cubic fo
ot requirements should be calculated , with thought also given to the location o
f the storage areas in the layout.

2 storage location methods1. Randomized storage When an individual SKU can be stored in any available stor
age location. The closest available slot is designated as storage location 2. De
dicated storage When a SKU is assigned to a specific storage location or a set o
f locations. Fixed slot is defined.
12.
Plan the service and auxiliary activities (Administration, transportation and st
orage) A look at the plant service area planning sheet shows the complexity of t
his step. Depending on the size of the plant all of the service activities must
be carefully studied, in order to determine which are needed. Later, during the
space planning and final design aspects of the planning, the details of many of
these service activities must be worked out.
13. Determine space requirements
At this stage, a preliminary estimate of the to
tal space required for each activity in the facility can be made and cumulativel
y, designer can arrive at a first estimate of the total area.
Production space n
eeds are estimated with the aid of a production space requirement sheet. Space d
eterminations made at this stage are estimates. So these are on a little higher
side to ensure there is sufficient area. Only the final layout will show accurat
ely the total space needs.
14. Allocate activity areas to total space The total space requirement work shee
t provides for an area template for each activity listed.
Activity relationship
diagram is helpful in determining the relationships b/w the different area templ
ates.

Then an Area Allocation Diagram can be made based on the above, which depicts th
e inter-relationships between the internal flow of materials and the external fl
ow-by means of various transportation modes.
It will also depicts the relationsh
ip w/ surrounding facilities e.g. power plant, parking areas, storage places and
adjacent buildings. A preliminary layout has now been established.
15. Consider building types Building type, construction, shape and number of flo
ors should be considered. Building usually comes after the layout. The layout sh
ould never be squeezed into or altered to fit into a building, if it can be avoi
ded by designing a layout first. As imp a building might seem to be, it is the l
ayout that forms the basis for the efficient operation of an enterprise.
16. Construct the master layout This step is the culmination of the detailed wor
k and planning done in the preceding steps. Final Layout is prepared using templ
ates, tapes, etc. to a scale e.g. = 1 ft. Two dimensional or three dimensional mo
dels are prepared.
17. Evaluate, adjust and check the layout with appropriate personnel No matter h
ow carefully or scientifically previous steps have been carried out, there are a
lways personal and judgmental factors to be considered. Facility designer and hi
s associates should check over their work at this stage before submitting it for
approval. Preliminary checks might also be made with others who have contribute
d in designing the layout (production, methods, and personnel safety).
18. Obtain approvals In the final stages , the layout must be formally approved
by certain plant officials, depending on plant facilities and procedures.
19. Install layout A layout designer should carefully supervise the necessary wo
rk involved in the installation of the layout to make sure all work is done acco
rding to the plans in the

approved layout. Any changes, if desired, should be carefully investigated and a


pproved by the concerned authorities.
20. Follow up on implementation of layout Just because layout has been installed
as planned, there is no guarantee that will work as planned. No plant layout is
100% perfect and layout designer must continually take note of how the layout i
s affecting the production operations. Scope should be improvement must always b
e kept and incorporated if found desirable.

1. Procure basic data 2. Analysis Of Basic Data a. Product Information b. Tech P


ack c. Factory Information i. Foundation ii. Location iii. Electric Supply iv. N
earness to Labor Supply v. Proximity to external Economies Of Scale vi. Reputati
on Of Area vii. Transport and Communication Services viii. Government Support ix
. Opportunities For Expansion x. Development Agencies And Inward Investment xi.
Building Typology xii. Construction Details xiii. Description Of Floors xiv. Are
a Of Factory- Department-wise xv. Government And Industry Compliances
Product information:
Sketch (front)
Sketch (back)

TECH PACK BUYER ADDRESS :GENUINE GARMENT EXPORT COMPANY, NEW DELHI product ID 01
126357 Product name Full sleeve Mens cotton shirt Order Quantity Season Size Fabr
ic fabric weave 1250 summer M 100 % cotton Plain Group Brand gender Date GSM Pla
in Local MALE 6/4/11 180
COLOUR DETAILS :Base Fabric Stitching Thread Button checks blue DTM White colore
d Shell button
TABLE OF MEASUREMENT FOR SIZE SET

S. No
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
Description
Neck line length Distance b/w Shoulder Total Sleeve length Armhole height from N
eck point Sleeve width Bottom Sleeve width Chest Width Bottom Width Total Length
from HSP Back yoke height at neck point Front cross (at arm) Back cross (at arm
) Cuff height Sleeve placket length Sleeve placket width Sleeve placket Box heig
ht Collar Point Collar Height Collar band Height Shoulder Slope Shoulder forward
M
43 45.5 67.5 29 21.5 11.8 55 55 78 9.8 41.5 44.5 8.5 14.5 3.5 3.5 6 4 3 4.8 2.5
Tolerance(+ / - )
.5 .5 .5 .3 .3 .1 .5 .5 .5 .1 .3 .3 .1 .1 .1 .1 .1 .1 .1 .1 0

FACTORY INFORMATION: Foundation:


The foundation will be built by digging 6 ft. d
own. Firstly a base of plain concrete cement is there for 6 inches and then a re
inforced concrete cement block of 1 ft. The column foundation starts after that
and the plinth and normal ground level are the same. IMT Manesar Gurgaon IMT Man
esar Area is under Haryana State Industrial Development Corporatation (HSIDC).Th
e Export House is situated in the Township (IMT) in Manesar, 17 km from Gurgaon.
The reasons for Manesar s popularity are not hard to find. "It is located on th
e main Jaipur-Delhi highway and is extremely well-connected to Delhi. The intern
ational airport is just 32 km away, while Connaught Place is 45 km. It takes abo
ut an hour and a half to reach Connaught Place which is the center of Delhi. The
re are various garment manufacturing units like Modelama, Innovation com, Remya
Fashions - Manufacturer and Exporter of Hi-Fashion Garments etc. in this area. T
he following could all be considered as important but for setting up the garment
unit, some of the factors will be more important than others. Electricity suppl
y: Some firms require either a certain type of power/energy source or particular
amounts to be able to operate effectively. This means that one consideration fo
r location is somewhere that has relatively easy access to such sources. This mi
ght be particularly relevant for a garment unit that uses sufficient amounts of
power in the production process. In simple terms, the location has to be in a po
sition to be able to supply the amount of power that the unit might need. In thi
s example of the garment unit, the production processes involved in this industr
y require an optimum amount of electricity. The electricity supply to the unit i
s continuous and the rates are cheap.
Nearness to a Supply of Labor:

All businesses need labour to operate. In some cases, this labour has to have hi
gh levels of skill. Some areas have concentrations of industry in a region and h
ave become known for having a pool of skilled labour available. In such cases, i
t can save a firm both time and cost locating near to the supply of labour. This
can be extended if the local labour supply is relatively cheap. In the vicinity
of the IMT Manesar, cheap labour can be easily found. The nearness to the villa
ges like Bhiwadi , Khandsa and Manesar fulfills the requirements of labour. Prox
imity of Other Businesses - External Economies of Scale: Where industry becomes
concentrated in an area, there are generally a number of supporting or ancillary
units set up. In some cases, these units supply specialised services or product
s to other firms in the industry. For example, fabric dyeing, printing, agencies
for fabric sourcing/ accessories sourcing, buying houses etc. are also in IMT m
anesar. These benefits can result in lower average costs (costs per unit). This
is called external economies of scale. The Reputation of an Area: Certain areas
of the country have a reputation for particular types of business - this might o
ften be due to its industrial past or the density of the similar kind of industr
ies. There are too many export houses in this area and it is reputed as a hub fo
r garment manufacturing. Whilst this factor may be seen as being less important
it can still be a factor that a unit might consider. Transport and Communication
Services: Units that rely on good communications networks either for informatio
n transfer or distribution may well look to locate in areas where such facilitie
s exist. This may include high quality road networks, access to trains, airports
, ports and so on. Many new industrial estates have been built in out of town ar
eas and major new trunk roads linking these estates with major road networks mak
e locating in these areas worthwhile for some firms. For other firms, speed of i
nformation may be the crucial factor in their business. Many city areas were the
first to have access to high speed data networks, broadband, cable and

satellite services and so on. For a firm in the City, having high speed data acc
ess is essential to the transaction of their business. The IMT manesar is well c
onnected to the highway for the transport of the materials. The information serv
ices are also satisfactory. Government support: The availability of low rent pre
mises, faster planning permissions, employment subsidies (a sum of money given f
or every job created), grants etc. can make a difference to a company that decid
es to locate in that area. Opportunities for Expansion: Many businesses might be
looking for opportunities to expand in the future. Access to land, and the ease
with which the business can expand if necessary, might therefore be something t
hat a business will want to find out before making a location decision, or at le
ast as part of a location decision. In some areas of the country, planning permi
ssion may be difficult to get - there may be restrictions on expansion into the
countryside, various policies to encourage use of derelict land and so on. Whils
t this may be of benefit to society as a whole, it is not necessarily the most c
ost-effective solution for a business. In some areas of the country, land and re
ntal prices can be significant factors in location decisions. IMT manesar can be
considered a perfect location for the expansion. Development Agencies and Inwar
d Investment: Regional policy in recent years has changed its emphasis. The appr
oach is to have a coordinated policy to help each region achieve its full econom
ic potential but at the same time to allow decision-making to be devolved to the
lowest level, where possible. This means that the regions themselves will take
a lead in encouraging economic development and supporting businesses in their re
gion. To this end, there is now a network of regional development agencies (DAs)
focusing their attention on improving the economy of particular regions. IMT ma
nesar Industries Association is the main association involved in the development
of this area

Govt. & industry compliances:


Labour Laws Human rights ILO Compliance Vendor Com
pliance Government Policies and State Government Laws Minimum Wages

3) Design production process


The production process of various sections involved in the production process is
designed using the analyzed data along with the consultation with concerned exp
erts and consultants The next is to decide how the raw material would be convert
ed to final part or product. Herein the production engineer designs an OPERATION
SHEET or PRODUCTION ROUTING, which is the tabulation of the steps involved in t
he production of a particular part and necessary details on related items. Infor
mation on routing may include:
i. Part names and number
ii. Operation numbers and sequence
iii. Operations name and descriptions
iv. Machine names and numbers
v. Production standards
vi. Number of operators
vii. Space requirements
viii. Material

OPERATIONAL BREAKDOWN FOR COTTON SHIRT


Sleeve Collar Front Back
PLKT MARK AND CUT
PRESS CLR
PRESS B/H PLKT
PLEAT MAKING
ATT SMALL PLKT
T/S ON CLR
SEW BUTTON PLKT
YOKE ATTACH
TACK @ V NOTCH
PRESS N/B
SEW B/H PLKT
LABEL MAKING
PLKT MARKING
N/B HEM
TACK B/H PLKT
LABEL MARKING
ATT BIG PLKT
CLR ATTACH TO N/B
FRONT CHECKING
LABEL ATTACH
FINISH BIG PLKT
CLR PRESS
BK CHECKING

T/S PLKT
CLR RAW EDGE TRIM NO SET FRNT & BACK
SLV CHECKING Sew Cuff
CLR CHECKING
JOIN FNT AND BK
Turn & Iron Cuff
SHOULDER T/S
COLLAR ATTACH
COLLAR FINISH CUFF CORNER TACK
ATT SLV TO BODY

SEW CUFF PLEATS


LEGEND SEWING OPERATION IRONING CHECKING HELPER No. SET TRIMMING
ARM HOLE T/S
CUFF ATTACH
ARM HOLE CHECKING
CUFF T/S
SIDE SEAM ATTACH
YOKE LABEL ATTACH
FINAL CHECKING
S/S LABEL ATTACH
BOTTOM HEM
GARMENT READY
S/S TOP STITCH
TRIM

MACHINERY REQUIREMENT CALCULATION FOR ONE LINE Target output = 1250 pc/day for 4
lines shift time = 480 min operator efficiency = 65%
Formal Shirt Operational Breakdown
Sewing SAM Helper SAM Finishing SAM
26.2 6.4 2.27
Sr.No.
Code
OPERATION
SAM
HELPER
ACTUAL TIME
MACHINE
W/S Calculated
W/S Req.
Actual W/S Req.
NO.of M/C Req.
Actual M/C Req. Cal Prod.
COLLAR PREPARATION 1 2 3 A1 A2 A3 Mark Collar Make Loop Tack Loop&Attach Loop to
CLR Patch 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 A4 A5 A6 Trim, Turn & Crease Collar A7 A8 A9
A10 A11 A12 A13 Topstitch Collar Press Neck Band Match Band With Collar Attach N
eckband To Collar Trim & Turn Pick Ready Cut Collar Press Collar CUFF PREPARATIO
N Top Stitch on collar with Patch Make Collar
0.31 0.12 0.26 0.2 0.48 0.31 0.31 0.32 0.3 0.48 0.32 0.16 0.47
Y N N N N Y N Y Y N Y N Y
0.477 0.185 0.400 0.308 0.738 0.477 0.477 0.492 0.462 0.738 0.492 0.246 0.723
Helper table Snls w/ ubt Snls w/ ubt Snls w/ ubt Snls we/c
Collar turning machine
0.31 0.12 0.26 0.20 0.48 0.31 0.31 0.32 0.30 0.48 0.32 0.16 0.47
0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
0 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0 0.5 0 0.5 0
0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0
503 1300 600 780 325 503 503 488 520 325 488 975 332

Snls w/ ubt Iron Table Helper table Snls we/c Helper table Snls we/c Iron Table

1
B1
Mark Cuff
0.32 0.29 0.64 0.3 0.32
Y N N Y Y
0.492 0.446 0.985 0.462 0.492
Helper table Snls w/ ubt Snls we/c Helper table Iron Table
0.32 0.29 0.65 0.30 0.32
0.5 0.5 1 0.5 0.5
1 1 1 1 1
0 0.5 1 0 0
0 1 1 0 0
488 538 488 520 488
2 3 4 5
B2 B3 B4 B5
Hem Cuff Make cuff Trim&turn cuff Press Cuff SLEEVE PREPARTION
6 7 8 9 10
C1 C2 C3 C4 C5
Notch Sleeve for PLKT Attach Down Sleeve PLKT Tack Down Sleeve PLKT Press Top Sl
eeve PLKT Attach Top sleeve PLKT&finish FRONT
0.32 0.31 0.22 0.65 0.96
Y N N Y N
0.492 0.477 0.338 1.000 1.477
Helper table Snls w/ ubt Snls w/ ubt Iron Table Snls w/ ubt
0.32 0.31 0.22 0.66 0.97
0.5 0.5 0.5 1 1
1 1 1 1 1
0 0.5 0.5 0 1
0 1 1 0 1
488 503 709 480 325
11 12 13 14 15 16

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6
Hem Pocket Mouth Press Patch Pocket Make Button Placket Attach Top Plkt Make But
ton Hole placket Mark front For Pocket Placment
0.24 0.29 0.3 0.62 0.65 0.31 0.79
N Y N N N Y N
0.369 0.446 0.462 0.954 1.000 0.477 1.215
Snls w/ ubt Iron Table Snls w/ ubt Snls w/ ubt Kansai Helper table Snls w/ ubt
0.24 0.29 0.30 0.63 0.66 0.31 0.80
0.5 0.5 0.5 1 1 0.5 1
1 1 1 1 1 1 1
0.5 0 0.5 1 1 0 1
1 0 1 1 1 0 1
650 538 520 503 480 503 395
17
D7
Attach Pocket To Front BACK
18 19
E1 E2
Match Yoke to Back Attach Yoke To Back
0.32 0.47
Y N
0.492 0.723
Helper table Snls w/ ubt
0.32 0.47
0.5 0.5
1 1
0 0.5
0 1
488 332

20 21 22 23
E3 E4 E5 E6
Topstitch Back Yoke Attach Patch to Back Press Patchlabel
Attach Patch Label to Back With Main Label
0.46 0.48 0.32 0.64
N N Y N
0.708 0.738 0.492 0.985
Snls w/ ubt Snls w/ ubt Iron Table Snls w/ ubt
0.46 0.48 0.32 0.65
0.5 0.5 0.5 1
1 1 1 1
0.5 0.5 0 1
1 1 0 1
339 325 488 488
ASSEMBLY 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5
F6 F7 F8 F9 F10 F11 F12 F13 F14 F15 F16 F17 F18 F19 Match Front With Back Attac
h Shoulder Topstitch Shoulder Panel Match Sleeves With Body Attach Sleeves Topst
itch Armhole Tack Wash care Label Sew Side Seam Make Side Slit Match Collar With
Body Stay Stitch on Neck Attach Collar to body Close Collar Topstitch Collar Ma
tch Cuff To Body Make Pleaet on Sleeve Attach Cuff To Body Topstitch Cuff Hem Bo
ttom
0.3 0.61 0.47 0.3 0.87 0.81 0.2 0.79 0.81 0.3 0.29 0.45 0.69 0.31 0.32 0.29 0.63
0.58 0.65
Y N N Y N N N N N Y N N N N Y N N N N
0.462 0.938 0.723 0.462 1.338 1.246 0.308 1.215 1.246 0.462 0.446 0.692 1.062 0.
477 0.492 0.446 0.969 0.892 1.000
Helper table Snls w/ ubt Snls w/ ubt Helper table Snls w/ ubt Snls w/ ubt Snls w
/ ubt Foa Snls w/ ubt Helper table Snls w/ ubt Snls w/ ubt Snls w/ ubt Snls w/ u
bt Helper table Snls w/ ubt Snls w/ ubt Snls w/ ubt Snls w/ ubt
0.30 0.62 0.47 0.30 0.88 0.82 0.20 0.80 0.82 0.30 0.29 0.45 0.70 0.31 0.32 0.29
0.64 0.59 0.66
0.5 1 0.5 0.5 1 1 0.5 1 1 0.5 0.5 0.5 1 0.5 0.5 0.5 1 1 1
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
0 1 0.5 0 1 1 0.5 1 1 0 0.5 0.5 1 0.5 0 0.5 1 1 1
0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1
520 511 332 520 359 385 780 395 385 520 538 347 452 503 488 538 495 538 480

43 44 45 46 47 48
F20 F21 F22 F23 F24 F25
Mark Front For Button Hole Attach Button on Cuff Make Button Hole on Cuff Make B
utton Hole Mark Front For Button Att Attach Button on Front Placket
0.32 0.22 0.21 0.65 0.24 0.63 26.2
F F F F F F
0.492 0.338 0.323 1.000 0.369 0.969 40.308
Helper table Button Attach Button Attach Button hole Helper table Button Attach
0.32 0.22 0.21 0.66 0.24 0.64 26.45
0.5 0.5 0.5 1 0.5 1 39.5
1 1 1 1 1 1 61.0
0.5 0.5 0.5 1 0.5 1 30.5
1 1 1 1 1 1 44.0
488 709 743 480 650 495 325
TOTAL
S.NO 1 2 3
MANUAL Helper table
Collar turning machine
QTY 14 1 6 21
S.NO
SEWING MACHINES
QTY 30 4 0 1 1 36
S.NO 1 2
FINISHING Button Attach Button hole TOTAL
QTY 3 2 5
1 2 3 4 5
Snls w/ ubt Snls we/c Sncs FOA Kansai TOTAL
Iron Table TOTAL

4) Plan material flow pattern


One of major activity during plant layout design is the planning of the flow pat
tern. It is on the flow pattern that the layout design depends upon. So selectio
n of the best flow pattern as per the given constraints from various available o
ptions is very important for the success of the final layout.
Different sections of the unit The new manufacturing unit will consist of follow
ing sections / departments:
A. Production Related Fabric Stores Sewing Trims & Accessories Store Spreading a
nd Cutting Section Sewing Section Finishing Section Merchandising Department Sam
pling & Technical Department Quality Department CAD Section IE Department Mainte
nance Warehouse

B. Administration and other departments CEO Office Accounts Department HR Depart


ment Medical Room Training Department Conference Room Reception Generator, Boile
r, Compressor and other utilities Room Security Room Toilets Parking Material Fl
ow Pattern Receipt of palletized fabric to store: Palletized fabric is received
at the unloading dock and is transferred to the fabric store through the articul
ated fork lifter. Issue of fabric to cutting section: The required amount of fab
ric is issued to the cutting section through fork lifter or the power pallet tru
ck as per requirement. Transfer of cut parts to parts section: The cut parts are
transferred to the parts section through a vertical trolley system. The cut par
ts would be lifted by the help of a trolley to the parts section from where it w
ould be fed to the respective lines. In the parts section, material is handled v
ia bins, or racks as per requirement.

Transfer of panels to assembly section: From parts to assembly garments are tran
sferred through use of various bins, racks or trolleys. And in the assembly sect
ion, garment panels move on a mover system. Transfer of garments to finishing se
ction: Garment is transferred to the finishing section through the stairs using
gravity. There would be slider provided in the stairs for easy movement of the b
ins on the stairs. In the finishing section garments will move on mover system a
nd racks. Transfer of packed garments to warehouse: The packed and/or palletized
cartons are transferred to the warehouse through the articulated fork lifter or
the power pallet truck. Shipment of palletized cartons: Eventually palletized c
artons are shipped and loaded in the container at the dock with the help of fork
lifter and the power pallet truck.

PRODUCTION ROUTING- MERCHANDISING DEPARTMENT


Start
Obtain tech pack from buyer
Costing
Sampling
Analyze fabric consumption from CAD
Analyze cost of trims and fabric
Obtain general sewing data from IED
Develop sample as per the tech pack
Prepare cost sheet from sample
Develop proto sample
Cost sheet & sample sent to buyer for approval
Confirmation of order
Yes
Approval
No
Cost sheet reworked
Obtain PCD & details from production unit
Source trims & fabric from concerned dept.
Book washing & embroidery capacity if required
Obtain GSD from IED
Execution of order by entering details in ERP
Prepare sample as per buyer requirements
Forward the sample to buyer for approval
Hold pre production meeting with the production unit
Yes
Approval
No
Comments received from buyer should be incorporated and fit sample reworked Offe
r garments for final inspection. Truck out Follow up on the payments for goods
Execute bulk order
Follow up with production departments & update the buyer

Submit required documents to documentation dept


End

Tech pack received from merchant


Develop patterns
Costing CAD marker
Develop sample
Develop fit/proto sample
If any comments comments If no comments
Revise Fit/Proto sample
If any comments comments
PP sample
If no comments
Revise PP sample
If any comments comments
Size set sample
If no comments
Incorporate buyer comments
If any comments comments
Sealer sample
If no comments
Incorporate buyer comments
Workflow of sampling
Bulk production (shrinkage to be added if its a wash program)

FABRIC SOURCING:
Sampling
Start
Bulk
Receiving order, technical analysis/ process starts for technical development, v
endor selection
Technical analysis. Vendor evaluation/selection of vendor Placement
If Ok
If not Ok D/L
Rate quotation from different mills
TNA/Execution plan/placement of order for production
Submit to buyer
Redo D/L If Ok If not Ok On line inspection
Lab testing as per buyer requirement
Sampling yardage/ lab tests
Placement, lab dips/strike offs submission to buyer
Final approval by buyer
Rate finalisation, sampling yardage, lab tests Final submission to buyer
Technical monitor/ corrective measures
Despatch to vendors godown
Mending/cleaning/washing
If not required End Process
If required
Sanforising/dyeing/prints/OXO/ washing/wet processing
Lab test as per buyer requirement
If not Ok
Third party inspection as per buyer standards Reject
Third party inspection as per buyer standards
Pass
Pass
Vendor evaluation/ feedback to vendor
End

FABRIC AUDIT:
Start
Receive fabrics
Conduct shrinkage test on minimum 2 bits/bale or minimum 10 bits of consignment
If No
Verify whether quantity received match with quantity ordered
If Yes
Forward one meter of each consignment for lab test
Inform to stores and prepare goods received note (in case of imported fabric)
If No
Inspection based on four points system. Match bulk with approved dye lot, width
of fabric etc.
If Yes
Name shade lot as ABC
Send to merchant for buyers approval
If No
If approved
If Yes
Forward to cutting department
Reject lot End

Start
Accept & receive materials against documents
Prepare PRE GRN
Verify materials against invoice/ Delivery challan & packing list
Carry out quality & quantity inspection as per AQL 1.5
ACCESSORY
Allocation of trims based on the nature of the item
STORES:
Prepare GRN & do the bill entry. The same is forwarded to accounts for payment
PROCESS SELECTION
PRODUCTION ISSUES
Prepare work order
Identify trims which have been approved by merchants
Prepare delivery challan
Prepare delivery challan & keep trims ready to issue to the factories
Forward trims along with documents for processing Materials to be issued after i
nspection by security against DC
End

Receive spec sheet form


Receive patterns from pattern
Digitize pattern to feed in
Pattern correction
Output to Graphtec plotter Pattern grading
Cut ratio planning
Pattern sent to merchandiser for sampling
Market planning according to the cut plan ratio

Output marker to plotter


WORK FLOW IN CAD DEPARTMENT
Output mini marker to printer
Send to cutting room for cutting Cutting package from production manager
Send to merchandiser for costing
Acquire fabric from fabric store
Cut sample to check
yes
Send to CAD for amendment
No
Cut for initial size set
Receive amendment pattern from CAD
Assemble and check

Require NO amendm No ents


Yes
Issue job order
WORK FLOW IN
Cut plan
CUTTING DEPARTMENT
Bulk cutting
Sorting
Bundling
Issue

PRODUCTION DEPT:
Start Bulk Production Cut parts received from cutting Parts preparation Assembly
In-Line checking End line checking & AQL audit Button & button hole/ Bar tack W
ashing Rough checking Ironing Final checking Measurement checking Tagging Packin
g FSA Audit Auditing by buyer QA Truck out
End

5) Material flow pattern plan


Specific methods of material handling must be decided upon for each move of mate
rial or item. Many factors need to need to be considered in the selection of han
dling methods. Material handling equipment is selected based on the requirement
with consideration for various factors like cost, service etc. Progressive bundl
e system (PBS)
The progressive bundle system (PBS) gets its name from the bundle
s of garment parts that are moved sequentially from operation to operation. Bund
les consist of garment parts needed to complete a specific operation or garment
component. Bundles are assembled in the cutting room where cut parts are matched
up with corresponding parts and bundle tickets. The sewing operations are laid
out in sequence . Each operator receives a bundle , does his work , re-ties the
bundle and passes it to the next operator . There is usually a storage facility
such as rack, bin or table for storing the interprocess work between each operat
ion. The work is routed by means of tickets. Any imbalance in production can be
corrected by using utility workers . It is used in shirt factories, jeans factor
ies , jacket factories, etc
Advantages
Operators perform the same operation on a continuing basis, which allows them to
increase their speed and productivity. This system may allow better utilization
of specialized machines, as output from one special purpose automated machine m
ay be able to supply several operators for the next operation.

Small bundles allow faster throughput unless there are bottlenecks and extensive
waiting between operations. Semi skilled labour can be used.

Disadvantages:
1. Operators who are compensated by piece rates become extremely efficient at on
e operation and may not be willing to learn a new operation because it reduces t
heir efficiency and earnings.
2. Slow processing, absenteeism, and equipment failure may also cause major bott
lenecks within the system.
3. Large quantities of work in process
4. This may lead to longer throughput time, poor quality concealed by bundles, l
arge inventory, extra handling, and difficulty in controlling inventory.
5. It requires a high level of management skill to arrange the workflow and deci
de on the number of operators for each operation .

6) Calculate equipments requirements


MACHINE TYPE INCHES FEET SNLS DNLS DNCS SNEC B/H B/S B/S feeder B/H B/S Tandem w
ithout feeder B/H B/S Tandem with feeder Auto Jig Front Pressing Sleeve plkt Pre
ssing Contour Collar Notch Kansai Back Stacker Cuff Stacker Collar blocking Cuff
Blocking Checking table Iron Table 1 Iron Table 2 Table Fusing Machine 60 43 52
42 35.5 42.5 42 42 53.5 42 24 47 41 51 48 175 5 3.6 4.3 3.5 3.0 3.5 3.5 3.5 4.5
3.5 2.0 3.9 3.4 4.3 4.0 14.6 40 32.5 45 21.2 23.5 24.5 21.2 21.2 21.2 34 33.5 3
8 25 31 31 62.00 3.3 2.7 3.8 1.8 2.0 2.0 1.8 1.8 1.8 2.8 2.8 3.2 2.1 2.6 2.6 5.2
16.67 9.70 16.25 6.18 5.79 7.23 6.18 6.18 7.88 9.92 5.58 12.40 7.12 10.98 10.33
75.35 42 42 42 42 47 47 47 48 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.9 3.9 3.9 4 INCHES 21.2 21.2 21
.2 21.2 22.5 22.5 23 28 FEET 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.9 1.9 2.3 SQ FEET 6.18 6.18 6
.18 6.18 7.34 7.34 7.51 9.33 LENGTH WIDTH AREA PER MC

Band Knife Die Cutting Mc Storage Rack 1 Storage Rack 2 Table 1 Table 2
84 42 38.4 38.4 905.28 787.2
7.0 3.5 3.2 3.2 75.4 65.6
60.00 42.00 157.44 275.52 78.00 78.00
5.0 3.5 13.1 23.0 6.5 6.5
35.00 12.25 41.98 73.47 490.36 426.40
Iron Table Folding Table Thread Sucker Collar and Cuff Press Collar Press Stain
Remover Needle Detector A-type Trimming Table Fabric Inspection Mc Washing Mc Dr
yer Light Box
60 60 60 60 36 60 72 48 120 24 24 28.8
5 5 5 5 3 5 6 4 10 2 2 2.4
36 36 24 48 24 48 48 36 72 18 18 20.4
3 3 2 4 2 4 4 3 6 1.5 1.5 1.7
15 15 10 20 6 20 24 12 60 3 3 4.08
i. Cutting Section To cut pieces for 1250 shirts per day, following equipments a
re required: Equipments required for producing 1250 pieces per day
Equipment Fabric Inspection Machine (72 width) Spreading & Cutting Table Pinning,
Numbering, Bundling Table Fusing Machine
Quantity 1 2 2 1
Quantity available
1

Die Cutter Band Knife Straight knife


1 1 3
1 1 3
ii. Finishing Section
TYPES OF EQUIPMENTS
Machinery
DESCRIPTION / CAPACITY
1250 pcs Fork Lift Iron Table Thread Sucking Stain Remover 1 4 1 1 NA Ramson Ram
son-TSN77 (300Pc/Hr) Ramson-CL7 (Enough for 1250pc/Day) Needle Detector 1 Hashim
aHN750G(1250pc/Day) Boiler Carton Strapper TOTAL 1 1 22 Ramson-ROB707
iii. CAD Section
EQUIPMENT
DESCRIPTION /DIMENSION
For 1250 pcs per day
PLOTTER DIGITIZER TABLE COMPUTER
7ft x 2ft 3.9x5.9ft 4 ft x 4 ft 2 ft x 4 ft
1 1 1 3

At this point, each operation, work station, area, process etc. must be planned
in detail. The interrelationships between machines, operators and auxiliary equi
pment must be worked out. Consideration must also be given to multiple machine o
peration, principles of motion economy and material handling to and from the wor
kplace. Each workstation must be tied into the overall flow pattern and flow thr
ough each work station must be planned as an integral part of the overall plan.
7) Plan individual work areas
Cutting Section: Pinning, Numbering and Checking table 12 mX1.8 m \

Workstation Details for Layout Construction


Parts section
Sewing Workstation
Note:
Area consumed by each workstation = 2 sq meters. feet space is being provi
ded for operators sitting and movement. On right hand side of workstation main ai
sle of 3 feet is being provided.
Checking Workstation (Supervisor and QC) 1.5 feet is being provided supervisor o
r checkers sitting and movement. Area consumed by each workstation = 1.7 sq mete
rs. On right hand side of workstation main aisle of 3 feet is being provided.

Assembly section
Sewing Workstation

Note: Area consumed by each workstation = 1.8 sq meters Area consumed by each wo
rkstation = 3.5 sq meters 2.5 feet space is being provided for operators sitting
and movement. Main aisle of 3 feet is being provided between two lines.
Finishing Section

Trimming Workstation (A-Type Table)

o Area consumed by each workstation = 3.9 sq meters. o 1.5 feet space is being p
rovided for operators sitting and movement. o Distance between two workstations i
s 1 feet. o Garment moves on the mover system. Pressing Workstation

o Area consumed by each workstation = 2.3 sq meters. o 2 feet space is being pro
vided for operators sitting and movement. o Main aisle of 3 feet is being provide
d. o Garment moves on conveyor
Folding and Bagging Workstation o Area consumed by each workstation = 2.3 sq met
ers. o 2 feet space is being provided for operators sitting and movement. o Main
aisle of 3 feet is being provided.

8. SELECTION OF SPECIFIC MATERIAL HANDLING EQUIPMENTS


Material handling is undertaken at every stage of logistics activity, and is an
integral part of the other elements of logistics function. Material is handled d
uring the production process, warehouses or storage, in transport, during packin
g and when goods are returned by the customer for one reason or the other. This
would insure cost reduction in the operation of the overall material handling fu
nction and increase productivity. Material handling equipment is all equipment t
hat relates to the movement, storage, control and protection of materials, goods
and products throughout the process of manufacturing, distribution, consumption
and disposal. Material handling equipment is the mechanical equipment involved
in the complete system. Material handling equipment is generally separated into
four main categories:
A. storage and handling equipment, B. engineered systems, C. industrial trucks,
and D. bulk material handling.
Material handling equipments were chosen on the basis of following three criteri
a: 1. 2. 3. Material Characteristics Move Requirements Method (Equipment) Capabi
lities
There are various kinds of equipments available for material handling. Since the
type of equipment will materially affect the layout, the layout planner should
be familiar with the characteristics and capabilities of each type. Usually the
best, most economical and most efficient handling is accomplished by an integrat
ion of different types of handling equipments.
For the selection of specific material handling equipments following points shou
Cost of the equipment delivered and installed complete with power
ld be checked:
and fuel facilities

Cost of operation Cost of maintenance Ability to do a specific job Safety aspect


of material and operator Effect on working conditions Dependability of performa
nce
A sound approach to the problem of selecting the most suitable material handling
system for a plant layout must take into consideration not only the engineering
aspects of the handling system but also the economic appraisal of the various m
aterial handling systems that lend themselves to the job to be performed.
A) Storage and handling equipment
Storage and handling equipment is a category within the material handling indust
ry. The equipment that falls under this description is usually non-automated sto
rage equipment. Products such as Pallet rack, shelving, carts, etc. belong to st
orage and handling. Selective pallet rack is an example of storage and handling
equipment.
B) Engineered systems

Engineered systems are typically custom engineered material handling systems. Co


nveyors, Handling Robots, AS/RS, AGV and most other automated material handling
systems fall into this category. Engineered systems are often a combination of p
roducts integrated to one system. Many distribution centers will optimize storag
e and picking by utilizing engineered systems such as pick modules and sortation
systems. Equipment and utensils used for processing or otherwise handling edibl
e product or ingredients must be of such material and construction to facilitate
thorough cleaning and to ensure that their use will not cause the adulteration
of product during processing, handling, or storage. Equipment and utensils must
be maintained in sanitary condition so as not to adulterate product.
C) Industrial trucks
Industrial trucks usually refer to operator driven motorized warehouse vehicles,
powered manually, by gasoline, propane or electrically. Industrial trucks assis
t the material handling system with versatility; they can go where engineered sy
stems cannot. Forklift trucks are the most common example of industrial trucks b
ut certainly aren t the extent of the category. Tow tractors and stock chasers a
re additional examples of industrial trucks.
D) Bulk material handling
Bulk material handling equipment is used to move and store bulk materials such a
s ore, liquids, and cereals. This equipment is often seen on farms, mines, shipy
ards and refineries
Different types of material handling equipment can be: Trolleys, Bins, Pallet, G
uides, Conveyor, Fork Lifters, Pallet Truck, Order Pickers, Manual handling syst
em etc.
We are here discussing the equipments our company uses :Features and Benefits of
Industrial Trolleys
Powder coated with durable non-slip industrial quality viny
l mats or lipped metal surfaces

Fitted quality non-marking wheels and castors. All industrial trolleys come stan
dard with castor mounting plates. Castors are bolted to these castor mounting pl
ates to allow for ease of castor replacement, or to allow for changes to castor
arrangement.

Available in a large range of models with ability to customise on large orders


Trolleys and Materials Handling Equipment Product Range:
Custom Made Trolleys Platform Trolleys Imported Trolleys Hand Trolleys and Dolli
es Hand Trucks Panel Carts General Cleaning Equipment Plastic Containers Ladders
Stackers Scissor Tables Guard Rails

Lifting and Handling Equipment Pallet Trucks Wheels and Castors Conveyors
Some salient features of storage bins are:
Made from Polypropylene Copolymer. Strong rear lip for use with louvered panel.
Strong heavy duty with reinforced base, sides and stacking rim. Resistant to mos
t industrial solvents and withstands high temperatures. Clear access to contents
. All bins with identification card holders. Incorporates a safety stop feature
at the back for use in shelves Features like bin dividers, louvered panels, shop
floor trolleys and rotary stands are also available.

Complete Line of Products:


Accessory Racks Clothes Racks Garment Steamers Gri
all Hangers Mannequins and Forms Rack Covers and Garment Bags Shelf Brackets, Ho
oks and Other Accessories

PALLETS
Wooden Pallets Widest type selection, best quality Babool/Hard wood with preserv
ative treatment, optimum design for all applications, flawless workmanship and v
ery high production capacity.
Mild Steel Pallet Pressed steel or rolled section
rigidly welded pallets for lifetime maintenance free usage.
Stainless Steel / Al
uminum Pallets For food and pharmaceutical industry, involving autoclave, driers
and other such application. Box / Cage Pallets Stackable / non stackable box /
cage pallets for storage of small parts and packages.
Collapsible Pallets Stacka
ble Box / Cage Pallets that can collapse to a fraction of their volume for lean
period storage or empty return PU Coated Wooden Pallets Total water repellency a
nd other resistive properties of polyurethane with design flexibility, economy a
nd frication safety of wooden pallets.

9. Coordinate the group of related operations


Once the workplaces have been designed, interrelationships between the work area
s, related group of operations or activities should also be planned. LAYOUT PLAN
NING CHART is a useful technique at this point. This chart records the major ste
ps in each operation, forces a consideration of the steps between the operations
, points out the omissions in planning and guiding the further development of an
effective integration of operations.
10. The Activity Relationship Chart
This chart is an ideal technique for planning the relationship among any group o
f interrelated activities. It is important for: 1. Preliminary allocation of seq
uence 2. Relative location of work centres or departments 3. Location of activit
ies 4. Location of work centres 5. Showing which activities are related to each
other and why 6. Providing basis for subsequent area allocation
The various activities identified as above may now be arranged in an activity re
lationship chart based on their need to be close to each other. Before actually
making the chart, it is necessary to analyze what all departments need to be clo
se to each other and also the reason for the need of their proximity needs to be
known. For this purpose, an analysis has been

Activity
Closeness to activity Raw material Inspection Cutting A A
Reason for closeness
The material from stored is issued to inspection so material movement needs to b
e minimized The fabric supply from store has to be sent to the cutting room. Thi
s flow must be smooth
Fusing Sewing Washing Finishing Merchandising STORE Sampling
U O U U I
The trims need to be moved to the sewing floor The merchandisers need to check a
vailability of certain raw material for sampling purposes
I
The sampling needs a supply of materials from the stores
Maintenance Industrial Engineering Administration Accounts Cutting
U U
U U O
The sequence of flow requires them to be somewhat close
Fusing Sewing Washing Finishing INSPECTION Merchandising Sampling Maintenance In
dustrial
U U U U U U U U
-

Engineering Administration Accounts Cutting Fusing U U A The pattern parts are f


used after being cut so these activities need to be close by
Sewing
E
After cutting, cut parts are sent for sewing so these departments need to be clo
se
Washing Finishing Merchandising Sampling Maintenance and housekeeping Industrial
Engineering Production CUTTING planning and Control Administration Accounts Pac
kaging and Dispatch Sewing
U U U U U
O
The IE department keeps conducting time studies for spreading and cutting operat
ions
O
The PPC department needs to be aware of the available capacity
U U U
I
The sequence of operations needs these activities to be together

Washing Finishing Merchandising Sampling FUSING Maintenance and housekeeping Ind


ustrial Engineering Production planning and Control Administration Accounts Pack
aging and Dispatch SEWING Washing
U U U O
The sampling section might need to get parts fused from the fusing section
U
U
U
U U U
E
The garments after being sewn need to be sent to the washing section
Finishing
I
They need to be close because of sequence of workflow
Merchandising Sampling Maintenance and housekeeping Industrial Engineering Produ
ction planning and Control Administration
U U E
There are greater chances of sewing room requiring maintenance people
O
The IE department keeps conducting time studies for sewing operations
O
The PPC department needs to be aware of the available capacity
U
-

Accounts Packaging and Dispatch


U U
Finishing WASHING Merchandising Sampling
E
The garments from washing need to move to the finishing department
U O
The sampling department needs to get samples washed from the washing
Maintenance and housekeeping Industrial Engineering Production planning and Cont
rol Administration Accounts Packaging and Dispatch FINISHING Merchandising Sampl
ing Maintenance and housekeeping Industrial Engineering Production planning and
Control
U
U
U
U U U
U
U U
U
U
-

Administration Accounts Packaging and Dispatch MERCHANDISING Sampling


U U A
The garments after finishing need to go in for packaging
A
The merchandising team coordinates all the activities in the sampling department
Maintenance and housekeeping Industrial Engineering Production planning and Cont
rol Administration Accounts Packaging and Dispatch SAMPLING Maintenance and hous
ekeeping Industrial Engineering Production planning and Control Administration A
ccounts Packaging and Dispatch
U
I
The merchandising department needs some data from the IE department
O
These departments work in consultation with each other
U U U
O
This is necessary in case machinery or other problems occur in the sampling room
U
U
U U U
-

Maintenance and housekeeping


Industrial Engineering Production planning and Control Administration Accounts P
ackaging and Dispatch
U
U
U U U
Industrial Engineering
Production planning and Control Administration Accounts Packaging and Dispatch
E
These two departments work in consultation with each other
U U U
Production planning and Control
Administration Accounts Packaging and Dispatch
U U U
Administration
Accounts Packaging and Dispatch
O U
They share paperwork amongst them Accounts
Packaging and Dispatch
U
-

CAD DEPARTMENT
MERCHNADISING
IE DEPARTMENT
DEPARTMENT MAINTENANCE
FABRIC STORE
ACTIVITIE S
FABRIC STORE TRIM STORE SPREADING & CUTTING SEWING FINISHING MERCHNADISI NG SAMP
LING QUALITY CAD DEPARTMENT IE DEPARTMENT FINANCE DEPARTMENT MAINTENANC E EXPORT
DEPARTMENT PPC U O U U U O I U O U O U A
U
A U
CUTTING SEWING
SPREADING &
O O A
U A U
I I I
U O O
U O I
U U A
U U I
U U U
U U I
O O U
U
O A O
A U O I I
A
I I
O O A
A I O
U U O

A U U
U U U
A O U
U U U
O
O I U
O I A
I A U
U I U
A O U I U
I
U U
U U U
U U U
O U O
U U U
O
U
I
A
I
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U

U
U
O
U
U
U
U
U
O
U
A
A
A
U
O
O
O
O
U
U
O
U
U
U
O
U
U
U
U
U

U
U
I
I
U
U
U
O
?
?
U
U
U
DEPARTMENT PPC U U I I U U U O ? ? U U U
TRIM STORE
SAMPLING
FINISHING
QUALITY
FINANCE
EXPORT

A
Absolutely Necessary
E
Especially Important
I O
Important Ordinary important
U X
Unimportant Undesirable
11.Determine the storage requirements
Fabric Storage Area Calculation:
Rolls to be stored in palletized form
Inventory
of 12 days ASSUMPTIONS Aisle space between racks = 1 m Main aisle = 1 m Roof He
ight = 15 m Average fabric consumption per shirt = 1.6m Total production per day
= 1250 shirts Total fabric required per day = 1250 * 1.6 = 2000 m Total consump
tion of fabric for 12 days inventory = 2,000 * 12 = 24,000 Roll Data: Total yard
age = 120 m Roll diameter = 7 inches Roll height = 62 inches Roll weight = 25 Kg
Pallet Data: Wooden Pallet Weight = 20 Kg Length = 62 inches Width = 62 inches

Height = 5 inches Total rolls in a pallet = 56 rolls (Rows = 7, Columns = 8) Fin


al Height of palletized rolls = 56 inches
Weight of one pallet = 56* 20 + 20 =11
40 Kg (It can sometimes go up to maximum of 1500 Kg) Total yardage of fabric in
one pallet = 56 * 120 m = 6720 m (It can be maximum of 7000m)
One block of the r
ack will be having: Length = 62 inches + 6 inches (allowance) = 68 inches Height
= 56 inches + 6 inches (allowance) = 62 inches Depth = 62 inches
Rail Girdles o
n all sides = 3 inches Ground clearance = 3 inches Roof Clearance = 1 feet = 12
inches
Conclusions Total number of pallets for storing = 25 pallets Max rack height = 7
m = 23 feet = 275 inches (But 7.5 m height racks to be made, so that smaller si
ze pallets can be stored there) In the single block of a rack, 1 pallet needs to
be stored. Total blocks required = Number of pallets In one column, we will hav
e 4 blocks. Total no of columns= 50 In a row, we will have 10 such columns. Tota
l no of racks = 5 Total minimum height consumed = 266 inches Length of racks = 1
8m
Other equipments in a store are: Fabric inspection m/c = 2 (7 feet x 6 feet x 2)
Fabric inspection table = 1 (10 feet x 6 feet) Fabric inspection machines = 1 (
5 feet x 7 feet)

Lab = 1 (125 sq feet) Office = 1 (125 sq feet) Articulated Fork Lifter = 1


Warehouse Area Calculation (Palletized Cartons ASSUMPTIONS Dimension of a carton
= 60 cm x 40 cm x 30 18 shirts per carton Peak Total Inventory = days
Roof Height = 8 m In a single
et, number of shirts = 18* 18 =
the movement of fork lifter.
= 3 inches Ground clearance =

pallet 18 cartons would be there (3*2*3) In a pall


324 Aisle space between 2 racks would be 2 m for
The main aisle of 3.5 m Rail Girdles on all sides
3 inches Roof Clearance = 1 feet = 12 inches

Pallet Dimensions: Total number of shirts in 12 days = 150000 shirts Total no of


cartons in warehouse at a time = 1, 20,000/18 = 6,666 cartons. Total no of pall
ets to be stored = 6,666/18 = 150 pallets Racks dimension: Length = 14 m Breadth
= 0.9 m Height = 1m Total Height = 7m Length = 1.8m Width = 0.8m Height = 1.0m
Total production per day = 1250 lm
12.Plan the service and auxiliary activities

13. Determine space requirements


DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION: DEPARTMENTS HR Department General Admin Export Import De
partment Financial Department Merchandising & Sourcing Reception Fabric store, I
nspection Trim store Cad department, Spreading Cutting department, Cad Sewing de
partment Quality Planning Meeting Finishing Washing Maintenance department Indus
trial engineering Warehouse Crche Dispensary Cutting department cabin Production
department cabin Kitchen Sampling Training conference room Ground Floor toilet F
irst Floor toilet Ground Floor Lift &First Floor First Floor Aisle Ground Floor
Aisle TOTAL AREA REQUIRED (sq ft) 700 200 255 255 820 100 1440 247 2250 3000 200
200 100 1350 375 300 400 983 225 150 100 100 80 720 630 620 278 178 182 1446 14
60 REQUIREMENT MANPOWER 4 1 2 3 7 1 7 3 23 226 9 2 27 7 5 7 5 1 1 1 1 1 13 3 -

Water cooler Ground & First Floor TOTAL


36 19380 360
HR DEPARTMENT
Area Required: 35*20 =700 Sq Ft Man Power required
1 HR manager
2 HR Persons
elper 1 Cabin for HR manager of 10*10 Furniture Table Chair Almirah Cube Quantit
y 1 7 4 1 Dim( Ft) 4*3 1*1 3.5*3 10*10 Area Req (Sq Ft) 12 7 42 100 162 Area Req
uired( Sq Ft) 9 9

Equipment System Printer Scanner + photo State


Quantity 3 1 1
Dim 3*3
General Admin
CEO Cabin of dimension 20*10=200 Sq Ft FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT Table Chair System Qu
antity 1 3 1 Dim (ft) 4*3 1*1 Area Required (Sq Ft) 12 3 15

1 H

Export Import Department


Area Required : 17*15 = 255 Sq Ft Man Power Required
2 person FURNITURE/EQUIPMEN
T Table Chair System Almirah Quantity 2 3 2 1 Dim (ft) 4*3 1*1 3.5*3 Area Requir
ed (Sq Ft) 24 3 10.5 35.5
FINANCIAL DEPARTMENT
Area Required : 17*15= 255 Sq Ft Man Power Required
QUIPMENT Quantity Table Chair System Almirah 4 4 3 1

1 Head

2 Account FURNITURE/E

Dim (ft) 4*3 1*1 3.5*3


Area Required (Sq Ft) 48 4 10.5 62.5
MERCHANDISING & SOURCING DEPARTMENT a) Merchandising
Area Required : 20*10 +20*31=820 Sq Ft Man power required
1 Helper Cabin for Head of 10*10 Sq Ft

1 Head

2 Merchandiser

FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT Table Chair System Almirah Cube Hanger Stand


Quantity 1 4 4 2 1 2
Dim (ft) 4*4 1*1 3.5*3 10*10 10*3
Area Required (Sq Ft) 16 4 21 100 60 201
b) SOURCING DEPARTMENT
Man power required
2 sourcing Persons
1 Helper FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT Chair System
Almirah Table Quantity 4 3 4 2 Dim (ft) 1*1 3*22 4*3 Area Required (Sq Ft) 4 284
24
RECEPTION
Area Required: 10*10= 100 Sq Ft Man Power Required
PMENT Quantity Chair System Sofa Table 1 1 1 1
Dim (ft) 1*1 10*5 3*5
Area Required (Sq Ft) 4 50 15 71
FABRIC STORE& INSPECTION

1 Receptionist FURNITURE/EQUI

Area required = 72 X 20= 1440 sqft Man power requirement


1 Head
2 Data entry Per
sons 2 Inspection Persons
2 Helpers Furniture Table Chair Racks Quantity 3 7 10
Dim (L*B)(in ft) 4*3 1*1 6*3.3 Total area req. (sq ft) 36 7 198 241 Total area R
eq(Sq Ft) 27 5.12 32.2 172.5 236.56
Equipment Trolley Weighing Machine Inspection Machine Color matching cabinet
Quantity 2 1 1 1
Dim(L*B*H) (in Ft) 3*4.5 3.2*1.6 7*4.6 13.12*13.12
TRIM STORE Area required = 19 x 13 sqft
Total Area = 247 sqft
Man power requirem
ent 1 In-charge
1 inspection person
1 Helper Furniture Racks Table Chair Stools
Quantity required 10 1 1 3 Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 5*2*6 4*4 1*1 1*1 Total area req.
(sqft) 100 16 1 3 120
CAD DEPARTMENT, CUTTING DEPARTMENT& FUSING DEPARTMENT
t

Area required = 75 x30 sqf

Total Area = 2250 sqft Man power requirement


1 In-charge
2 person NO. OF M/CS 1
1 Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 7.36*2.15*3.83 3.91*5.90 Total area req.(sqft) 15.82 23.08
38.9 Total area req .(sqft) 32 4 10.5 46.5
MACHINES PLOTTER Digitizer
Furniture Table Chair Almirah System
Quantity required 2 4 1 3
Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 4*4 1*1 3.5*3*6.5
CUTTING DEPARTMENT Man power requirement
1 In-charge
4 Spreader
3 Cutter 2 Ticke
ting 2 Bundling
2 Fusing 2 helper
1 person for data entry MACHINES Straight Knif
e cutter Band Knife Cutter Die Clicker Fusing machine No. of m/cs 3 1 1 1 7.49*4
.89 7.38*2.78*4.0 Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) Total are required(sqft) 36.62 20.57 57.19

Furniture Spreading/cutting Table Table Chair Racks Almirah


Quantity required 3 1 3 5 1
Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 10*5*3 4*4 1*1 4*2*6 3.5*3*6.5
Total are required(sqft) 150 16 3 40 10.5 219.5
SEWING DEPARTMENT:
Area required = 75 x 40 sqft
Total Area = 3000 sqft
requirement 1 In-charge
4 supervisor
221 workers

Man power

Machines SNLS W/UBT SNLS WE/C FOA KANSAI


No. of m/cs 30 4 1 1
Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 6.18 6.18 6.30 6.30
Total area required(sqft) 185.4 24.72 6.30 6.30 222.72 Total area required(sq ft
) 30 84 50 164
Furniture Pressing Tables End Line Inspection tables Trolleys
Quantity 2 4 5
Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 3*5 7*3 5*2

QUALITY DEPARTMENT:
Area required = 20 x 10 sq ft
Total Area = 200 sq ft Manpowe
r requirement
1 Quality manager
8 checker Furniture Table Chair Almirah Quantity
1 5 1 Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 4*4 1*1 3.5*3 Area req. (sq ft ) 16 5 10.5 31.5
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT: Area required = 20 x 20 sq ft
Total Area = 40
0 sq ft
Manpower requirement 1 In-charge
6 persons Furniture Table (Head) Chair
Table (Assistant) Chair Quantity 1 2 1 2 Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 4*4 1*1 4*4 1*1 Area
req. (sq ft ) 16 2 16 2 36
MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT:
Area required = 20 x 25 sq ft
Manpower requirement 1 In- charge
4 person

Area required = 300 sq ft

Furniture Table Chair Almirah


Quantity 1 3 1
Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 4*4 1*1 3.5*3
Area req. (sq ft ) 16 3 10.5 29.5
PRE PRODUCTION:
irement = 2

Area Required = 20 x 10 sqft

Total Area = 200 sqft

Manpower requ

Furniture Table Chair


Quantity 1 3
Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 4*4 1*1
Area req. (sq ft ) 16 3 19
SAMPLING DEPARTMENT: Area Required = 40 X 18 sqft
Total Area = 720 sqft
requirement 1 Sampling Head
1 Pattern master
20 operator
1 cutter

Manpower

Furniture Pattern Table Cutting Table Stools Almirah SNLS W/UBT SNLS WE/C Button
hole Button Attach FOA KANSAI Mini Boiler Cum pressing
Quantity 1 1 15 1 12 4 1 1 1 1 1
Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 5*4 5*4 1*1 3.5*3 6.18 6.18 6.18 6.18 6.30 6.30 5*3
Area req. (sq ft ) 20 20 15 10.5 74.16 6.18 6.18 6.18 6.30 6.30 15 204.34

TRAINING ROOM
Area Required = 35 x 18sqft
Total Area = 630 sqft
Man Power Requir
ement 1 Training head
2 Trainers Furniture Tables Chair Machines SNLS W/UBT SNLS
WE/C FOA KANSAI Quantity 1 23 No. of m/cs 15 3 1 1 Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 4*4 1*1 D
im (L*B*H)(in ft) 6.18 6.18 6.30 6.30 Area req.(sq ft ) 16 23 Total area require
d(sqft) 92.7 18.54 6.30 6.30 123.84
CONFERENCE ROOM: Area Required = 31x20 sqft
Total Area = 620 sqft Furniture Tabl
e Chair Maniquences Meeting
Quantity 1 16 2 Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 10*5 1*1 Area req.
(sq ft ) 50 16
Area Required = 10x10 sqft Total Area = 100 sqft

Furniture Table Chair


Quantity 1 8
Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 10*7 1*1
Area req. (sq ft ) 70 8 78
Finishing:
Area Required = 75x18 sqft Total Area = 1350 sqft Man power required:
1 In charg
e 2 Spotter
8 Thread cutter
8 Pressing 3 Checker
5 Packer Quantity 4 8 8 1 4 4 1
1 1 Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 8*4 1*1 7*3 4*5 6.18 6.18 8*8 3*2 3*2 Total Area req. (s
q ft ) 128 8 168 20 24,72 24.72 64 6 6 449.44
Furniture/ Machine Table Stool Iron table Thread Sucking machine Button hole But
ton Attach Stain Removing Station Needle Detector Carton Packing machine
Washing:
Area Required = 25x15 sqft Total Area =375 sqft Man Power Required 1 In Charge 4
Washer 2 Finisher

Furniture Table Washing machine Dryer


Quantity 1 3 1
Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 8*4 8*12 5*7 Total
Area req. (sq ft ) 32 288 35 355
Kitchen Area Required: 20*4 = 80 Sq Ft Man Power Required: 1
CANTEEN
Area Required = 50 x 30 sqft Total Area = 1500 sqft
Man Power Requiremen
t 5 person Furniture Tables Stools Serving Table Quantity 10 100 1 Dim (L*B*H)(i
n ft) 10*3*3 1*1*2 10*2*4 Area req. (sq ft ) 30 100 20 150
LAVENTRY: Area required = 390 sqft SECURITY DEPARTMENT:
Area Required 10 * 10 =
100 Sq Ft Man Power Requirement
2 Security guard Furniture Tables Chair Almirah
Quantity 1 2 1 Dim (L*B*H)(in ft) 4*4 1*1 3.5*3 Area req.(sq ft ) 16 2 10.5 28.5
BOILER ROOM: Total required Area = 200 sqft GENERATOR:
Total required Area = 300
sqft Total Area Outside The main building occupied = 600 sq ft

14.Allocate activity areas to total space GROUND FLOOR

FIRST FLOOR

15.Consider building types


Building Typology:
Height of One Floor = 15 sq. ft.
Construction Details:
ft Roof: Tapered Roof

Types of Construction: Concrete Height of the Building: 30

Description of floors: Ground Floor


g Training Sampling Finishing Washing Trim store
First Floor
intenance IE Quality

Reception Finance Export Import Merch

Sewing, Cutting +spreading +Fusing +CAD Fabric store + inspection M

16.Construct the master layout


Master layout is drawn in the graph sheet.
17.Evaluating, adjusting the layout.

18.Installation and implementation of layout.


Check list
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Machinery and equipment arranged to make full use of capa
city? Machinery and equipment accessible for material supply and removal? Machin
ery and equipment located for maximum operator efficiency? Line production used
where practical? Proper use made of mechanical handling? Minimum walking require
d of operators? Processing combined with transportation? Finished work of one op
erator easily accessible to next? Machinery and equipment block in any operators?
Machine over travel extend into aisles or interfere with operator? Adequate stor
age space at work stations? Efficient work place layouts? Service area convenien
tly located tool room, tool crib, maintenance, etc) Easy to supervisor to overse
e his area? Machine arrangements permit maximum flexibility in case of product c
hange? Space allocation for foremen and production control records? Related acti
vity located near each other? All required equipment included in layout? Floor a
rea fully utilized? Provisions made for expansion? Provision for scrap removal?
Crowded condition anywhere? Ok Ok Ok Ok No Ok Ok Ok Ok Ok Ok Ok Ok Ok Ok Ok No N
ot applic. OK Ok Ok Ok No No Remark

Conclusion:The Layout is very Easy to use and departments are planned according
to the material flow and such that no crowded condition will occur. The Layout i
s personnel friendly. Hence whole study is done in a planned manner step by step
with keeping all the given parameters in the mind and with the knowledge of arc
hitectural planning.