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TABLE OF CONTENTS

1
 The
Abstract
of
the
Study.........................................................................................................2


2
 Introduction:
As
If
You
Saw
Morrissey
at
Starbucks
or
Illusion
as
a
Defense

Mechanism .............................................................................................................................................3


3
 Sometimes
I
Tell
Myself:
Go
Settle
in
Guyana
and
Get
Yourself
an
Iguana.........4


4
 And
Count
Dracula
Decides
to
Buy
a
House
in
London...............................................8


5
 Radio
Saint
Helena
Island ........................................................................................................9

1 The Abstract of the Study

This
chapter
is
the
real
abstract
of
the
study,
and
its
concept
is
chosen
to

be
 ‘reality’.
 The
 study
 is
 mainly
 based
 on
 creating
 an
 academic
 thesis
 with
 an

absurd
 approach.
 It
 is
 composed
 of
 12
 chapters
 in
 total.
 The
 first
 of
 these
 12

chapters
 is
 the
 abstract
 you
 are
 currently
 reading,
 and
 chapter
 12
 is
 the

“Bibliography”
 which
 deals
 with
 the
 concept
 of
 “reference”.
 With
 these
 two

chapters
being
the
beginning
and
the
end,
the
chapters
in
between
are
the
main

body
of
the
thesis.
The
concept
of
“Defense”
is
treated
in
Chapter
2,
“not
having

an
idea”
or
“having
no
idea”
in
Chapter
3,
and
“transformation”
in
Chapter
4.
As

the
 study
 was
 bound
 to
 continue
 with
 a
 Chapter
 5,
 the
 concept
 of
 that
 chapter

was
 chosen
 to
 be
 “coding.”
 Chapter
 6
 explains
 in
 detail
 the
 tendency
 to
 “find

something
 while
 looking
 for
 something
 else”,
 which
 is
 the
 main
 concept
 of
 the

thesis.
 Chapter
 7
 contains
 the
 concepts
 of
 “getting
 to
 know”
 and
 “defining,”

whereas
 Chapters
 8
 and
 9
 cover
 the
 opposites.
 In
 this
 respect,
 it
 was
 found

appropriate
 to
 explain
 the
 concept
 of
 “resemblance”
 in
 Chapter
 8,
 and
 that
 of

“dissemblance”
in
Chapter
9.
The
“Conclusion”
chapter
of
the
study
refers
to
the

concept
 of
 “conclusion”
 or
 “concluding.”
 Finally,
 the
 study
 ends
 with
 the

“Appendixes,”
 i.e.
 the
 parts
 regarded
 as
 appendixes,
 which
 form
 a
 chapter
 in

their
own
right.
The
appendixes
are
formed
to
exemplify
the
concept
of
“note”
or

“note‐taking,”
and
cover
the
creation
process
of
the
present
thesis.



The
 study
 has
 been
 prepared
 in
 a
 period
 of
 6
 months
 in
 2009.
 The

numerous
 notes
 taken
 during
 the
first
 4
 months
of
this
period
 were
combined,

and
the
rewriting
period
lasted
35
days
in
total.
First,
the
books
presented
in
the

“Bibliography”
 were
 examined.
 Some
 of
 these
 books
 were
 entirely
 read,
 some

were
 partly
 read
 and
 some
 were
 only
 skimmed
 through.
 After
 these

examinations,
the
points
that
were
found
interesting
were
noted
in
a
notebook.

Then,
 new
 notes
 were
 created
 by
 copying
 the
 notes
 in
 the
 notebook
 to
 the

computer
and
by
rereading
the
notes
over
and
over
again.
The
level
of
chaos
was

increased
 by
 interspersing,
 among
 these
 new
 notes,
 ones
 about
 various
 people

or
events
bearing
no
relation
to
the
books.
Afterwards,
stories
were
created
from

the
ideas
produced
in
this
chaos.



The
study
reflects
an
experimental
style
in
techniques
and
an
absurd
style

in
content.
Attention
has
also
been
paid
to
the
part‐whole
coherence
in
the
study.

However,
the
desire
here
was
for
the
whole
–with
all
the
parts
it
included‐
to
be

a
study
on
its
own,
but
the
parts
were
also
allowed
to
be
independent.
In
other

words,
 though
 the
 parts
 are
 not
 separate
 from
 the
 whole,
 they
 each
 convey
 a

story
or
a
message
of
their
own.
Apart
from
these,
of
the
two
points
that
require

to
be
mentioned
here,
one
is
that
all
through
the
study
something
is
found
while

looking
for
something
else,
and
the
other
is
coherence.
Although
it
was
desired

for
 the
 study
 to
 be
 consistent,
 only
 partial
 consistency
 could
 be
 provided.

Various
 explanations
 on
 how
 the
 study
 was
 prepared,
 or
 on
 the
 chapters
 are

again
present
in
the
texts
–though
their
precise
locations
are
not
clear.




2 Introduction: As If You Saw Morrissey at Starbucks


or Illusion as a Defense Mechanism

This
chapter
is
written
to
explain
the
concept
of
‘Defense’.


The
present
study
represents
the
copy,
entitled
“delivery
5”
of
the
thesis

of
a
writer
who
had
started
and
could
not
finish
writing
a
film
script.
Because
of

the
necessity
of
making
a
delivery
on
October
21,
the
writer
created
another
file,

entitled
 “clips,”
 and
 added
 the
 parts
 clipped
 from
 the
 notes
 to
 “delivery
 5”

without
 “composing”
 in
 the
 file
 itself,
 because
 the
 writer
 knew
 that
 they
 were

present
in
“delivery
4”
and,
for
this
reason,
deleted
“Clips”
after
seeing
that
it
is

of
no
use.
(It
is
now
an
empty
new
file.
The
writer
will
take
other
notes
in
there.)

Now
this
is
the
final
copy,
as
final
as
possible,
and
the
new
file
entitled
“clips”
is

not
 added
 so
 as
 to
 not
 increase
 the
 number
 of
 pages.
 You
 can
 imagine
 that
 the

writer
has
added
the
file,
if
you
like.
After
all,
it
is
now
empty.
However,
the
new

notes
the
writer
will
take
in
that
file
will
most
probably
be
about
marketing
or

statistics,
but
that
is
a
case
belonging
to
the
ca
of
mysterious
codes,
and
even
the

writer
does
not
know.



The
present
study
is
a
real
thesis
and
it
has
been
delivered
to
you.
Today

is
 not
 that
 Friday
 which
 eventually
 arrived,
 but
 a
 Wednesday
 that
 delayed
 the

program
a
great
deal,
by
being
way
beyond
Friday.
Though
the
most
important

sentence
of
a
thesis
is
the
thesis
statement
and
the
defense,
the
thesis
statement

has
not
yet
been
written
in
the
desired
form,
since
the
present
thesis
could
not

be
finished.
Anyhow,
a
perfunctory
defense
is
given
here.
So
if
you
did
like
your

defense
that
means
“the
thesis
has
been
delivered
to
you.”
If
not,
keep
waiting
till

God
 knows
 when.
 Moreover,
 like
 it
 or
 not,
 THE
 THESIS
 HAS
 BEEN
 DELIVERED

TO
 YOU.
 Yes,
 this
 is
 the
 most
 crucial
 sentence
 of
 the
 present
 thesis,
 and
 it
 also

contains
a
meaning
you
can
“fob
off”
on
people
as
the
“thesis
statement,”
if
you

like.
And
that
which
was
desired
to
be
the
real
last
sentence
is
chosen
for
the
end

of
this
paragraph.
For,
the
keyboard
knows
it
has
to
stop
here:
LET
WHAT
YOU

RECEIVED
BE
YOURS,
AND
LET
WHAT
I
UNSTERSTOOD
BE
MINE!


Important
Note:
It
is
to
be
kept
in
mind
that
whether
an
academic
or
an

informal
language
is
employed,
none
of
the
statements
in
the
present
study
give

formal
information
and
that
the
writer
has
randomly
made
up
all
of
them.
Only

the
 information
 in
 the
 footnotes,
 with
 references
 designated,
 are
 relatively

formal
as
quotations
from
the
relevant
references.



3 Sometimes I Tell Myself: Go Settle in Guyana and


Get Yourself an Iguana

Imagine
 someone
 has
 asked
 you
 something.
 You
 have
 no
 idea
 of
 the

answer.
Then,
do
not
say,
“I
don’t
know.”
Say,
“Sometimes
I
tell
myself:
Go
settle

in
 Guyana
 and
 get
 yourself
 and
 an
 iguana,”
 instead.
 This
 expression
 will
 be
 the

code
representing
the
expression
“I
have
no
idea”
between
you
and
me.



Put
 this
 code
 (to
 be
 certain,“Go
 settle
 in
 Guyana
 and
 get
 yourself
 an

iguana.”)
in
the
machine
in
Demonia,
which
will
be
right
on
your
way
to
Guyana.

The
 person
 coming
 by
 the
 machine
 right
 after
 you
 will
 take
 the
 expression
 “I

have
 no
 idea”
 as
 the
 real
 solution
 of
 the
 code,
 and
 that
 person
 will
 be
 greatly

mistaken.
The
machine
will
give
her
a
meaningful
answer,
for
the
first
time
not
in

a
 tricky
 way,
 because
 since
 you
 stopped
 by
 Demonia,
 that
 means
 you
 have

certainly
 decided
 to
 go
 to
 Guyana.
 So
 now
 you
 have
 an
 idea.
 Of
 course,
 that
 is

unless
you
give
up
on
going
to
Guyana
or
have
to
get
a
job
offer
from
Demonia.
In

that
situation
the
first/encoded
solution
the
machine
will
give
you
for
“Go
settle

in
 Guyana
 and
 get
 yourself
 an
 iguana”
 will
 be
 “find
 s.w.l.f.s.e.”.
 A
 former
 visitor

should
 have
 put
 the
 code
 “and
 0”
 in
 the
 machine,
 so
 that
 you
 receive
 this.
 For

Guyana
is
somewhere,
and
Demonia,
which
you
find
as
s.w.l.f.s.e.,
is
somewhere

else!



For
 this
 reason,
 the
 present
 chapter
 is
 created
 with
 the
 “questionnaire‐
style
fortune
telling
technique,”
in
order
to
explain
the
concept
of
“not
having
an

idea”
 or
 “having
 no
 idea”
 and
 to
 show
 you
 the
 way
 together
 with
 its
 reasons.

First
 the
 questionnaire
 was
 formed
 and
 the
 intention
 was
 then
 to
 prepare
 the

fortunes.
Thus,
it
was
intended
to
first
form
the
questionnaire;
then
to
fill
out
the

questionnaire;
 then
 to
 conduct
 the
 statistical
 evaluation
 of
 the
 questionnaire;

then
 to
 carry
 the
 discriminant
 analysis;
 then
 to
 form
 the
 scores,
 following
 the

determination
 of
 the
 fortune
 groups;
 and
 then
 to
 tell
 the
 fortunes
 according
 to

the
scores
of
those
filling
out
the
questionnaire.
Since
all
this
would
take
a
very

long
 time,
 it
 was
 decided
 that
 it
 would
 be
 sufficient
 here
 to
 briefly
 express
 the

intention
do
so
and
to
indicate
that
some
notes
regarding
the
idea
are
present
in

the
 “Appendixes”.
 Here,
 it
 was
 decided
 that
 explaining
 what
 was
 intended
 by

saying
“the
questionnaire
is
present,
but
the
fortune
is
not,”
would
be
sufficient

for
those
willing
to
continue
dealing
with
this
topic
and
technique.
Then,
it
was

decided
that
these
decisions
were
all
insufficient,
and
the
primary
intention
was

carried
out.
However,
it
was
not
totally
carried
out,
so
the
work
lacks
scientific

validity.
Imagining
that
someone
has
asked
something,
imaginary
examples
were

provided
instead
of
saying
“I
do
not
know”.
In
short,
a
slapdash
work
has
been

made.



The
 process
 has
 been
 created,
 inspired
 by
 Umberto
 Eco’s
 quite
 serious

statements
regarding
the
concepts
of
signification
and
sign
in
his
work
entitled

Open
Work.
The
part
that
concerns
us
goes
briefly
as
follows:
 “…1.
Proposition
with

referential
 function…
 a
 proposition
 such
 as
 “that
 man
 comes
 from
 Milan”
 …
 a
 sentence
 like
 “that

man
comes
from
Genoa”…
2.
Proposition
with
suggestive
function…
the
sentence
“that
man
comes

from
 Basra”
 …
 3.
 Suggestive
 effect
 …
 “That
 man
 comes
 from
 Basra,
 via
 Bisha
 and
 Dam,
 Shibam,

Tarib
 and
 Hofuf.
 Anaiza
 and
 Buraida,
 Medina
 and
 Khaibar;
 he
 has
 followed
 the
 course
 of
 the

Euphrates
to
Aleppo.”
;
so
from
a
phonic
fact
…”
1.
Yes,
even
this
much
quotation
is
enough

for
us.
For
we
have
made
the
man
travel
enough
–
The
book
has
308
pages,
and

we
have
been
examining
just
the
journey
he
made
in
2
pages‐.
The
man
sure
has

a
 life,
 works
 and
 affairs,
 yet
 a
 family
 and
 kids…
 The
 writers
 are
 so
 cruel

sometimes!
 Yes,
 we
 will
 not
 be
 that
 cruel
 and
 we
 will
 only
 be
 interested
 in
 the

place
 the
 man
 came
 from
 –the
 answer
 might
 be
 any
 part
 of
 the
 world‐.
 Don’t

worry,
 we
 will
 not
 write
 all
 the
 possible
 answers
 here,
 because
 then
 we
 would

have
 to
 have
 approximately
 1.5
 billion
 people
 fill
 the
 questionnaire
 in
 order
 to

carry
out
the
discriminant
analysis.
That
takes
so
much
time
and
costs
a
fortune.

For
 this
 reason
 we
 briefly
 prepare
 the
 questionnaire
 and
 present
 the
 fortune

results
below.
The
questionnaire
is
formed
by
one
question
and
11
choices:



Question
1:
It
is
so
“__”
that
you
say
“wherever
that
man
comes
from”:



a‐
tiresome,



b‐
wearisome,



c‐
sickening,



d‐
exhausting,


e‐
driving
away,



f‐
alienating,



g‐
disregard‐able,



ı‐
all,



i‐
none,



0‐
I
have
no
idea,



‐1‐
another
adjective
that
I
found/chose.


Select
from
the
choices
the
answer
or
the
answers
that
suit
you.
For

every
 choice
 given,
 your
 mental,
 personality
 and
 life
 fortunes
 are
 as

follows:



a:
 Being
 tired
 is
 a
 concept
 about
 time.
 So,
 you
 have
 been
 surrounded
 by

troubles
 for
 a
 very
 long
 time,
 and
 now,
 you
 are
 tired
 of
 life.
 It
 means
 that
 by

nature
you
have
such
a
personality
that
it
is
very
likely
for
you
to
get
tired,
and


























































1
Umberto Eco, Açık Yapıt (Trans. Nilüfer Uğur Dalay), Istanbul: Can Publishing, 2000, pp. 98-100.
getting
tired
of
something
has
become
a
character
trait
of
you.
As
for
your
mind,

entirely
tired
out,
it
now
has
turned
into
a
tire,
tried
and
tried
and
tied
up.



b:
 Being
 wearisome
 is
 a
 concept
 about
 multiplicity.
 So
 you
 have
 many

things.
 That
 means
 you
 are
 weary
 either
 of
 your
 job
 and
 power,
 or
 of
 your

wealth.
It
means
that
by
nature
you
have
such
a
personality
that
it
is
very
likely

for
you
to
get
pissed
off,
and
you
can
get
pissed
off
from
anything.
Since
that
also

includes
the
opposite
sex,
it
means
you
are
full
of
piss
and
vinegar,
and
cannot

wait
to
fall
in
love.
As
for
your
mind,
it
is
just
worn
out.
Well,
this
choice
signifies

that
from
now
on
you
will
not
think
that
much.



c:
 Being
 sickening
 goes
 together
 with
 being
 tired.
 Generally,
 one
 says
 “I

am
 sick
 and
 tired.”
 For
 this
 reason,
 it
 seems
 that
 you
 construct
 long
 sentences

and
use
many
words
as
you
talk.
So
you
are
a
talkative
person
and
though
you

talk
 a
 lot,
 no
 one
 understands
 you.
 Since
 no
 one
 understands
 you,
 you
 seem
 to

express
 yourself
 by
 making
 these
 kinds
 of
 sentences
 one
 after
 another:
 “For

God’s
sake,
I’m
sick
and
tired”,
“Hey,
I’m
sick
and
tired”,
“I
say
I’m
sick
and
tired

even
of
saying
‘for
God’s
sake,
I’m
sick
and
tired’,
‘hey,
I’m
sick
and
tired,’
yet
no

one
listens
to
me,
and
that’s
why
I’m
sick
and
tired.”
As
for
your
mind,
by
getting

sickened
 over
 and
 over
 again,
 you
 seem
 to
 have
 become
 ill‐minded.
 For
 this

reason,
 talk
 in
 less
 and
 shorter
 sentences
 so
 that
 no
 one
 recognizes
 your
 ill‐
mindedness.


d:
Being
exhausting
is
a
concept
about
working.
That
means
your
notable

personality
trait
is
being
hard‐working.
That
is
why
your
life
is
all
about
going
to

work
 and
 getting
 back
 home.
 Therefore,
 your
 second
 personality
 trait
 is

ordinariness
 and
 monotonousness.
 As
 for
 your
 mental
 fortune,
 by
 working
 out

all
the
time,
you
have
reached
so
many
interpretations.
As
an
extra
personality

trait,
you
are
an
interpreter
and
your
mind
is
full
of
your
personal
opinions.
That

means
that
with
every
new
interpretation
you
will
get
an
idea,
which
will
lead
to

an
 increase
 in
 your
 work
 load,
 and
 you
 will
 become
 even
 more
 hard‐working.

Then
your
life
will
become
more
colorful.


e:
Driving
people
away
is
a
concept
about
being
boring.
Then,
admit
that

you
 are
 a
 boring
 person
 and
 draw
 inspiration
 from
 the
 concept
 of
 being

exhausting,
 told
 in
 choice
 ‘d.’
 Your
 basic
 personality
 trait
 is
 loneliness.
 No

wonder
 people
 run
 away
 from
 you!
 Is
 it
 possible
 that
 you
 might
 have
 been

inspired
by
the
sick
people
in
choice
‘c’?
Do
not
defend
yourself
by
saying
“I’m
on

my
 own”
 and/or
 “I’m
 a
 lonesome
 cowboy,”
 because,
 as
 for
 your
 mind,
 it
 seems

that
driving
people
away
this
much
has
driven
you
mad,
and
it
shows
that
your

madness
results
from
your
loneliness.
For
this
reason,
it
is
advised
that
you
join

social
occasions.
For
then,
you
will
blossom,
and
that
would
do
you
good!



f:
Being
alienating
is
about
isolating
something
from
another.
So,
you
are
a

person
who
sees
some
beings
as
aliens.
It
also
seems
that
you
are
highly
talented

in
separating
things
and
transferring
them
to
other
places.
Your
life
is
all
about

separating,
transferring
and
picking
out
things.
If
this
is
the
case,
you
might
have

a
bizarre
job.
Could
it
be
possible
that
you
are
a
haberdasher
in
a
tailors’
bazaar?

If
you
are
not,
you
had
better
become
one.
As
for
your
mental
fortune,
as
you
set

things
 apart,
 it
 is
 likely
 that
 you
 often
 set
 a
 trap.
 Hmm,
 so
 you
 have
 an
 ever‐
entrapping
 mind.
 Then
 give
 up
 on
 being
 a
 haberdasher
 in
 a
 tailors’
 bazaar
 and

dash
out
to
the
bizarre
by
tailing
people
around.



g:
 Being
 disregard‐able
 is
 a
 concept
 about
 body
 and
 non‐existence.
 That

means
 you
 live
 in
 absence
 and
 poverty.
 However,
 you
 have
 a
 huge
 spatial

extension,
though
you
should
have
been
so
thin
in
this
poverty.
So,
you
are
fat.

According
to
your
mental
fortune,
the
song
“look
what
disregarding
has
done
to

us/
we
took
everyone
for
a
friend”
is
just
for
you,
and
hoping
it
would
open
your

mind,
you
are
advised
to
sing
this
song
often.
For
someone
cannot
take
everyone

for
a
friend.
On
this
subject,
get
inspired
by
the
people
told
in
choice
‘e’,
but
do

not
go
that
far.



ı:
The
choice
‘all’
shows
that
all
concepts
are
unsatisfactory
for
you.




i:
The
choice
‘none’
shows
that
you
either
read
the
book
–
all
308
pages
–

from
beginning
to
the
end,
or
you
wish
to
read
in
a
very
short
period
of
time
but

will
never
manage
to
do
so.
If
you
are
among
those
who
actually
read
the
book,

congratulations!
I
do
not
know
how
you
managed
to
do
so,
for
I
could
not
stand
it

more
than
2
pages.
Those
2
pages
were
very
attractive
and
inspired
me
to
create

a
technique
on
the
subject.
If
you
are
among
those
who
will
not
be
able
to
read,
I

congratulate
you
as
well.
For
there
is
nothing
wrong
with
that,
and
it
means
we

are
on
the
same
page.
(And
this
expression
applies
to
both
the
state
of
reading

and
 non‐reading
 due
 to
 the
 fact
 that
 I
 could
 not
 resist
 either.)
 Who
 cares

wherever
that
man
comes
from!
The
important
thing
is
where
that
man
will
go

now.
(Because
someone
who
has
decided
to
go
to
Guyana,
will
eventually
stop
by

Demonia
 on
 the
 way.
 Well,
 if
 the
 man
 gets
 a
 job
 offer
 there,
 then
 he
 will

transform
from
being
a
male/man
to
a
woman.)
If
Eco
had
not
written
a
book
on

the
subject,
it
is
advised
that
you
write
one
addressing
this
subject.
If
you
cannot

manage
 to
 do
 so,
 find
 out
 your
 fortune
 by
 preparing
 a
 questionnaire
 on
 the

subject.
After
all,
we
have
explained
the
technique
here.
Your
job
is
much
easier.

Definitely
 include
 ‘I
 have
 no
 idea’
 among
 the
 choices.
 For
 as
 the
 corresponding

code
of
this
choice,
the
machine
will
answer
you
“Demonai
shared
taxi
is
about
to

depart,
 you
 troublemaker.”
 (The
 former
 visitor
 should
 have
 entered
 the
 code

‘gülizar’
into
the
machine,
so
that
the
machine
would
give
you
this
answer.
In
the

‘Appendixes’,
there
are
some
pictures
in
the
part
the
TV
serial
is
mentioned).
The

person
visiting
the
machine
after
you
will
get
“George,
tell
me
buddy,
how
come

you
 can
 write
 scripts
 this
 well?”
 asked
 Richard,”
 i.e.
 the
 real
 solution,
 which
 is

also
the
title
of
chapter
6.



0:
GO
SETTLE
IN
GUYANA
AND
GET
YOURSELF
AN
IGUANA.



‐1:
 This
 answer
 is
 false.
 Select
 the
 appropriate
 answer
 or
 answers
 from

the
choices
above.




4 And Count Dracula Decides to Buy a House in


London...

The
 picture
 below
 is
 formed
 of
 the
 images
 found
 by
 google
 search
 made
 using

“woman”
and
“man”
as
keywords,
and
explains
the
concept
of
“transformation”:



5 Radio Saint Helena Island


The
present
chapter
is
prepared
in
order
to
explain
“coding,”
i.e.
the
second

technique,
and
the
concept
of
“coding
with
Andy
Warhol
style”.
Thus
the
chapter

is
 written
 by
 combining
 these
 two
 techniques.
 This
 way,
 a
 new
 technique
 has

been
found,
and
it
is
encoded
as
the
“TO
THE
WISE!”
technique.
In
other
words,

what
 you
 understand
 is
 up
 to
 you.
 In
 daily
 life,
 Radio
 Saint
 Helena
 Island’s

program
 flow
 is
 determined
 by
 the
 codes
 found
 by
 this
 technique.
 The

information
 below
 is
 presented
 to
 give
 a
 better
 understanding
 of
 the
 kind
 of

programs
the
radio
makes,
and
to
explain
the
coding
categories
of
the
“TO
THE

WISE!”
technique:



This
 technique
 is
 used
 in
 various
 places
 throughout
 the
 whole
 study.

However,
the
important
thing
is
what
the
codes
are
like.
Here,
it
is
thought
that
it

would
 be
 useful
 to
 explain
 this
 mystery.
 Some
 of
 these
 codes
 belong
 to
 the

concept
 of
 popular,
 which
 has
 been
 the
 source
 of
 inspiration
 for
 the
 Andy

Warhol
 style,
 and
 consist
 of
 the
 names
 of
 the
 talents
 appearing
 in
 a
 TV
 serial.

These
 are
 “Mehmet
 Aslantuğ”,
 “Özgü
 Namal,”
 and
 “Necip
 Memili.”
 These
 codes,

are
 chosen
 from
 the
 category
 of
 the
 codes
 that
 are
 “clearly
 seen
 and
 could
 be

found
 at
 will.”(To
 find
 out
 where
 these
 expressions
 are
 hidden
 please
 examine

the
 ‘Appendixes’
 chapter.)
 Another
 code
 is
 “susufifiN.esesyaya.”
 No
 one
 knows

what
that
means,
except
for
the
writer.
For
this
reason,
this
code
is
an
example
of

the
 “mysterious
 codes”
 category.
 (To
 find
 out
 where
 these
 expressions
 are

hidden
please
examine
the
‘Appendixes’
chapter.)


Ibn
 Arabi
 defined
 the
 letters
 this
 way:
 “…O
 friend,
 the
 alphabet
 is
 also
 an

ummat
 among
 others.
 The
 letters
 are
 interlocutors
 and
 they
 are
 obliged.
 They

have
 their
 own
 prophets
 of
 their
 own
 nature.
 They
 have
 names
 too;
 however,

they
are
recognized
only
by
the
masters
of
divination
following
our
way…2
Thus

the
letters
are
the
most
important
source
of
inspiration
for
the
coding
technique.

A
 basic
 example
 explaining
 this
 situation
 is
 the
 languages.
 For,
 the
 languages

represent
the
phenomenon
of
being
understood
by
some
groups.
In
other
words,

the
meaningful
words
of
a
language
are
nothing
but
alien
codes
for
those
who
do

not
speak
the
language.
Thus,
the
code
category
that
covers
this
example
is
called

“codes
 belonging
 to
 groups”
 or
 “community
 codes.”
 In
 the
 community
 codes

category,
there
is
the
“unspoken
rules
of
a
spoken
language”
type
of
coding
as
a

subcategory.
 Arabic
 language
 is
 an
 example
 of
 that.
 For,
 in
 Arabic,
 something

starting
with
an
“s”
can
start
with
either
“sin”
or
“sad.”
Whereas
in
English
and

Turkish,
a
word
that
starts
with
“s”
starts
with
“s”.
This
implies
that
the
alphabet



























































2 Ibn Arabî, Harflerin İlmi, (Trans. Mahmut Kanık), 2nd Edition, Bursa: Asa Publishing, 2000, p.14.
can
 be
 loaded
 with
 a
 meaning
 that
 is
 mercurial,
 flexible,
 fragile,
 encoded,
 and

with
its
own
combinations.


Another
 topic
 that
 was
 found
 appropriate
 to
 be
 explained
 here
 is
 the
 idea

that
the
human
brain
resembles
an
ocean
sheltering
vivacity
and
reflecting3
the

transparent
layers,
which
reflect
the
inside
of
the
inner
side.
If
man’s
brain
is
so,

the
codes
produced
by
him
would
be
made
of
marine
animals.
Thus
the
coding

category
comprising
the
marine
animals
is
called
“ocean
codes.”
Another
group

of
coding
is
called
“plain
codes.”
In
this
approach,
there
is
a
guide
containing
the

key
 words.
 However,
 the
 key
 words
 guide
 is
 not
 provided
 separately
 for
 the

reader,
but
given
within
the
text.
For,
the
key
words
are
the
same
as
the
words
in

the
 text
 and
 do
 not
 have
 second
 meanings.
 Thus
 the
 words
 are
 present
 in
 text,

being
both
hidden
and
unveiled.
In
other
words,
when
the
text
is
totally
read
and

the
words
in
the
key
are
replaced
in
the
text,
the
meaning
remains
the
same.
This

coding
style
is
used
more
in
formal
writing.
However,
if
the
words
have
second

meanings,
then
the
keys
have
to
be
given
separately.
For
then,
it
is
impossible
to

give
the
keys
within
the
text.
If
this
second
technique
is
used
as
part
of
the
plain

codes
category,
this
kind
of
coding
is
called
“plain
key
codes.”




Another
 category
 is
 called
 “color
 chart”
 codes.
 In
 this
 coding
 style,
 each

color
 has
 a
 meaning.
 These
 meanings
 are
 written
 in
 the
 color
 chart.
 This

approach
 is
 somewhat
 like
 the
 plain
 key
 codes.
 However,
 a
 basic
 difference
 is

that
in
the
case
the
colors
are
mixed,
the
meaning
is
also
formed
as
a
mixture
of

the
two
colors.
For
this
reason,
one
should
know
which
color
mixtures
result
in

which
 colors.
 For
 example,
 if
 the
 resulting
 color
 is
 green
 for
 the
 mixture
 of

yellow
and
blue,
the
meaning
corresponding
to
the
yellow
and
blue
parts
of
the

text
represents
the
meaning
corresponding
to
the
color
green
in
the
color
chart.


There
 is
 another
 detail
 in
 the
 color
 chart
 coding
 style,
 and
 that
 is
 about
 the

mediums
 the
 colors
 appear
 on.
 The
 word
 medium
 signifies
 the
 texts
 graphics,

photographs,
 geometrical
 shapes,
 etc.
 on
 which
 the
 colors
 appear.
 Thus,

information
about
the
resulting
meanings
of
color‐medium
combinations
should

also
be
included
in
the
color
chart.
Since
writing
resembles
the
“neutral
element”

in
mathematics,
there
is
no
need
of
including
writing
in
the
color
chart.
In
other

words,
if
no
medium
meaning
is
included
in
a
color
chart,
a
decoder
viewing
the

chart
 has
 to
 understand
 or
 should
 already
 know
 that
 the
 meanings
 the
 colors

represent
apply
for
writing.
In
this
case,
this
sub‐category
can
also
be
named
as

“neutral
element
color
chart
coding.”



Then,
there
is
the
“abbreviations”
category,
being
among
the
best
known

categories
 in
 the
 area
 of
 coding.
 The
 abbreviations
 like
 a.w.,
 or
 concepts
 like


























































3 Beyin Anatomisinin Şeffaf Atlası, Istanbul: Abbott Laboratories, 1955. This
 idea
 was
 acquired
 by
 the

association
created
by
this
referred
source.

f.s.w.l.f.s.e.
used
throughout
the
thesis
are
examples
of
this
category.
For
example

the
 abbreviation
 a.w.
 symbolizes
 the
 expression
 Andy
 Warhol
 and
 his
 art.


Throughout
 the
 thesis,
 the
 name
 Andy
 Warhol
 is
 abbreviated
 in
 various
 ways.

There
are
two
reasons
for
that.
The
first
is
to
popularize
Andy
Warhol
by
using

his
name
frequently,
and
the
other
is
that
one
of
the
sources
of
this
style
is
the

“Andy
 Warhol
 style”
 which
 is
 the
 6th
 technique.
 The
 meaning
 of
 the
 code

f.s.w.l.f.s.e.,
 which
 is
 given
 as
 an
 example
 of
 the
 abbreviated
 concept
 is
 the

concept
 of
 the
 thesis.
 It
 stands
 for
 the
 concept
 of
 “finding
 something
 while

looking
for
something
else.”



A
special
type
of
the
abbreviation
codes
is
called
the
“lipogram.”
Though

the
 concept
 of
 the
 lipogram
 is
 furnished
 with
 an
 example
 in
 the
 thesis,
 it
 is

decided
that
giving
the
solution
of
a
text
written
according
to
the
rule
would
be

more
absurd
than
writing
a
text
following
the
lipogram
rules.
For
this
reason,
it

is
thought
that
finding
a
decoding
machine
while
trying
to
make
a
coding
one
fits

perfectly
 well
 with
 the
 concept
 of
 “finding
 something
 while
 looking
 for

something
else.”


In
this
chapter
the
logic
and
the
structure
of
the
decoding
machine
will
be

explained
 by
 an
 example.
 The
 machine
 itself
 will
 start
 operating
 in
 Demonia
 in

the
following
chapters.
The
reason
the
machine
does
not
operate
here
in
its
place

but
 there
 is
 yet
 another
 code
 and
 points
 to
 the
 consistency
 of
 the
 thesis
 as
 a

whole.
 This
 consistency
 is
 consistent
 with
 that
 of
 the
 photographs
 –
 given
 in

chapter
 4
 –
 that
 tell
 of
 the
 events
 in
 Demonia
 as
 the
 signs
 of
 Dracula’s

transformation
from
a
man
to
a
woman.
If
attention
is
paid,
it
can
be
seen
that

there
 is
 another
 secret
 consistency
 and
 chapters
 4,
 5
 and
 6
 tell
 the
 same
 story

one
 after
 another.
 Being
 the
 main
 characteristic
 of
 the
 “TO
 THE
 WISE!”

technique,
 this
 coding
 approach
 is
 on
 the
 inexhaustibility
 of
 consistency
 and
 of

the
explanation
of
consistency.



The
story
of
how
the
machine
was
found
goes
as
follows:
This
machine
is

actually
the
decoder
of
the
code
writer.
This
person
made
a
decoding
machine
by

mistake,
while
trying
to
make
a
coding
machine.
In
other
words,
a
decoder
was

found
 while
 looking
 for
 a
 coding
 machine.
 2
 codes
 are
 required
 to
 operate
 the

machine.
The
first
is
“Rimbaud”
and
the
second
is
“I
is
another.”
To
solve
a
code,

first
 the
 code
 to
 be
 solved
 is
 thrown
 into
 the
 machine
 and
 then
 “Rimbaud”
 is

written.
So,
the
machine
understands
that
what
is
given
is
actually
a
code.
Then,

“I
 is
 another”
 is
 written.
 So,
 the
 machine
 understands
 that
 it
 should
 give
 the

solution
 not
 to
 you,
 but
 to
 someone
 else.
 Thus,
 the
 solution
 you
 will
 take
 from

the
machine
is
the
solution
of
the
code
that
the
former
visitor
has
entered
into

the
 machine,
 and
 the
 solution
 of
 the
 code
 you
 enter
 into
 the
 machine
 will
 be

given
 to
 the
 person
 that
 will
 visit
 the
 machine
 after
 you.
 The
 machine
 is
 quite

reasonable.
 When
 you
 give
 it
 a
 code,
 it
 gives
 you
 back
 a
 code.
 Because
 for
 the

machine,
code=code,
and
thus
there
is
consistency.
So,
what
you
actually
have
to

find
is
the
person
that
will
enter
a
new
code
into
the
machine
after
you.


There
 are
 two
 ways
 to
 get
 the
 real
 solution
 of
 your
 code.
 The
 first
 is
 to

wait
for
the
person
that
will
visit
the
machine
after
you.
When
that
person
enters

the
code
to
be
decoded,
your
solution
will
come
out.
You
can
steal
the
solution

they
receive
from
them
–
the
person
you
are
awaiting.
After
all,
that
solution
is

actually
the
solution
of
your
code.
If
you
do
not
have
much
time,
let
us
tell
you
a

little
trick.
The
machine
does
not
recognize
the
people
who
enter
the
codes
to
be

decoded.
 So,
 put
 the
 solution,
 which
 you
 got
 for
 the
 code
 you
 entered
 into
 the

machine,
 the
 one
 which
 actually
 belongs
 to
 the
 former
 visitor,
 back
 in
 the

machine.
 Then,
 write
 the
 two
 codes
 required
 for
 the
 machine
 to
 operate.
 So,
 if

you
 enter
 the
 solution
 that
 you
 have
 back
 into
 the
 machine
 and
 write
 first

“Rimbaud”
and
then
“I
is
another”,
the
machine
will
think
that
the
code
entered

is
a
new
code
and
will
take
you
for
another
person.
And
taking
you
for
another

person,
the
machine
will
give
you
the
solution
of
the
first
code.



We
have
made
this
machine.
(We
are
experimenting
on
the
decoder
of
the

code
 writer.)
 Now,
 we
 are
 making
 the
 first
 experiment.
 This
 way,
 we
 meet
 the

writer’s
words
saying:
“Here,
we
shall
explain
the
machine
with
an
example”:


Enter
the
code
into
the
machine.
Write
the
first
code:
“Rimbaud”.


The
code
goes
as
follows4:


“…
.o.e
kidd.
.o.e,
.on’t
.on
.un


b.
scru..
I
.old
.ou,
.on’t
.on
.un


Let’s
.lope
.o
.he
roo.
together


An.
.ill
.awn
pla.
ch.cke.


I,
.he
.oor
ser..nt
o.
.ours


.a..ene.
b.
.ou,
.he
.our.e!
...”


Then
say
“I
is
another”
and
get
the
solution.



The
solution
goes
as
follows:



Core
kiddo
core,
won’t
yon
sun


Bi
scruff
I
told
fou,
won’t
yon
sun


Let’s
alope
so
she
root
together


Ant
dill
sawn
plan
checked


I,
she
door
serpent
on
fours


saddened
bi
fou,
she
course!



 Now
throw
the
solution
back
into
the
machine
and
write
“Rimbaud”.
The

machine
will
think
that
it
is
a
new
code.
Then
write
“I
is
another”
and
take
the

real
solution.
The
machine
will
take
you
for
another
person.



























































4 Levent Şentürk, Yerdeğiştirmeler Seçkisi, 1st Edition, Istanbul: YKY, 2004, p.110.
The
real
solution
probably
goes
as
follows:


Come
kiddie
come,
don’t
you
run


By
scruff
I
hold
you,
don’t
you
run


Let’s
elope
to
the
roof
together


And
till
dawn
play
checkers


I,
the
poor
servant
of
yours


maddened
by
you,
the
source!


The
 poem
 chosen
 to
 be
 the
 “code”
 here
 is
 [the
 translation
 of]
 the
 first

three
 lines
 taken
 from
 page
 110
 of
 the
 book
 entitled
 Yer
 Değiştirmeler
 Seçkisi


written
by
Levent
Şentürk
to
exemplify
the
“Oulipo”
techniques.
Regarding
this

poem,
 it
 is
 explained
 in
 page
 240
 of
 the
 same
 book
 that
 the
 [Turkish]
 letters

r,f,w,e,s,m,h,t,a,v,d
 had
 been
 excluded
 as
 lipogram
 letters.
 Here,
 to
 solve
 the

poem,
the
writer
derived
two
possible
variations
as
the
plain
[Turkish]
version.

However,
 the
 rule
 about
 the
 deletion
 of
 the
 letters
 listed
 in
 the
 lipogram
 had

been
ignored
to
some
extent.
Actually,
it
was
only
after
the
solution,
towards
the

end
of
the
book,
that
the
rule
was
noticed.
Here,
the
solution
was
approached
by

taking
the
following
actions:




In
 the
 above‐mentioned
 book,
 the
 title
 of
 the
 poem
 is
 given
 as
 “Tekir

Divan”
[Tabby
Divan].
Therefore,
it
was
thought
to
be
“a
poem
written
for
a
cat.”

For,
“divan”
is
either
poem
or
sofa
and
“tekir”
[tabby]
is
a
kind
of
cat
you
hold
by

the
scruff.
It
was
seen
that
there
were
not
many
meaningful
words
to
replace
one

of
 the
 words
 present
 [“
 scru..”]
 in
 the
 poem.
 Thus,
 on
 the
 subject
 of
 finding

something
 while
 looking
 for
 something
 else,
 a
 linguistic/grammatical
 meaning

and
 an
 implicit
 rule
 of
 the
 writer’s
 own
 mother
 tongue
 have
 been
 seen.
 The

“unspoken
rules
of
a
spoken
language”
type
of
coding
approach,
explained
above,

was
seen
to
be
present
too.
Thus
the
word
“scruff”
was
used
as
“scru..”
in
both

the
solutions
as
the
outstanding
meaningful
alternative.
Regarding
the
subject
of

finding
 something
 while
 looking
 for
 something
 else,
 the
 idea
 that
 was
 found
 is

“the
fact
that
cats
are
held/caught
by
the
scruff
is
information
common
to
both

the
book’s
author
and
me.”
The
author
of
the
book
and
I
do
not
know
each
other,

but
 the
 coder
 and
 the
 decoder
 share
 a
 cultural
 knowledge,
 or
 to
 put
 it
 more

clearly,
a
semantic
knowledge
that
brings
us
to
the
code.
For,
the
places
we
live

and
our
mother
tongues
are
probably
same.
Since
it
is
likely
that
we
are
around

the
same
ages,
we
both
should
have
learned
in
our
childhood
that
a
cat
could
not

move
if
it
was
held
by
the
scruff,
and
this
way
it
could
easily
be
carried
around

without
 getting
 scratched.
 So,
 we
 were
 taught
 to
 carry
 the
 cat
 in
 a
 way
 that

would
 be
 safe
 both
 for
 us
 and
 the
 cat.
 In
 Turkish
 language,
 the
 only
 difference

between
the
word
‘cat’
[kedi]
and
‘self’
[kendi]
is
the
letter
‘n,’
present
in
one
and

missing
 in
 the
 other.
 If
 there
 is
 an
 “n”
 it
 means
 that
 we
 are
 talking
 about
 our

selves
 and
 if
 the
 “n”
 is
 missing
 it
 means
 that
 we
 are
 talking
 about
 the
 cat.
 All

these
 facts
 are
 even
 more
 secret
 codes,
 and
 they
 are
 also
 among
 the
 means
 of

solving
codes.
So,
the
point
is
that
the
culture
and
the
things
we
learn
constitute

not
 explicit,
 but
 actual
 means
 of
 forming
 and
 solving.
 For
 this
 reason,
 before

reaching
 the
 end
 of
 the
 book
 (to
 page
 240),
 it
 is
 possible
 that
 an
 approximate

solution
 of
 the
 poem
 can
 be
 realized
 without
 using
 the
 coding
 rule,
 and
 that
 is

exactly
what
happened
in
this
solution.



The
solved
part
of
the
poem
is
made
up
with
2
versions.
In
both
solutions,

the
letters
are
added
in
the
parts
shown
as
“.”
and
the
words
obtained
this
way

do
 convey
 meaning
 in
 Turkish.
 However,
 when
 you
 read
 the
 poem
 as
 a
 whole,

the
 poem
 that
 was
 supposedly
 entered
 into
 the
 machine
 and
 taken
 back
 as
 the

“solution”
 presents
 meaningless
 results.
 Neither
 the
 lines,
 nor
 the
 poem
 as
 a

whole
 harbor
 a
 meaning
 and
 they
 stand
 as
 lined
 up
 words
 or
 clauses,
 making

sense
only
on
their
own.
The
poem
taken
from
the
machine
as
the
hypothetical

“real
 solution”
 is
 meaningful
 both
 in
 the
 lines
 and
 as
 a
 whole.
 To
 put
 it

differently,
 the
 letters,
 words
 and
 the
 sentences
 replaced
 with
 dots
 all
 convey

meaning
 in
 Turkish.
 Nevertheless,
 the
 resulting
 poem
 can
 be
 considered
 as

lighthearted
and
partly
absurd
to
be
a
literary
poem.
Moreover,
since
it
does
not

apply
 to
 the
 rule,
 it
 is
 not
 possible
 to
 say
 “the
 poem
 written
 and
 coded
 by
 the

author
of
the
book
is
original
and
completely
solved.”


The
sentence
summarizing
this
chapter
is
as
follows:



–
 SERVE
 SOME
 PURPOSE,
 YE
 EXPERIMENTALISTS!
 DO
 SOMETHING



THAT
SERVES
SOME
PURPOSE!








Coding
is
useful
work
and
it
surely
calls
for
talent.
For,
it
requires
skills
to

form
 and
 to
 decode,
 and
 Oulipian
 texts
 have
 a
 style
 that
 inspires
 and
 provides

sources
for
coding.
Who
knows,
maybe
the
first
code‐maker
was
some
Oulipian,

yet
 it
 is
 obvious
 that
 the
 code
 created
 by
 the
 first
 code‐maker
 was
 an
 Oulipian

text.
It
is
also
evident
that
all
codes
written
are
Oulipian
texts.
On
the
other
hand,

since
life
itself
is
an
enigma,
the
area
of
Oulipian
literature
is
so
vast
that
actually

all
literature
is
made
up
of
Oulipian
styles,
but
since
the
rules
are
more
formal,

the
writings
do
not
look
that
absurd.
This
idea
applies
not
only
to
literature,
but

to
 everything
 that
 can
 be
 written
 or
 said.
 It
 also
 applies
 to
 science
 and
 to
 all

kinds
 of
 literature.
 So,
 the
 expression
 used
 for
 the
 Oulipians
 –
 “rats
 who

themselves
build
the
maze
from
which
they
set
out
to
escape”
–

has
developed

decoding
 and
 has
 created
 Radio
 Saint
 Helena
 Island’s
 program
 flow.
 Not
 only

that,
it
also
nourished
the
present
thesis
to
a
great
extent.