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tel 614-403-8912

fax 614-267-8590
2864 North Hight Street
William Mook Columbus, Ohio 43202 william.mook@mokenergy.com

MOKENERGY

Project Proposal
Prepared for Khurram, Irshad, Client
Prepared by: William Mook, CEO

January 13, 2010


Proposal number: PK-001

Initial Development
Six Million Dollars

Desalination/Power Plant/
Chemical Processing
Water Towers

Solar Collector

6,200 kilo-liters of fresh water per day


2,000 kg of salt per day
24,800 kWh of electricity per day
Assorted Chemicals
tel 614-403-8912

fax 614-267-8590
2864 North Hight Street
William Mook Columbus, Ohio 43202 william.mook@mokenergy.com

MOKENERGY

Executive Summary
Objective
Provide Water and other Essential Services at usual cost, or better, to customers in Ormara Pakistan

Goals
Make the Desert Bloom - Turn Salt Water, Sunlight, and available Land into high value commodities

Solution
Develop a custom solar energy solution using MOKENERGY proprietary technologies

Ultra-low-cost Solar
Solar energy is abundant on Earth, yet because it occurs at energy densities far less intense than is usual for
industry its cost is far higher than other industrial sources despite its availability. The solution is to create col-
lectors that are extremely low cost to gather solar energy, concentrate it to industrial intensities, and convert
it to easily usable forms. MOKENERGY achieves these ends my air stabilizing thin films of tough plastic to
form large optical systems that concentrate sunlight at very low cost.

Low-cost Hydrogen
Concentrating sunlight to 5,000x ambient levels allows MOKENERGY to directly break-down water into its
component parts, hydrogen and oxygen. These components may then be reacted to release the energy it
took to make them from water, forming water again. This heat energy may be used in a variety of ways;

• Gases are stored in low-cost plastic pressure vessels to provide energy whenever needed on the scale
needed
• Heat energy may be used to drive conventional thermal generators to produce electricity
• Heat energy may be used to drive conventional flash evaporators to produce fresh water from sea water
• Heat energy may be used to drive conventional crystallizers to produce salt from brine
• Electricity may be used to convert brine into bleach using Brine Electrolysis
• Hydrogen may be combined with nitrogen in the air using the Haber Process to make ammonia - a fertilizer
• Electricity and oxygen may be used to make hydrogen-peroxide a powerful oxidizer
• Salt, Bleach, Ammonia, Hydrogen-Peroxide, Hydrogen, Oxygen and Electricity may be used in a variety of
ways to provide high-value commodities for trade

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tel 614-403-8912

fax 614-267-8590
2864 North Hight Street
William Mook Columbus, Ohio 43202 william.mook@mokenergy.com

MOKENERGY

Water Management
The production of large quantities of low-cost water means that water must be stored and efficiently man-
aged. The use of large quantities of low-cost water means that waste water must be processed.

• The production of chlorine and its introduction into water at low concentrations provides a means to store
water safely
• Innovative water storage, retrieval, distribution using low-cost molded plastic components.
• Containers
• Pipes, Headers and Pipe Networks
• Tanks
• Pumps
• Waste water retrieval and processing
• Septic Lines
• Septic Tanks
• Treatment

Site
The site is located at 25 degrees 12.1 minutes North Latitude and 64 degrees 40.2 minutes East Longitude
near Ormara Pakistan.

Solar Agriculture Expansion Site

Area to Develop with Inflatable Greenhouse & Irrigation Facing South

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2864 North Hight Street
William Mook Columbus, Ohio 43202 william.mook@mokenergy.com

MOKENERGY

Water Towers
Initial Site

Solar Field Expansion Site

Area to Develop with Solar Collectors Facing West

Solar Industrial Expansion Site

Initial Site

Area to Develop with Desalination, Power & Chemical Processing


Facing East

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2864 North Hight Street
William Mook Columbus, Ohio 43202 william.mook@mokenergy.com

MOKENERGY

Agricultural Field

City Center

Waterfront
Park Initial Site
Industrial Chemical Water Process Port

Solar Field - 17.3 km2


6.92 giga-watts peak
570 mega-watts base

Phase I Development

The site may be developed to support up 1 million people at a European or Japanese level of per per-
son consumption of food, water, energy and other industrial products.

Solar Energy Level

Each square meter at the proposed site intercepts


5.2 kWh/m2/day. This one site, fully developed gen-
erates 5 million mega-watt-hours of electrical en-
ergy and 10 million mega-watt-hours of thermal en-
ergy for water desalination.

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2864 North Hight Street
William Mook Columbus, Ohio 43202 william.mook@mokenergy.com

MOKENERGY

Phase II

Phase II
Phase II
Phase I

20.0 giga-watts peak Phase I


1.8 giga-watts base

Phase II Development - 5 million people

Phase III

77.0 giga-watts peak


6.0 giga-watts base

Phase III Development - 60 million people


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Equals Current Installed Electrical Generation
tel 614-403-8912

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2864 North Hight Street
William Mook Columbus, Ohio 43202 william.mook@mokenergy.com

MOKENERGY

Ormara and Manhattan on Same Scale

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2864 North Hight Street
William Mook Columbus, Ohio 43202 william.mook@mokenergy.com

MOKENERGY

PROCESS

In addition to providing fresh water and electricity, we also provide salt, bleach, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide
and other assorted products expanding to every variety of product possible to make with sunlight and sea-
water.

Background
The Indus Valley civilization, one of the oldest in the world and dating back at least 5,000 years, spread over
much of what is presently Pakistan. During the second millennium B.C., remnants of this culture fused with
the migrating Indo-Aryan peoples. The area underwent successive invasions in subsequent centuries from
the Persians, Greeks, Scythians, Arabs (who brought Islam), Afghans, and Turks. The Mughal Empire flour-
ished in the 16th and 17th centuries; the British came to dominate the region in the 18th century. The sepa-
ration in 1947 of British India into the Muslim state of Pakistan (with West and East sections) and largely
Hindu India was never satisfactorily resolved, and India and Pakistan fought two wars - in 1947-48 and 1965
- over the disputed Kashmir territory. A third war between these countries in 1971 - in which India capitalized
on Islamabad's marginalization of Bengalis in Pakistani politics - resulted in East Pakistan becoming the
separate nation of Bangladesh. In response to Indian nuclear weapons testing, Pakistan conducted its own
tests in 1998. The dispute over the state of Kashmir is ongoing, but discussions and confidence-building
measures have helped the two countries begin to work through their issues. In February 2008, Pakistan held
parliamentary elections and in September 2008, after the resignation of former President MUSHARRAF,
elected Asif Ali ZARDARI to the presidency. Pakistani government and military leaders are struggling to con-

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MOKENERGY

trol domestic insurgents, many of whom are located in the tribal areas adjacent to the border with Afghani-
stan. India-Pakistan relations have been rocky since the November 2008 Mumbai attacks, but both countries
are taking small steps to put relations back on track.

Location
Southern Asia, bordering the Arabian Sea, between India on the east and Iran and Afghanistan on the west
and China in the north

Area
total: 796,095 sq km
country comparison to the world: 36
land: 770,875 sq km
water: 25,220 sq km

Boundaries
total: 6,774 km
border countries: Afghanistan 2,430 km, China 523 km, India 2,912 km, Iran 909 km

Coastline
1,046 km

Maritime Claims
territorial sea: 12 nm
contiguous zone: 24 nm
exclusive economic zone: 200 nm
continental shelf: 200 nm or to the edge of the continental margin

Climate
mostly hot, dry desert; temperate in northwest; arctic in north

Terrain
flat Indus plain in east; mountains in north and northwest; Balochistan plateau in west

Elevation Extremes
lowest point: Indian Ocean 0 m
highest point: K2 (Mt. Godwin-Austen) 8,611 m

Natural Resources
land, extensive natural gas reserves, limited petroleum, poor quality coal, iron ore, copper, salt, limestone

Land Use
arable land: 24.44%
permanent crops: 0.84%
other: 74.72% (2005)

Irrigated Land
182,300 sq km (2003)

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William Mook Columbus, Ohio 43202 william.mook@mokenergy.com

MOKENERGY

Total Renewable Water Resources


233.8 cu km (2003)

Freshwater Withdrawal Total


total: 169.39 cu km/yr (2%/2%/96%)
per capita: 1,072 cu m/yr (2000)

Natural Hazards
frequent earthquakes, occasionally severe especially in north and west; flooding along the Indus after heavy
rains (July and August)

Environment Current Issues


water pollution from raw sewage, industrial wastes, and agricultural runoff; limited natural fresh water re-
sources; most of the population does not have access to potable water; deforestation; soil erosion; desertifi-
cation

International Agreements
party to: Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol, Desertification, Endangered Species,
Environmental Modification, Hazardous Wastes, Law of the Sea, Marine Dumping, Ozone Layer Protection,
Ship Pollution, Wetlands signed, but not ratified: Marine Life Conservation

Geographic Location
controls Khyber Pass and Bolan Pass, traditional invasion routes between Central Asia and the Indian Sub-
continent

Population
176,242,949 (July 2009 est.)
country comparison to the world: 6

Age Structure
0-14 years: 37.2% (male 33,739,547/female 31,868,065)
15-64 years: 58.6% (male 52,849,607/female 50,378,198)
65 years and over: 4.2% (male 3,475,927/female 3,931,605) (2009 est.)

Median Age
total: 20.8 years
male: 20.6 years
female: 21 years (2009 est.)

Population Growth Rate


1.947% (2009 est.)
country comparison to the world: 63

Urbanization
urban population: 36% of total population (2008)
rate of urbanization: 3% annual rate of change (2005-10 est.)

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MOKENERGY

Literacy
definition: age 15 and over can read and write
total population: 49.9%
male: 63%
female: 36% (2005 est.)

Economy - Overview
Pakistan, an impoverished and underdeveloped country, has suffered from decades of internal political dis-
putes, low levels of foreign investment, and declining exports of manufactures. Faced with untenable budg-
etary deficits, high inflation, and hemorrhaging foreign exchange reserves, the government agreed to an In-
ternational Monetary Fund Standby Arrangement in November 2008. Between 2004-07, GDP growth in the
6-8% range was spurred by gains in the industrial and service sectors, despite severe electricity shortfalls.
Poverty levels decreased by 10% since 2001, and Islamabad steadily raised development spending in recent
years. In 2008 the fiscal deficit - a result of chronically low tax collection and increased spending - exceeded
Islamabad's target of 4% of GDP. Inflation remains the top concern among the public, jumping from 7.7% in
2007 to 20.8% in 2008, primarily because of rising world fuel and commodity prices. In addition, the Paki-
stani rupee has depreciated significantly as a result of political and economic instability.

GDP Purchasing Power


$431.2 billion (2008 est.)
country comparison to the world: 28
$417 billion (2007 est.)
$393.4 billion (2006 est.)
note: data are in 2008 US dollars

GDP
$164.6 billion (2008 est.)

GDP Real Growth Rate


3.4% (2008 est.)
country comparison to the world: 114
6% (2007 est.)
6% (2006 est.)

GDP Per Person


$2,500 (2008 est.)
GDP Sector Comparison
agriculture: 20.4%
industry: 26.6%
services: 53% (2008 est.)

Labor Force
1150.58 million
country comparison to the world:
note: extensive export of labor, mostly to the Middle East, and use of child labor (2008 est.)

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William Mook Columbus, Ohio 43202 william.mook@mokenergy.com

MOKENERGY

Labor Force Composition


agriculture: 43%
industry: 20.3%
services: 36.6% (2005 est.)

Unemployment Rate
13.6% (2008 est.)

Agriculture Products
cotton, wheat, rice, sugarcane, fruits, vegetables; milk, beef, mutton, eggs

Industries
textiles and apparel, food processing, pharmaceuticals, construction materials, paper products, fertilizer,
shrimp

Industrial Production Growth Rate


4.6% (2008 est.)
country comparison to the world: 56

Electricity Production
90.8 billion kWh (2007 est.)
country comparison to the world: 33

Electricity Consumption
72.2 billion kWh (2007 est.)
country comparison to the world: 35

Oil Production
61,870 bbl/day (2008 est.)
country comparison to the world: 59

Oil Consumption
383,000 bbl/day (2008 est.)
country comparison to the world: 35

Natural Gas - Production


37.5 billion cu m (2008 est.)
country comparison to the world: 23

Natural Gas - Consumption


37.5 billion cu m (2008 est.)
country comparison to the world: 21

Exports
$21.09 billion (2008 est.)
country comparison to the world: 71
$18.12 billion (2007 est.)

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