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Respectful Relationships Education Program

Project evaluation report

Published by: Womens Health West


Authors: Django Love and Elly Taylor
Contributor: Helen Makregiorgos
Editor: Karin Holzknecht
Cover images: Isis and Pluto
Womens Health West would like to acknowledge the following peer educators who assisted in the collation of
evaluation data that is compiled in this report.
Adut Akol
Alexandra Jones
Ashlea Monigatti
Caitlyn Fisher
Juliet Nakhla
Rosa Koua
Thakshila Tilakaratne
Womens Health West 2014
Suggested citation:
Womens Health West 2014, You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report,
Womens Health West, Melbourne.

www.whwest.org.au

Womens Health West acknowledge the support of the state government


You, Me and Us was funded by the Australian Government Department of Social Services

Contents

Definitions

Executive summary
Summary of results from respectful relationship education sessions with 10 to 13 year
olds
Summary of results from respectful relationship education sessions with 18 to 24 year
olds
Summary of results from adult leaders who participated in You, Me and Us
Summary of results from peer educators who participated in You, Me and Us

Overview of the You, Me and Us project evaluation


You, Me and Us project overview
Developing a theory of change and project logic
You, Me and Us project logic
Peer education model
Evaluation questions

7
7
7
7
9
9

Evaluation outcomes for young people who participated in You, Me and Us


respectful relationships education sessions
Overview
Methodology
Summary of results from sessions delivered with young people aged 10 to 13
Summary of results from sessions delivered with young people aged 18 to 24

4
4
5
6

11
11
11
11
24

Evaluation outcomes for adult leaders in participating settings

33

Adult leaders evaluation of You, Me and Us in key project settings


Overview
Methodology
Respectful relationship education sessions
Professional development training

45
45
45
46
51

Evaluation outcomes from You, Me and Us peer education training

55

Evaluation outcomes for peer educators post project delivery


Overview
Methodology
Knowledge and skills in facilitating and delivering respectful relationship education
sessions
Ambassadors for the prevention of violence against women
Changes in relation to work and study
Summary of key findings

70
70
70

References

83

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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79
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Definitions
The following definitions inform Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us project:
A bystander is a person or persons, not directly involved as a victim or perpetrator, who observes an
act of violence, discrimination or other unacceptable behaviour (VicHealth 2012).
Bystander action is taken by a bystander to speak out about or engage others in responding to
specific incidents of sexism, discrimination or violence against women (VicHealth 2012).
Consent means free agreement of your own free will (Victoria Legal Aid 2014).
Intimate partner violence refers to behaviour within an intimate relationship that causes physical,
sexual or psychological harm, including acts of physical aggression, sexual coercion, psychological
abuse and controlling behaviours (World Health Organization/London School of Hygiene and Tropical
Medicine 2010).
Gender encompasses the socially constructed norms, roles, responsibilities and expectations that
shape our understanding of what it means to be a woman or a man within a given society at a
particular time (Womens Health West 2014).
Gender equality is the realisation of equal and measurable outcomes for women, men and genderdiverse people (Womens Health West 2014).
Gender equity is the process of being fair to women, men and gender-diverse people with the aim of
achieving equal outcomes for all (Womens Health West 2014).
Gender stereotypes are generalisations of the traits that all women or men are assumed to possess
(Womens Health West 2014).
Primary prevention refers to initiatives that aim to prevent violence before it occurs by redressing
the underlying causes, such as gender inequity (VicHealth 2007).
Respectful relationships education refers to a broad range of educational programs that cover
romantic and/or sexual relationships, peer relationships, the relationships between students and
teachers, bullying and homophobia (Fileborn 2014).
Sexual assault is an act of a sexual nature carried out against a person's will through the use of
physical force, intimidation or coercion, and includes any attempts to do this (ABS 2012).
Victim/survivor is a term used to emphasise the capacity of people who have been sexually
assaulted to survive and overcome the impacts of violence in their lives (CASA House 2007).
Violence against women refers to any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to
result in, physical, sexual or mental harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts,
coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life (United Nations
1993).
Young people is used throughout this report to refer to people aged between 10 and 24 years.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

Executive summary
You, Me and Us is a multi-faceted project that trains and supports culturally and linguistically diverse
young women aged 18 to 24 to co-deliver respectful relationships education sessions with Womens
Health West health promotion workers in higher educational institutions, sporting clubs, youth
organisations and primary schools in Melbournes western region. Target groups for the respectful
relationship education sessions are young people aged 18 to 24 and senior primary school students
aged 10 to 13. To support the efficacy and sustainability of the project, professional development
training is provided to adult leaders in participating schools and organisations.

Summary of results from respectful relationship education sessions with 10 to


13 year olds
The respectful relationship education session evaluations with young people aged 10 to 13 found
notable increases in their awareness and knowledge about what constitutes a respectful and
disrespectful relationship and in their ability to reject and challenge gender stereotypes and gender
inequity.
Results included a:

10 per cent and 7 per cent increase among girls and boys respectively who identified that a
relationship where you can tell a friend anything and know that they will listen and accept you
is a respectful relationship
7 per cent and 5 per cent increase among girls and boys respectively who knew that a
friendship where friends hang out with other friends sometimes was a respectful relationship
19 per cent and 10 per cent increase among girls and boys respectively who identified that
telling a friend how you feel following a fight is very respectful behaviour
16 per cent and 6 per cent increase among girls and boys respectively who strongly disagreed
with the gender stereotype that pink is for girls and blue is for boys
11 per cent and 8 per cent increase among girls and boys respectively who strongly disagreed
with the gender stereotype that girls and boys are too different to be equal
10 per cent and 13 per cent increase among girls and boys respectively who strongly
disagreed with the gender stereotype that women shouldnt work in a paid job because they
are more suited to housework and childcare
17 per cent and 13 per cent increase among girls and boys respectively who strongly
disagreed with the gender stereotype that boys are better at sports like football than girls
11 per cent and 10 per cent among girls and boys respectively who correctly identified that if
a boys calls another boy a girl it is an insult that suggests girls are weak.

Summary of results from respectful relationship education sessions with 18 to


24 year olds
The respectful relationship education session evaluations with young people aged 18 to 24 found that
there was already high knowledge and awareness of respectful relationships among this cohort. There

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

were increases in awareness and knowledge about the prevalence of violence against women,
understanding violence-supportive attitudes, and bystander action.
Results included a:

31 per cent and 20 per cent increase among young women and young men respectively who
correctly identified that violence against women is extremely common in Australia
18 per cent and 20 per cent increase among young women and young men respectively who
could correctly identify attitudes that support violence against women
21 per cent increase among young men who reported that they would take positive bystander
action if a male friend was posting sexist and suggestive comments about a female friend
online
17 per cent increase among young women who reported that they would take positive
bystander action if a female friend was really drunk and being chatted up by a man she just
met.

Summary of results from adult leaders who participated in You, Me and Us


Among adult leaders who participated in the You, Me and Us professional development training, there
were increases in knowledge about the prevalence of, and factors that cause, violence against
women, and about gender inequity in Australia.
Results included a:

20 per cent increase among adult leaders who knew that a survey had found one in seven
young men agreed that its okay for a boy to make a girl have sex with him if she had flirted
with him or led him on
31 per cent increase among adult leaders who correctly identified that violence against
women is extremely common in Australia
12 per cent increase among adult leaders who could identify factors that cause violence
against women
35 per cent increase among adult leaders who strongly disagreed with the myth that women
are more likely to be sexually assaulted by a stranger than someone they know
10 per cent increase in the number of participants who strongly disagreed with the statement
that women in Australia have achieved equality with men.

Among adults who attended the professional development training, their overall feedback was positive
with the majority either finding the training useful for their practice, as motivation to undertake further
respectful relationship work, or as a useful refresher.
Overall, adult leaders provided positive feedback about the project having an impact on young
peoples behaviour or awareness of respectful relationships. The majority of adult leaders stated that
young people understood the session content, were actively engaged in the project and that there
was increased awareness and/or behaviour change among young people. Participants also provided
key recommendations for future consideration, such as the need for additional session delivery that
allows for content to be discussed in depth, the need to tailor sessions more specifically for young
people who speak English as a second language and for sporting clubs, universities and TAFEs, and
the need to engage male facilitators in the co-delivery of respectful relationship education sessions.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

The findings indicated that professional development training is not enough to embed respectful
relationship strategies within organisations and that further support and capacity building initiatives
are needed to embed respectful relationship education work and primary prevention strategies.

Summary of results from peer educators who participated in You, Me and Us


Following the You, Me and Us peer education training, young women reported increased knowledge
about the prevalence and types of violence against women, increased ability to dispel myths
associated with gender-based violence, and increased awareness of positive bystander action and
what they can do to end violence against women.
Results included a:

21 per cent increase among young women who strongly disagreed with the sexist myth that
if a woman is raped while drunk or affected by drugs she is at least partly responsible
27 per cent increase among young women who strongly disagreed with the myth that if a
woman dresses in a suggestive way she is asking for whatever happens
22 per cent increase among young women who correctly identified that violence against
women is extremely common in Australia
15 per cent increase among young women who correctly identified that harassment via
emails, text messages and other social media is a form of violence against women
23 per cent increase among young women reporting that they can make a difference in
ending violence against women
14 per cent increase among young women who would take positive bystander action if a
family member or friend was a victim/survivor of intimate partner violence

Impact and outcome evaluations conducted with peer educators indicated that You, Me and Us
increased their knowledge and skills in the facilitation of the delivery of respectful relationships
education, supported them to become primary prevention advocates within their communities and
influenced their future employment and education opportunities.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

Overview of the You, Me and Us project evaluation


You, Me and Us project overview
You, Me and Us is a multi-faceted respectful relationships education project that sits under Womens
Health Wests health promotion priority area of prevention of violence against women. The project
trains and supports culturally and linguistically diverse young women aged 18 to 24 to become youth
ambassadors in the primary prevention of violence against women. The peer educators co-deliver
respectful relationships education sessions with Womens Health West health promotion workers in
higher educational institutions, sporting clubs, youth organisations and primary schools in
Melbournes western region. Target groups for the respectful relationship education sessions are
young people aged 18 to 24 and senior primary school students aged 10 to 13. To support the efficacy
and sustainability of the project, professional development training is provided to adult leaders in
participating schools and organisations.

Developing a theory of change and project logic


You, Me and Us is underpinned by a rigorous evaluation framework. Dr. Sue Dyson, an expert in
evaluating gender-equitable respectful relationship programs, developed the projects evaluation
framework and tools. The University of Queensland also conducted an independent evaluation of the
project for the Australian Government Department of Social Services, who funded the project.
The projects evaluation was developed to meet national standards for primary prevention of sexual
assault through education (see Carmody et al. 2009). The standards inform the project design and
implementation, which aims to prevent violence against women, including sexual assault. One
identified national standard is that projects should demonstrate the use of a theory of change model.
A theory of change aims to illustrate a link between the proposed project activities and anticipated
project outcomes, and can be defined as a description of how and why a set of activities be they
part of a highly focused program or a comprehensive initiative are expected to lead to early,
intermediate and longer term outcomes over a specified period (Anderson 2000, p. 2).

You, Me and Us project logic


You, Me and Us uses a project logic model to demonstrate the theory of change, underpinned by a
peer educator model. A project logic model is a diagrammatic representation of a theory of change,
which shows the ways in which project resources, processes and activities are intended to transform
inputs into desired outcomes (Carmody et al. 2009, p. 36). The You, Me and Us project logic was
developed with specific reference to the key determinants of violence against women, as informed by
VicHealths framework for preventing violence (2007):

Unequal power relations between women and men


Adherence to rigid gender stereotypes.

Hence, projects such as You, Me and Us that aim to prevent violence against women work to redress
the causes of violence by promoting gender-equitable respectful relationships between young women
and men and by challenging gender stereotypes.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

You, Me and Us project logic


Inputs

Project team consisting


of project workers,
coordinator and
manager

Three-year project
funding from the
Department of Social
Services until 30
November 2014

Project worker training

Promotional material

External evaluator

Internal and external


steering groups

Activities

Develop education and


training tools and
resources
Deliver respectful
relationships education
sessions to 3,500
participants aged 10 to
13 and 18 to 24 in four
settings: primary
schools, sports clubs,
youth organisations and
universities/TAFEs
Train 48 young culturally
and linguistically diverse
women aged 18 to 24 to
co-deliver the respectful
relationships education
sessions
Deliver professional
development to 45
adults across the four
settings
Manual of program
resources and
evaluation is created for
dissemination
Seek additional funding
after November 2014

Outputs

Impacts

Outcomes

Young people have


increased knowledge and
skills in how to conduct
respectful relationships

Raise young peoples


awareness of ethical
behaviour and assist
them to develop
protective behaviours
and the skills needed to
conduct respectful
relationships

Communities, cultures
and organisations in the
western region that are
non-violent, nondiscriminatory, genderequitable and promote
respectful relationships

Peer educators have


increased knowledge and
skills in facilitation and
primary prevention of
violence against women
Adults in settings have
increased knowledge in
primary prevention of
violence against women
and respectful
relationships education
Adults have an intention
and commitment to
ongoing respectful
relationships work in their
setting
Evidence-based research
for respectful
relationships is built on
and resources are made
available for further
respectful relationships
education work

Attitudinal and behaviour


change towards
respectful relationships
among young people,
peer educators and
adults in settings
Young women become
ambassadors for
prevention of violence
against women within
their communities
Increased safe,
inclusive, respectful and
gender-equitable
cultures within primary
schools, sports clubs,
youth organisations and
universities/TAFEs
Knowledge in the field of
respectful relationships
education grows and
continues to expand

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

Peer education model


The peer education model responds to the need for peer-led prevention of violence against women
initiatives that enable young women to become primary prevention leaders within their communities
(Imbesi 2008).
Research shows that young people are strongly influenced by the opinions and views of their peers.
Young people are also more likely to talk to friends, family and other trusted and known people
(Imbesi 2008, p. 14) than make contact with a specialist support service. A peer education model
allows young people to deliver education to their peers, thereby ensuring that projects are relevant to
other young people via positive role modelling.
You, Me and Us adopts a peer education model to train and support young women to develop the
skills, knowledge and capacity to become respectful relationship youth ambassadors and youth
leaders in the prevention of violence against women within their community.

Evaluation questions
The questions outlined below were developed to measure the process, impact and outcomes
evaluation indicators, as anticipated in the project logic. These questions informed the development
of a series of evaluation tools that were piloted and then delivered with peer educators, young people
who participated in respectful relationship education sessions, and adult leaders who participated in
the You, Me and Us professional development training.
The following evaluation questions informed the action research project undertaken in partnership
with Dr. Dyson. The projects overarching evaluation aim is to understand:

To what extent has You, Me and Us led to more inclusive, safe and respectful environments
and gender-equitable cultures within the target settings?

The following questions informed evaluation tools designed to measure attitudinal and knowledge
change among young people who participated in the respectful relationships education sessions.

To what extent do young people in the settings where the project is delivered report increased
awareness of gender-equitable respectful relationships, ethical behaviour and how to prevent
violence against women?
To what extent do participants in each setting report increased skills in conducting respectful
relationships, ethical behaviour and how to prevent violence against women?

The following action research questions were adopted to inform the You, Me and Us evaluation for
the professional development training with adult leaders.

In what ways do adult leaders understand primary prevention of violence against women and
gender-equitable respectful relationships as a result of the training?
Do adults report an increase in knowledge and skills in this area?
Do adults report an intention and commitment to promote gender-equitable respectful
relationships within their settings?

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

In what ways has You, Me and Us led to further primary prevention actions being conducted
in these settings?
Were specific actions taken up, how were they received and were there other unintended or
alternative primary prevention actions that came about as an outcome of the project?

The following questions informed the design of tools to measure process, impact and outcome
evaluation indicators with the projects peer educators.

To what extent were peer educators satisfied with the training they received?
Did the peer educators feel satisfied with the support and supervision they received?
To what extent was the support and supervision appropriate?
Did the training give them the knowledge and skills they needed to deliver the training?
Did they have appropriate resources to deliver the project?
Were they confident to deliver respectful relationship sessions in different settings?
Since participating in the You, Me and Us project, have the peer educators engaged in other
leadership projects or initiated any primary prevention of violence against women work in their
school or community? Was it formal or informal?
What, if anything, has changed since their involvement in the You, Me and Us project?

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Evaluation outcomes for young people who participated in You, Me and


Us respectful relationships education sessions
Overview
You, Me and Us used two evaluation methods to measure change in skills, knowledge and awareness
among young people who participated in a one-off respectful relationship education session. Session
participants were independently evaluated by the University of Queensland on behalf of the Australian
Government Department of Social Services. Young people who received the project outside of the
University of Queenslands specified data collection timeframe were evaluated by Womens Health
West. The findings detailed in this report are those from Womens Health Wests self-evaluation. The
University of Queenslands findings are not publicly available.
Womens Health West delivered sessions to 3,571 young people aged 10 to 13 and 18 to 24 who
reside in Melbournes western region. The project successfully recruited 920 participants to participate
in the University of Queensland evaluation, who were therefore ineligible for the Womens Health
West evaluation due to the time limitations of a one-off session. Womens Health West successfully
recruited 683 young people to take part in our evaluation, which equates to 25 per cent of eligible
young people who participated in the project.

Methodology
Surveys were developed by Dr Sue Dyson and revised with Project workers delivering the sessions.
Pre and post surveys were distributed to young people who participated in the one off sessions.
Surveys were distributed to participants immediately prior to the session and again at the end of the
session. Survey questions directly correspond with session activities to measure skills, knowledge
and attitudinal change relating to gender equitable respectful relationships, ethical behaviour and
bystander action.

Summary of results from sessions delivered with young people aged 10 to 13


Overall, 310 girls and 322 boys aged 10 to 13 participated in the pre evaluation questionnaire, while
295 girls and 300 boys completed the post evaluation questionnaire.
In response to question one, the overwhelming majority of participants provided a correct response
of respectful both pre and post session delivery.
Female: 67 per cent (n=208) of girls correctly identified this to be a respectful relationship, which
increased by 6 per cent to 75 per cent (n=208) post session delivery. Girls were more likely than boys
to identify this as a respectful relationship both before and after participating in the session.
Male: 60 per cent (n=192) of boys provided a correct response to this question prior to session
delivery, which increased to 67 per cent (n=202) in the post session survey.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Percentage of participants

Question one: I can tell my friend anything and know they will
listen to me and accept me for who I am. Is this relationship...?
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

75
67
67
60

Girls response pre session


Girls response post session
252225
21
6

9 8

Boys response pre session


1 1 4 2

0 1 0 1

Boys response post


session

Participant response

In response to question two, the majority of participants provided a correct response of respectful
both pre and post session delivery.
Female: Before the session 59 per cent (n=184) of young women reported that this statement was
respectful, which increased by 7 per cent to 66 per cent (n=195) of respondents post delivery.
Male: Before the session 58 per cent (n=187) of boys provided a correct response to this question.
Following session delivery, this response increased by 5 per cent to 63 per cent (n=189) of
participants.

Percentage of participants

Question two: I know they will still be my friend if I hang out with
other friends sometimes. Is this relationship...?
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

66 63
59 58

Girls response pre session


Girls response post session
30
262627

Boys response pre session


9

11
4

Boys response post session


6

0 0 2 1

1 2 0 1

Participant response

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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In response to question three (Even though we dont like the same things, or dont agree on
everything, we are still good friends. Is this relationship?), the correct response identified by female
and male participants increased post session.
Female: Prior to the session, 65 per cent (n=202) of girls correctly stated that the relationship outlined
in question three was respectful. This statistic increased by 7 per cent post session delivery to 72
per cent (n=213). Before the session 6 per cent (n=19) of girls were unsure and 2 per cent (n=6)
selected mostly disrespectful. However, post survey these results reduced to 3 per cent (n=9) and
0.34 per cent (n=1) respectively.
Male: Before the session, 54 per cent (n=173) of boys identified this behaviour to be respectful,
which increased by 8 per cent to 62 per cent (n=186) post session delivery. Before the session 10 per
cent (n=32) of boys were unsure, which reduced to 6 per cent (n=18) post session delivery.

Percentage of participants

Question three: Even though we don't like the same things, or don't
agree on everything, we are still good friends. Is this
relationship...?
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

72
65
62
54

Girls response pre session


Girls response post session
31
2623 28

Boys response pre session


6 3 10 6

Boys response post session


2 0 3 2

0 0 0 1

Participant response

In response to question four, the majority of participants correctly reported that this scenario was very
respectful or respectful.
Female: Prior to the session, most girls (39 per cent, n=121) selected respectful. Following their
participation, 56 per cent (n=165) reported that this was very respectful, which was an increase of
19 per cent. Prior to session delivery, 17 per cent (n=52) didnt know the answer, which reduced to 8
per cent (n=24) post session delivery.
Male: Boys responses were more evenly spread with 24 per cent (n=76) selecting very respectful
prior to participating in the session. This correct response increased by 10 per cent to 34 per cent
(n=103) post project delivery. Most selected respectful with 34 per cent (n=108) selecting this in the

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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pre session questionnaire and 35 per cent (n=106) selecting this post session delivery. Prior to the
session, 21 per cent (n=69) of boys didnt know the answer, which reduced to 13 per cent (n=40)
post session delivery.

Question four: You have a fight with a friend. Later they tell you how it
makes them feel. Is this relationship...?

Percentage of participants

100
90
80
Girls response pre session

70
56

60

Girls response post session

50
40
30
20
10

Boys response pre session

39

37

34

31

34 35

Boys response post session

24

21

17

13
8

10 10
5

9
2 1

0
Very
Respectful Dont know Not very Not at all
respectful
respectful respectful
Participant response

In response to question five, the majority of boys and girls strongly disagreed or disagreed with the
statement Pink is for girls and blue is for boys.
Female: Most girls, which equates to 55 per cent (n=172) strongly disagreed with question five that
pink is for girls and blue it for boys before the session. Following the session, girls ability to reject
this gender stereotype significantly increased by 16 per cent to 71 per cent (n=210).
Male: Both before and after their participation in the You, Me and Us session, the majority of boys
selected strongly disagree or disagree. In the pre-session questionnaire, 44 per cent (n=143)
strongly disagreed with this statement, which increased to 50 per cent (n=149) post survey. Although
there was a 6 per cent and 5 per cent increase respectively in the number of boys who strongly
disagreed or disagreed with this statement, the session had a greater impact on supporting girls to
reject this gender stereotype.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Question five: Pink is for girls and blue is for boys.


100
Percentage of participants

90
80

71

70

Girls response pre session

60

55
50
44

50
40

31

Boys response pre session


Boys response post session

30
25
20

30
20
10

Girls response post session

7 6
1 1

11
5 4

10
3

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Not sure Disagree Strongly


disagree
Participant response

In response to question six the following was reported by participants.


Female: Prior to the session, 40 per cent (n=124) of girls correctly answered this statement by
selecting strongly disagree. There was an 11 per cent increase post session delivery with a 51 per
cent (n=151) correct response rate. One in ten girls remained unsure of the answer following the
session, while the number of participants who strongly agreed that girls and boys are too different to
be equal increased by 2 per cent.
Male: Prior to participation, the majority of boys (31 per cent, n=99) chose disagree for question six.
The most significant statistical change among boys was an 8 per cent increase among those who
reported that they strongly disagree with this statement, 30 per cent (n=90) to 38 per cent (n=113).
More than one in ten boys agreed or were not sure. This response highlights the importance of
additional sessions to further promote gender equity.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Question six: Girls and boys are too different; they can't be equal.
100

Percentage of participants

90
80
70

Girls response pre session

60

Girls response post session

51

50

Boys response pre session


40

40

33 31
30
27

30
20
10

6 6
3 5

14
11

38

Boys response post session

30

15 1614
12

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Not sure

Disagree Strongly
disagree
Participant response

In response to question seven, the majority of participants selected strongly disagree before and
after participating in the You, Me and Us session.
Female: In the pre-session questionnaire, 61 per cent (n=190) of girls strongly disagreed with the
statement that women shouldnt work in paid employment as they are more suited to housework and
childcare, which increased by 10 per cent to 71 per cent (n=208) post session delivery.
Male: Prior to the session 43 per cent (n=140) of boys strongly disagreed with this statement, which
increased by 13 per cent to 56 per cent (n=167) following the session. There was limited change
among participants who either agreed or strongly agreed. Three per cent (n=11) strongly agreed
prior to the session, which increased to 5 per cent (n=14) post session delivery.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Question seven: Women shouldnt work in a paid job, they are more
suited to housework and childcare.
100
Percentage of participants

90
80

71

70

Girls response pre session

61
56

60

Boys response pre session

50

43

40
16

20
3 1 3 5

9 9
4 2

9 8

Boys response post session

26
23
21
17

30
10

Girls response post session

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Not sure

Disagree Strongly
disagree
Participant response

For question eight, which relates to gender stereotypes about sporting ability, the most significant
statistical change was among girls.
Female: Before the session, 50 per cent (n=154) of girls strongly disagreed with this statement,
which increased by 17 per cent to 67 per cent (n=198) post session delivery. This shift can in part be
explained by girls shifting their response from disagree to strongly disagree following their
participation. Hence, girls ability to confidently identify gender stereotypes increased following the
You, Me and Us session.
Male: The majority of boys (26 per cent, n=83) disagreed with this statement before and after the
respectful relationship session. The most significant change was among boys who strongly
disagreed with this statement. Prior to the session, 25 per cent (n=82) of participants reported that
they strongly disagreed, which increased by 13 per cent to 38 per cent (n=113) following delivery.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Question eight: Boys are better at sports like football than girls.
100
Percentage of participants

90
80
67

70
60

Girls response pre session


Girls response post session

50

50

Boys response pre session

40

35

30
20
10

242626

20
16

13
8
1 1

6 5

38

Boys response post session

25

14
10
3

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Not sure Disagree Strongly


disagree
Participant response

In response to question nine, the overwhelming majority of participants answered that this behaviour
is not very respectful or not at all respectful.
Female: There was no change among girls who identified that this behaviour was not at all respectful
(91 per cent, n=282) or not very respectful (7 per cent, n=21) before and after session delivery. This
data suggests that girls have significant knowledge about what is acceptable and respectful online
behaviour and what constitutes bullying on social media sites such as Facebook.
Male: Boys were also most likely to report this behaviour as not at all respectful, with 82 per cent
(n=263) nominating this as their response prior to the session. After the session, the number of boys
who reported this behaviour to be not at all respectful decreased by 4 per cent.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Percentage of participants

Question nine: If you put a mean message on Facebook about one


of the kids in your class, would this be...?
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

9191
8278

Girls response pre session


Girls response post session
Boys response pre session
0 1 1 1

0 0 0 2

12
7 7 10

5 5
1 2

Boys response post session

Participant response

Responses to question ten yielded a similar response to other questions relating to gender
stereotypes, with girls more likely to identify and reject gender stereotypes both before and after their
participation.
Female: Prior to the session, when asked if boys can wear skirts, 63 per cent (n=266) of girls
answered correctly, which increased by 22 per cent following the session to 85 per cent (n=368).
Male: Prior to the session, 44 per cent (n=174) of boys adhered to the gender stereotype that boys
cant wear skirts. This response decreased significantly by 21 per cent post session, while the number
of boys rejecting this gender stereotype changed from 44 per cent (n=174) to 67 per cent (n=252).

Percentage of participants

Question ten: Boys can wear skirts (tick all answers that apply).
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

85
67

63
44
24

44

23
13

10

Incorrect response Definitely not; no, it's


weird and they'll get
laughed at

Not sure

9
0
Correct response Yes, people can
wear whatever they
want to; yes,
because in some
countries it's what
men wear

No response

Girls
response pre
session
Girls
response
post session
Boys
response pre
session
Boys
response
post session

Participant response

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Participant responses to question eleven were nearly identical between girls and boys, with the
overwhelming majority providing a correct response.
Female: Prior to the session, 64 per cent (n=265) of girls correctly identified this statement to be an
insult that demeans girls and women. Post session delivery, this number increased by 11 per cent to
75 per cent (n=347).
Male: Prior to the session, boys were slightly more likely to correctly report this statement as an insult
or saying that girls are weak or scared (65 per cent, n=249). Post session delivery, this response
increased by 10 per cent to 75 per cent (n=287).
Question eleven: If a boy calls another boy 'a girl', it is... (tick all
answers that apply)
100

Percentage of participants

90
80

75

70

64

75
65

60
50
40
30
20

Girls response pre


session
Girls response post
session
Boys response pre
session

23
18 17

17

18
12
8

10

0
Incorrect response Only a joke

Not sure

Correct response - An
insult; saying that girls
are weak and scared

Participant response

The following question has six multiple-choice questions and participants are asked to tick any
responses they deem appropriate. Most participants provided a correct response before and after the
session when asked what they would do if someone older or stronger tried to hurt or bully them.
Female: Prior to the session, 72 per cent (n=491) of girls identified the correct answer to question
twelve. This decreased to 65 per cent (n=461) post session delivery.
Male: Pre (66 per cent) and post (65 per cent) session delivery, two-thirds of boys provided a correct
response to the question.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Question twelve: If someone older or stronger tries to hurt or bully

me, I would... (tick all aswers that apply)


100

Percentage of participants

90
80

72

70

65

66

65

60

Girls response pre session


Girls response post session

50
Boys response pre session
40
30

35

34

35

Boys response post session

28

20
10
0
Incorrect response - Fight back, if
Correct response - Report it to a
necessary with physical force; try to teacher or trusted adult; stand up for
change the subject or make a joke; myself by telling them to stop hurting
do nothing, telling would just make it
me and how it makes me feel
worse; talk to a friend afterwards
and see what he or she thinks I
should do

Participant response

A very similar percentage of girls and boys reported a correct response when asked about bystander
intervention and what they would do if someone they know was being hurt or abused, as shown in
responses to question thirteen.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Question thirteen: If I saw someone I know being hurt or abused by


someone else, I would... (tick all answers that apply)
100

Percentage of participants

90
Girls response pre
session

80
69

70

67

64

63

Girls response post


session

60
50
40

31

33

36

Boys response pre


session

37

Boys response post


session

30
20
10
0
Incorrect response - Try to stop it
Correct response - Report it to a teacher
happening, if necessary with physical or trusted adult; stand up for the person
force; step in and try to change the
being hurt by telling the bully to stop
subject or make a joke; do nothing, it's
none of my business; talk to my friend
after and suggest they tell their parents
or a teacher

Participant response

Question fourteen, which was only included in the post-session questionnaire, asked participants to
tell us what you learnt in todays You, Me and Us session.
Female: The most common responses to question fourteen related to respectful and disrespectful
relationships, with 15 per cent (n=43) reporting that they learnt about types of relationships and what
makes a respectful and disrespectful relationship.
I have learnt that there are many different relationships.
I learnt that other people can have different friends and do what they want.
Fifteen per cent (n=43) of responses related to gender and gender equity.
Boys and girls are both equal.
Some girls stated that they learned how to challenge gender stereotypes and promote diversity.
I've learnt that there is no 'line' between girl and boys. They can do or wear what they want. It's
not other people's choice.
Thirteen per cent (n=38) said they learned to stand up for themselves and others and the importance
of bystander action.
Dont just walk away, do something.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Ten per cent (n=29) of female participants noted acceptance of differences as one of the things they
learnt in the session.
If everyone was the same, it would be boring.
Learning about passive, assertive, and aggressive communication was mentioned by 8 per cent
(n=24) of participants.
Male: The most common responses related to learning about gender equity and how to challenge
gender stereotypes, which equated to 19 per cent (n=56) of comments.
Girls and boys can wear and do same things.
You should do what you want even if it doesn't fit the stereotype of your gender.
Boys and girls are equal.
The next most common responses (12 per cent (n=37)) related to respectful relationships.
To respect each other.
Never disrespect anyone.
Be kind to people.
To always treat people the way you like to be treated.
The third most common responses among boys of this age cohort were about standing up for each
other or yourself at 10 per cent (n=29).
I learned that you have to stand for others and not walk away.
To always stand up for yourself.
Seven per cent (n=21) reported that they learned about acceptance of differences.
I learned that people are different.
That everyone is different and we must respect their wishes.
It's okay to be different and you will be happier being yourself.
Five per cent (n=14) mentioned different communication styles as the main thing they learnt during
the You, Me and Us session.
I learned how to disagree with someone in a good way instead of being aggressive.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Summary of results from sessions delivered with young people aged 18 to 24


There were 29 young women and 22 young men aged 19 to 24 who completed the pre-session survey
and 27 female participants and 20 male participants who completed the post-session survey. The full
survey was not undertaken with students who speak English as a second language as the survey
could not be translated. However, a modified interactive evaluation activity was undertaken with these
participants to gauge change in knowledge, skills and awareness.
In response to question one, there was an increase after the session in young people who reported
that violence against women in Australia is common.
Female: Prior to their participation in the respectful relationship education session the majority of
young women (69 per cent, n=20) reported that violence against women in Australia is somewhat
common. Following the session, young womens awareness regarding the high prevalence of genderbased violence increased with 48 per cent stating that violence is extremely common.
Male: A similar pattern in responses occurred among male participants. Prior to the session, 50 per
cent (n=11) reported that violence was somewhat common, which increased by 15 per cent following
the session. The most notable increase was among those who responded that violence against
women was extremely common. Prior to the session no young men provided this response, which
increased to 20 per cent (or one in five respondents) following the session.

Percentage of participants

Question one: Violence against women is common in Australia.


100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

69

65
50

48

Young women's response


pre session

37
23
3 0 5 0

3 4

10

23
7

11

20

17
5

Young women's response


post session
Young men's response pre
session
Young men's response post
session

Participant response

Question two of the survey asked participants to identify whether gender-based violence can include
physical, psychological and verbal abuse, sexist attitudes, sexual assault and rape, economic
deprivation, and domestic and intimate partner violence. The overwhelming majority of young women
and young men correctly identified all these behaviours as forms of violence.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Question three asked participants to identify the types of family in which domestic violence is likely to
occur.
Female: In any family, regardless of race, religion, culture or sexual orientation was by far the most
common response among young women, accounting for 39 per cent (n=28) of all responses before
and after the session. The second most common response was in families where there is a
breakdown in the parents relationship, accounting for 23 per cent (n=16) of female responses in the
pre session survey. This figure fell to 19 per cent (n=15) in the post session survey responses.
Male: Young mens responses followed a similar trend, with 33 per cent (n=19) of participants
selecting in any family, regardless of race, religion, culture or sexual orientation before the session
and 32 per cent (n=19) selecting this in the post-session questionnaire. As was the case with the
female surveys, the second most common response was in families where there is a breakdown in
the parents relationship, accounting for 26 per cent (n=15) of all pre-session survey responses, which
dropped slightly to 23 per cent (n=14) of responses post session.

Question four of the survey related to participants understanding of attitudes that support violence
against women, and included five possible responses, such as using language that belittles or puts
women and girls down; assuming there are skills and abilities specifically related to being a woman
or a man; name calling and wolf whistling at women; the belief that some girls ask for it; and calling
girls sluts or other insulting names.
Female: The majority of participants selected all responses before and after the session. In the presession survey, all responses was selected by at least 75 per cent (n=22) of participants. In the postsession survey 93 per cent (n=25) selected all responses.
Male: In the pre-session survey, 65 per cent (n=15) of young men correctly selected all responses
and after the session 85 per cent or more (n=17) selected all responses.
Participant response rates to question five demonstrate that prior to the session both young women
and young men had very high knowledge about was constitutes informed sexual consent.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Percentage of participants

Question five: Informed consent to sexual relations...


97

100

97

95

92

90
80

Young women's
response pre
session
Young women's
response post
session
Young men's
response pre
session
Young men's
response post
session

70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

8
3

Incorrect response - Is given when the


woman does not say no

Correct response - Is given when both


partners say or do something to
communicate their consent; can be
withdrawn at any time during sexual
activity; cannot be given if someone is
too drunk or high on drugs to understand
what is happening

Participant response

Similarly, young women and young men also had significant prior knowledge about what behaviours
constitute a respectful relationship between friends and partners, as evident in response rates to
question six.
Question six: A respectful relationship is one where friends or partners...
(tick all answers that apply)
100

100

99

98

96

Young
women's
response pre
session

Percentage of participants

90
80
70

Young
women's
response
post session

60
50

Young men's
response pre
session

40
30
20
10
0

Young men's
response
post session

0
Incorrect response - Only spend time with each other and rarely

Correct responses - Dont mind if last-minute plans are

see other friends

sometimes broken; feel free to be themselves; trust each other;


do not pressure each other; avoid using blaming or sexist
language; listen to and respect each others ideas and opinions

Participant response

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

26

You, Me and Us had limited, if any, impact on bystander behaviour among young adults who
participated in the session, as shown in responses to question seven. The overwhelming majority of
responses before and after the session revealed young peoples high level of commitment to
respectfully respond to a female friend who disclosed that she was a victim of intimate partner violence
or sexual assault.

Percentage of participants

Question seven: If a female friend tells you she has been a victim of
intimate partner or sexual assault, what should you do?
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

93

94

96
84

Young women's response


pre session
Young women's response
post session
Young men's response
pre session

9
2

10
5

Incorrect response - Ask Correct response - Ask her


her what she did to cause what she wants to do and
it and make suggestions to
support her to do it;
help her avoid it
suggest she sees a
happening in future
counsellor and check out
where she can get help

6
0

Young men's response


post session

Other

Participant response

Responses to question eight demonstrated that the session had a limited impact on increasing young
peoples knowledge about the causes of violence against women.
Female: Prior to the session, half of young women were able to correctly identify that gender
stereotypes and sexist behaviour were factors that cause violence against women. Post session
delivery this response rate increased by 8 per cent to 59 per cent (n=48).
Male: Just under half of young men could correctly identify the cause of violence against women prior
to the session; this response rate increased 4 per cent after the session to 52 per cent (n=36).

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Percentage of participants

Question eight: What factors do you think cause violence against


women?
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

Young women's
response pre session
59
52

48

47

51

48

Young women's
response post session

52

41

Young men's response


pre session

1
Incorrect response Correct response - rigid
Alcohol and drug abuse; stereotypes and gender
a family history of
roles for women and
violence
men; tolerance of sexist
language and behaviour

Young men's response


post session

Other

Participant response

As mentioned earlier in discussing results for question seven, young peoples attitudes towards
bystander action in response to violence were predetermined prior to the session. However, the
session did have an impact on bystander behaviour among young men in response to sexist
behaviour, as shown in participant responses to question nine.
Female: The overwhelmingly majority of young women were clear before (90 per cent, n=26) and
following (93 per cent, n=28) the respectful relationship session that they would intervene if they were
a bystander who witnessed such behaviour.
Male: Prior to the session, 59 per cent (n=13) of young men reported that they would intervene if
someone behaved in a sexist and degrading manner towards a friend. The number of young men
reporting that they would intervene rose by 21 per cent following the session to 80 per cent (n=16).

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Percentage of participants

Question nine: You notice that some of your (male) Facebook friends are
publicly posting pictures of one of your female friends and inviting others
to make sexist and suggestive comments about her body and her
sexuality. Would you do anything to intervene
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

Young women's
response pre session

90 93
80

Young women's
response post session

59

Young men's response


pre session

27
20
10

Yes

4
No

14
0

Young men's response


post session

Unsure

Participant response

Question ten asked young people to provide three helpful responses to the following scenario: At a
party you are attending, a (female) friend tells you she is upset because she is being harassed by
another (male) friend and he wont take no for an answer.
Female: There was little difference between young womens pre- and post-session survey responses.
Prior to the training, the most common response among young women was to remove their female
friend from the situation (32 per cent pre session and 35 per cent post session). For example, one
young woman noted that she would take her home with me, while others suggested that they would
go to a different area of the bar or club.
The second most common response was to ask the male friend to stop behaving in such a manner
(27 per cent pre session and 29 per cent post session).
The third most common response was to seek assistance from others, such as the police, a male
friend or counsellor. This response made up 26 per cent of pre-session survey responses, but dropped
to 14 per cent post session delivery.
Far less common was the suggestion to offer the female friend emotional support or ask her what she
might like to do, which accounted for 9 per cent of young womens pre- and post-session responses.
Five per cent of female respondents reported that they would stay with the female friend to make sure
she was okay. In the post survey, 1 per cent of young women suggested that their male friend should
leave the party.

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Male: Similarly, the most popular response among young men was to remove the female friend from
the situation. For example, males suggested they would pay for her cab home' or take the female
friend to her home where she is safe. These types of answers accounted for 29 per cent of all presession responses and 33 per cent of responses post session delivery.
The second most common response among young men was to talk to their male friend about his
behaviour. This was reported by 25 per cent of respondents pre session and 22 per cent post session.
For example, one participant stated that they would ask the guy to leave her alone.
Slightly more popular among male participants was the suggestion to remain with their female friend
to ensure her safety. Sixteen per cent of participants gave this response prior to the session and 10
per cent post session.
The fourth most common response was to ask their female friend what she would like to do or offer
her emotional support (12 per cent before and 10 per cent after the session). For example, one
participant stated he would ask the friend if there is specific assistance she could be given. Male
participants also reported that they would seek help from others such as the police, friends or parents
accounting for 12 per cent of pre-session responses and 10 per cent of post-session responses. Prior
to the session, 4 per cent of respondents stated that they would remove the male from the situation
and this rose to 8 per cent in the post-session survey.
In response to question eleven, young men were more likely to provide a correct response prior to
the session, which increased slightly by 3 per cent to 83 per cent (n=24). There was a more notable
change in correct responses among young women, with a 17 per cent increase following participation
in the You, Me and Us session.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

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Percentage of participants

Question eleven (for women only): You are in a pub with a group of
female friends. Some are getting pretty drunk and having a great time.
One of the girls who you think is pretty drunk is being chatted up by a
man she has just met. He is part of a group w
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

89

Young women's
response pre session

72

Young women's
response post session
23
11
5

Incorrect response - Correct response - Try


Nothing, it's none of my to get her out of there by
making jokes and
business; nothing, even
though I worry that she distracting her; call a
could regret it later, I taxi and take her home,
dont want my friends to she will thank me in the
morning
think Im a kill-joy

Other

Percentage of participants

Participant response

Question eleven (for men only): You are in a pub with a group of mates
who start making sexist and sexually suggestive comments about a
woman in the bar. You feel uncomfortable about what they are saying.
What would you do?
100
90
83
80
80
Young men's
70
response pre
60
session
50
Young men's
40
response post
session
30
14
20
13
6
10
3
0
Incorrect response Correct response - Try to
Nothing, it's none of my change the subject or make
business; nothing, even a joke to shift their attention;
though it makes me
tell them its not okay to talk
uncomfortable, I dont want
about women like that
my mates to think Im a killjoy

Other

Participant response

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

31

Question twelve asked participants to provide a written response naming three important things that
they had learnt in the session. There were 56 responses in total.
Female: Although responses to this final question varied, a few common themes can be identified.
The most common theme, mentioned in 27 per cent of responses among female participants, related
to gaining a better understanding of sexual consent.
Consent must be continuous.
Consent can be withdrawn at any time.
The second most common response related to realising that gender-based violence in Australia is
extremely common, which was mentioned in 25 per cent of responses.
Violence in Australia is a big common issue.
Also relatively common were responses about gaining a better understanding of how gender
stereotypes contribute to violence against women, which accounted for 14 per cent of responses.
Eleven per cent of responses referred specifically to learning about healthy relationships as the most
useful component of the session.

Male: There was even more variety in responses to question twelve among young men; however,
there were still the same three common themes. Twenty three per cent of male responses related to
the realisation of just how common gender-based violence is in Australia. Equally as common were
responses relating to gaining a greater understanding of sexual consent. Ten per cent of male
participants noted important factors of what behaviours constitute a respectful relationship.

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32

Evaluation outcomes for adult leaders in participating settings


You, Me and Us provides professional development training to adult leaders in primary schools,
TAFEs, universities, youth organisations and sporting clubs. The training maximises the sustainability
of project outcomes through increasing adult leaders knowledge and skills to continue discussions
about respectful relationships with young people. The training also provides adult leaders with audit
tools and action plans to develop strategies to promote respectful relationships, gender equity and
ethical behaviour within their organisations.
Twenty-nine adult leaders attended four Womens Health West professional development trainings.
Twenty-nine participants completed the pre-training evaluation questionnaire and 25 completed the
post-training survey. The survey questions largely measured knowledge and attitudinal change with
regard to respectful relationships, violence against women and bystander intervention.
The majority of adult leaders who participated were welfare and wellbeing officers, sports clubs
representatives, primary school teachers and youth workers. A smaller number of social workers and
student counsellors also attend the session. Of these, 78 per cent (n=18) reported that their
attendance was in a paid capacity, while the remaining 22 per cent (n=5) were volunteers.
Question two is multiple choice, and asked participants whether respectful relationships are important
for young peoples social development, emotional development, cognitive development and physical
development. All adult leaders correctly identified social development before and after training.
Similarly, 96 per cent (n=28) of adults also correctly identified emotional development before and
after training. Slight shifts were noted among those who correctly identified cognitive development
(79 per cent (n=23) before and 88 per cent (n=22) after training) and physical development (72 per
cent (n=21) before and 92 per cent (n=24) after training).
Participants were asked about their knowledge of Victorian research relating to young mens attitudes
towards sexual consent and violence against women. Prior to the training, 60 per cent (n= 18) correctly
identified that one in seven young men agreed that its okay for a boy to make a girl have sex with
him if she has flirted with him or led him on (National Crime Prevention 2001). Following the training,
awareness among participants of violence-supportive community attitudes increased by 20 per cent
to 80 per cent (n=20) of respondents.

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Percentage of participants

Question three: A Victorian survey found that one in seven young


men agreed that 'it's okay for a boy to make a girl have sex with him
if she has flirted with him or led him on'. True or false?
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

80
Participant
response pre
training

60

23

17
8

True

False

Participant
response post
training
12

Unsure

The Australian Bureau of Statistics personal safety survey (2012) is the primary data source on the
prevalence of violence against women in Australia. The latest survey showed that for Australian
women aged 15 years and over, one in three have experienced physical violence and one in five have
experienced sexual violence (ABS 2012). Violence against women is therefore extremely common.
Over half (57 per cent, n= 17) of participants said that violence against Australian women is extremely
common prior to the session. Following the training, there was an increase in participant awareness
of violence against women, with the correct response rate increasing by 31 per cent to 88 per cent
(n=22).

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

34

Percentage of participants

Question four: Is violence against women common in Australia?


100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

88

57
Participant response pre
training
23
3 0

17
0

0 0

12

Participant response post


training

Question five asked participants to identify whether gender-based violence can include physical,
psychological and verbal abuse, sexist attitudes, sexual assault and rape, economic deprivation and
domestic and intimate partner violence. There was a 98 per cent correct response rate before and
after the training. This indicates that participants had significant knowledge about the different forms
of gender-based violence prior to taking part in the professional development training.
In response to question six, 57 per cent (n=27) of adult leaders correctly responded that domestic
violence occurs in any family regardless of race, religion, culture or sexual orientation. Participant
knowledge and awareness increased by 11 per cent to 68 per cent (n=23) following the professional
development training.

Womens Health Wests You, Me and Us respectful relationships education program: project evaluation report

35

Percentage of participants

Question six: Please tell us where you think domestic violence is


likely to occur.
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

Participant
response pre
training

68
57

Participant
response post
training

21
12

11

8 9

9 6

In families where In families where

In the average

In families that

In any family,

Aussie family

come from

regardless of

there is a

the parents are

countries outside

race, religion,

breakdown in the

very young

Australia

culture or sexual

parents'

orientation

relationship

0 0
Other

Question seven asked participants to identify attitudes that support violence against women that
include:

Using language that belittles or puts women and girls down


(100 per cent before, 100 per cent after training)
Assuming there are skills and abilities specifically related to being a woman or a man
(93 per cent before, 96 per cent after training)
Name calling and wolf whistling at women
(96 per cent before, 92 per cent after training)
The belief that some girls ask for it
(96 per cent both before and after training)
Calling girls sluts or other insulting names
(96 per cent both before and after training).

In response to question eight, a high number of adults rejected the sexist myth that women and girls
who wear suggestive clothing are responsible for violence and abuse perpetrated against them. Prior
to the training, 80 per cent (n=24) of adults strongly disagreed with this notion, which increased by 4
per cent to 84 per cent (n=21) following the training.

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Question eight: If a woman or girl dresses or acts in a suggestive


way, she is asking for whatever happens.

Percentage of participants

100
90

80

84

80
70

Participant
response pre
training

60
50
Participant
response post
training

40
30
17

20
10

12

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Neither agree
nor disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

A core component of the professional development training focused on increasing participant


knowledge about the causes of violence against women and how respectful relationship education
can prevent violence before it occurs (VicHealth 2007). Prior to the training, 50 per cent of participants
could identify the causes of violence against women in question nine. This knowledge increased post
training delivery by 12 per cent to 62 per cent.

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Percentage of participants

Question nine: What factors do you think cause violence against


women?
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

Participant response
pre training

62
50

47

Participant response
post training

34

3
Incorrect response - Correct response Alcohol and drug Rigid stereotypes and
abuse; a family
gender roles for
history of violence
women and men;
tolerance of sexist
language and
behaviour

Other

In response to question ten, there was no change in participant knowledge, with 95 per cent (n=26)
of participants providing a correct response both before and after the training.
Question ten: Informed consent to sexual relations...
95

100

95

Percentage of participants

90
80
70
Participant
response pre
training

60
50
40
30
20
10

Participant
response post
training

0
Incorrect response - Is given when Correct response - Is given when
the woman does not say no
both partners say or do something
to communicate their consent; can
be withdrawn at any time during
sexual activity; cannot be given if
someone is too drunk or high on
drugs to understand what is
happening

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Australian research shows that women are far more likely to be sexually assaulted by someone they
know, with 89 per cent of sexual assaults being perpetrated by a partner or former partner, while only
12.3 per cent are committed by a stranger (ABS 2012).
Prior to the training, 17 per cent (n=5) of respondents provided the correct answer to question eleven,
saying that they strongly disagreed with this statement. Following the training, this response rate
increased significantly by 35 per cent to over half of participants (52 per cent, n=13).
Question eleven: Women are more likely to be sexually assaulted
by a stranger than someone they know.
100
Percentage of participants

90
80
70

60

60

52

Participant
response pre
training

50
36

40
30
20
10

13
7

17
8

Participant
response post
training

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Neither
agree or
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

In response to question twelve, which asked participants to rate whether or not they can make a
difference to ending violence against women, 53 per cent (n=16) of participants selected strongly
agree prior to training. This shifted to 48 per cent (n=12) post survey, with the majority of responses
(52 per cent, n=13) selecting that they agreed with this statement. This response increased from 37
per cent (n=11) prior to the training.

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Question twelve: What I do can make a difference to ending


violence against women.
100
Percentage of participants

90
80
Participant
response pre
training

70
60
50

53

52

48
37

40

Participant
response post
training

30
20
7

10

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Neither
agree or
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

The overwhelming majority of participants chose to disagree or strongly disagree with the gender
stereotype posed in question thirteen, that the leaders of a community should largely be men.
Following the training, there was a slight increase among those who rejected this stereotype, with a
3 per cent increase among participants who disagreed and strongly disagreed respectively.

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Question thirteen: The leaders of a community should largely be


men.
100
Percentage of participants

90
80

73

76

Participant
response pre
training

70
60
50
40
30
17

20
10

Participant
response post
training

20

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Neither
agree or
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

Following the training, there was a slight decrease (6 per cent) in the number of participants who
strongly agreed that repeated online harassment was a form of violence against women.

Question fourteen: Harassment via repeated emails, text messages


and other social media is a form of violence against women.
100
Percentage of participants

90
80
70

70

Participant
response pre
training

64

60
50
40
27 28

30
20
10

8
0

Participant
response post
training

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Neither
agree or
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

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Questions fifteen and sixteen directly relate to bystander action. A bystander is a person or persons,
not directly involved as a victim or perpetrator, who observes an act of violence, discrimination or
other unacceptable behaviour (VicHealth 2012). Bystander action is taken by a bystander to speak
out about or engage others in responding to specific incidents of sexism, discrimination or violence
against women (VicHealth 2012). Hence, bystander action is a prevention of violence against women
strategy. The training had a limited impact on participants willingness to take bystander action if a
stranger was being physically assaulted. However, there was a notable increase of 10 per cent in the
number of respondents who would be somewhat likely to act if a family member or close friend was
a victim/survivor of partner violence.

Question fifteen: How likely would you be to intervene in any way if


a woman that you did not know was being physically abused?
100
Percentage of participants

90
80
Participant
response pre
training

70
60

55 57

50
40

31 30

Participant
response post
training

30
20

10

10

9
3

0
Very likely

Somewhat Dont know Somewhat Very unlikely


likely
unlikely

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Question sixteen: How likely would you be to intervene if you found


out that a family member or close friend of yours was currently a
victim/survivor of intimate partner violence?
100
Percentage of participants

90
80

72 74

Participant
response pre
training

70
60
50
40

Participant
response post
training

30
17

20
7

10

17
9
3

0
Very likely

Somewhat Dont know Somewhat Very unlikely


likely
unlikely

Question seventeen asked participants to identify whether a respectful relationship between male and
female intimate partners is one where both partners share all tasks around their home equally, each
partner listens to and respects the others ideas and opinions, they share the care of children equally
(if they have them), they negotiate domestic roles and responsibilities and come to an agreement that
both are comfortable with, and they avoid the use of blaming language and sexist ideas in all their
communications and actions. The majority of participants correctly selected all responses in both the
pre- and post-training survey. The option with the highest response before training was each partner
listens to and respects the others ideas and opinions with all respondents answering this question
correctly (n=27). The question with the highest response after training was they negotiate domestic
roles and responsibilities and come to an agreement that both are comfortable with with 88 per cent
(n=24) of responses.
The majority of participants disagreed with the statement in question eighteen that Australian women
have achieved equality with men. More than one in five participants were unsure about whether
gender equality had been achieved both before and after the training. The most significant increase
was among participants who answered correctly with strongly disagree, which rose from 10 per cent
(n=3) to 22 per cent (n=5) following the training.

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Question eighteen: On the whole, women in Australia have


acheived equality with men.
100
Percentage of participants

90
80
Participant
response pre
training

70
60
45 47

50
40
28

30

22

20
10

22

14
3

10

Participant
response post
training

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Neither
agree or
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

Questions nineteen and twenty featured only in the post-training evaluation questionnaire. All
participants reported that the training was somewhat useful (44 per cent, n=11) or very useful (56
per cent, n=14), as well as being relevant to their work. Similarly, 96 per cent (n=24) of participants
reported that they would be able to put what they had learnt in the training into practice. Indeed,
training and professional development for adult leaders and educators is a fundamental component
of best or good practice in respectful relationship education and can have an impact on adult
knowledge, awareness and attitudes (Carmody et al. 2009; Evans, Krogh and Carmody 2009).

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Adult leaders evaluation of You, Me and Us in key project settings


This component of the project evaluation investigates, from the perspective of adult leaders, the
impact of the You, Me and Us respectful relationship education sessions on young people. It also
explores the extent to which the professional development training supported adult leaders to continue
respectful relationship conversations with young people and to implement primary prevention of
violence against women strategies in their organisations.

Overview
Adult leaders who participated in the project evaluation included teachers, welfare staff, youth
workers, program coordinators, sporting club coaches and volunteers. A total of nineteen adult
leaders participated in this component of the evaluation. Of these, ten adults worked in organisations
that received the You, Me and Us respectful relationship sessions, but did not participate in You, Me
and Us professional development training. The remaining nine adult leaders worked with young
people who received sessions and took part in professional development.
Of the nineteen participants, eight worked in primary schools. Of these professionals, five participated
in the professional development training. There were three adults from sports clubs and organisations,
none of which took part in the training. There were five respondents from council youth organisations,
three of which participated in the professional development training. The remaining three adult leaders
were from universities and TAFEs, one of which attended the professional development training.
It is important to note that a number of adults commented that they do not work directly with young
people in their organisation on a day-to-day basis and were not always present during the delivery of
the You, Me and Us session. Their ability to comment on the impact of the project was therefore
limited, and they could only relay information they had heard from their colleagues.

Methodology
Adult leaders took part in a semi-structured 20 minute phone interview with a Womens Health West
You, Me and Us project worker. All questions were open ended and answers were analysed via key
themes. The percentage response rate detailed in the analysis is based on the number of total
responses participants provided to each question.
A number of evaluation responses were analysed according to those adults who participated in You,
Me and Us professional development training and whose organisation received sessions,
comparative to adults who did not participate in the training. This analysis was designed to assess
whether participating in professional development training had an impact on participants likelihood to
continue respectful relationship conversations with young people and initiate primary prevention of
violence against women actions (as committed to during the training session).

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Respectful relationship education sessions


Young peoples understanding of respectful relationship sessions
Nineteen adult participants provided a response to this question. Overall, 68 per cent (n=13) of adults
stated that young people definitely understood the session content and indicated that the project was
comprehensive and engaging.
I think they took a lot of it on board and the role playing and discussions in the little
workshops that we were doing really drove the point home.
(Evaluation participant from sports setting)
I think they understood it really well, I think it was explained in a really clear, concise way.
I think the facilitation style, especially the peer-led facilitation model that you use, was really
good. I think it really speaks to young people.
(Evaluation participant from youth setting)
One participant noted the need for additional follow on sessions, particularly for young people in
primary schools.
It would have been good for us to do a follow up session, but I think the overall concept
was great.
(Evaluation participant from youth setting)
One challenge noted by a participant from the university sector was that young people who
participated in the project were more likely to already be engaged and therefore have an
understanding of the topics discussed during the You, Me and Us session.
Although the people who were there were already supporters so you were preaching to
people who were already aware.
(Evaluation participant from university setting)
Sixteen per cent (n=3) of participants commented that young people seemed to understand most of
the content. One person suggested that the content could have been more in-depth and hard-hitting
for year six students.
I just felt like my grade sixes could have got more out of it, it could have been grittier but it
wasnt.
(Evaluation participant from school setting)
The remaining 16 per cent (n=3) of participants commented that the language was at times too
advanced for participants who speak English as a second language.
When they were being spoken to the language was modified and that was fine, I think most
of the time they understood when they were being spoken to directly, but when it was
describing a scenario I think that was quite challenging, because a lot of them were about

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relationships and probably aspects theyd never thought of, which was not at all
inappropriate but needs to be simpler.
(Evaluation participant from university setting)

Young peoples participation in sessions


Overall, 84 per cent (n=16) of adult evaluation participants commented that young people actively
participated in the sessions, which were interactive and highly engaging. Two of these participants
also indicated that their students were at times a challenge to engage with and were surprised by how
much they engaged with the You, Me and Us session.
They enjoyed it and they were engaged and they got really good information and they were
all able to participate in the discussion.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
I was really surprised how engaged the young people were.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
Another two of these participants especially made note of how engaged young male participants were
during the sessions.
I think the boys got more involved than the girls did but as a whole I think they all really got
into it.
(Evaluation participant from sports setting)
We were surprised by how much they (male participants) enjoyed it.
(Evaluation participant from sports setting)
Two of the university representatives (or 11 per cent of respondents), commented that students
participated to some extent. One commented that it took students a little while to engage, but that
they participated more actively as the session went on.
They were uncomfortable (at first) but when they warmed up they started taking it more
seriously. The physical activities were good. People got up.
(Evaluation participant from university setting)
One adult commented that she believed that some students werent providing responses in relation
to what they actually thought.
There was a couple of people in my session once they did the scenarios people
were giving a textbook answer, but the textbook answer is not the most appropriate
answer.
(Evaluation participant from university setting)
The remaining five per cent (n=1) of participants commented that students did not understand all of
the session content.

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They enjoyed it but I dont think they really made the links to gender issues.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)

Suggested changes to the You, Me and Us session


Overall there were 17 responses to this question. Of these, 53 per cent (n=9) commented that no
changes were needed to the session content.
It ticked it all the boxes I wanted it to tick and all the kids were getting involved.
(Evaluation participant from sports setting)
I did a reflection with them afterwards and everything was really positive.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
It was really good because I was able to go through the lesson plans beforehand with (the
project worker) and just make sure it was tailored towards the right audience Because
we had the luxury of going through the needs and getting feedback from the teachers at
the school that was really important.
(Evaluation participant from TAFE)
The remaining 43 per cent (n=8) of adults made suggestions that were often specific to their setting.
Twelve per cent (n=2) of participants commented that one session did not seem to be enough.
I think that the message they were trying to get across in the program for it to really stick
it needs to be over several weeks.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
Its fantastic but its almost like you need a follow up session to go a bit deeper, but it was
great, really good.
(Evaluation participant from youth setting)
Six per cent (n=1) mentioned that the session needed to be more interactive.
Not interactive enough and not moving kind of quick enough.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
Another 6 per cent (n=1) or one evaluation participant who worked in a primary school suggested that
the session needed to include a same sex component to make it more inclusive.
If you could bring in a component of same sex as an example of relationships, its really just
about highlighting all types of relationships.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
One participant (6 per cent, n=1), who had sessions delivered in a culturally diverse university setting,
suggested the content needed to include plain language and more relevant scenarios for young
people who speak English as a second language.

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I actually think just rewriting scenarios making them simpler and probably not using
idioms because students who speak English as a second language struggle with that.
(Evaluation participant from university setting)
Another participant (6 per cent, n=1) suggested that sessions needed to be tailored to the particular
setting the project is being delivered in, through the inclusion of topics such as alcohol.
I think you could pitch it to the group you're working with rather than it being so general. If it was
specific to the environment, especially the college environment I think focus on awareness and
behaviours to do with alcohol.
(Evaluation participant from university setting)

Discussions with young people following You, Me and Us project delivery


Eighteen adult evaluation participants responded to this question, ten of which had not participated in
the professional development training and eight who had. Of these respondents, 66 per cent (n=12)
reported that they had further discussions with young people in regards to You, Me and Us session
content. The remaining 34 per cent (n=6) reported that they did not discuss the project or respectful
relationships with young people following the project delivery.
Of the ten who did not attend professional development training, 80 per cent (n=8) provided positive
feedback indicating that they initiated further discussion with young people about respectful
relationships, while the remaining 20 per cent (n=2) did not. Of those adults who did, two participants
specifically mentioned that they facilitated an informal discussion with students following the session
delivery.
We had a bit of a debrief when we came back.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
Two participants noted that the topics covered in the respectful relationship session werent previously
known or familiar to their students.
Quite a few of them have spoken to me about how the topics werent something they had actually
thought of before or applied any sense of importance to but now they had a greater understanding
of how people perceive it and greater empathy for other people in the community albeit male or
female.
(Evaluation participant from sports setting)
The participants had a lot of conversation about the session afterwards. They particularly talked
about how much they learnt in the sex and consent activity. They didnt know a lot of the
information presented.
(Evaluation participant from sports setting)
Of the eight adult leaders who did attend professional development training, 50 per cent (n=4)
indicated that they further initiated conversations with young people about respectful relationships
and the prevention of violence against women. Two of these participants said that they had facilitated
follow up sessions with young people after the You, Me and Us session delivery.

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Yes, we had a reflective session about it and there were a few personal things that came
up with them, so it allowed them to open up a little bit.
(Evaluation participant from youth setting)
Of the eight respondents, two stated that they directly put into practice tangible actions from the
training and session delivery, and that behaviour changes among young people who participated were
evident.
I hear a lot of the language and the posters (posters that highlight respectful behaviours)
have stayed up at the school for a long time, The Keep Calm and Carry on logo.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
Their behaviour did change and how they viewed each other, boys arent superior to girls
and vice versa.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
The other 50 per cent (n=4) of adult leaders who attended professional development training noted
that they were unaware of further conversations about respectful relationship, with one of these
participants stating that she did not directly work with young people.

Changes in young peoples awareness and knowledge of gender, respectful relationships or


prevention of violence against women
Nineteen adults provided a response to this evaluation question, which asked about changes in young
peoples awareness of gender, respectful relationships or prevention of violence against women. Of
these respondents, 38 per cent (n=7) said they had witnessed behaviour change, while 21 per cent
(n=4) mentioned that the project raised further awareness and discussion about gender, respectful
relationships and violence prevention. Forty per cent (n=4) reported that they cannot recall due to
limited contact with young people, or that it is too soon to tell if there are changes in awareness and
knowledge. The remaining 41 per cent (n=8) did not comment on specific changes.
Adults reported changes in young peoples behaviour and awareness including an increase in
respectful behaviour among young people, greater awareness of gender equity, increased confidence
to speak up and seek assistance with difficulties in their relationships or at home, and a reduction in
physical aggression.
It did prompt discussion and generate interest about gender forums and other gender activities we
want to run.
(Evaluation participant from university setting)
When (boys) were out in the yard and if they liked a girl they would push her around, they
wouldnt treat her nice. And that settled down after that program and I think theres been a
shift in awareness of what they should be expecting in relationships and they dont have to
accept being treated in a violent way, whether its language, what people are doing, saying
or the physical violence as well.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)

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They knew what was going on in their own relationship but until it was said upfront it wasnt
until then that they got the confidence to speak up about it.
(Evaluation participant from youth setting)
Obviously brought some awareness to them about what they were experiencing at home
and resonated with them and encouraged them to seek further support, so I suppose that is
the best outcome for that session for them to recognise this is actually happening to me
and I need help.
(Evaluation participant from youth setting)

Feedback from teachers or other adults


Overall, thirteen adults provided feedback that they had received from other adults who participated
in the You, Me and Us sessions. Of these respondents, 78 per cent (n=10) reported that they had
received positive feedback from colleagues about the sessions.
The teachers said it was helpful in terms of the conversations they have they can refer
back to it.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
Its so crucial to have people who have a lot more knowledge than teachers have around
these areas [and presented] by people with appropriate skills.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
Fifteen per cent (n=2) of participants commented that the session could have been more interactive.
A couple of the teachers said that maybe it went a little bit too long and the kids were sitting
down a bit too long.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
Another participant, where the session was delivered predominately to young men, said some staff
commented that having a male facilitator present could have been beneficial.
There were a few workers present and we discussed it afterwards and were surprised but
really happy about how well the session went. We discussed that it might be helpful to have
a male facilitator present as well.
(Evaluation participant from sports setting)

Professional development training


Understanding of violence prevention and respectful relationships education
In total there were nine responses to this question. Fifty-six per cent (n=5) commented that the training
was comprehensive, useful for their practice and informative.

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It helped me greatly because of the data, so using the data as an activity and I also ran a
professional learning for staff based on that. That was highly productive and important so I
think very helpful.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
The training was really informative, it was really well presented I got a better
understanding of what it actually meant and what it actually involved and how it may affect
our students.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
A number of these participants commented on specific content that they learnt, including the
prevalence of violence against women, the sexualisation of women, myths associated with violence
against women and a better understanding of the benefit of respectful relationships education.
I didnt realise how in the media and with sporting things, how its more sexualised for
women. How we look, like tennis players and things like that I thought about it but not
like that.
(Evaluation participant from youth setting)
Thirty-three per cent (n=3) commented that they already had a good understanding of the content;
however, the training was useful revision and raised further awareness.
I think the content just brought things that we were somewhat aware of already, it gave us
some more context.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
One person (11 per cent, n=1) commented that they felt there was not a clear link between the training
content and what was delivered in the session.
What we got in the training wasnt really what was followed up with in the sessions, so the
team didnt really find it that effective.

Motivation to continue respectful relationships work in settings post training


There were eight responses to this question, all of which were positive in terms of the training being
motivational to continue respectful relationships work, including through engaging with other
programs, embedding respectful relationships information in their values and work, or further
knowledge and confidence to discuss content within their groups and organisations.
As of last week we brought in another organisation for our senior years who run respectful
relationships workshops so its a topic that we want to keep on talking about. We also
ran a year eight workshop on respectful relationships so its definitely part of our
curriculum.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
There are a lot of things that I can remember a lot of times so they actually add on to the
knowledge that I had initially.
(Evaluation participant from youth setting)

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I think it just gave me a little bit more confidence to implement it in the training I do with
disengaged youth and it just gave me a broader outlook on the way were portrayed.
(Evaluation participant from youth setting)

Follow up discussions with others after professional development training


Eight adults provided a response when asked if they had further discussions with other adults after
their professional development training. Of these eight responses, 63 per cent (n=5) noted that they
spoke to other colleagues at their organisational team meetings or at other training they attended.
The remaining participants did not speak with others about the training content.
Of those who did discuss the topic, the most common aspects discussed included the prevalence of
violence against women and its effects on young people; assertive behaviour; the concept of You, Me
and Us as a primary prevention project; core components of respectful relationships education; and
how to further support young people to gain relevant knowledge and skills.
We ran a couple of trainings with the staff. We ran one on the effect that domestic violence
can have on students and we did a respectful relationships one.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
Yep, I did [discuss the training with other staff] in the team meeting [I discussed] the
extent [of violence against women] in Australia, how prevalent it is It was well received
and it was easy to explain.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)

You, Me and Us action plans and organisational implementation


Seven participants provided a response when asked whether they had implemented their
organisational action plans and the impact this work had. Of the respondents, 57 per cent (n=4) were
not able to recall their action plan, while 43 per cent (n=3) listed a number of actions from their plan
that had been implemented. Specific actions referenced included disseminating the information to
other staff through training, staff facilitating further respectful relationship sessions with year five
students, and further discussing content with young people in small group learning situations. One
participant highlighted that the action plan had been challenging to implement as schools often have
a number of competing priorities.
By disseminating the information to staff, I tried to get the program to run again with the grade
fives, but you are not able to do that so Im going to do that myself. The other program runs it with
years nine and ten. Overall, weve done five year levels. Our students often say oh, weve heard
that before.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)
At that workshop we all came up with an action plan and to be realistic schools are incredibly busy
places Probably where it has worked mainly is in small groups with our year five and six
students in the student wellbeing area Actually Ive just finished with a grade six boys group,
theyve just walked out and they were saying, next week can we talk about not blaming and

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acceptance and if we dont like something someone is doing how can we manage it? So the
training about positive relationships comes into that.
(Evaluation participant from primary setting)

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Evaluation outcomes from You, Me and Us peer education training


Forty-seven young culturally and linguistically diverse women aged 18 to 24 participated in the You,
Me and Us peer education training. Four different training sessions were held that ran over four half
days. Each training had between seven and fifteen participants in attendance. There were a total of
47 pre-training and 45 post-training evaluation questionnaires completed.
Prior to the training, 68 per cent (n=32) of peer educators answered question one correctly, reporting
that they strongly disagree with the statement that if a woman is raped while drunk or affected by
drugs she is at least partly responsible. Following the training, there was an attitudinal shift among
peer educators evident by a 21 per cent increase in the number of peer educators who selected
strongly disagree.

Question one: If a woman is raped while drunk or affected by drugs


she is at least partly responsible.

Percentage of participants

100

90

90
80

69

70

Participant
response pre
training

60
50

Participant
response
post training

40
30

19

20
10

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Neither agree
or disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

Peer educators were also more likely to reject violence-supportive attitudes that perpetuate the myth
that rape is caused by mens inability to control their need for sex. Prior to the training, 47 per cent
(n=22) of participants reported that they strongly disagreed with the statement in question two. This
number increased by 20 per cent to 67 per cent (n=29) following the training. There was a notable
reduction in those who agreed with this myth, from 15 per cent (n=7) to 5 per cent (n=2).

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Percentage of participants

Question two: Rape results from men not being able to control
thier need for sex.
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

67

Participant
response
pre training

47
Participant
response
post training
9

15
7

Strongly
agree

15
5

Agree

15 14
7

Neither
agree or
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

Similarly, peer educators were more likely to reject the sexist myth that women and girls who wear
suggestive clothing are responsible for violence and abuse perpetrated against them. Prior to the
training, 68 per cent (n=32) of young women strongly disagreed with this notion presented in question
three, which increased after the training by 27 per cent to 95 per cent (n=40) of participants. There
was also a notable decrease in the number of young women who neither agreed nor disagreed with
this statement, with a reduction of 13 per cent (n=6).

Percentage of participants

Question three: If a woman or girl dresses or acts in a


suggestive way, she is asking for whatever happens.
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

95

68

Participant
response
pre training

Participant
response
post training
15

13
0

Strongly
agree

Agree

0
Neither
agree or
disagree

5
Disagree

Strongly
disagree

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Question four asked participants to identify forms of gender-based violence, including physical
violence, psychological and emotional abuse, sexist attitudes, sexual assault and rape, economic
deprivation, verbal abuse, and domestic or intimate partner violence. The overwhelming majority of
participants selected all responses both before and after the training, except in relation to domestic
or intimate partner violence. Prior to the training, 57 per cent (n=27) of peer educators identified
domestic and intimate partner violence as a form of gender-based violence, which increased by 25
per cent following the training to 82 per cent (n=39) who correctly identified this as a form of genderbased violence. An increase in understanding of the multiple forms of violence against women was a
clear outcome of the training.

Prior to participating in the training, 79 per cent (n=37) of young women correctly identified genderbased violence as an extremely serious health problem in response to question five. Following the
training, this response rate increased by 5 per cent to 84 per cent (n=36).

Percentage of participants

Question five: As a health problem gender-based violence is...


100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

79

84

Participant response
pre training

19 16
2 0

0 0

Participant response
post training

0 0

There was a clear increase in knowledge about the prevalence of violence against women, as evident
by participants response to question six. Prior to the training, one in three peer educators reported
that violence against women was extremely common (n=16), which increased by 22 per cent
following the training to 56 per cent (n=22).

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Percentage of participants

Question six: Is violence against women common in Australia?


100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

56
Participant response
pre training

34
17 21
4 0

26

19 23
Participant response
post training

When asked in question seven to identify the type of families where domestic violence is most likely
to occur, most young women correctly chose in any family, regardless of race, religion, culture or
sexual orientation.

Percentage of participants

Question seven: Domestic violence is likely to occur...


100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

Participant
response pre
training

45
34

13

12

22 20

17

Participant
response post
training

13 15
0 0

In families where In families where

In the average

In families that

In any family,

Aussie family

come from

regardless of

there is a

the parents are

countries outside

race, religion,

breakdown in the

very young

Australia

culture or sexual

parents'

orientation

relationship

Other

Question eight asked peer educators to identify attitudes and behaviours that support gender-based
violence from five multiple choice questions that included using language that belittles or puts women

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and girls down, assuming there are skills and abilities specifically related to being a woman or a man,
name calling and wolf whistling at women, the belief that some girls ask for it, and calling girls sluts
or other insulting names. Prior to the training, 70 per cent (n=33) of participants answered correctly
by selecting all five responses. Following the training, this response rate increased by 14 per cent to
84 per cent (n=38) of participants.

Question nine asked participants what factors they think lead to gender-based violence. Prior to
their participation in the training, the most commonly selected response was a history of family
violence with 24 per cent of responses (n=42). Following the training, the overall correct response
rate rose by 8 per cent to 54 per cent.

Percentage of participants

Question nine: What factors do you think lead to gender-based


violence?
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

Participant response
pre training

54
47

46
40

Participant response
post training
8

Incorrect response - Correct response Alcohol and drug Rigid stereotypes and
abuse; a family
gender roles for
history of violence
women and men;
tolerance of sexist
language and
behaviour

Other

Responses to question ten demonstrated that young womens knowledge of what constitutes
informed sexual consent was high at 95 per cent pre and post the session.

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Question ten: Informed consent to sexual relations...


95

100

94

Percentage of participants

90
80
70
Participant
response pre
training

60
50
40
30
20
10

Participant
response post
training

0
Incorrect response - Is given
Correct response - Is given
when the woman does not say when both partners say or do
no
something to communicate their
consent; can be withdrawn at
any time during sexual activity;
cannot be given if someone is
too drunk or high on drugs to
understand what is happening

There was a 23 per cent increase in the number of peer educators who strongly agreed in question
eleven that they can make a difference to ending violence against women following the training. This
shift was far more significant among peer educators than among adult leaders who attended training.
Following the training, adult leaders were 5 per cent less likely to strongly agree that they could make
a difference to ending violence against women. This difference could be explained by the fact that
peer educators attended an additional full day of training compared to adults, and hence gained a
greater understanding of how respectful relationships education can prevent violence against women.

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Question eleven: What I do can make a difference to ending


violence against women.

Percentage of participants

100
90

Participant
response pre
training

80
70

61

60
50
40

53
38

Participant
response
post training

34

30
20
4

10

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Neither agree
or disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

When asked about their attitude to question twelve and the statement that women should not expect
to have the same freedoms as men, the overwhelming majority of young women chose to strongly
disagree. However, there was a slight reduction of 5 per cent in the number of respondents who
strongly disagreed with this statement following the training (89 per cent, n=33).

Question twelve: Women should not expect to have the same


freedoms as men.
94

Percentage of participants

100
90

89
Participant
response pre
training

80
70
60
50

Participant
response
post training

40
30
20
10

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Neither agree
or disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

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For question thirteen, the majority of participants reported, both before and after the training, that they
would intervene if they found out that a family member of friend was a victim/survivor of intimate
partner violence. Following the training, the number of young women who reported that they would
be very likely to intervene increased by 14 per cent to 67 per cent (n=28). The training content relating
to bystander action promoted positive attitudinal change among participants.
Question thirteen: How likely would you be to intervene if you
found out that a family member or close friend of yours was
currently a victim of intimate partner violence?
100
Percentage of participants

90
80
67

70
60

Participant
response pre
training

53

50
40
30
20
10

29

Participant
response post
training

26
13
5

2 0

0 2

2 0

In question fourteen, young women were asked about their attitudes toward mens responsibility in
perpetrating sexual assault in instances where they are under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Prior
to the training, 79 per cent (n=37) of peer educators stated that they strongly disagreed that a man
under the influence was less responsible for his violent behaviour. This response rate increased by 5
per cent to 84 per cent (n=37) following the training.

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Percentage of participants

Question fourteen: A man who sexually assaults a woman is less


responsible if he is drunk or affected by drugs.
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

79

84

Participant
response
post training

15 16
0

Strongly
agree

Agree

Participant
response pre
training

Neither
agree or
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

In response to question fifteen and whether women are more likely to be sexually assaulted by a
stranger than someone they know, there was a clear increase in knowledge among peer educators.
Prior to their involvement in the training, 33 per cent (n=16) correctly responded that they strongly
disagreed with this statement. Following the training there was a 27 per cent increase in this response
rate to 60 per cent (n=28). Evaluation findings with adult leaders also noted a significant increase of
35 per cent in correct response rates to this question. Indeed, it would appear that both the peer
educator and professional development training sessions were highly successful in dispelling genderbased myths about sexual assault.

Percentage of participants

Question fifteen: Women are more likely to be sexually assaulted


by a stranger than someone they know.
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

60
41
33
26

22
2

Strongly
agree

Agree

Participant
response pre
training
Participant
response
post training

11

Neither agree
or disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

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In question sixteen, when asked if women should worry less about their rights and more about
becoming good wives and mothers, 83 per cent (n=39) of peer educators strongly disagreed with this
statement prior to their training. This response rate increased by 10 per cent following the training to
93 per cent (n=41), indicating that the rights-based content had an impact on young womens attitudes
towards gender equity.

Question sixteen: Women should worry less about their rights and
more about becoming good wives and mothers.

Percentage of participants

100

93

90

83

80
70

Participant
response pre
training

60
50

Participant
response
post training

40
30
20
10

11
2

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Neither agree
or disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

In keeping with similar responses relating to myths about sexual assault, the training dispelled the
myth among participants that women often falsely accuse men of sexual assault. There was a 20 per
cent increase to 71 per cent (n=30) following the training in those young women who strongly
disagreed with the statement in question seventeen. The training also had a significant impact on
participants who didnt know or were undecided. Prior to the training, 21 per cent (n=10) were
undecided, which following the training reduced to only 5 per cent (n=2) of young women.

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Percentage of participants

Question seventeen: Women often falsely accuse men of rape


because they regret having sex.
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

71

Participant
response pre
training

51

26

21
0

Strongly
agree

21

Agree

Participant
response
post training

Neither agree
or disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

Prior to the training, 83 per cent (n=39) of young women strongly disagreed with the notion outlined
in question eighteen, that community leaders should largely be men. This response rate increased to
91 per cent (n=39) following the training.

Percentage of participants

Question eighteen: The leaders of a community should largely


be men.
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

91
83

Participant
response
pre training

Participant
response
post training
17
0

Strongly
agree

Agree

Neither
agree or
disagree

7
Disagree

Strongly
disagree

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Responses to question nineteen showed a notable increase (15 per cent) in the number of peer
educators who strongly agreed that online harassment was a form of violence against women.

Percentage of participants

Question nineteen: Harassment via repeated emails, text


messages and other social media is a form of violence
against women.
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

Participant
response
pre training

76
61

Participant
response
post training

28
16
7
Strongly
agree

Agree

Neither
agree or
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

There were only slight changes in correct responses to question twenty. This response rate indicates
that there is high knowledge among young women that rape can occur within the confines of marriage
and intimate partner relationships.

Percentage of participants

Question twenty: A woman cannot be raped by someone she is


married to or in a relationship with.
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

76 79

Participant
response
pre training

Participant
response
post training
7

15

9
0

Strongly
agree

Agree

7
0

Neither
agree or
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

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Question twenty-one asked participants to tick behaviours associated with a respectful relationship
between intimate partners. There were five correct multiple choice questions that included:

Both partners share all tasks around their home equally


(70 per cent before, 62 per cent after training)
Each partner listens to and respects the others ideas and opinions
(100 per cent before, 95 per cent after training)
Partners share the care of children equally, if they have them
(72 per cent before, 64 per cent after training)
Partners negotiate domestic roles and responsibilities and come to an agreement that both
are comfortable with
(97 per cent before, 95 per cent after training)
Partners avoid the use of blaming language and sexist ideas in all their communications and
actions
(95 per cent before, 93 per cent after training).

In response to question twenty-two, which asked for participants perceptions about whether women
have achieved equality with men in Australia, the most popular response prior to the training was that
participants disagreed (45 per cent, n=21). Following the training, there was a notable increase in
knowledge and awareness relating to gender inequity with a 14 per cent increase among those who
strongly disagreed.

Question twenty-two: On the whole, women in Australia have


achieved equality with men.

Percentage of participants

100
90

Participant
response pre
training

80
70
60
45 42

50
40

29

30

19 18

17

20
10

Participant
response
post training

15

9
2 2

2 0

0
Strongly
agree

Agree

Neither
agree or
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
disagree

No
response

Prior to the training, the overwhelming majority of young women were clear about the roles and
responsibilities of a peer educator. This could be attributed to the comprehensive You, Me and Us

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recruitment and interview process peer educators were required to complete prior to joining the
project, where Womens Health West staff clearly articulated the roles and responsibilities of a You,
Me and Us peer educator.

Percentage of participants

Question twenty-three: An effective peer educator should be...


100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

86

82

Participant
response pre
training
18

Participant
response post
training

14

Incorrect response - A
Correct response - A leader; a
counsellor; an expert in family good communicator; a role
violence
model; a facilitator

You, Me and Us peer educator training had a strong focus on building the public speaking skills,
capacity and confidence of young women. Following their participation in the training, there was an
increase of 14 per cent of participants who reported that they were very confident, while the number
that stated that they were confident increased by 20 per cent following the training to 62 per cent
(n=24).

Percentage of participants

Question twenty-four: How confident are you speaking in front


of a large group of people?
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

Participant
response pre
training

62
43
30
18
4

Participant
response post
training

21
10

10
0 0

2 0

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Comprehensive professional development training for peer educators is vital to project success
(Carmody et al. 2009). Weisz and Black (2010) suggest that the length of training provided should
correlate with the complexity of the skills peer educators are supposed to teach in respectful
relationship education sessions.
In question twenty-five of the post-training questionnaire, peer educators were asked if they thought
that the training had provided them with the knowledge and skills needed to confidently co-deliver
respectful relationships sessions. The response was overwhelmingly positive, with 98 per cent of
participants reporting that it had. These findings suggest that respectful relationships peer educators
require at least two days intensive professional development training, as was provided by You, Me
and Us.

Question twenty-six of the post-training questionnaire asked: in preparation to become a peer


educator what was the most useful part of the training? Participants were able to identify numerous
responses. There were therefore 63 responses to this question. Of this the majority of responses at
30 per cent (n=19) stated that practicing session content was the most useful, with a number of
participants also commenting this helped them to feel prepared and confident for session delivery.
The second most frequent response was that practicing public speaking and presenting (17 per cent
of responses, n=11) were most useful, while slightly fewer young women (14 per cent (n=8)) reported
that learning about violence against women was most useful. A further 11 per cent (n=7) of
respondents stated that all training content was useful.
Ten per cent (n=6) of young women noted that learning how to respond to disclosures was essential
learning. A further 10 per cent (n=6) reported that they found the group-based discussions and
networking with other peer educators most useful, while the remaining 8 per cent (n=5) made
reference to other topics, including leadership skill development and gaining skills to negotiate their
personal relationships.

Question twenty-seven of the post-training questionnaire asked peer educators: in preparation to


become a peer educator, what was the least useful part of the training? Overall there were 26
responses to this question. Of those who responded, 50 per cent (n=13) stated that they found all of
the training useful and hence were unable to identify the least unhelpful components. Another 19 per
cent (n=5) of comments focused on the need for more time on a number of different content areas,
including practicing the sessions, leadership, and in group-based discussions among their peers.

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Evaluation outcomes for peer educators post project delivery


Peer education is a core component of You, Me and Us. All respectful relationships education
sessions delivered to young people were co-delivered by peer educators who were integral to meeting
the You, Me and Us project impacts and outcomes.
In total, 47 peer educators were trained over four intensive training sessions (16 hours in total) in 2013
and 2014. Peer educators were all young women between the ages of 18 and 24 from Melbournes
western region. Of these, 26 participated in the post project evaluation.

Overview
The post project evaluation was designed to measure project impacts and outcomes for peer
educators both personally and professionally. It also aimed to investigate whether the project had
provided young women with effective peer education support and mentoring to deliver respectful
relationships education sessions via mechanisms such as training, session delivery and network
meetings. The questions that guided the peer education evaluation are detailed in the Overview of
the You, Me and Us project evaluation section of this report.
This section of the report specifically examines evaluation findings associated with:

Peer educators increased knowledge and skills in relation to respectful relationship education
session facilitation and delivery
Whether young women became youth ambassadors for the prevention of violence against
women within their communities, as an outcome of the project
The ongoing impact of the project on peer educators personal and professional lives.

This component of the evaluation was conducted in August 2014. The evaluation measures shortterm impact and outcomes for peer educators. Peer education training and session delivery was
staggered throughout the three year project. Hence, the time since exiting the project varied among
peer educators from two months to nine months.

Methodology
Peer educators were invited to participate in a confidential phone interview undertaken by an
independent consultant, or in one of two interactive workshops held in August 2014 and facilitated by
Womens Health West staff. These two options were offered to young people to provide flexibility, to
ensure the maximum number of peer educators participated, and to ensure that peer educators had
sufficient opportunity to provide open and critical evaluation feedback. Fourteen peer educators
participated in the phone interview and twelve participated in the interactive workshops. The questions
asked via both methods were aligned. However, the workshop engaged the use of focus group
discussions, personal reflections and brainstorming to further prompt evaluation feedback. Both the
semi-structured phone interview and workshops included a mix of quantitative and qualitative
methods.

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Some questions allowed for more than one answer and other questions did not require a response
from all peer educators. Therefore it is stated when there were not 26 responses to a question. Please
note that percentages are based on response numbers, as opposed to participant numbers.

Knowledge and skills in facilitating and delivering respectful relationship


education sessions
This section examines whether peer educators were equipped with the skills and knowledge to
effectively deliver respectful relationships education sessions to young people who participated in the
You, Me and Us sessions. The results given here summarise peer educators responses to questions
on the key project components including training, session delivery, support and mentoring, and peer
educator network meetings, which were held bi-monthly throughout the duration of the project.

What peer educators learnt from their involvement in the project


The 26 peer educators who participated in the evaluation were asked to articulate three things they
learnt or had come to better understand since their involvement in You, Me and Us. Of the total 56
responses to this question, 14 per cent (n=8) related to learning about the prevalence of and statistics
associated with violence against women.
Definitely that violence does happen regularly and it may not be obvious.
(Peer educator)
Another 14 per cent (n=8) of responses reference gender and/or the causes of violence against
women. Of these responses, 3 per cent specifically name the causes of violence against women as
unequal power relations between women and men and rigid gender.
As the peer educator training emphasised the strong links between sexist attitudes and the
different types of gender-based violence, I am now much more likely to challenge sexist
behaviour. I also feel I am more confident to speak about these issues.
(Peer educator)
A further 13 per cent (n=7) of responses mentioned that involvement in You, Me and Us had increased
peer educators skills in effective facilitation.
My public speaking has gotten a bit better and I have become more confident.
(Peer educator)
How to deliver respectful relationship education sessions, the difference between younger
and older groups.
(Peer educator)
Eleven per cent (n=6) of responses related to learning about and now understanding respectful
relationships education as primary prevention of violence against women.

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It is important to start this message to a young audience and to continue to reinforce


respectful relationships, and not just between men and women, but also between women
and women, and men and men.
(Peer educator)
Another 11 per cent (n=6) of responses mentioned understanding more about violence against
women, specially the different forms of violence.
Reminded me of different forms of violence against women, e.g. not just physical, but also
can be financial and emotional.
(Peer educator)
Another 9 per cent (n=5) of responses relate to learning different communication styles and how to
communicate in ways that are respectful and assertive.
How to behave in an assertive manner and how it helps.
(Peer educator)
I learnt to be assertive.
(Peer educator)
Seven per cent (n=4) of responses related to respectful relationships generally, but did not always
provide specific examples. Another seven per cent (n=4) of responses related to myths and attitudes
about violence against women.
If a woman is wolf whistled at on the street it is still a disrespectful relationship and I didn't
know that before.
(Peer educator)
Another 5 per cent (n=3) of responses referenced womens rights and the importance of gender equity
as a key learning associated with involvement in the project.
Be strong for yourself and for women's rights.
(Peer educator)
[I learnt about] my power and effect as a woman.
(Peer educator)
Comments related to other topics made up 9 per cent (n=5) of responses and included references to
sexual consent, how to effectively work and communicate with culturally and linguistically diverse
communities, knowing where to seek help, and increased personal confidence.
My confidence has also improved since the program.
(Peer educator)

Feedback on peer educator training


Overwhelmingly, peer educators agreed that the peer education training increased their knowledge
and skills and built their capacity to effectively facilitate respectful relationships education sessions.

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Fifty-eight per cent (n=15) of peer educators said that the training was extremely useful, while 42 per
cent (n=11) stated that it was useful.
Stand out messages able to be recalled from training
Fifty per cent (n=13) of peer educators were unable to recall a key message from the training with
many commenting that it was too long ago. Of the 50 per cent (n=13) who could recall a stand out
message from the training, the most common response (31 per cent (n=8)) related to violence against
women.
There is a large problem with violence against women in Australia which I think many
people do not understand or know about as they may think it is a problem that may be
more common overseas.
(Peer educator)
I didnt know that husbands can be convicted of raping their own wife. It was something
new that I didnt know before attending the training.
(Peer educator)
Eight per cent (n=2) of young women specifically made reference to gender and gender stereotypes
as the stand out message they could recall from the training
Gender stereotypes and how that can impact peoples wellbeing.
(Peer educator)
Another 8 per cent (n=2) referenced bystander action, with one peer educator commenting specifically
on the Caught in the Crowd video by Kate Miller-Heidke used in the 10 to 13 year old bystander
activity.
I actually played that video (Caught in the crowd) to my (university) class and then we had
a discussion about bullying.
(Peer educator)
The final 4 per cent (n=1) of responses made reference to respect, diversity and equity in general.
It was just good to have space to have conversations about those things.. How you
understand respect.
(Peer educator)
Peer educator training booklet
Most peer educators stated that they found the peer educator booklet extremely useful (46 per cent
(n=12)) or useful (35 per cent (n=9)). Nineteen per cent (n=5) selected a neutral response. Forty-six
per cent (n=12) of young women reported that they had used the booklet since training.
I gave it to a friend. My friend was concerned about her sister and they found it helpful.
(Peer educator)

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Yes I have used the booklet since the training; I would look over the booklet before every
session. I would look over it to refresh my memory and prepare myself for the session.
(Peer educator)

Feedback on session delivery


Peer educators were asked to reflect on the support and mentoring they received and how effective
this was for preparing them to deliver respectful relationships education sessions to young people.
Preparedness to deliver sessions
Overall, 58 per cent (n=15) of peer educators selected that the project definitely provided them with
the skills and knowledge to deliver respectful relationships education sessions. An additional 35 per
cent (n=9) selected mostly, 4 per cent (n=1) selected somewhat and another 4 per cent (n=1)
provided a neutral response.
Forty-two per cent (n=11) of peer educators selected that the project definitely provided them with
the skills and knowledge to facilitate activities and discussion with their peers and young people who
participated in the project. Another 46 per cent (n=12) selected mostly, eight per cent (n=2) selected
neutral and 4 per cent (n=1) selected not at all.
Components of sessions that worked well
Overall there were 18 responses to this question, as only peer educators who had delivered sessions
provided responses. Fifty per cent (n=9) said session components worked best when participants
could relate to the content either through using relatable examples or through sharing their
experiences.
People relate to stories more than games, especially when the stories are someone's real
experience You can go from there, and ask them about themselves and their
experiences.
(Peer educator)
I think what helped was kids sharing their own personal stories. I know some kids don't
want to talk, but getting them to think about their own personal life experiences and
examples that they can share was really helpful.
(Peer educator)
Thirty-nine per cent (n=7) of responses noted that participatory and interactive activities worked well,
including the need to engage 10 to 13 year old participants through physical activities. There were
specific references to the role plays and assertive communication activity used in the 10-13 year old
session, and to the body-mapping activity for 18 to 24 year olds that helps explore gender stereotypes.
The body image activity where the young people get to draw on the big sheet of paper and
write around the image what people expect them to be, so like self-image around the
media for example. The young people then got a good understanding with that activity.
(Peer educator)

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Getting the students to do role play activities and use examples, I found that really useful to
engage them and keep them interested in the session.
(Peer educator)
Six per cent (n=1) specifically commented on the benefit of using a peer education model with the 18
to 24 year age group.
It's good the way it was delivered by people of a similar age (university students). Peer
educators spoke in a way that they were facilitating but werent telling them what to do and
it was more like sharing information. That environment enhances engagement between
educators and the participants. It allowed them to think and challenge what they think and
what they do. This was a great benefit to the program.
(Peer educator)
One young woman noted that they could not recall any activity that worked well.
I felt that the sessions I was involved in weren't partially successful. The kids weren't
engaged or responsive so it was hard to gauge anything positive about it.
(Peer educator)
Components of sessions that could be improved
Overall there were 17 responses to this question, and only peer educators who had delivered sessions
responded to this question. Thirty-five per cent (n=6) of responses related to the need to ensure that
there was both flexibility in the session structure and facilitation style specific to the needs of each
group.
I think that some of the activities could have been more flexible ... It became regimented
and didnt allow children to discuss. I think that was what they really wanted to do and if it
didnt I could see that their attention drifted. I think having a flexible session plan to tailor to
each group to keep them all engaged is very important.
(Peer educator)
I think you have to be flexible thats the most important thing (when delivering a session).
(Peer educator)
Twenty-four per cent (n=4) commented on the need for more follow up sessions and that one session
was not enough to effectively discuss all the topics covered within the session plan.
One session is not enough and I'm not sure if the program had the impact it could have
potentially had if they were able to participate in some more sessions.
(Peer educator)
Twenty-four per cent (n=4) of participants commented that the session content needed to focus more
on practical solutions.

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Follow on resources for students, how can they actually apply this information.
(Peer educator)
More concrete solutions of what they can do, because there was a lot of information, but
not much action.
(Peer educator)
Twelve per cent of participants (n=2) commented on the need to further tailor sessions to diverse
groups of young people and in specific settings, which was noted with particular reference to the 18
to 24 year old sessions.
We need to adapt the session to suit each group.
(Peer educator)
Six per cent (n=1) commented on the need for further support to teachers to be able to follow up after
the session.
More support to teachers.
(Peer educator)

Feedback on network meetings


Peer educators were asked to reflect on their experiences with the educator network meetings and
comment on whether they were an effective mechanism to assist peer educators in developing their
skills and knowledge to deliver respectful relationships education and content about prevention of
violence against women.
Network meeting attendance
Fifty per cent of peer educators indicated that they attended network meetings regularly. The
remaining 50 per cent (n=13) commented that they did not attend regularly, all of whom said the
barrier to attending regularly was that their time was overcommitted with work and study as well.
I didnt go because I was busy and hadn't facilitated any sessions.
(Peer educator)
I was always at university and working in my job.
(Peer educator)
Components of network meetings that worked well
Peer educators were asked what they thought were the best or most interesting parts of the network
meetings. There were 13 responses. From these responses, 33 per cent (n=4) said the most
interesting component was networking with like-minded young people and the social interaction.
I liked being able to connect with people who also had similar views and we were able to do some
research on further topics.
(Peer educator)

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Another 38 per cent (n=5) commented on the chance to debrief, reflect and share experiences with
other peer educators.
Sharing experiences regarding facilitation.
(Peer educator)
Fifteen per cent (n=2) commented on the opportunity to develop content or to use the session as an
opportunity to refresh their respectful relationship content knowledge.
I think having the opportunity to develop content was really good and be able to make
changes to the existing program. I think when you are involved with those processes it
helps you to learn the material much better, so that was fantastic.
(Peer educator)
Another fifteen per cent (n=2) commented on the guest speakers who presented during the network
meetings.
We had one meeting where a lawyer came in and she spoke about consent and the legal
definition ... That was quite eye opening and interesting.
(Peer educator)
Components of network meetings that could be improved
Thirteen young women provided ideas for how the peer educator network meetings could be
improved. Of these responses, 46 per cent (n=6) commented on the need for greater flexibility
regarding when the meetings were held so more peer educators could attend. The remaining 8 per
cent (n=1) of responses related to a number of different topics, including increased peer educator
input, network meeting reminders, reimbursement and wanting more peer educators to attend.
Some things were started but didnt always get finished because there was about a
month between meetings; the work from the previous meeting may not have been picked
up and concluded Maybe more email communication or some sort of extra
communication between the meetings.
(Peer educator)
A text reminder before sessions would have been good.
(Peer educator)
More financial incentive to attend.
(Peer educator)
Other events would have been great, like a movie night.
(Peer educator)

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Ambassadors for the prevention of violence against women


This section reports on the impact of the You, Me and Us project on young womens personal and
professional lives and their perceptions of whether they had become primary prevention youth
ambassadors. This was measured in two ways. Firstly, if peer educators had continued discussions
with others, such as friends, family members, partner, fellow students, or work colleagues. Secondly,
if they had taken on a formal leadership opportunity, such as internship or employment, that related
to the prevention of violence against women.

Significant personal changes for peer educators


Since being involved in the You, Me and Us project, all peer educators (n=26) who participated in the
evaluation recalled at least one significant change for them personally. Thirty per cent (n=9) of
responses related to increased confidence or skills associated with being more assertive.
I am more confident about my rights and how to protect myself, and how to share this
message to other people.
(Peer educator)
I have gotten much better with public speaking and my confidence talking in front of people
has improved.
(Peer educator)
Being aware I need not remain silent when I hear negative remarks, even from family and
friends.
(Peer educator)
I feel much more empowered and proud to be who I am. I feel so much more strength as a
woman to effect important change in my community.
(Peer educator)
Another 23 per cent (n=7) mentioned an increased commitment to womens rights, gender equity and
the prevention of violence against women.
I have become much more proud and confident to call myself a feminist.
(Peer educator)
I have become more passionate and outspoken about respectful relationship education,
consent and entrenched patriarchy and gender norms.
(Peer educator)
I am more aware of women's rights and I can speak up when I see something is unfair.
(Peer educator)
Seventeen per cent (n=5) reported that their involvement with the project had given them the skills
and awareness to be able to make changes in their own lives and relationships.

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In particular the opportunities for reflection helped me take action in my own life and
previous relationships.
(Peer educator)
My own expectations for my personal relationships are much clearer.
(Peer educator)
Another 13 per cent (n=4) commented on their general increased awareness of respectful
relationships, with two of these participants specifically stating that they learnt to be less judgemental,
while another two young women specifically referenced the importance of having empathy and being
able to put themselves in someone elses shoes.
I'm trying to be less judgemental and more aware of the complexities related to respectful
relationships and violence against women.
(Peer educator)
The remaining 17 per cent (n=5) of responses related to personal values and more general skills and
knowledge development.
I have applied it in my life and I have used it as tangible information. I have taken the
information in and it has affected and influenced my values.
(Peer educator)

Becoming an advocate for prevention of violence against women


All peer educators commented that they had talked about the prevention of violence against women
or respectful relationships with others following the training and their involvement in the project. Of
the 79 total responses, 20 per cent (n=16) reported discussing these topics with adult family members,
14 per cent (n=11) with teenage or child family members, 14 per cent (n=11) with their intimate
partner, 14 per cent (n=11) had discussed violence against women with young people in the
community, 25 per cent (n=20) had discussed the topic with work colleagues or people at university,
and 13 per cent (n=10) had discussions with friends.
I reflected on the training a lot and now use what I have learnt in my work and university.
(Peer educator)

Changes in relation to work and study


This section reports on changes identified by peer educators to their work, study opportunities and
further engagement with the community sector, which they reported as being a direct outcome of their
involvement with You, Me and Us.

Leadership opportunities since being involved in You, Me and Us


Overall, 31 per cent (n=8) of peer educators commented that they had been involved in leadership
opportunities since You, Me and Us, with 23 per cent (n=6) of these being formal opportunities and 8

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per cent (n=2) being informal opportunities. Another 19 per cent (n=5) commented that they would
like to or are planning to engage in leadership opportunities. Formal leadership opportunities that peer
educators noted included:

Gaining employment at Womens Health West in a policy role


Facilitator for an interfaith program
Selected as one of 25 young women from all over Australia to be a girl delegate to represent
Plan Australia at Parliament House for the Because I am a girl campaign to promote gender
equality at the Girls Leadership Summit
Greater confidence to facilitate womens groups at university
Facilitating a workshop for the Network of Women Students Australia
Paid cadetship with a young womens program the peer educator had presented at through
the You, Me and Us project.
Thanks to the You, Me and Us program, I have got a work placement with the Western
Bulldogs where I will be able to learn a lot of new things and also use the knowledge I gained
from the You, Me and Us program.
(Peer educator)

Informal opportunities referenced general leadership at university or within the community, though
specific examples were not provided.
Yes, I have become involved with numerous leadership opportunities in the community since You,
Me and Us.
(Peer educator)

Community sector opportunities since being involved in You, Me and Us


Thirty-one per cent (n=8) of peer educators reported that they had been involved in other education
or community development work related to respectful relationships or prevention of violence against
women. One participant referenced volunteering at Lifeline, while another young woman mentioned
that she would soon be facilitating respectful relationships sessions for 8 to 13 year olds and
undertaking direct service work with women who have experienced violence through her student
placement.
Will be very soon facilitating children's groups on respectful relationships work and doing
direct service work with violence against women.
(Peer educator)

Influence on work or study opportunities


Seventy-three per cent (n=19) of peer educators commented that the You, Me and Us project
influenced decisions they made about work or study. Two participants specifically mentioned they
wanted to stay in work directly related to the You, Me and Us project.
I feel I have finally found my calling This program has transformed me and my life
(Peer educator)

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Another two participants commented that they are studying to be teachers and are committed to
integrating respectful relationships education into their teaching.
Because I will become a high school teacher at the end of the year, the program has
contributed to my determination to challenge gender stereotypes and promote respectful
relationships in this future community role.
(Peer educator)
Three participants specifically mentioned the project influencing their study course and subject
choices.
I started studying social work after I started with the You, Me and Us program. I was
already interested in it, but the program helped confirm my decision.
(Peer educator)
Other participants mentioned the project had a more general influence on their work and wanted to
integrate concepts from You, Me and Us into their existing work.

Summary of key findings


The evaluation findings indicate that You, Me and Us increased peer educator knowledge and skills
in the facilitation of respectful relationships education, supported them to become primary prevention
advocates within their communities, and influenced their future employment and education
opportunities.
Peer educators reported satisfaction with the projects ability to equip and support them to develop
the knowledge and skills to effectively function as peer educators. All of the young women were able
to recall at least one significant message or skill that they had developed through their involvement
with the project, such as knowledge about the causes of violence against women, understanding
myths and attitudes, and increased facilitation and communication skills. Peer educators reported that
the respectful relationship education sessions they delivered were for the most part interactive and
engaging for young people. However, some stated that the sessions could have been enhanced by
greater flexibility in session structure and facilitation style.
Although only 50 per cent (n=13) of peer educators regularly attended network meetings, this was
largely due to timing commitments as opposed to lack of interest in attending. Of those who did attend,
feedback was that the network meetings were a mechanism that supported peer educators to become
effective facilitators and advocates for the prevention of violence against women. Much of the
feedback relating to how the network meetings could be improved related to greater flexibility
associated with logistics to facilitate more young women being able to attend.
All peer educators who participated in the evaluation reported that they had spoken with others
formally and informally about respectful relationships and preventing violence against women as an
outcome of their involvement in the project.

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It is evident that the project had an impact on peer educators knowledge of respectful relationships,
the primary prevention of violence against women, their work and education opportunities, personal
relationships and confidence. All peer educators provided an example of how the project had impacted
them personally, often referring to their increased confidence, skills and awareness to make positive
changes within their own relationships.
The majority of peer educators also commented that the project had influenced their decisions relating
to employment, training and their future study. Half of the peer educators had either engaged in
leadership opportunities or were motivated to be engaged in leadership opportunities following the
project.
You, Me and Us created a number of opportunities for peer educators to gain further work and
leadership experience. For example, two young women gained paid work and a cadetship, which
came about directly as an outcome of their involvement in the You, Me and Us project. Two peer
educators were also invited to speak on panels or at formal events related to the prevention of violence
against women, which resulted in their recognition as youth leaders within their communities. A
number of peer educators were also employed to collate the You, Me and Us evaluation data. Many
peer educators reported that they had an increased passion and commitment to the prevention of
violence against women and are actively seeking opportunities in this area. Hence, it is evident that
a key outcome of the You, Me and Us project was that peer educators became active leaders and
youth ambassadors for the prevention of violence against women within their community, beyond the
scope of the project.

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