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Idea Visualization-DMGT-706-OL

Projects A, B, Exercises
Conceptual Explorations into Visualizing Ideas
Ericca Hope Garrison
Professor Regina Rowland, Ph.D.
Fall Quarter 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PROJECT A: Sketchbook Visualizations


Phase A/1: Drawing as a Visceral Process

Project Overview 4

Research: Visual Studies 5

Phase A/2: Stick Figures


Project Overview 46

Research: Visual Studies 47

Phase A/3: Conceptual Drawing


Project Overview 69

Research: Visual Studies 70

PROJECT B: Infographic Poster


Phase B/1: Data Collection

Project Overview 100

Research: Visual Studies 101

Phase B/2: Infographics Poster


Project Overview 116

Research: Visual Studies 117

Final Infographic Poster 124

PROJECT C: Telling Stories w/ Data: Infographics Video


Phase C/1: Story Boarding

Project Overview 125

Storyboards, Script 126

Phase C/2: Infographics Video


Project Overview 129

Final Infographic Video 130


Ericca Hope Garrison | DMGT-706-OL | Idea Visualization

TABLE OF CONTENTS

EXERCISE 2: Basic Drawing Practice


Accurate perspective sketches 131

EXERCISE 3: Diagramming and Assessment of


Complex Ideas

Visually articulate complex problems 134

EXERCISE 4: Idea Lexicon: Developing a Personal


Visual Vocabulary

Visually articulate complex problems 143

EXERCISE 5: Stick Figures Storyboarding


Graphic abstractions and storytelling 168

Vimeo video of storyboards 170


Ericca Hope Garrison | DMGT-706-OL | Idea Visualization

PHASE A/1:
DRAWING AS A VISCERAL PROCESS

PROJECT A OVERVIEW
Sketching, whether skilled or unskilled, should be as natural as writing. And, as with
writing, it takes practice and repetition over time in order to transform self-conscious
deliberate movement of the hand into the unconscious making of marks on paper that
convey an idea.
A sketch journal is a history of your thought as it happens. In this project, you will go
through three different exercises, draw commonplace objects, record observations from
the environment, and develop ideas that are relevant to your work.

PHASE A/1 OVERVIEW


Learning Outcomes

Rapidly sketch objects with proficiency and ease

Construct images demonstrating command of line and spatial representation

Express line work of varying weight conveying form and scale.

Procedure

Draw 10 objects per page or as many as you can draw according to the size of
your sketchbook.

Minimum requirement is to draw 10 pages per day.


Ericca Hope Garrison | DMGT-706-OL | Idea Visualization

PHASE A/2:
STICK FIGURES

PHASE A/2 OVERVIEW


Learning Outcomes

Learn about rapid sketching and diagramming in the synthesis of ideas

Use graphic abstractions to develop a concrete idea

Sketch simple figures through expressive line work conveying mood, emotions,
actions, and scale.

Procedure

Sketch as many stick figures as you can on a page, minimum 15 pages.

Review your work and highlight the most interesting ones: five ten examples.
Repeat this exercise several times until you have five favorite stick figure styles.

Draw the five favorite candidates while keeping consideration of their:

Proportionscan you approximate actual human proportions?

Do the selected figures have the ability to rotate or change views?

Heads, hands, and feetcan you direct attention with minimal detail?

Gesturescan they point, walk, run, fall, or hold things?

Use at least two pages for each figures exploration.


Ericca Hope Garrison | DMGT-706-OL | Idea Visualization

PHASE A/2:
STICK FIGURES

PHASE A/2
Refined Stick Figures

Draw the five favorite candidates while keeping consideration of their:

Proportionscan you approximate actual human proportions?

Do the selected figures have the ability to rotate or change views?

Heads, hands, and feetcan you direct attention with minimal detail?

Gesturescan they point, walk, run, fall, or hold things?

Use at least two pages for each figures exploration.


Ericca Hope Garrison | DMGT-706-OL | Idea Visualization

PHASE A/3:
CONCEPTUAL DRAWING

PHASE A/3 OVERVIEW


Learning Outcomes

Experience rapid decision-making and consensus realizations

Improvise and generate unique ideas in any situation

Demonstrate skill in constructing images of an idea in real time.

Procedure

Sketch as many compositions, journal pages as you can in reference to the on-going
project on a page, minimum 25 pages.

Review your work and highlight the most interesting journal/concept development
pages: five to ten examples.
Ericca Hope Garrison | DMGT-706-OL | Idea Visualization

PHASE B/1:
DATA COLLECTION

PROJECT B OVERVIEW
The main goal of data visualization is its ability to visualize data, communicating information clearly and effectively. Data visualization does not need to look boring to be
functional, or extremely sophisticated to look beautiful. To convey ideas effectively, both
aesthetic form and functionality need to go hand in hand, providing insights into a rather
sparse and complex data set by communicating its key aspects in a more intuitive way.
The graphical representation of data is also called infographics.

PHASE B/1 OVERVIEW


Learning Outcomes

Collect data and sort through the information to find focus

Separate facts from declarations and assumptions

Sort the data to validate the argument.

Procedure

Working together as a two-person team, select a topic and research.

Find extensive data points, sort it to chunks, and find the focus (the part you would
like to highlight or to raise an issue).

Show this data in a graphical way with simple sketches, bullet points, or key words.
In short, tell the story of information you collected in a format that is easily understood and can be shared with others. Include various diagrammatic formats in addition to icons and symbols, pictures, numerical data, and explanatory notes.
Ericca Hope Garrison | DMGT-706-OL | Idea Visualization

Data Visualization, Part 1:Data Collection


Food Trucks
Catherine Foulks and Errica Garrison

IDEA VISUALIZATION DMGT 706-OL


Data for Info Graphics Poster (Food Trucks)

Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

Introduction:
Errica and I will be highlighting the growth and impact the food
truck industry has had on our on the US in the last 5 6 years.
Food trucks have become a large part of the US small business
market. In the past several years the age-old business of street
vendors and mobile dinning rooms has turned into a lucrative
nation wide trend.

FOOD TRUCKS VENDORS IN THE U.S.


Statistics (From 2008-2013) [3]
!
!
!
!
!

3.9% annual growth


30,810 businesses created
35,502 jobs created
$1 billion in revenue
$2.7 billion (expected revenue growth by 2017)

Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

Small Business with Big Start up


Startup Costs: Food Truck [2 & 4]
Although food truck seems like a compact business, the start
up cost ranging for 50 to 100 thousand dollars can hard to
chew. Several small businesses can be started for less than
$10,000; however food trucks are much closer to the cost of a
brick and mortar restaurant.
Three price ranges subdivide each of these sections:
$ = Low, $$ = average and $$$ = high for each area.
Food Truck Business Start Up Costs

One time start-up costs


Purchasing your food truck
Vehicle inspection
Retrofitting and/or bring the truck up to code
Generator
Register/POS System
Paint
Truck wrap
Initial food purchases
Utensils and paper goods
Website design
Initial office equipment and supplies
Initial advertising and PR
Professional, legal and consulting fees
Reoccurring start-up costs
Payroll
Commercial kitchen/Commissary rent
Credit card processing equipment
Fuel
Start-up costs which vary by location

$$

$$$

5000
100
25000
1500
150
1000
2500
500
500
500
200
500
500

25000
300
40000
5000
1250
2000
3500
1250
1000
3500
500
750
2000

125000
500
50000
10000
2500
3000
5000
2000
3500
7500
1000
1000
5000

1500
500
50
250

2500
1500
150
300

3500
3000
500
400

Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

Permits and licensing


Insurance

50
300

500
500

10000
1000

Fuel For the Road


Fuel Costs [6]
! Food Trucks: 32% spend $500+ per week
! Food Trucks: 42% spend $250-$499 per week
! Avg. Driver: $360

Best Cities For Food Trucks


Although food truck is popping up everywhere there are cities in the US
that are still dominating the industry. Places like New York City, Washington
D.C and San Francisco have made names for their street fair. Food truck
are no longer a scary oddity but are now considered dining destinations
for mobile cuisine.

Best Cities for Food Trucks [5]


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!
!
!
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!
!
!
!

In order of significance (dominating fare theme)


New York, NY (vegan to BBQ)
Chicago, IL (vegan)
Miami, FL (fried bites, burgers, sandwiches)
Austin, TX (Mexican and barbecue)
Portland, OR (only highest quality ingredients)
Los Angeles, CA (Korean-Fusion-BBQ)
Cleveland, OH (healthy, local, organic)
Boston, MA (wide variety)
Houston, TX (taco trucks)
Washington, DC (all things cheesy)

Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

Competition
Lunch
! 47% (fast, quick, or takeout food)
! 42% (home or brought food from home)
! 11% (full service restaurant)
Dinner
! 7% (fast, quick, or takeout food)
! 57% (home or brought food from home)
! 34% (full service restaurant)

Fast Food Service


Food Trucks Generate about 2/3 of their revenue during the day
and before dinner.
Food trucks compete primarily with fast, quick-service and takeout food.
The fast food industry is the main competition for food trucks, the
convenience and selection creates and overwhelming industry.

[3A] Fast food Stats for the US (Research Date: 4.20.2013)

! Number of Fast Food Restaurants - 160,000


! Number of American Served - 50 Million
! Annual Fast Food Revenue $110 Billion

Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

Title Options
FOOD TRUCK101

KEEP ON TRUCKING

THE FOOD TRUCK REVOLUTION

TASTE FOR SUCCESS

MODERN FOOD TRUCKING

GOURMET FARE TO-GO

MOBILE CUISEN

ROLLING RESTAURANTS ON THE


ROAD

Food Truck 101


Keep On Trucking
Gourmet Fare to-go
The Food Truck
Revolution

Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

Info Graphic Poster Examples

Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

Font Selection
1.Bemio
Bemio Italic

2.Bender Solid
Bender inline
Bender thin
3.Carton\
Carton

4.Haymaker
haymaker
Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

Color Schemes

Urban

https://kuler.adobe.com/camping-color-theme-3050272/

Organic Vintage

https://kuler.adobe.com/Copy-of-Settle-color-theme-3016037/

Confetti

https://kuler.adobe.com/VERSUZ-2013---def-color-theme-3069671/

Farmers Market

https://kuler.adobe.com/Lemon-Lime-color-theme-3106012/
Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

Sketches
Layout 1

Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

10

Layout 2

Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

11

Layout 3

Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

12

Layout 4

Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

13

Refined Icons

Conclusion
Food trucks have become a viable part of the US economies and what
was once a fad has now turned in to an overwhelming growth of
successful small business.
Entrepreneurs are risk takers and full of adventure, just like the true
footprint of a local food truck. These new fast food options are taking a
stake in the billion-dollar industry.
Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

14

Sources
[1] http://www.zagat.com/buzz/sf-bay-areas-12-best-food-trucks
[2] http://network.intuit.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Intuit-FoodTrucks-Report.pdf
[3] http://ibisworld.com/industry/default.aspx?indid=1683
[4]http://idiotsguides.com/static/quickguides/businesspersonalfinance
/what-you-need-to-know-about-starting-a-food-truck-business.html
[5] http://blog.zagat.com/2012/02/which-us-city-has-hottest-foodtruck.html
[6] http://mobile-cuisine.com/features/poll-how-much-do-you-spendon-fuel-for-your-food-truck-per-month/
[7] http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/all-we-caneat/post/premium-service-the-cost-of-insuring-foodtrucks/2012/07/20/gJQA9T5FyW_blog.html
[1a] http://www.forbes.com/sites/investopedia/2012/09/27/the-cost-of-startinga-food-truck/
[2a] http://mobile-cuisine.com/business/why-do-food-truck-businesses-fail/
[3a] http://www.statisticbrain.com/fast-food-statistics/
[4a] http://mobile-cuisine.com/business/how-much-does-it-cost-to-start-a-foodtruck-business/
Color Scheme
https://kuler.adobe.com
Fonts
http://www.losttype.com
Info graphics Examples
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/26/food-trucks_n_2017376.html
http://www.dbsquaredinc.com/images/blog/food-trucks-infographic.png

Idea Visualization-DMGT-706- OL
Unit 6 Part 1: Data Collection (Food Truck Info graphics Poster)

15

PHASE B/2:
INFOGRAPHICS POSTER

PHASE B/2 OVERVIEW


Learning Outcomes

Learn about data presentation in a graphically effective and descriptive way

Use graphic abstractions to support complex information

Present statistical data in a creative and intuitive way.

Procedure

Design an infographic poster that has relevance, complexity, and a degree of


controversy.

Conduct additional secondary research on the topic to determine its nature and
boundaries, background, and key influencers.

Define major problem areas using the diagram of a problem shown below as a guide.

From a rapid analysis of your findings, sketch minimum 10 different compositions each
showing data in a different way to gage effective ways of sharing complex information.
Ericca Hope Garrison | DMGT-706-OL | Idea Visualization

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Final Poster

PHASE C/1:
STORYBOARDING

PROJECT C OVERVIEW
We live in a complex world, with complex ideas, concepts, and issues. As such, sometimes a complex issue can be better understood with the use of creatively designed
infographics rather than using the written word or spoken language. The most popular
type of infographics is a simple poster, which allows the user to follow and soak up the
graphical information in an easy and formulaic manner. The human brain is programmed
to absorb a combination of visuals, movement, and audio more quickly and efficiently
than information in the form of text.
On the other hands videos are a combination of animated storytelling, visual text and an
engrossing voice-over to make to make even the more complex issues understandable,
memorable and to highlight certain points explicitly. It is also a more compelling form of
reaching a more diverse audience.

PHASE C/1 OVERVIEW


Learning Outcomes

Present data in a visually and emotionally compelling form which reaches a


diverse audience

Use storytelling as a medium of information that is memorable and relevant.

Procedure

Working together as a two-person team, further develop your ideas from a poster to a
self-running presentation.

Convert your data into a compelling story.

Storyboard your content frame-by-frame through sketches.


Ericca Hope Garrison | DMGT-706-OL | Idea Visualization

Food truck 101 Gourmet Fare to GO


Frame 1: Introduction with logo Welcome to food truck 101 we will be
taking a road trip to explore the food truck industry. There will be a few
ups and downs on our journey so buckle up and enjoy the ride.
Frame 2: There are so many obstacles involved with starting a food truck
business. Success is possible but the rise to a great the food truck is an
uphill climb. With all the competition it can feel like a free for all.
Read all of the stats on the bottom left. Read down from top to bottom
Keep in mind as you climb the hill to success, this industry keeps climbing
with you. The expected growth by 2017 is in the area of 2.7 billion in
revenue. That is a tasty treat, but beware there are several passengers on
the same road to success with over 30k new food truck and 35k new jobs
created in the industry it can feel like a long line. Still yet hold on to your
forks because the annual growth is about 3.9% so there is room for many
more great mobile dishes.
The final course this rocky road has to offer is the comfort that 91% of food
trucks are a lasting trend like your favorite food its here to stay, over 84%
are peeking in the window via social media and just about 72% of truck
are cash and carry only. No bad for a day on the road!
Frame 3: Start your engines and get ready to spend thousands of dollars in
start up cost. Your food truck is a mobile business that can take a pretty
penny to get moving.

Generators to make you shine and dine after the sun sets will run
about 6k
POS systems for collecting coin is around 4k
All of the equipment and tool to establish function total 15k
Operations and all that keeps you open for serves is 17k
The Van is 15k
Kitchen ware that make you a master of all thing culinary 3k
Customization to add your personal flare to your mobile fare will
equal 20k
Last but not least your pots will burn in the kitchen that cost 20k

Yes indeed this is a pretty large out lay of cash, but in comparison to other
brick and mortar start ups you have a great deal like an kind of of like and
blue plate special at your local dinner
Frame 4: Up in smoke there is more to burn in a food truck besides the
chicken. Gas is a huge factor in getting your show on the road; the
average cost of gas is about 40cent per mile. 4a:Compared the weekly
total 42% of food trucks spend $250 on gas, the average driver spends
about $360 weekly, while 32% spend $500 a week on gas. Thats fuel for
thought! 4b: Your food truck will be guzzling more than ice-cold cola on a
hot day. These gas-guzzlers burn on average 7 miles per gallon vs. a
standard automobile 24 miles a gallon. The comparison is like apples to
orange, although mobile fare is at the mercy of fuel, the best food trucks
are serving up more that gas prices can measure.
Frame 5: Taste across the great 50 states. The food truck scene is growing
in leaps and bounds and on this great food truck journey we have found
some tasty towns we would like to share.
New York, New York takes a bite out of gourmet with its vegan fare
and BBQ it ranks #1 on our food truck chew.
Chicago breezes in and ranked #2 for its tasty vegan dishes
Miamis fired bites basks in the sun at #3
Austin wrangles in the #4 slot with Mexican and slow smoked BBQ
Portland keeps it farm fresh and rides away with #5 for delicious
organic dishes.
LA wins the #6 spot for the glitz and glamour of fusion and BBQ
Cleveland in at #7 takes organic cuisines as serious as the browns
winning the super bowl.
Boston keep it saucy with the variety pack in the #8 spot
Huston makes big Texas a double winner of the #9 spot with the
best tacos in town.
Last but equally delicious
Washington D.C takes hold of #10 spot to represent our nations
capital with the ooey gooey cheesiest fare in the USA.

Frame 6:(Summary) Thank you for taking this journey through the highways
and by ways of the food truck industry. I hope you have learned a few
short cuts along the way that will help grow your new business.
Although there are so many things to learn, there is a vast amount of room
for creativity and delectable expressions. This growing industry is the
perfect platform for savvy foodie to become a profitable mobile small
business owner.

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PHASE C/2:
INFOGRAPHICS VIDEO

PHASE C/2 OVERVIEW


Learning Outcomes

Make complex issues understandable and persuasive to highlight the point explicitly
and stimulate action

Create a five-minute video presentation of the entire project.

Procedure

Use the feedback from your peers and instructor to refine your video.

Submit the final video.


Ericca Hope Garrison | DMGT-706-OL | Idea Visualization

http://vimeo.com/79008283

Ericca Hope Garrison | DMGT-706-OL | Idea Visualization

Exercise 3:
Diagramming & Complex Ideas

Diagramming & Complex Ideas

LEARNING OUTCOMES
DESIGN NARRATIVE
Although I know the exercise asked for digitally rendered diagrams, I
find them to be cold and flat. Therefore, I decided to challenge myself
to hand lettering and visual diagramming. I will admit that some diagrams are more interesting than others. However, in each I attempted
to capture a unique typographic style or even diagram style without
losing the essence of the required diagram. I am completing my
visual thesis component in conjunction with this class and am working
on some intense dataset visualizations that will perform dynamically on
the web. I hope that the visualization practice here will help me garner
new insights on other projects as well.
IMPORTANCE?
Diagramming in all its forms offers an simplified visual representation
of what are typically complex datasets or concepts. Much like graphic
design, these visualized diagrams grab the attention of the viewers,
help others easily grasp and comprehend the message, while increasing viewer engagement and open interpretation.

Developing a Personal
Visual Vocabulary
Exercise 4: Idea Lexicon

Developing a Personal
Visual Vocabulary Keywords
1

Inside
Outside
Belonging
Exclusion
Equal, equal to

10

Increase
Decrease
Rise, growth
Decline
Status Quo

Direction
Power
Leader, leadership
Isolate, isolation
Cooperation
Community
Coach Facilitate, support

11

12

13

14
4

6
7

Thinking
Exploring
Reflection
Discovery
Conclusion
Idea
Create

Personal, myself
Personal (user) perspective
Trigger
Intent

Conclusion

Actor
Stakeholder

Condense
Elaborate, detail
Problem
Opportunity
Question
Decision
Urgent, important
Alert, danger

15

16

17

Success, achievement
Anchor
Root cause
Cause
Effect

Computer
Technology
Network
Energy

18

Agreement
Disagreement
Conflict

Alignment
Influence
Attraction

Count, accounting
Data

19

Frustration
Misunderstanding
Decision/Resolution
Cooperation
Competition

Balance
Plan, blueprint
Schedule
Communication
Message

Acquire
Merge
Takeover

20

21

22

23

Global
Local
Domestic
Foreign
MacroMicroEnvironment
Social, society
Cultural
Ritual

Work
Leisure
City, urban
Suburban
Rural
Family
Education

Children
Teens
Adults: men, women
Service personnel
Management
Workers
Diversity
Private sector
Public sector
Government
Media (print, TV, Internet, mobile)

Marketing
Manufacturing
Distribution
Customer support
Legal
Policy

Organize
Focus
Research
Consensus

Final Elaborations

Concept 1

Concept 2

Concept 3

Concept 4

Concept 5