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선상기름오염비상계획서

SHIPBOARD OIL POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN

선 명
:
NAME OF SHIP

호 출 부 호
:
DISTINCTIVE LETTER

IMO 번호
:
IMO NUMBER
History Card

VER. NO. DATE HISTORY

0 20 . . . INITIAL

__________________________________________________________________________________
Contents

INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER 1. Organization

CHAPTER 2. Reporting
2.1 When to report
2.2 How to report
2.3 Whom to contact
2.4 What to report

CHAPTER 3. Response(General)
3.1 Prevention of operational spill
3.2 Measure to be taken in the event of operational spill

CHAPTER 4. Measures to be taken in the event of a casualty


4.1 The Captain's priority actions
4.2 Response to oil spill
4.3 Response to fire/explosion
4.4 Response to collision
4.5 Response to grounding/stranded
4.6 Response to hull/containment system failure
4.7 Response to excessive list
4.8 Response to submerged/foundered/wrecked
4.9 Response to hazard vapour release

CHAPTER 5. Further response


5.1 Mitigating activities
5.2 Damage stability and stress considerations
5.3 Emergency ship to ship transfers of cargo and fuel oil

CHAPTER 6 National and local co-ordination


6.1 National and local co-ordination

CHAPTER 7. Additional information(non-mandatory)


7.1 Training and review of plan
7.2 Record keeping and sampling
7.3 Public Affairs

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Contents

APPENDIX

Appendix 1. Ship's particular


Appendix 2. Notification system chart
Appendix 3 Duties and position of crew for response to casualty
Appendix 4. List of contacts of coastal state
Appendix 5. List of contacts of other persons
Appendix 6. Safety assessment and precaution
Appendix 7. Prediction of slick movement
Appendix 8. Handling of Shipboard Oil Response Equipment
Appendix 9. Check list for response to casualty
Appendix 10. Relevant drawings

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Preamble

This plan is written in accordance with the requirements of regulation 37 of Annex I of the
International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the
Protocol of 1978 relating thereto.
The purpose of the Plan is to provide guidance to the captain and officers on board the ship
with respect to the steps to be taken when an oil pollution incident has occurred or is likely to
occur.
The Plan contains all information and operational instructions required by Regulations. The
appendices contain names, telephone, telex numbers, etc. of all contacts referenced in the Plan,
as well as other reference material.

Except as provided below paragraph, no alteration or revision shall be made to any part of it
without the prior approval of the Administration.

Changes to Chapter 7 and the appendices will not be required to be approved by the
administration. The appendices should be maintained up to date by the owners, operators and
managers.

This plan is prepared both in Korean and English, but the Korean version has priority if there
is a conflict between them.

The Plan is available to assist personnel in dealing with an unexpected discharge of oil. Its
primary purpose is to set in motion the necessary actions to stop or minimize the discharge and
to mitigate its effects. Effective planning ensures that the necessary actions are taken in a
structured, logical, safe and timely manner.

The purpose of the Plan is to provide the Master, Officers and certain crew members with a
practical guide to the prevention of oil spill and in carrying out the responsibilities associated
with regulation 37 of Annex Ⅰto MARPOL 73/78.

The Plan include guidance to assist the master in meeting the demand of operational spills or a
catastrophic discharge.

Information on the ship, cargo, etc., is included in appendix. An example of a summarizing


flowchart is included in the Plan.(refer to Appendix 2)

The Plan is used on board by the master and officers of the ship. It must therefore be available
in a working language or languages understood by the master and officers. Where there is
alteration(for example, a change in the master and officers) on board in their working language
or languages understood, the Plan in the new language(s) should be reissued.

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CHAPTER 1 Organization

1.
A Ship Response Organization is necessary to ensure prompt action in response to oil spill. The
following officers and crew are assigned to the Spill Response Teams.

Upon discovery or report of oil, a Command Post will be established on the bridge to receive
and compile information, keep the captain informed, and make timely reports to company and
government authorities.

1.1 Captain

Captain is in full commend of the ship and is at all times responsible for the prevention against
the shipboard oil pollution.

1.2 Ship Spill Response Officer

Responsible for training vessel crew members how to carry out spill response efforts, and for
coordinating all on board response actions in all case of a oil spill.

1.3 Duties and Position of Emergency Response Team

Duties and position of Emergency Response Team shall be referred to Appendix 3.

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CHAPTER 2 Reporting

2.
This chapter should ensure that the reporting requirements of regulation 37 of Annex I of
MARPOL 73/78 are complied with and should include information relating to the following :

2.1 When to report

When the ship is involved in an oil pollution incident, the master or other on-board persons in
charge of oil spill shall report to the nearest coastal state.

2.1.1 Report shall be made to the nearest coastal state in the cases of actual discharge of oil as
follows ;

(1) a discharge above the permitted level of oil for whatever reason including those for the
purpose of securing the safety of the ship or saving life at sea; or

(2) a discharge during the operation of the ship of oil in excess of the quantity or
instantaneous rate permitted under MARPOL 73/78.

2.1.2 Reporting for discharge of oil

In judging whether there is a probability of discharge of oil resulting from damage to the ship or
its equipment, and whether the report should be made, the following factors, as a minimum,
should be taken into account ;

(1) the nature of the damage, failure or breakdown of the ship, machinery or equipment ;

(2) failure or breakdown of machinery or equipment which may adversely affect the ability of
the ship to manoeuvre, operate pumps, etc.

(3) ship location and proximity to land or other navigational hazards ;

(4) weather, tide, current and sea state; and

(5) traffic density

(6) morale, health and ability of crew to deal with the situation

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CHAPTER 2 Reporting

2.1.3 Probable discharge of oil

The captain and/or designated crew member should make a report in the following cases of
damage, failure or breakdown which involve probable discharge of oil :

(1) damage, failure or breakdown which affect the safety of ships; examples of such situation
are collision, grounding, fire, explosion, structural failure, flooding, cargo shifting ; and

(2) failure or breakdown of machinery or equipment which results in impairment of the safety of
navigation; examples of such incidents are failure or breakdown of steering gear, propulsion,
electrical generating system, essential ship-borne navigational aids.

(3) If in doubt, the captain should always make a report.

2.2 How to report

2.2.1 General

Make a report to the nearest coast state or port contacts and owner/operator by means of the
fastest telecommunications channel available in accordance with the following procedures ;

(1) Conform to the reporting format of this plan ;

(2) Make the initial report as soon as possible, leaving unknown matters to make a follow-up
reports ;

(3) Make the follow-up report, as necessary, in order to provide information concerning further
developments ; and

(4) Comply as fully as possible with requests from affected States for additional information.

2.2.2 Transmission

Reports should be transmitted either, by the quickest available means, ;

(1) At sea
Ÿ Use the nearest appropriate coast radio station on appropriate frequencies in the bands
405-525kHz, 1605-2850kHz or 156-174MHz; or
Ÿ If the ship is not within reach of an MF or VHF coast radio station, use the most
appropriate HF coast radio station or the relevant maritime satellite communication
system; or
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CHAPTER 2 Reporting

Ÿ when the ship is within or near to an area where a ship movement reporting system has
been established, use the designated radio station of that system.

(2) In port
Ÿ Use shore telephone
Ÿ Use the communication means which is agreed with terminal or barge for emergency
shut-down
Ÿ VHF radio communication, if available.

2.3 Whom to contact

2.3.1 At sea

In order to expedite response and minimize damage from an oil pollution incident, the master or
other on-board persons in charge of oil spill shall make a report to the following contacts.

(1) Make a report to the nearest appropriate coastal state and the owner/operator without delay.

(2) In the absence of a listed focal point, or should any undue delay be experienced in
contacting the responsible authority by direct means, the captain should be advised to
contact the nearest coastal radio station, designated ship movement reporting station or
Rescue co-ordination centre(RCC) by the quickest available means.

2.3.2 In port

(1) For ship in port, the captain should make a report to local agencies without delay. Where
port is regularly visited, the captain should familiar with the reporting procedure of that port
and the flow chart or reporting format shall be provided on board.

(2) Where port is irregularly visited, and the reporting procedure of the port is not feasible,
captain should obtain details concerning local reporting procedures upon arriving in port.

2.3.3 Ship interest contacts

(1) In the event of a serious incident, ship's personnel will be fully engaged in saving life and
taking steps to control and minimize the effects of the casualty.

(2) The master or other on-board persons in charge of oil spill should inform to the various
interested parties such as cargo owners, insurers, and salvage interests. Both the ship's
Plan and its company's shoreside Plan are to be co-ordinated to guarantee that all parties
having an interest are advised and that duplication of reports is avoid.
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CHAPTER 2 Reporting

(3) All further reports and copies of messages sent to coastal states and/or port authorities
should be sent to the company. If required, the company's officer will be staffed as soon as
possible after receipt of an initial report.

2.3.4 When to report and procedure of oil spill shall be referred to notification system chart and
list of contact point shall be referred to Appendix 4 and 5.

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CHAPTER 2 Reporting

Discharge of oil or noxious liquid substance(probable or actual)

Assessment of the nature of incident

Actions Required
- Alert crew members
- Identify and monitos spill source
- Personnel protection
- Spill assessment
- Vapour monitoring
- Evacuation

Reporting Action to control discharge


By master and/or designated crew member Measures to minimize the escape of oil or noxious liquid
substance and threat to the marine environment.
When to report Navigational measures Seamanship measures
- All probable and actual spills
How to report - Alter course/position - Safety assessment and
- By quickest means to coastal radio station and/ or speed precaution
- Designated ship movement reporting - Change of list and/or - Advice on priority/
station or trim countermeasures/preventive
- Rescue co-ordination centre(at sea) - Anchoring measures
- By quickest available means to local - Setting aground - Damage stability and stress
authorities - Initiate towage considerations
Whom to contact - Assess safe haven - Ballasting/deballasting
- Nearest coastal state requirements - Internal cargo transfer
- Harbour and terminal operators(in port) - Weather/tide/swell operator
- Shipowner's manager, P&I insurer forecasting - Emergency ship-to-ship
- Head charterer, cargo owner - Slick monitoring transfers of cargo and bunker
- Refer to contact lists - Record of events and - Set up shipboard response
What to report communications taken for ;
- Initial report(res. A. 851(20)) Leak sealing
- Follow-up reports Fire fighting
- Characteristics of oil or noxious liquid Handing of shipboard
substance spilled Response equipment(if
- Cargo/ballast/bunker dispositions available)
- Weather and sea conditions Etc
- Slick movement
- Assistance required
Salvage Steps to initiate external response
Lighting capacity
- Refer to coastal port State listings for local assistance
Mechanical equipment
- Refer to ship interest contact list
External response team
- External clean-up resources required
Chemical disperant/degreasant
- Continued monitoring of activities

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CHAPTER 2 Reporting

2.4 What to report

2.4.1 Initial report

The initial report to be sent to the government of the coastal state and owner or operator
should contain the following information :

SHIPBOARD OIL POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN


SAMPLE FORMAT FOR INITIAL NOTIFICATION

AA SHIP NAME, CALL SIGN, FLAG


BB DATE, AND TIME(UTC) OF INCIDENT (a 6 digit group giving day of month(first 2 digits)
hours and minutes(last 4 digits)
/--/--/--/--/--/--/
D D H H M M
CC SHIP'S POSITION, either LAT.(a 4 digit group)/LONG.(a 5 digit group);
/--/--/--/--/--/--/
d d m m N S
/--/--/--/--/--/--/--/
d d d m m E W or
DD SHIP'S POSITION by Bearing(first 3 digits), DISTANCE(in nautical miles)
FROM A CLEARLY IDENTIFIED LANDMARK
/--/--/--/ /------/ from _______
d d d N miles
EE TRUE COURSE AT TIME OF INCIDENT (as a 3 digit group)
/--/--/--/
d d d
FF SPEED AT TIME OF INCIDENT (in knots and tenths of knots as a 3 digit group)
/--/--/--/
kn kn 1/10
LL INTENDED TRACK(FROM - TO)
MM FULL DETAIL OF RADIO STATION AND FREQUENCIES BEING GUARDED
NN DATE AND TIME(UTC) OF NEXT REPORT
/--/--/--/--/--/--/
D D H H M M
OO DRAUGHT(FORE AND AFT) AT TIME OF INCIDENT (4-digit group giving metres and
centimetres)
/--/--/--/--/
m m c c
PP TYPE AND QUANTITY OF CARGO/BUNKER
- Type of oil or the collect technical name of the noxious liquid substances on board
- Names of manufacturers of substances, if appropriate, when known, or consignee or
consignor
- Quantity
QQ BRIEF DETAILS OF DEFECTS/DEFICIENCIES/DAMAGE
- Damage area

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CHAPTER 2 Reporting

SHIPBOARD OIL POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN


SAMPLE FORMAT FOR INITIAL NOTIFICATION
- State of Damage
- Ability to Transfer Cargo/Ballast/Fuel.
RR BRIEF DETAILS OF TYPE OF OIL POLLUTION
- Type of oil on board
Loading port
Specific gravity, either in terms of API gravity or grams per cc
Viscosity at standard temperature, with the units and temperatures specified
Pour point
Wax and asphalt content
Distillation characteristics
- An estimate of the quantity of the substances
- Whether lost substances floated or sank
- Whether loss is continuing
- Cause of loss
- Estimate of the movement of the discharge or lost substances, giving current
conditions if known
- Estimate of the surface area of the spill if possible
SS BRIEF DETAILS OF WEATHER AND SEA CONDITIONS,
- Wind direction(a 3-digits) and force(Beau fort scale Including)
- Relevant current(direction, speed)
- Swell(direction, height)
TT CONTACT DETAILS OF SHIP'S OWNER/OPERATOR/AGENT,
- Name
- Address
- Telex and telephone
UU SHIP SIZE AND TYPE,
- Length
- Breadth
- Draft
- Tonnage
- Type
WW NUMBER OF PERSONS ON BOARD
XX ADDITION INFORMATION, including
- Brief details of incident
- Type and quantity of equipment carried to assist in pollution response
- Need for outside assistance
- Actions being taken
- Action being taken with regard to the discharge and the movement of the ship
- Number of crew and details of any injuries
- Details of P & I Club and local correspondent
- Others

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CHAPTER 2 Reporting

SHIPBOARD OIL POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN


SAMPLE FORMAT FOR INITIAL NOTIFICATION

** For Collision the following information for other ship shall be included;
․Name of ship
․Name of captain
․Owner and address
․Intended track(from - to)
․Type of cargo on board
․Gross tonnage
․Angle of collision
․Direction of bow

** For Grounding the following information shall be included;


․Nature of the bottom
․Depth around the ship
․Heel angle
․Direction of bow

2.4.2 Follow-up reports

After the transmission of the information referred to paragraph 2.4.1 in the initial report, as much
as possible of the information essential for the protection of the marine environment as is
appropriate to the incident should be reported in a supplementary report as soon as possible.
That should include informations as follow, but the informations may not be included for which
the circumstances not changed from the initial report. The format for the follow-up report shall
be used that of initial report.

(1) Serious changes of ship's condition and circumstances


Ÿ Quantity discharged and movement speed of oil
Ÿ Weather and sea conditions
Ÿ Detail of being removal operations
Ÿ Change of circumstance which is additionally occurred

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CHAPTER 3 Response(General)

3.
Whenever a spill of oil occurs, it is the duty of the person finding the spill to immediately inform
the master or responsible officer, who should call out the vessel's pollution prevention team.

Remember that an oil spill may create a fire or explosion hazard, if safety precautions don't be
observed.

Ship personnel will almost always be in best position to take quick action to mitigate or control
the discharge of oil from their ship.

Following figure provides the conceptual framework for the categorization of response levels as
basis of for emergency planning. This will be a basis of judgement in order to minimize
response time and response method when incident is occurred.

3.1 Prevention of operational spill

3.1.1 Prior to transfer oil, close deck scuppers and openings.

3.1.2 Prior to transfer oil, put spill equipments near the site at which operation take place.

3.1.3 Carry out tank sounding frequently to avoid overflow.

3.1.4 If any slight leakage at the ship and shore connections, Catch oil by drain trap.

3.1.5 Watch for leakage or overflow of them when transferring of oil.

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CHAPTER 3 Response(General)

3.2 Measures to be taken in the event of operational spill

3.2.1 General

(1) The captain is to assign their duties for the crew members to take measures for oil spillage
prevention.

(2) Stop transfer of cargo and/or fuel oil by quickest possible method.

(3) When taking measures, detect gas density and use breathing apparatus or chemical
protective clothing when necessary.

(4) Identify source and cause of leakage, and immediately take measures to minimize that
leaked oil is discharged to outside the ship, by using absorbent mats, sawdust or waste
cloth. (The material provided on board is listed in Appendix 8)

(5) Immediately deploy boom to prevent dissipation of leaked oil, and at the same time, recover
as much leaked oil as possible using absorbents.

(6) Do not use dispersant without approval of authorities.

(7) Do not resume operation until cause of oil leak has been revealed and excluded.

(8) Request assistance to clean-up company when necessary(In this case, prior to this action
discuss with a responsible person of company).

(9) Dispose of removed oil and clean-up materials properly by means of delivering them to
disposal company.

3.2.2 Leakage during discharging or loading of oil cargoes or during bunkering

(1) Measures to be implemented immediately :


Ÿ Stop all cargo oil and/or bunkering operations, and close manifold valves.
Ÿ Sound the emergency alarm, and initiate emergency response procedures.
Ÿ Inform terminal/loading master/bunkering personnel about the incident.

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CHAPTER 3 Response(General)

(2) Further measures :

Ÿ Consider whether to stop air intake into accommodation and non-essential air intake to
engine room.
Ÿ Consider mitigating activities such as decontamination of personnel who have been
exposed.
Ÿ Locate source of leakage, and begin clean-up procedures.
Ÿ Drain affected section of pipeline into an empty or slack tank(e.g. the slop tank or
another cargo tank)
Ÿ Prepare portable pumps where it is possible to transfer spilled oil into a slack or empty
tank.
Ÿ If the source of the leakage is located in the pump room at the sea valves the
necessary measures must be taken to relieve the pressure from the relevant section the
pipeline.

(3) If the spilled oil is contained on board and can be handled by the Pollution Prevention
Team then, use sorbents and permissible solvents to clean up liquid spilled on board and
ensure that any residues collected, and any contaminated sorbent materials used in the
clean up operation are stored carefully prior to disposal.

(4) When leakage occurs from ballast line penetrating tank loaded with cargo oil and/or fuel oil,
close the valves on ballast line and stop discharge of ballast.

(5) When leakage occurs from piping connected to overboard valves (sea valve), never open
these valves.

3.2.3 Tank overflow during loading or bunkering

(1) Measures to be implemented immediately :


Ÿ Stop all cargo and bunkering operations, and close manifold valves.
Ÿ Sound the emergency alarm, and initiate emergency response procedures.
Ÿ Inform terminal/loading master/bunkering personnel about the incident.

(2) Further measures :

Ÿ Consider whether to stop air intake into accommodation and non-essential air intake to
engine room.
Ÿ Consider mitigating activities such as decontamination of personnel who have been
exposed.
Ÿ Reduce the tank level by dropping cargo oil or bunkers into an empty or slack tank
Ÿ Prepare pumps for transfer of cargo oil/bunkers to shore if necessary

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CHAPTER 3 Response(General)

Ÿ Prepare portable pumps where it is possible to transfer spilled oil into a slack or empty
tank.

(3) If the spilled oil is contained on board and can be handled by the Pollution Prevention
Team then, use sorbents and permissible solvents to clean up liquid spilled on board and
ensure that any residues collected, and any contaminated sorbent materials used in the
clean up operation are stored carefully prior to disposal.

3.2.4 Hull Leakage

If oil is noticed on the water near the vessel during cargo oil and/or bunkering operations, the
possibility of hull leakage should be suspected.

(1) Measures to be implemented immediately :


Ÿ Stop all cargo and/or bunkering operations, and close manifold valves, tank valves and
pipeline master valves.
Ÿ Sound the emergency alarm, and initiate emergency response procedures.
Ÿ Inform terminal/loading master/bunkering personnel about the incident.

(2) Further measures :


Ÿ Use the Pollution Prevention Team in an attempt to locate the source of leakage.
Ÿ Consider mitigating activities such as decontamination of personnel who have been
exposed.
Ÿ Consider whether to stop air intake into accommodation and non-essential air intake to
engine room.
Ÿ If the source of the leak is not readily identified on deck or above the waterline,
consider the use of a diver to assist in locating the leak.
Ÿ When appropriate, reduce the inert gas pressure to zero.

(3) When the source of leakage is identified :


Ÿ Reduce the head of fuel oil and/or cargo oil by dropping or pumping fuel oil and/or
cargo oil into an empty or slack tank.
Ÿ Consider possibility of pumping water into the leaking tank to create a water cushion to
prevent further loss oil that is less dense than water.
Ÿ If the leakage is located below the waterline, call in divers for further investigation.

(4) If it is not possible to identify the actual tank :


Ÿ The level of liquid in the tanks in the vicinity of the suspected area should be reduced.
Remember to consider the effect on hull stress and stability of the vessel and the
compatibility of noxious liquid substances with tank type, materials of construction and

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CHAPTER 3 Response(General)

tank coating.

(5) It is possible that failure of machinery, such as the oily water separating equipment or the
oil discharge monitor, can cause an operational discharge while at sea in excess of that
permitted. In such an incident the discharge should be stopped immediately and the correct
report made. It is generally acknowledged that no clean up is possible by the ship, but the
shore authorities can often respond more effectively to a spill in its early stages.

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CHAPTER 4 Measures to be taken in the Event of Casualty

4.

4.1 The Captain's priority actions

4.1.1 In the event of a casualty, give top priority to ensure safety of personnel and the ship, and
at the same time take action to prevent escalation of incident. Mitigating activities that can
be considered are transfer of liquid from damaged compartments, containment of on-board
deck spills, and preparation for dispersal of spills overboard.

(1) Check if there are any casualties.

(2) Make a judgement on whether a request for rescue should be made.

(3) Decide if entire crews are to abandon ship.

4.1.2 Immediately notify parties concerned and interested, according to established procedure

4.1.3 Prior to considering remedial action, the master will need to obtain detailed information on
the damage sustained by his ship. A visual inspection should be carried out and all cargo
tanks, bunker tanks, and other compartments should be sounded. Due regard should be
paid to the indiscriminate opening of ullage plugs or sighting ports, especially when the ship
is aground, as loss of buoyancy could result.

4.1.4 When it is possible to manoeuvre, the master in conjunction with the appropriate shore
authorities, shall consider moving his ship to a more suitable location in order, for example,
to facilitate emergency repair work or lightening operations, or to reduce the threat posed to
any particularly sensitive shoreline areas. Such maneuvering may be subject to coastal State
jurisdiction.

4.1.5 Having assessed the damage sustained by the ship, the master will be in a position to
decide what action should be taken to prevent or minimize further discharge. When bottom
damage is sustained, hydrostatic balance will be achieved (depending on physical properties)
fairly rapidly, especially if the damage is severe, in which case the time available for
preventive action will often be limited. When significant side damage is sustained in the way
of fuel/lubrication and/or cargo tanks, bunkers or cargo will be released fairly rapidly until
hydrostatic balance is achieved and the rate of release will then reduce and be governed
by the rate at which bunkers or cargo is displaced by water flowing in under the bunkers or
cargo. When the damage is fairly limited and restricted, for example, to one or two
compartments, consideration may be given to transferring the substance involved internally
from damaged to intact tanks. When considering the transfer of oil or noxious liquid
substances from a damaged tank to an intact tank, the master should consider

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CHAPTER 4 Measures to be taken in the Event of Casualty

(1) the extent of the damage;

(2) hydrostatic balance;

(3) the ship's ability to transfer cargo; and

4.1.6 In oil discharge involving incidents, take the following measures in order to prevent the
occurrence of fire and explosion.

(1) Alter course so that ship is up-wind of slick.

(2) Shut down non-essential air intakes.

(3) Prevent flammable and toxic vapours entering accommodation and engine room spaces.

(4) Eliminate all possible sources of ignition.

(5) Regularly test for gas in accommodation and engine room spaces.

(6) Prepare fire fighting equipment and fire extinguisher.

(7) Establish total control over smoking and other naked flame sources

(8) If loaded reactivity cargoes, temperature monitoring of loaded cargo tanks or damaged cargo
tanks(if necessary)

4.1.7 When taking measures in places where gas can stagnate, pay full attention to the effect of
toxic gases on the human body.

4.1.8 Detailed action for the damage stability and stress and ship to ship transfer shall be
referred to Chapter 5.2 and 5.3.

4.1.9 Duties and position of the crew members in the event of a casuality shall be referred to
each response as specified in the Appendix 3.

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CHAPTER 4 Measures to be taken in the Event of Casualty

4.2 Response to oil spill

The captain shall ensure the followings for the actions to be taken.

4.2.1 The captain is to command the crew to go to oil spillage prevention stations.

4.2.2 In order to prevent additional outflow, take the following measures;

(1) Secure oil spill area.

(2) Reduce internal pressure in oil spill tank.

(3) Close or cut off related piping.

4.2.3 Create optimum condition for prevention of additional outflow of oil, by adjusting ballast or
by using other methods.

4.2.4 Transfer oil internally from damaged tanks to intact tanks to prevent additional outflow of oil

4.2.5 A contract with salvage and oil pollution clean up company should be entered promptly,
while maintaining contact with the representative of the shipowner.

4.2.6 When necessary, transfer oil from the damaged tank to another ship to prevent additional
outflow of oil.

4.3 Response to fire/explosion

The captain shall ensure the following for the actions to be taken.

4.3.1 The captain is to order the crew to go to their fire-fighting stations.

4.3.2 Conduct effective and appropriate initial fire-fighting operations, check condition of lifeboats
and prepare to abandon ship for the preservation of life. Take care not to give the order to
abandon ship either prematurely or too late.

4.3.3 Promptly shift paint cans, oily waste, fixtures including ropes and other inflammables and
explosives in the vicinity of the fire.

4.3.4 When the fire is becoming more intense due to the wind, anchor ship or manoeuvre ship to
leeward.

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CHAPTER 4 Measures to be taken in the Event of Casualty

4.3.5 Close openings including doors, scuttles, skylights and ventilation ducts and stop mechanical
ventilation. And cool around them when necessary.

4.3.6 Position ship so that the fire and smoke do not hamper fire-fighting activities.

4.3.7 Cut off electric power supply leading to fire site.

4.3.8 When fire-fighting activities of the ship are judged to be inadequate, request assistance
from ships sailing in the vicinity before it is too late.

4.3.9 Inert gas

(1) Cargo tanks which are maintained in an inert condition reduce the risks fire and/or explosion
resulting from, for example, collision or stranding. Therefore the captain of any ship fitted
with an inert gas installation must endeavor to keep inert condition of the tank spaces at all
times with use this plant(if the ship is fitted with this system).

(2) Where casualties occur to ships which are not fitted with inert gas systems or when the
inert gas system is inoperative and where a risk of fire and explosion exists, considerations
should be given to the possibility of supplying inert gas from an external source.

4.3.10 Flammable vapour

(1) If there is an escape or jettison of flammable cargo or fuel oil, care should be taken to
prevent flammable vapour from the cargo or fuel oil reaching sources of ignition on board
the ship or on other ships. If this is impossible, measures should be taken to eliminate any
sources of ignition as far as practicable.

4.4 Response to collision

The captain shall ensure the following for the actions to be taken.

4.4.1 The captain is to order the crew to go to designated stations.

4.4.2 When there is no immediate danger to own ship and crew, rescue crew of the other ship.

4.4.3 Investigate the damaged area of the ship and ingress of water, and take emergency
measures to prevent the damage becoming worse.

4.4.4 When an ingress of water is found as a result of damage investigation, take necessary
measures to prevent water coming in or pump out the water already taken, according to the
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CHAPTER 4 Measures to be taken in the Event of Casualty

position and amount of water taken in. Such measures include the closing of water-tight
doors, inserting wooden plugs, the use of collision mats, cement box, strengthening of
bulkhead and use of water discharge pumps.

4.4.5 When water penetration is severe even after countermeasures are taken, and there is a
danger of the ship sinking, consider intended grounding on an appropriate shore.

4.5 Response to grounding/stranded

4.5.1 If the ship runs aground, the following steps should be taken immediately :

(1) Sound the emergency alarm, and initiate emergency response procedures.

(2) Eliminate all avoidable sources of ignition and ban all smoking on board.

(3) Consider whether shut off of air intake of accommodation and engine room

(4) Reduce the inert gas pressure to zero.

4.5.2 Further action :

(1) Carry out a visual inspection of the ship to determine the severity of the situation.

(2) Take soundings around the ship to determine the nature and gradient of the seabed.

(3) Check difference in the tidal ranges at the grounding site.

(4) Evaluate tidal current in the grounding area.

(5) Take soundings of all cargo, ballast and bunker tanks and check all other compartments
adjacent to the hull. Ullage plugs should not be opened indiscriminately as loss of buoyancy
could result.

(6) Compare present tank soundings against departure soundings

(7) Evaluate the probability of additional release of oil

4.5.3 Having assessed the damage that the vessel has sustained, and taking into account the
effects of hull stress and stability, the master should decide whether or not any action can
be taken to avoid further spillage, such as :

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CHAPTER 4 Measures to be taken in the Event of Casualty

(1) Transfer of cargo and bunkers internally. If the damage is limited, for example to one or
two tanks, consideration should be given to transfer of liquid from damaged to intact tanks.

(2) Isolate all cargo and bunker tanks to reduce further loss due to hydrostatic pressure during
tidal changes.

(3) Review existing and forecast whether conditions, and whether the ship will be adversely
affected by them.

(4) Evaluate the possibility of transferring cargo to barges or other ships, and request such
assistance accordingly.

(5) Trimming or lightening the vessel sufficiently to avoid damage to intact tanks, thereby
avoiding additional pollution from spillage of oil or noxious liquid substance.

4.5.4 If the risk of additional damage to the ship by attempting to refloat it by its own means is
assessed to be greater than by remaining aground until assistance has been obtained, the
master should try to prevent the ship from moving from its present position by :

(1) Using anchors

(2) Taking in ballast in empty tanks(if possible)

(3) Reducing longitudinal stress on the hull by transferring cargo internally. Attention should be
given to hull stress and damage stability information, referring to the classification society if
necessary. Care must be taken over the compatibility of noxious liquid substances with tank
type, material of construction and tank coating.

4.5.5 The captain should obtain information about the situation, including the following :

(1) Tides and currents.

(2) Weather, including wind, state of sea and swell.

(3) Any weather forecast changes.

(4) Nature of the bottom.

(5) Depth of water around the ship, the calculated buoyancy needed to refloat and draught and
trim after refloating.

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CHAPTER 4 Measures to be taken in the Event of Casualty

(6) Condition of the ship, including stresses on the hull.

4.5.6 Strict safety precautions should be taken before entering any empty space, in order to avoid
any risks from toxic fumes or oxygen deficiency.

4.5.7 Soundings should be taken around the ship to determine the extent of the
grounding/stranded as accurately as possible. If the sea is too rough for accurate sounding,
it may be possible to measure the distance from the seabed to the main deck. By marking
this on a longitudinal section from the general arrangement drawings, the extent of
grounding/stranded can be determined.

4.5.8 If the ship is structurally intact, an immediate attempt may be made to refloat her, with or
without assistance. In deciding whether or not to make an immediate attempt to refloat, the
captain should consider the use of the ship's engines, tugs and ground tackle, as well as
having regard to the possible damage that might be caused to the ship.

4.5.9 Immediate refloating may be the best course to adopt even if a ship has sustained bottom
damage. However, if there are signs of excessive hogging, sagging or of undulations in the
sides of the hull, more careful consideration is required before attempting to refloat the ship.
In these circumstances lightening of the ship may reduce the risk of further damage and of
pollution.

4.5.10 When judged to be impossible to refloat without aid, promptly arrange salvage interests.

4.5.11 When water ingress into the ship due to grounding/stranded, take preventive measures, i.e.
close water-tight doors in order to minimize ingress of water.

4.5.12 If there is minor damage to a full cargo tank or fuel oil tanks, internal transfer of cargo or
fuel oil may reduce or eliminate any outflow of cargo or fuel oil and pollution that may be
caused. However, a substantial transfer of cargo or fuel oil when the ship is aground may
produce unacceptable stresses on the hull.

4.6 Response to hull /containment system failure

The captain shall ensure the following for the actions to be taken.

4.6.1 The captain is to order the crew to go to designated stations.

4.6.2 In the event of leakage from area above sea level, promptly transfer cargo oil and/or fuel
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CHAPTER 4 Measures to be taken in the Event of Casualty

oil in problem tank, and reduce level in tank to below sea level.

4.6.3 Should it not be possible to transfer oil internally, consider transfer to another ship or an
on-shore tank.

4.6.4 Should it be suspected that leakage is occurred from area below sea level, immediately
close openings of upper deck including vent valve of damaged tank to make the pressure
of tank to vacuum.

4.6.5 Should it not be possible to identify specific tank from which leakage is occurring, reduce
levels of all tanks in the vicinity, taking account of the effect on hull stress and stability.

4.7 Response to excessive list

4.7.1 If excessive list occurs rapidly and unexpectedly, it may be due to ;

(1) Failure of the hull plating

(2) Failure between an internal bulkhead and compartments

(3) Shift of cargo

(4) Flooding of the engine room, where free surface can cause a list

(5) Damage through grounding or collision

(6) Incorrect operational procedures

4.7.2 The captain shall ensure the following for the actions to be taken immediately.

(1) The captain is to sound the emergency alarm and order the crew to go to designated
stations.

(2) Stop any cargo, bunkering or ballast operation in progress

(3) If under way, reduce speed or stop

(4) Investigate reason for the list

4.7.3 Further measures

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CHAPTER 4 Measures to be taken in the Event of Casualty

(1) Sounding all tanks and compare with departure condition

(2) Investigate the damaged area of the ship and ingress of water, and take emergency
measures according to degree of the list to prevent the damage becoming worse.

(3) When ingress of water is found as a result of damage investigation, take necessary
measures to prevent water coming in or discharged to overboard, according to the position
and amount of water taken in.

4.8 Response to submerged / foundered / wrecked

The captain shall ensure the following for the actions to be taken immediately.

4.8.1 If the ship is wrecked to the extent that it or parts it are submerged take all measure to
evacuate all persons on board.

4.8.2 Avoid contact with any spilled oil.

4.8.3 Alert other ships and/or the nearest coastal state for assistance in rescuing lives.

4.8.4 Reduce speed.

4.8.5 All openings in hull and superstructures to be checked for watertight integrity. Ensure all
water doors, sewage and other relevant damage control valves are closed.

4.8.6 Head into sea/swell to reduce rolling and use the minimum amount of rudder necessary to
maintain course.

4.8.7 Fill bottom tanks with ballast - low side first.

4.8.8 Should the situation appear to be deteriorating then urgency or distress messages should
be dispatched as appropriate.

4.9 Response to hazard vapour release

The captain shall ensure the following for the actions to be taken immediately.

4.9.1 In case of any vapour release out of the containment system, the properties of the vapor
should be identified by a gas analyzer and precautions have to taken protect the persons
onboard against contamination.

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CHAPTER 4 Measures to be taken in the Event of Casualty

4.9.2 Cargo and bunkering operations to be shut down, if such operations are taking place in the
mean time.

4.9.3 The ship should be brought with the accommodation up-wind to the spill area as far as
possible.

4.9.4 The crew should be evacuated form any area of risk.

4.9.5 If the situation takes place in or near a port, Port/Harbor Authorities to be notified and if
needed assistance should be required.

4.9.6 All possible sources of ignition should be eliminated and non-essential air intakes shut down
to prevent intake of vapour into accommodation and engine spaces.

4.9.7 If unavoidable work has to be carried out within risk areas, the involved persons have to
wear protective clothing and breathing apparatus.

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CHAPTER 5 Furthur Response

5.

5.1 Mitigating Activities

5.1.1 When the safety of the vessel and the personnel onboard have been successfully
addressed, the following aspects are to be further considered :

(1) Assessment and monitoring requirements

(2) Personnel protection issues, such as the use of protective clothing, decontamination of
personnel exposed to hazardous material, other threats to health and safety.

5.1.2 Persons engaged in cleaning or mitigating activities may become contaminated in number of
ways such as :

(1) Contacting vapours, gases, mist or particulate in the air.

(2) Being splashed by materials while open pressurized cargo tank.

(3) Walking through paddles of liquids or on contaminated soil.

(4) Using contaminated instrument and equipment.

5.1.3 When decontamination of personnel is needed, certain procedures depending on the type of
containments as well as the extend of contamination should be followed.

5.1.4 When an spill takes place on deck, it should be isolated in such way to prevent pollution
(i.e. deck scuppers should be plugged). Then the oil should be removed by using dedicated
materials and other like :

(1) Oleophilic / hydrophobic skimmers.

(2) Solvent

5.1.5 Materials used for isolation, removal or clean up operation of the spill is to be collected and
isolated in a way that prevents further treat for pollution such as fire, explosion, release of
toxic or flammable vapours etc.

5.1.6 Such material should be stored in a safe and pollution free condition until disposal to shore
facilities (i.e. garbage bares) are possible.

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CHAPTER 5 Furthur Response

5.2 Damage stability and stress considerations

5.2.1 Ships are designed to withstand the stresses to which they may be subjected when afloat
and loaded in accordance with prescribed load distribution patterns, which assume the ship
is in a seaway. The stresses may change once a ship is aground, and internal transfer of
discharge of cargo, possibly coupled with loss of cargo from other spaces, may increase
these beyond acceptable limits.

5.2.2 A damaged ship will usually behave differently from an intact ship and the ship's personnel
will have means readily available on board to determine whether any action taken will
produce unacceptable stresses or loss of stability when she comes afloat. The following
information should be sent to the owner or operator as soon as it is available in order to
make use of this facility:

(1) Loading Condition


Ÿ Cargo/ballast-amount and disposition
Ÿ Cargo oil and/or fuel-amount and disposition
Ÿ Draught-when free floating

(2) Location and extent of damage

(3) Condition of the ship


Ÿ Extent to which aground (soundings around the vessel)
Ÿ Draught-forward, amidships(port and starboard), aft
Ÿ Cargo and fuel-loss or change in amount or disposition
Ÿ Action already taken-pressurization of tanks, internal transfer of cargo, jettison of cargo,
bunkers or ballast, etc.

(4) Local Conditions


Ÿ Tide-range and whether rising or falling
Ÿ Wind-Force and direction
Ÿ Sea and swell-height and direction
Ÿ Current
Ÿ Weather forecast
Ÿ Nature of bottom
Ÿ Other locally significant features

(5) When a.m. actions for response in accordance with above 5.2.1 to 5.2.2 (1)~(4) are implemented,
The master shall have prompt access to computerized shore-based damage stability and residual
structural strength calculation programs. With regard to this service, following items was attached in
the appendix of this SOPEP. But, if the following attachment is amended, the master should replace
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CHAPTER 5 Furthur Response

the relevant attachment and then record the revision status on the History Card.

• A contract with a shore-based service provider(or certificate) ; and


• A statement from the shore-based service provider indicating that were suitable as per the
above-mentioned regulation ; and
• A paper which contains that the master has means to access the shore-based firm at any time
and contact points.

5.2.3 The list of information is not all-embracing and covers only the minimum required. Any
additional information that might be of use should also be included. Any changes in the
information sent should be reported.

5.2.4 With the information listed in paragraph 5.2.2, it should be possible to calculate the stability
of the ship when afloat and the stress conditions. This will enable the owner to pass to the
ship and the savors advice on what can and cannot safely be done in the efforts to save
the ship.

5.2.5 The importance of relaying all the required information as soon as possible cannot be over-
emphasized. A great deal of valuable time can be lost if delays occur in sending to the
owner or operator details of the damage suffered and prevailing conditions.

5.2.6 Additionally, in the case of ships certified to carry NLSs, consideration as to the
compatibility of all substances involved such as cargoes, bunkers, tanks, coatings, piping,
etc., must also be considered before such an operation is undertaken.

5.3 Emergency ship to ship transfers of cargo oil and/or fuel oil

5.3.1 General

(1) The actual cargo oil and/or fuel oil transfer operations should be carried out in accordance
with the requirements of the receiving ship.

(2) Each captain should take into consideration the estimated duration and the particular
requirements of the operations to ensure that adequate manning can be maintained
throughout.

(3) Communicate with other party details of the weather conditions, sea conditions, and
conditions with regard to bringing ships alongside.

(4) Ensure that the vessels involved are compatible in certain critical features of design and
equipment and thus that communications, mooring and hose handling operations can be
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CHAPTER 5 Furthur Response

conducted safely and efficiently.

(5) To avoid any misunderstanding, a common language to be used in communication should


be agreed before the operation commence.

(6) The captain shall coordinate the activity with coastal state, as such operation may be
subject to its jurisdiction.

5.3.2 Preparation for cargo oil and/or fuel oil transfer

(1) Establish contact with the lightening ship and make a detailed plan of the proposed
operation including the designation of a communications channel. Fixed or portable
hand-held radio telephones may be usefully employed.

(2) Lay out mooring lines, heaving lines, messengers, stoppers, fenders, etc. If no large
fenders are available, mooring ropes and any other soft material should be strung over the
ship's side in strategic positions.

(3) Prepare the cargo oil and/or fuel oil manifold and have reducers readily available to
facilitate the connection of a wide range of hoses(from 200mm to 400mm) on both sides of
the ship. In most cases the lightening ship will prefer to berth with her port side to the
disabled ship's starboard side, if this is practicable.

(4) Top-up derricks or cranes to assist in hose connection. Also have messenger rope lifting
tackles etc. available.

(5) Have the anchors cleared ready for use, if in waters where use may be possible.

(6) Brief the officers and crew on the operation, with particular reference to the safety aspects
and complete the appropriate safety check list, if possible.

5.3.3 Ballast handling

(1) Any ballast which is discharged overboard should be clean. All other ballast should be
retained on board or in certain circumstances may be transferred to the discharging ship.

(2) During transfer, ballast operations should be carried out in order to avoid excessive changes
in freeboard and trim by the stern. Listing of each vessel should be avoided except as
required for proper cargo oil tank draining.

5.3.4 Ship to ship cargo oil and/or fuel oil transfer

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CHAPTER 5 Furthur Response

(1) If disabled ship has power and its cargo piping system is intact, transfer should be made in
the usual way.

(2) If the ship's pipelines are not intact, approved portable submersible pumps with power packs
should be obtained. The power for submersible pumps may be electric, air or hydraulic.
When using submersible pumps, the tank being emptied of cargo oil and/or fuel oil may be
counter-flooded with water in order to reduce the head.

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CHAPTER 6 National and Local Co-ordination

6.

6.1 National and Local Co-ordination

Quick, efficient co-ordination between the ship and coastal state or other involved parties
becomes vital in mitigating the effects of a pollution incident.
In most countries it is accepted that an oil spill can be tackled most effectively from the shore
and there is normally no requirement on the part of the shipowner or the ship's crew to
organize the clean up response in respect of oil lost overboard. Operational spills usually occur
in port at an oil or cargo facility and tend to be cleaned up by the facility operator. In the case
of casualties, the responsibility for organizing and controlling the clean up response if usually
assumed by an agency of government. In both cases the spiller would be expected to
co-operate fully and pay the reasonable costs of clean up and any damages caused, up to a
specified limit of liability based on the tonnage of the ship.
In the event of a spillage the master is to contact the National or Local Authority to co-ordinate
the spill response activities. It is the responsibility of the master to make the initial contact with
these authorities. Subsequent communication with these authorities will normally be carried out
by the office.

A list of coastal state contacts is given in Appendix 4 of this plan and is up to date up to the
production of this plan. In addition to contacting the authorities listed in Appendix 4, the master
is also required to inform the offices as listed in Appendix 5. These offices are in general, the
offices of company appointed agencies and will offer the best local help and knowledge.

In all cases where there has been pollution, it is most important that the vessel takes actions to
minimize the damage immediately. You are not to wait until the arrival of the shore based spill
contractors. The only exception to this rule concerns the use of dispersants the use of which is
banned by many states and permission must be obtained from the responsible authority prior to
use.

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CHAPTER 7 Additional Information(Non-mandatory)

7.

7.1 Training and review of plan

7.1.1 General

The training shall be held in accordance with the following table. The captain shall ensure that
the plan functions as expected and that the contacts and communications specified are accurate.
Anything changed in the plan shall be reported to the person in charge of reviewing plan. Such
exercises may be held in conjunction with other shipboard exercises and appropriately logged in
the deck log book.

7.1.2 Example of Training schedule

Kind of
Trainee Trainer Interval Contents
Training
Chief
Training - MARPOL 73/78
Engineer or Once
for All - Korean Oil Pollution Prevention Law
Ship Spill a
Pollution crew - Precautions for bunkering
Response month
Prevention - Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plan
Officer
Chief
Duties - Use of clean-up equipment
Engineer or Once
and All - Response to oil spill and minimize of
Ship Spill a
Response crew pollution
Response month
Oil Spill - Position and duty of each person
Officer
Drill for
- Drill for the response to oil spill in
Emergency Once
All accommodations with the Shipboard Oil
Response Captain a
crew Pollution Emergency Plan
to Oil month
- Check the contact point
Spill
Chief
Equipment
Engineer or Once - Kind & quantity of provided equipment
for
- Ship Spill a - Check the keeping status
Pollution
Response month - Refer to Appendix 8
Prevention
Officer

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CHAPTER 7 Additional Information(Non-mandatory)

7.2 Record keeping and sampling

The following record and sampling shall be kept to give the background of the compensation
which will arise later.

7.2.1 Record keeping

(1) All communication records with owner, outside organization and third parties, etc.

(2) The observation on the movement of the spilled oil (including wind, sea and current)

(3) Polluted area

(4) Pictures for the each situation, as far as possible

(5) Remedial actions taken by the authority(number of people, kind and number of equipment
employed, used material, etc)

7.2.2 Fuel oil, cargo oil sampling

(1) Sampling of all types of fuel oil, cargo oil

(2) Sampling of spilled fuel oil, cargo oil

(3) Pictures of fuel oil, cargo oil spilled on deck/hull and around the ship

(4) Pictures of the scene of spilling fuel oil, cargo oil by other ship/installation

(5) Arrange P & I surveyor for sampling of fuel oil, cargo oil spilled on beach

(6) Joint sampling or present witness for sampling and sealing

7.3 Public affairs

The captain of the ship shall prepare informations for releasing to news media.

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Page: 33
APPENDIX 1 Ship's Particulars

Ship Name :

Class No. :

IMO No. :

Nationality :

Port :

Official No. :

Owner :

Operator :

Address :

Type of Ship :

Gross Tonnage :

Building Date :

Shipyard :

L×B×D :

__________________________________________________________________________________
APPENDIX 2 Notification system chart

- Public affairs
Lead Agency(LA) Assisting Press releases
with overall control services and - Financial and
(Operational Control Authority) advisors contractual support
- Legal support for
compensation
Presentation
- Scientific support
damage assessment
long-term effects

Advisory Services*
- Chemical industry
- Port operators of
On-Scene Commander(OSC) HNS facilities
with tactical control at scene - Salvage operators
- Chemical tank ship
owner
- Experts from
insurance companies

Response team Response team Aerial surveillance

FOL** FOL**

Access control unit


Salvage unit
Access control unit

Recovery unit
Monitoring and sampling units

Recovery unit Decontamination

* Advisory Services : The Advisory Services often have to co-operate very closely with the OSC .
** FOL : Field Operational Leader, if needed in a lager operation.

__________________________________________________________________________________
APPENDIX 3 Duties and position of crew for response
to casualty

3.1 The master of the ship should appoint a pollution prevention team on board. The primary
function should be to initiate immediate recovery or clean-up procedures if an incident occurs
during cargo operations or bunker transfer. The company's spill response plan should be
brought to the attention of everyone in the team, so that they understand their own part in the
broader picture.

3.2 Suggested composition is: the master, chief officer and chief engineer together with deck and
engineer officers and ratings on duty. This will provide an initial response capability which can
be reinforced as necessary if the incident develops beyond the teams capacity.

3.3 The team should be given the necessary training in the use of spill containment equipment or
absorbents carried on the ship. All members of the Pollution Prevention Team should be
aware of their duties should a spill occur.

Suggested instructions to a Pollution Prevention Team


In overall charge
Inform terminal authorities of incident.
Inform local agent and request agent to inform the local P&I Club
representative.
Master
Advise to head office.
Keep everyone updated at regular intervals.
Advise of any changes in status of the emergency.
Request assistance as deemed necessary.
In charge of operation in deck.
Keep master informed and updated on the situation.
Chief officer
Ensure event log is maintained.
Report results of steps taken to limit liquid outflow.
In charge of bunker operations.
If bunkering in progress, stop operation.
Chief engineer
Organize distribution of oil spill detergent or appropriate treatment.
Organize starting of foam pump if required.
Tank spillage: Open an empty or slack tank.
Deck officer Stop pumping of that cargo; consider stopping cargo operations.
on duty Alert and inform chief officer and master of the situation.
Alert shore staff.
Engineer officer Prepare for fire fighting.
on duty Assist chief engineer.

Rating on duty If a leakage is detected, alert duty officer immediately.

__________________________________________________________________________________
APPENDIX 4 List of contacts of coastal state

The latest list of contact points, published by IMO on behalf of all governments that are
signatories to MARPOL, can be obtained from the IMO Internet site: "http://www.imo.org".

__________________________________________________________________________________
APPENDIX 5 List of contacts of other persons

A5.1 Head office

A5.2 Agents

A5.3 P & I Club

__________________________________________________________________________________
APPENDIX 5 List of contacts of other persons

A5.4 Others

1. Regularly Visited Ports

Nation Port Tel. Fax. Etc.

__________________________________________________________________________________
APPENDIX 6 Safety Assessment and Precaution

When a casualty causes any loss of the operational capability of a ship, however slight, the
captain must evaluate the situation that could arise if no corrective action were to be taken. He
must assess how long the present situation can be permitted to continue, taking into account
the possible changes in the weather or circumstances such as drift towards the shore.

A6.1 Plan of action

The captain should take whatever action is possible to remedy the situation, initially
making the best use of the ship's own resources until outside assistance can be obtained.

A6.2 A plan of action should be developed taking account of the following factors;

.1 The nature, circumstances and urgency of the situation

.2 The various ship systems(main propulsion, steering, electrical, cargo, etc.) that remain
operative and how they can be applied to relieve the situation.

.3 The ability of ship's personnel to minimize or nullify the effects of the casualty and to restore
the ship's capability.

.4 The use of alternative means to overcome the operational deficiency.

.5 The natural effect of wind, sea, current, etc. and ways to take advantage of them.

.6 The use of outside assistance and the measures to be taken on board the ship to
accommodate such assistance.

.7 The risk of pollution.

.8 If the ship is in imminent peril and if all else fails, the extreme measures to be taken to
avoid loss of life, to minimize damage to property and to mitigate the effects of pollution.

__________________________________________________________________________________
APPENDIX 7 Prediction of Slick Movement

A7.1 Prediction of slick Movement

It is important to be able to forecast the movement of slick of oil after it has been spilled. This
allows sensitive resources in the path of the slick to be identified and, if appropriate,
response measures to be put into effect. The task of forecasting the position of the oil can only
be accomplished if data on winds and currents are available since both contribute to the
movement of floating oil.
It has been found empirically that floating oil will move downwind at about 3 % of the wind
speed. In the presence of surface water currents, an additional movement of the oil equivalent
to the current strength will be superimposed on any wind-driven motion. Close to land, the
strength and direction of any tidal currents must be taken into account but further out to sea
their contribution is usually less significant because they are cyclic and so tend to cancel out
over time. Thus, with a knowledge of the prevailing winds and currents, it is possible to predict
the rate and direction of movement of floating oil from a known position, as shown in the
following figure.

A7.2 Assesment of the quantity of floating oil

An accurate assesment of the quantity of floating oil is virtually impossible due to the difficulty
of gauging its thickness. At best the correct order of magnitude can be estimated by considering
certain factors. Oil spreads rapidly and most liquid oils will soon reach an average thickness of
about 0.1mm, characterized by a black or dark brown appearance. Similary, the color of sheen
roughly indicates its thickness as following table.

__________________________________________________________________________________
APPENDIX 7 Prediction of Slick Movement

Approximate Approximate
Oil Type Apperence 3 2
Thickness (mm) Volume (m /km )

Oil sheen silvery


0.0001 0.1

Oil sheen irridescent


0.0003 0.3

Crude and Fuel Oil black/dark brown


0.1 100

Water-in oil brown/orange


>1 >1000
emulsions

__________________________________________________________________________________
APPENDIX 8 Handling of Shipboard Oil Response Equipment

Each personnel are responsible for its deployment, oversight, and maintenance, when such
equipment is carried.
Training in the use of it is to be carried out for crews, in order to ensure safe and effective use
of such equipment.
No chemical agent should be used for response to pollution on the sea without authorization of
the appropriate coastal state.

Clean-up
Equipment Quantity Location How to Use
(Type)

Oil fence M
(A type)

Sawdust Pack

Sand Pack

Waste cloth Pack

Absorbent mat Box

Despersant Can
(GAMMASOL)

Portable pump Ea
(pneumatic)

Trash bucket Ea

__________________________________________________________________________________
APPENDIX 9 Check List for Response to Casualty

A9.1 Sample Checklist for response in case of fire/explosion

This checklist may be intended for response guidance and responsibility for action to deal with
other emergencies which result from the liquid spill will be as laid down in existing plans, such
as the Emergency Muster List.

RESPONSE TO FIRE/EXPLOSION
STEP TO CONTROL DISCHARGE IN THE OF THE CASUALITIES
Ship's Name :
Operator :
Charterer :

CHECK ITEMS Confirm REMARK


The captain is to order the crew to go to their fire fighting station. ⃞

Promptly shift paint cans, oily waste and other inflammables and ⃞
explosives in the vicinity of the fire

Conduct effective and appropriate initial fire fighting operations ⃞

When the fire is becoming more intense due to the wind, anchor ship ⃞
or maneuver to leeward

Close openings including door, skylights and vent duct and stop ⃞
mechanical vent fans

Position ship, so that the fire and smoke dose not hamper fire fighting ⃞
activities

Electric power supply leading to fire site is to be cut off ⃞

When fire fighting activities of the ship are judged to be inadequate ⃞


request assistance from ships sailing in the vicinity before it is to late

Check condition of lifeboats and prepare to abandon ship for the ⃞


preservation of life

If there is an escape or jettision of flammable cargo, care should be ⃞


taken to prevent flammable vapour from the cargo reaching sources of
ignition on board or on other ships

Position : Date :

Master's Signature :

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APPENDIX 9 Check List for Response to Casualty

A9.2 Sample Checklist for response in case of collision

RESPONSE TO COLLISION
STEP TO CONTROL DISCHARGE IN THE EVENT OF THE CASUALITIES

Ship's Name :
Operator :
Charterer :
CHECK ITEMS Confirm REMARK

The captain is to order the crew to " Go to XXX stations" ⃞

When there is no immediate danger to own ship and crew, rescue ⃞


crew of the ship

Investigate the damaged area of the ship and ingress of water, and ⃞
take emergency measures according to degree to prevent the damage
becoming worse

When an ingress of water is found as a result of damage investigation ⃞


take necessary to prevent water coming in or pump out the water
already taken, according to the position and amount of water taken in

Close watertight doors and inert wooden plugs, use collision mats, ⃞
cement boxes to decrease of water due to damage

When water penetration is severe even after counter measures are ⃞


taken, and there is a danger of the ship sinking, consider grounding on
an appropriate shore and own steam

Position : Date :

Master's Signature :

__________________________________________________________________________________
APPENDIX 9 Check List for Response to Casualty

A9.3 Sample Checklist for response in case of grounding

RESPONSE TO GROUNDING
STEP TO CONTROL DISCHARGE IN THE EVENT OF THE CASUALITIES
Ship's Name :
Operator :
Charterer :
CHECK ITEMS Confirm REMARK
The captain is to order the crew to " Go to XXX stations " ⃞

The master should first obtain information about the situation, including ⃞
tides, currents, weather, depth of water and etc.

A visual inspection should be carried out, together with sounding of ⃞


cargo hold and other compartments, examination of empty spaces, etc.

Strict safety precautions should be taken before entering any empty ⃞


space, in order to avoid any risks from toxic fumes or oxygen
deficiency

Check the condition of grounding, ship's bottom and damaged area to ⃞


ascertain possibility of refloating

In deciding to make an immediate to reflost, the master should the use ⃞


of the ship's engines.

If there are signs of excessive hogging, sagging or of undulations in ⃞


the sides of the hull, more careful consideration is require before
attempting to refloated the ship.

When judged to be impossible to refloat without aid, promptly arrange ⃞


salvage interests.

When the ship is taking water due to grounding, take preventive ⃞


measures, i.e. close watertight doors in order to minimize ingress of
water

Internal cargo transfer to the empty or slack tanks in case of minor ⃞


damage

Ship to ship transfer procedures establish, when judged to be ⃞


impossible to internal transfer

Position : Date :

Master's Signature :

__________________________________________________________________________________
APPENDIX 9 Check List for Response to Casualty

A9.4 Sample Checklist for response in case of hull failure

RESPONSE TO HULL FAILURE


STEP TO CONTROL DISCHARGE IN THE EVENT OF THE CASUALTIES

Ship's Name :
Operator :
Charterer :
CHECK ITEMS Confirm REMARK

The captain is to order the crew " Go to XXX stations " ⃞

In the event of leakage from area above sea level, promptly transfer ⃞
cargo oil or fuel oil in tank in question and reduce level in tank to well
below sea level

Should it not be possible to transfer oil internally, consider transfer to ⃞


another ship or an on-shore tanks.

should it be suspected that leakage is from area below sea level ⃞


immediately close opening to upper deck including vent valve of
damaged tank to make pressure inside tank vacuum.

Should it not be possible to identify specific tank from which leakage is ⃞


occurring, reduce levels of all tanks in the vicinity, taking ito account
the effect on hull stress and stability.

Position : Date :

Master's Signature :

__________________________________________________________________________________
APPENDIX 10 Relevant Drawings

A10.1 General Arrangement

A10.2 Midship Section

A10.3 Capacity plan (capacity and arrangement of cargo tanks and/or fuel tanks)

A10.4 Cargo oil and/or fuel oil piping diagram

A10.5 Ballast piping diagram

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