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Summary of Impact

Southern Innovator 2012 to 2014

People are the real wealth of a nation.”
UNDP Human Development Report 1990

Southern Innovator (SI) is the world’s first magazine to connect innovation and human development. Southern Innovator does not
just tell stories, it shows how innovations work and connects readers with the contacts and resources they need to replicate or
modify the innovations for their local conditions.
SI gathers the data, trends and stories relevant to the global South’s innovators and distributes it in myriad ways intended to reach
as wide an audience as possible, including using social media, mobile and online media.
Since the first issue in 2011, SI has been able to use the global South’s rising number of mobile and Internet readers to help spread
ideas. It has – along with its sister publication, e-newsletter Development Challenges, South-South Solutions – focused on, and
drawn attention to, a rising 21st-century global innovator culture.
In five issues with five themes published from 2011 to 2014, Southern Innovator has encouraged the wider United Nations and others
to embrace innovation to solve development challenges – and the impact is visible around the world, from books to media stories
to a strategic repositioning of the UN’s development agency, UNDP. SI’s relationship with the United Nations Office for South-South
Cooperation (UNOSSC), which acts as the high-level adviser to the UN’s Secretary-General on South-South cooperation, has helped
raise the profile of the innovators and their ideas featured in the magazine.
But what matters most is SI readers: as one reader on Pinterest.com said: “Beautiful, inspiring magazine from UNDP on South-South
innovation. Heart is pumping adrenaline and admiration just reading it”.

Designing Change for Human Development
United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme
URBANIZATION

Making Urban Environments Liveable
CITIES

Great Housing Solutions and Building Technologies
KEY DATA
Facts and Figures
STATE OF PLAY
Solutions for Planned and Unplanned Cities
Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 04

www.southerninnovator.org

2013

IN THIS ISSUE:

Smart Cities Up Close

Urbanization
Trends

Innovative
Home Designs
Wu
ha

Do
ha

LAGOS

Cities &

k
gko
Ban

Xian

Urbanization Issue

is
Add ba
Aba

n

Shanghai

Beijing

ACCRA

Tianjin

Sao
o
Paul

Source: McKinsey

Bue
Air nos
es

Global Institute

The Global South's Increasing Urbanization: Challenges to City Living

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme
WASTE

Turning Waste into Wealth in the 21st Century
RECYCLING

Building Green Businesses That Work: From Fashion to Fuel to Farms
KEY DATA

Facts and Figures
STATE OF PLAY

Mobiles Transforming Green Solutions: A How-to Guide Pages 26-27
Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 05

www.southerninnovator.org

2014

IN THIS ISSUE:

Designing for a New Africa

98%

Recyclable
Zero-waste
Solutions

Cradle-to-cradle Pen
Solution

Waste &

Recycling Issue

southerninnovator.org
southerninnovator.com

Improving Human Development with Finite Resources

Messaging and Reinforcement of Concepts and Knowledge
Infographics
The stories and ideas captured in the e-newsletter and magazine are further reinforced through
various visual tools. To help readers grasp complex trends, data or events, infographics are used
to give a simple snapshot and big-picture view of
what has happened and is happening.

Illustrations
Illustrations serve several goals: they encapsulate a story’s innovation in a simple, visual
form; they give a ‘blueprint’ of how a particular
innovation works; and they make the reader see
how the different pieces of the innovation puzzle
fit together.

Innovator: Definition
A person who introduces new methods, ideas, or products.
Source: Oxford Dictionary of English

Iconic images
Iconic images throughout the magazine reinforce
the Southern Innovator cultural message, showing how technology aids in poverty reduction.

Southern Innovator: Definition
An innovator from the global South.
Source: Southern Innovator

Human Development and Innovation: The Methodology
behind the Magazine
All the content in the magazine is chosen for its relevance to human development.
SI tries to give readers the resources they require to replicate or adapt innovations
featured in the magazine. Originally inspired by the impact of mobile phone and
information technologies on Africa, Southern Innovator features the innovations and
innovators in an expanding 21st-century global innovator culture, where people are
using new information technologies to solve problems and improve their lives and
their communities.
One insight gleaned from the hundreds of hours of research that goes into the magazine (by an editor with two decades of experience working in international development) is the importance of good design to successful innovation. It is also key to
successful human development. The magazine seeks to set a good example by the
way it is put together and presented. It seeks to show that good design leads to better
use of resources and more successful outcomes.

THE MAGAZINE AS A PRODUCT

Comments
On Southern Innovator
“Btw, I really enjoyed reading
them, impressive work & a
great resource. Looking forward to Issue 6.”
Jeannine Lemaire
“Your insight into the issues
facing us a(s) (a) “global
Village” is made real in the
detail of your article - 10 out
of 10 from the moladi team.”
Moladi, South Africa
www.moladi.net
“Beautiful, inspiring magazine
from UNDP on South-South
innovation. Heart is pumping
adrenaline and admiration
just reading it.”
Peggy Lee on Pinterest.com

Wipe-free cover

Southern Innovator:
2015 to 2017
Paper from
sustainable
forests.
60 pages
Clear graphic
design guides the
reader through
the magazine.

Designed using
100% renewable
energy.
Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme
MOBILE PHONES

Apps to innovations to pioneers
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Digital decade delivers huge changes
KEY DATA

Facts and figures
STATE OF PL AY

What is going on across the South?

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 01

www.southerninnovator.org

MAY 2011

Strong spine

Mobile Phones &

Information Technology Issue
How these tech tools can aid in the push to meet the MDGs

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme
WASTE

Turning Waste into Wealth in the 21st Century
RECYCLING

Building Green Businesses That Work: From Fashion to Fuel to Farms
KEY DATA

Facts and Figures
STATE OF PLAY

Mobiles Transforming Green Solutions: A How-to Guide Pages 26-27
Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 05

www.southerninnovator.org

2014

IN THIS ISSUE:

Designing for a New Africa

98%

Recyclable
Zero-waste
Solutions

Cradle-to-cradle Pen
Solution

Waste &

Recycling Issue
Improving Human Development with Finite Resources

Green energy: SI is designed and laid out
using 100 per cent renewable energy.
Sustainable forests: SI is printed on paper
from sustainable forest resources.
Collaboration with innovators: SI works with
innovators to source much of its content.
Wipeable cover: A laminated cover ensures
the magazine can weather dirt and water spills.
60 pages: SI is 60 pages to keep its weight down
and lower distribution costs.
Strong binding: SI needs to be tough
and made to last.

You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something,
build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” Buckminster Fuller

Set up to help countries
achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in the
years approaching the target
deadline of 2015, Southern
Innovator highlighted three
things which were having a
large – but often under-reported – impact on development:
the rapid take-up of information technologies, in particular
mobile phones, across the
global South; increasing trade
and contact between countries
of the global South on the back
of rising economic growth;
and the power of innovation
– as expressed by the people
featured in the magazine – to
overcome development challenges, often under the most
demanding country conditions.
As people debate the future of
development goals post-2015,
it is clear that Southern Innovator, rather than fading away,
needs to scale-up its impact.
Since its launch in 2011, the
magazine has proven an influential force for positive change
and a source of inspiration.

Designed and laid out in Iceland using
100 per cent renewable energy.

Summary of Impact
“People are the real wealth of a nation.”
UNDP Human Development Report 1990

The e-newsletter Development Challenges, South-South Solutions has had a significant impact since its
launch in 2006. Along with its sister publication – Southern Innovator magazine and its online archive – it
has re-shaped perceptions about the global South, and Africa in particular.
Southern Innovator magazine emerged from the insights and discoveries gained in researching Development Challenges, South-South Solutions. The e-newsletter has tracked trends across the global South
and discovered its ballooning numbers of innovators, pioneers and entrepreneurs who are tackling the
challenges of poverty and development in the 21st century.
One of the stand-out achievements of the e-newsletter and magazine has been their contribution to the
rise of mobile phones and information technology in the global South’s development, including Africa.
The e-newsletter was acknowledged as one of the first forums to regularly cover this emerging trend and
champion its pioneers and first movers. Southern Innovator magazine’s first issue on mobile phone and
information technologies, is now one of the top online resources chronicling this trend.

Designing Change for Human Development

Messaging and Reinforcement of Concepts and Knowledge
Infographics
The stories and ideas captured in
the e-newsletter and magazine are
further reinforced through various
visual tools. To help readers grasp
complex trends, data or events,
infographics are used to give a simple
snapshot and big-picture view of what
has happened and is happening.

Illustrations
Illustrations serve several goals: they
encapsulate a story’s innovation
in a simple, visual form; they give
a ‘blueprint’ of how a particular
innovation works; and they make the
reader see how the different pieces
of the innovation puzzle fit together.

Iconic images
Iconic images throughout the magazine reinforce the Southern Innovator
cultural message, showing how
technology aids in poverty reduction.

Infographics: Definition
Information graphics or infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge. These graphics present complex information
quickly and clearly, such as in signs, maps, journalism, technical writing, and education. With an information graphic, computer scientists, mathematicians,
and statisticians develop and communicate concepts using a single symbol to process information.
Source: Wikipedia

Social Media and Online Resource-sharing
As Internet-based social media evolved from 2008 onwards, it became clear
that these online channels were an excellent way to share the stories in the
e-newsletter and the magazine. Readers can read ‘Tweets’ on the Twitter
platform or bookmark stories to keep a running archive of the stories. This
has enabled the stories to reach other media, such as mobile phones, smart
phones and e-reading devices such as tablet computers.
A complete archive of the e-newsletters and the magazine have been kept
on the open-source Scribd document platform (a favourite place for government agencies and public agencies to post official documents, reports and
correspondence to better facilitate transparency and knowledge-sharing).
This has also proven to be an effective strategy for reaching out across Africa.
TOTAL READS FOR SCRIBD CHANNEL (AS OF 22 MARCH 2012)
Southern Innovator magazine Issue 1

5,819
929

Development Challenges July 2010 Issue
Development Challenges September 2010 Issue

479

Development Challenges February 2011 Issue

355

Development Challenges March 2011 Issue

855

On Development Challenges, SouthSouth Solutions
“Great economic and business
reporting! Very helpful for us.” Africa
Renewal, Africa Section, Strategic
Communications Division, United
Nations Department of Public
Information
“Congratulations on another great
newsletter that’s packed with
fascinating information! I really enjoy
getting it each month.”
Whitney Harrelson, Making Cents,
Washington D.C.
“I just went over your June newsletter. It’s very well done and far
reaching. Congratulations!” Violette
Ruppanner, Director, 3D -> Trade
– Human Rights – Equitable
Economy, Geneva, Switzerland.
On Southern Innovator magazine

1,030

Development Challenges January 2012 Issue

Comments on
e-newsletter and
magazine

reads

Search Terms + Memes
South-South
solutions +
innovators
Memes:
Innovators
culture

South-South
solutions mobile
phones +
information
technology
Memes:
Technology culture

South-South
solutions
Memes:
Resilience and
knowledge-sharing
culture

“What a tremendous magazine your
team has produced! It's a terrific
tour de force of what is interesting,
cutting edge and relevant in the
global mobile/ICT space... Really
looking forward to what you produce
in issues #2 and #3. This is great,
engaging, relevant and topical stuff.”
Rose Shuman, Founder and CEO,
Open Mind and Question Box.

CASE STUDY:
Now Public Reader
Response Test

In 2007, a new form of communication
emerged on the Internet: crowdsourced media. This allowed ordinary
citizens to contribute stories and
images to an online platform that would
then be read by readers around the
world. Over time, trusted “reporters”
who got their facts right would build
their profile and gain greater respect
with the reading audience. This seemed
an ideal place to test the reader reaction
to the stories featured in Development
Challenges, South-South Solutions.
From 2008 to 2010, the stories were
regularly posted on the Now Public
“crowd-powered” media platform and
reader responses were tracked and
evaluated.
The stories were then refined to make
sure that the information was useful to
the readers and that they understood
the messages being communicated.

TOTAL READS (AS OF 22 MARCH 2012): 36,289 VIEWS

Two-stroke Engine Pollution Solution

2,689

Rebuilding After Chinese Earthquake: Beautiful Bamboo Homes

2,529
2,442

views

6,587

1,179

Debt-free Homes for the Poor
Disabled Congolese Musicians Become World Hit
Afropolitan: African Fashion Scene Bursting with Energy
Fact: 336,289 views for 201 stories posted

Meme: Definition
A meme is “an idea, behavior or style that spreads from
person to person within a culture.” Source: Wikipedia

Designed and laid out using 100 per cent renewable energy.

Press Release for General Distribution

Southern Innovator’s Fifth Issue Profiles Innovators in Waste and Recycling
United Nations, New York, USA, 28 April 2014

Fifth issue of Southern Innovator tackles ways to improve human development in a world
with finite resources
60-page color magazine offers a snapshot of our fast-changing world

The fifth issue of Southern Innovator (SI) magazine is out now. It explores how innovation can
tackle the challenges of improving human development on a planet with finite resources.
SI researchers identified innovative, low-polluting options to the world's energy needs. They found
that it is possible to alter the way that things are made to reduce or eliminate waste and toxic
pollutants harming human health and damaging the environment. And not only that: they also
discovered that there are sustainable incomes to be made from the economy of waste reduction
and recycling – an opportunity that has yet to be fully realized. The innovations shared here
demonstrate that raising living standards in the global South and responsible use of the world's
resources are not necessarily incompatible.
               
Some innovators are transforming attitudes towards fashion, proving that it does not have to be a
wasteful industry. Others are turning commonly found waste – food waste, or human or animal
excrement – into fuel for heating. The link between good design and the efficient use of resources
is apparent in many of the innovators’ solutions. If a new, green economy is to work, then it must
appeal to people's aspirations and be something that they want in their lives and are willing to work
to achieve.
 
Southern Innovator (southerninnovator.org) champions a 21st-century global innovator culture. It is
based on intensive research and produced by the United Nations Office for South-South
Cooperation in (UNOSSC) in UNDP. UNOSSC also organizes the annual Global South-South
Development Expo (southsouthexpo.org), a traveling celebration bringing together Southern
innovators, with previous venues in New York, Washington, D.C., Geneva, Rome,Vienna, Nairobi
and Doha.
  
We hope that you enjoy the magazine and find its content interesting and illuminating, a snapshot
of a fast-changing world awash with innovators, creators and doers making their world a better
place.
                              
For information on sponsoring issues of the magazine, either through helping to fund its
print run, or through an insert relating to an issue's theme with pertinent content for our
readers, contact Cosmas Gitta at
cosmas.gitta@undp.org.
Online archives: southerninnovator.org; http://www.scribd.com/SouthernInnovator. Follow us
@SouthSouth1

Press Release for General Distribution

More on Southern Innovator

Issue 5: ISBN 978-0-9920217-1-9
Southern Innovator print version: ISSN 2222-9280; Southern Innovator e-version: ISSN
2227-0523
Issue 1
"What a tremendous magazine your team has produced! It's a terrific tour de force of what
is interesting, cutting edge and relevant in the global mobile/ICT space... Really looking
forward to what you produce in issues #2 and #3. This is great, engaging, relevant and
topical stuff.", to "Looks great. Congratulations. It’s Brill’s Content for the 21st century!"
What they are saying about SI on Twitter: From @CapacityPlus Nice job RT
@ActevisCGroup: RT @UNDP: Great looking informative @SouthSouth1 mag on SouthSouth Innovation; @UNDP Great looking informative @SouthSouth1 mag on South-South
Innovation; @JeannineLemaire Graphically beautiful & informative @UNDP Southern
Innovator mag on South-South Innov. 
And on Pinterest:
Peggy Lee • 1 year ago
"Beautiful, inspiring magazine from UNDP on South-South innovation. Heart is pumping
adrenaline and admiration just reading it"
Issue 2
“Your insight into the issues facing us a[s] [a] "global Village" is made real in the detail of
your article - 10 out of 10 from the moladi team"
Issue 4
"The magazine looks fantastic, great content and a beautiful design!"

"I liked your latest Southern innovator! Always inspiring.
Facts about SI:
Number of issues since 2011: 5
Number of pages for each issue: 60
Print run for each issue: 5,000
A summary for publication is here:
“Southern Innovator (SI) (ISSN 2222-9280) is a magazine published by the United Nations
Office for South-South Cooperation in UNDP. SI celebrates creativity and the 21st-century
innovator culture emerging from the global South. It uncovers the trends and events
shaping the rise of the South in order to spur action on ending extreme poverty and toward
reaching the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).”
For more information on Southern Innovator, contact Cosmas Gitta at
cosmas.gitta@undp.org.
Online archives: southerninnovator.org; http://www.scribd.com/SouthernInnovator

Press Release for General Distribution

Fourth Issue of UNDP Magazine Southern Innovator Launches at Expo
United Nations, Nairobi, Kenya, 31 October 2013

Fourth issue of Southern Innovator launched at Global South-South Development Expo 2013
in Nairobi, Kenya
60-page color magazine gives snapshot of fast-changing world

The fourth issue of Southern Innovator magazine has launched at the Global South-South Development
Expo 2013 in Nairobi, Kenya. Southern Innovator Issue 4 visits the new cities being built to tackle the
challenges of a rapidly urbanizing 21st-century world. The magazine also highlights some of the solutions
being devised to the challenges people face as the world becomes a majority urban place.
               
Some innovators are building new cities from scratch, applying the latest thinking and hard-wiring in cuttingedge information technologies and innovative environmental measures to create 'smart' cities and eco-cities.
Architects are designing and refining homes that are beautiful and functional, easy to build, affordable and
conserve energy. Social entrepreneurs are innovating ways to create liveable and socially inclusive urban
areas, often in places where planning has been scant and where incomes are very low. All those featured in
the magazine were chosen for their focus on improving human development and their ingenuity and fresh
thinking.
Southern Innovator champions a 21st-century global innovator culture. The magazine profiles and celebrates
the innovators across the global South finding new ways to tackle poverty, create wealth and improve human
development and achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In its first issue in September 2011,
Southern Innovator featured the people who are re-shaping new information technologies - from mobile
phone apps to Internet technologies. Many of the innovators profiled in that first issue came from Kenya.
 
SI (southerninnovator.org) is based on intensive research and produced by the United Nations Office for
South-South Cooperation in UNDP (UNOSSC) (formerly the Special Unit for South-South Cooperation in
UNDP). UNOSSC organizes an annual Global South-South Development Expo (southsouthexpo.org), a
roaming celebration and gathering of Southern innovators previously held in New York, Washington, D.C.,
Geneva, Rome and Vienna. This year's Expo is being held in Nairobi, Kenya (28 October to 1 November
2013) and is hosted by the UN Environment Programme (unep.org).
 
SI is being distributed through the United Nations' network and partners and reaches some of the world's
poorest and remotest places, as well as the vibrant but stressed growing global megacities. It is hoped the
magazine will inspire budding innovators with its mix of stories, essential information, facts and figures,
images and graphics.
We hope you enjoy the magazine and find its content interesting and
illuminating: a snapshot of a fast-changing world awash, as we found out, with
innovators, creators and do-ers making their world a better place. It is possible to sponsor issues of the
magazine, either through helping to fund its print run, or through sponsored inserts covering that issue’s
theme with relevant content for our readers. 
For more information on Southern Innovator, contact Cosmas Gitta at
cosmas.gitta@undp.org.
Online archives: southerninnovator.org; http://www.scribd.com/SouthernInnovator. Follow @SouthSouth1

Press Release for General Distribution

More on Southern Innovator

Issue 4: ISBN 978-0-9920217-0-2
Southern Innovator print version: ISSN 2222-9280; Southern Innovator e-version: ISSN 2227-0523
What people have said about the magazine: 
Issue 1
"What a tremendous magazine your team has produced! It's a terrific tour de force of what is interesting,
cutting edge and relevant in the global mobile/ICT space... Really looking forward to what you produce in
issues #2 and #3. This is great, engaging, relevant and topical stuff.", to "Looks great. Congratulations. It’s
Brill’s Content for the 21st century!"
Issue 4
“The magazine looks fantastic, great content and a beautiful design!" 
Facts about SI: 
Number of issues since 2011: 4
Number of pages for each issue: 60
Print run for each issue: 5,000
A summary for publication is here:
“Southern Innovator (SI) (ISSN 2222-9280) is a magazine published by the United Nations Office for SouthSouth Cooperation in UNDP. SI celebrates creativity and the 21st-century innovator culture emerging from
the global South. It uncovers the trends and events shaping the rise of the South in order to spur action on
ending extreme poverty and toward reaching the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).”
For more information on Southern Innovator, contact Cosmas Gitta at
cosmas.gitta@undp.org.
Online archives: southerninnovator.org; http://www.scribd.com/SouthernInnovator

The second issue

Rich infographics

Southern Innovator comes
packed with stories, images
and contact details about a
new generation of pioneering
innovators across the global
South.

Complex data and trends
are transformed into
clear graphics for ease of
understanding.

Global reach
SI is distributed around the
world, from the buzzing new
urban megacities of the
South to the poorest places
on earth.

Stories to learn from
There isn’t a better way to
learn than from others in the
same situation. SI’s stories
share details on success and
innovation and have links to
resources - so readers can
get down to work.

Eye-catching illustrations
and graphics
Concepts are reinforced
through visual images to aid
understanding.

Getting connected
Southern Innovator is packed
with resources and is backed
up with a website and
monthly e-newsletter. Each
issue is intended to provide
inspiration and practical
information to get started
on the journey to being a
Southern Innovator!

Southern Innovator is a global magazine celebrating creativity and innovation emerging from the
global South. It explores entrepreneurial solutions to development challenges and uncovers the
trends and events shaping the rise of the South in order to spur action on ending extreme poverty and
toward reaching the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The second issue is out now, profiling
innovators focused on youth and entrepreneurship.
Download the magazine's PDF from its hosted site on the Scribd platform here:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/86451057/Southern-Innovator-Magazine-Issue-2

DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES,
SOUTH-SOUTH SOLUTIONS

E-newsletter of the United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation in UNDP

……………………………………………………………………………………………….….
July 2014

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In this issue:

1) 3D Home Printing Landmark: 10 Houses in a Day
The global South is experiencing urban growth on a scale unprecedented in
human history, far outstripping the great urbanization wave that swept across
Europe and North America during the 19th and 20th centuries.
Faced with growth at this pace, governments - both national and local - often
become overwhelmed by the rate of change and find it difficult to cope. One
of the most common complaints urban-dwellers around the world have is
about their living conditions. Even in developed countries, creating enough
housing to match demand can be a struggle.
Quality housing is crucial to human development and quality of life. Adequate
living space and access to running water make a significant contribution to
people's health and well-being. Despite this obvious conclusion, millions of
urban dwellers live in squalid conditions with poor sanitation, overcrowding,
crime, pollution, noise and a general feeling of insecurity. Insecure people find
it difficult to access stable jobs and suffer stigma for living in poor-quality
neighbourhoods.
But many initiatives are seeking to speed up the pace of home construction.
These include the Moladi construction system from South Africa (moladi.net).
Moladi uses moulds to assemble houses, so that the building skills required
are minimal and easily learned. Built to a template that has been tested for
structural soundness and using a design that produces a high-quality home
both in structure and appearance, the Moladi system seeks to provide an
alternative to makeshift homes that are structurally unsound and vulnerable to
fires, earthquakes and other natural disasters.
Another clever approach is a home and dwelling assembly system developed
by architect Teddy Cruz (http://estudioteddycruz.com)
(http://visarts.ucsd.edu/faculty/teddy-cruz) that allows slum dwellers to
gradually construct a building in stages as they can afford it. It is earthquakesafe and fire resistant.

1) 3D Home Printing Landmark: 10
Houses in a Day
2) Old Boats Become New Furniture in
Senegal
3) Innovative Solutions Celebrated in
Ashden Awards
4) Innovative Ways to Collect Water from
Air

………………………………..
Featured links:
Babajob.com
Equator Initiative
Kiva.org
SSC Website

………………………………..
Quick links:
Window on the World
Upcoming Events
Awards and Funding
Training and Job Opportunities
Past Issues

..………………………………..
Bookmark with:

what is this?

………………………………..

Another approach turns to the fast-growing technology of 3D printing
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3D_printing). This technology has gone
mainstream in the past five years in the form of desktop-sized 3D printers, or
fabricators as they are sometimes called. The machines assemble objects in an
additive fashion - layer-by-layer - using digital designs from a computer.
3D printers can make a complex object without having to resort to mass
manufacturing. An accurate, one-off object can be created with the same
precision as a machined object. Architects, for example, use the technology to
make 3D models of their designs. And now a company in China is hoping to
use 3D printers to make houses.
The WinSun Decoration Design Engineering Co.
(http://www.yhbm.com/index.aspx) 3D printed 10 houses in 24 hours in
Shanghai's Qinpu district, reported Business Insider.
This landmark achievement was accomplished with a giant printer - 152
meters long, 10 meters wide, and 6 meters high - which manufactured walls
for the house from a mix of construction waste and cement.
As a sign of the confidence the company has in the innovative construction
technique, it built its own 10,000 square meter headquarters in one month
using the same materials. The company's chief executive officer, Ma Yihe, is
also the inventor of the technique. It is a very flexible technology and the

………………………………..

material can be tinted different colors according to the customer's wishes. It is cheap to work with and is also less
draining on environmental resources than traditional building materials.
The 10 houses consist of two concrete side supporting walls with glass panels at the front and back and with a
triangle roof. They will be used as offices at a high-tech industrial park in Shanghai. The company has big plans,
hoping to use the technology to build more homes - and even skyscrapers.
Competition is heating up as people around the world seek to perfect 3D technology to print houses to meet the
growing demand for dwellings.
In The Netherlands, Dutch architectural firm Dus Architects (dusarchitects.com) commissioned the development
of a leviathan 3D printer so it could print entire rooms. Modeled on a much smaller home desktop version, the
Ultimaker (ultimaker.com), this printer creates whole rooms that are then assembled into custom-built houses.
The 6-meter high KamerMaker (kamermaker.com), or "room builder", is being used in Amsterdam to build a fullsize house.
The project is called "3D Print Canal House" (http://3dprintcanalhouse.com/). The printer assembles the rooms
individually, and then they are snapped together to make a house. The internal structure of the building blocks
are in a honey-comb pattern, which is then filled with a foam that becomes as hard as concrete.
"For the first time in history, over half of the world's population is living in cities," Dus Architects founder Hans
Vermeulen told cnet.com. "We need a rapid building technique to keep up the pace with the growth of the
megacities. And we think 3D printing can be that technique.
"We bought a container from the Internet and we transformed it into one of the biggest printers on this planet."
This technology can also easily use recycled waste materials and lower the pollution and cost of moving building
materials around. The Dus Architects prototype house is expected to take three years to complete (so, still in its
early development phase) and will look like a typical Dutch canal house with a pointy, gabled roof
(http://www.build.com.au/gabled-roof).
One of the pioneering advocates for using 3D technology to address the global South's urbanization and housing
challenge has been Larry Sass, director of the Digital Design Fabrication Group (http://ddf.mit.edu/) at the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
Three technologies have been developed at MIT since the 1950s that have made digital fabrication possible computer numerical control (CNC), which enables computers to control machines; computer-aided design
software in the 1960s; and 3D printing in the 1980s to make solid models using digital designs.
Sass told MIT's Spectrum newsletter (spectrum.mit.edu) that large-scale 3D printing would mean "buildings will
rise faster, use fewer resources, cost less, and be more delightful to the eye than ever before."
He envisions a future in which architects will be able to send their designs by computer to a 3D printer and it will
then be able to start "printing" the building or a house accurately according to the original designs.
The conventional way of making buildings has been stuck in the same approach since the 1800s, according to
Sass. It uses highly skilled and extensive labour, it is slow and plagued by weather disruptions and urban
congestion, and it is expensive, often using materials brought from far away.
Digitally fabricating buildings takes a radically different approach: the building is made in a series of precisioncut, interlocking parts and then assembled on site like a jigsaw puzzle.
"It's the right delivery system for the developing world, because the developing world doesn't have an
infrastructure of tools, air guns, saws and power," Sass said.
"Design and high-quality construction is mostly for the rich," added Sass, who was raised in Harlem, a New York
City neighbourhood with high poverty levels. "I've always wanted to figure out how to bring design choice and
architectural delight to the poor."
LINKS:
1)

3D Printing Technologies: A website exploring the development of 3D technology. Website:
http://www.3d-printing-technologies.com/index.html

2)

Sweet Home 3D: An open source, free interior design software application that allows users to draw the
plan of their house, arrange furniture and view in 3D. Website: sweethome3d.com

3)

A video showing how it was done is here: http://www.businessinsider.com/this-video-shows-how-acompany-3-d-printed-10-houses-in-a-day-2014-4

4)

3-D Printed Buildings for A Developing World from MIT's Spectrum. Website:
http://spectrum.mit.edu/articles/3-d-printed-buildings-for-a-developing-world/

2) Old Boats Become New Furniture in Senegal
Every country has its fair share of waste and the remnants of past economic activity. Old cars nobody wants,
discarded tins of food, old plastic bags, spare copper wire, cast-off clothing - all can have a new life in the right
hands.
An intriguing twist on recycling is happening in the West African nation of Senegal. The country has a strong
fishing tradition, and plenty of boats are used to haul in the catch every day. These boats are elaborately
decorated and dazzle the eye when lined up on the beach awaiting the next journey to sea. But what to do with
the boats when they have completed their service?
One ingenious social enterprise is turning the weather-beaten but colorful boats into highly prized pieces of
furniture that sell in the boutiques of Europe. The enterprise Artlantique (slogan "Made in Africa")
(http://artlantique.com) gathered together local craft folk, both masters and young apprentices, to tackle the
challenge of re-shaping old fishing boats into furniture.
Artlantique’s founder, Spanish designer Ramon Llonch, then sends the furniture back to his shop in Barcelona,
Spain where it is in turn distributed to shops around the world. Llonch ploughs Artlantique’s profits back in to
expanding the business and hopes to hire more skilled craft folk in Senegal.
The idea is to create a "contemporary, modern design, which is above all 100 per cent African, as much in the
material as in the making."
Each unique piece of furniture is a riot of color, with planks of wood harvested from the boats creating an original
and eye-pleasing pattern. The furniture has the weathered look expected of wood battered by years of exposure
to salty sea water, and is streaked and branded with colorful patterns from its previous life as a fishing boat. The
furniture items include cabinets, tables, benches, work tables, chairs, picture frames, coffee tables and even a
fusball game table for lovers of soccer (football).
The catalogue that accompanies the website shows the families of the fisher folk, their boats, the workshop
where the furniture is made, and the finished product. As the catalogue says, the boats "are stylish and elegant,
their sides covered by many layers of paint, faded, and affected by rust from the salt and sea air, giving the wood
a rich texture of different tones. Attracted by their beauty, and their history, we wondered whether after all the
sea faring they had undergone, the wood would still be in good enough condition to begin a new life, to be
'reincarnated' into furniture."
Negotiations are made with the fisher folk to acquire boats when they look like they have reached the end of
their work life. The purchased boat is taken to a beach-side workshop and the craft folk discuss what to do with
it. Young apprentices work alongside skilled craft folk, gaining the skills to make a high-quality wooden product
capable of being exported.
The craft folk draw on their years of experience to add value to the final product. "Their contribution is essential
as they suggest which type of furniture would be the most suitable to make," Artlantique's website explains.
"They discuss their past and that of their forefathers: their cultural heritage, how to take full advantage of the
wood, according to the size of the boat, and its color combinations."
The furniture made from the boat wood has a high value because each piece is unique and can not be replicated.
The raw "Samba" wood comes from an African tropical tree
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triplochiton_scleroxylon) and remains untreated by chemicals. It is seasoned
naturally by the sea from its years of service as a fishing boat.
"This wood ... has certain limitations, not only because it has a shape but also because it's very damaged by the
salt, the sea, the sun and the lime. But these artisans are very talented," Llonch told CNN.
"Their creativity is not academic, they are like this by nature because [for them] recycling and reusing is not a
fashion, it's not a trend."
Artlantique-branded furniture is now on sale in boutiques in Barcelona, Spain, Paris, France and Rome, Italy.
In Brazil, artist Sérgio Dido (http://www.artinsurf.com/art-dido.php), who lives in the dynamic beach resort town
of Buzios (http://www.lonelyplanet.com/brazil/the-southeast/buzios), also salvages wood from fishing boats to
create art with a surfing theme. The work is featured in the Art in Surf shop (http://www.artinsurf.com/index.php).
LINKS:
1)

Jack Bell Gallery: The focus of the gallery is to exhibit, represent and champion contemporary artists, many
from Africa. Website: jackbellgallery.com

2)

Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute: The Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, a nonprofit organization, administers the Cradle to Cradle CertifiedTM Product Standard. It was created to bring
about a new industrial revolution that turns the making of things into a positive force for society, economy,
and the planet. Website: c2ccertified.org

3)

Southern Innovator Issue 5: Waste and Recycling: The fifth issue explores how innovation can tackle the
challenges of improving human development on a planet with finite resources. Website:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/207579744/Southern-Innovator-Magazine-Issue-5-Waste-and-Recycling

4)

Senegal Tourist Office: Connect on the Facebook page to find out more about Senegal. Website:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Senegal-Tourist-Office/211140248926509

3) Innovative Solutions Celebrated in Ashden Awards
The world's population is heading towards 9.6 billion by 2050 (UN). Combined with a growing middle class and
rising living standards across the global South, that means ever-greater demand on the world's finite resources.
This raises a crucial question: Where will the energy to power rising living standards come from, and how much
damage will be done to the planet's environment by pollution created generating it
(https://www.un.org/en/development/desa/news/population/un-report-world-population-projected-to-reach-96-billion-by-2050.html)?
The solution advocated by the world's scientists is to move to sustainable energy creation, which does not rob
from the future to create energy for today.
Such an approach requires fresh thinking and engagement from those who are actually involved in the struggle
to raise living standards and improve human development.
One way to do this is to use high-profile awards and prizes to lure out fresh thinking and innovators and help
them get the funding they need to realize their plans.
The International Ashden Awards (ashden.org) - considered the "leading green energy awards" - is about
championing and promoting “practical, local energy solutions that cut carbon, protect the environment, reduce
poverty and improve people’s lives”. It recently announced the finalists and winners for 2014.
The international finalists are 10 sustainable energy enterprises drawn from Africa (Burkina Faso, Tanzania), India
and Southeast Asia (Cambodia, Myanmar). A handy, clickable and searchable online map
(http://www.ashden.org/winners) further explains the winners and finalists for 2014 and previous years.
"With the stark warnings from the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) of the impacts of climate
change, especially for the most vulnerable, we need to find solutions before it is too late," said Ashden founderdirector Sarah Butler-Sloss.
"Our role at Ashden is to shine a light on those organizations around the world that are helping reduce carbon
emissions and finding ways of adapting to the effects of climate change."
The mix of non-profit organizations and businesses among 2014's winners and finalists shows there is no
shortage of enthusiasm and fresh thinking out there. Proof the global South is alive with innovators with
solutions.
Among the five international winners - who will receive between US $8,566 and US $68,531 each - is India's
Greenway Grameen (greenwaygrameen.com). It is tackling the problem of harmful pollution caused by cooking.
Despite rapid economic growth and the spread of consumer goods such as televisions and mobile phones, most
Indian women still cook with wood or dung. This is not only time-consuming, it also produces health-damaging
smoke. Greenway Grameen was founded by two young MBA graduates in 2010 to make and sell affordable,
desirable cookstoves that reduce smoke, cook food more quickly and stay cleaner for longer, dramatically
improving the quality of life for many women and girls. As of March 2014 more than 120,000 of Greenway's
made-in-India smart stoves had been sold, benefitting around 610,000 people.
Another Indian winner is Infosys (infosys.com). India's fast-growing economy is making ever-greater demands on
its electrical grid. Global IT giant Infosys is leading the way to more sustainable growth by embracing green
building measures, decreasing electricity consumption per staff member across its Indian business campuses.
Success lies in seizing every opportunity to cut energy consumption in its existing buildings - from reducing the
size of chiller plants for air conditioning to painting roofs white to reflect the heat. Cutting-edge design of new
buildings also helps keep offices cooler and maximizes natural light. Taking US $80 million off its electricity bills,
Infosys has proven the business case for large companies to invest in energy efficiency - not just in India but
around the globe.
Among the other winners:
- Tanzania's Off Grid Electric (offgrid-electric.com) is a leader in solar energy in East Africa, using mobile
money to sell solar power as a daily service at an affordable price. Mobile money - where customers pay with
their mobile phones - is increasingly used as a method of payment. Off Grid stands out because it understands
the importance of customer service, offering an all-day customer care telephone line and ongoing support from a
local agent. More than 10,000 households have taken up the service since April 2012. As fast as systems are
manufactured they are off to customers - thanks to a sophisticated mobile phone app-based customer
registration and product-tracking system.

- Myanmar's Proximity Designs (proximitydesigns.org) is introducing treadle pumps
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treadle_pump) and other sustainable agriculture technologies to the country for the
first time. Lifting water from wells and carrying it across fields is back-breaking, time-consuming work for rural
farmers. Combined with water-saving drip irrigation technology, foot-operated treadle pumps that draw up water
from wells can dramatically increase yields and incomes. Farmers are now seeing their lives transformed with
some harvests and incomes more than doubling - and the pumps are helping ease the daily drudgery of farming.
With over 90,000 households benefiting so far, Proximity Designs continues to adapt and introduce new products
like solar pumps, to meet the needs of this rapidly changing country.
- Cambodia's Sustainable Green Fuel Enterprise (http://www.sgfe-cambodia.com/environment) is turning
leftover coconut shells and other waste into clean-burning briquettes for use as cooking fuel in the capital
Phnom Penh's homes and restaurants. While most Cambodians cook on wood charcoal, contributing to the
country's rampant deforestation and air pollution, this pioneering Cambodian business - led by Carlo Figà
Talamanca - can scarcely keep up with demand.
The finalists are also an innovative lot too. Kéré Architecture (kerearchitecture.com) in Burkina Faso, Africa, has set
a new standard for green school buildings. The school it built has a ventilated roof and other clever design
features, providing a much cooler environment for children to study in. Not only that, the school was built by
local people, and largely with local materials. Germany-based Francis Kéré, originally from Burkina Faso, designed
and built the school in his home village. Kéré Architecture has since designed and built more than 20 innovative,
naturally cooled public buildings in Africa.
India's Sakhi Unique Rural Enterprise (sureindia.co.in), or SURE, is a not-for-profit social enterprise in central
Maharashtra that has selected, trained and supported more than 600 female micro-entrepreneurs to sell clean
energy products such as solar lanterns and cleaner cookstoves to other women. For the women entrepreneurs,
selling energy products boosts income and carries a social cachet, while customers also see their lives improved
with time-saving products.
Another Indian innovator, Mera Gao Power (http://meragaopower.com/), is demonstrating the business case for
meeting the needs of some of the poorest people in India with unsubsidized commercial micro-electric grids,
connecting more than 20,000 Uttar Pradesh families to clean, affordable power. Each system is easy to install and
provides seven hours of light and mobile phone-charging for up to 32 houses. And with weekly payments of just
US $0.42 cents, the electricity is even cheaper than kerosene.
The Rajasthan Horticulture Development Society (http://horticulture.rajasthan.gov.in/) in India has come up with
a novel way to boost green agriculture and boost farming incomes. Farmers in the desert state of Rajasthan are
seeing their sons return from cities to work on their farms thanks to a new solar-powered agricultural boom. The
Rajasthan Horticulture Development Society (RHDS) has provided more than 10,000 farmers with new solarpowered water pumps, enabling year-round cultivation of high-value crops and the kind of high-tech horticulture
that's never been seen in the region before. With farmers' incomes more than doubling, the programme has
given them the “gift of life”.
And finally, Tanzania's SimGas (simgas.com) is selling biogas plants that help people turn manure into clean gas
for cooking instead of using charcoal, helping reduce deforestation. The plants are factory-produced and made
of plastic, so they can be installed much more quickly than conventional plants and reach many more thousands
of people. SimGas has just installed the largest plastic injection-moulding machine in East Africa, creating the
potential to roll out biogas plants across East Africa.
The Ashden Awards were set up in 2001 to champion trailblazing sustainable energy enterprises and
programmes that improve people's lives and tackle climate change. Ashden says its 150 award winners have
improved the lives of 37 million people worldwide, and are now saving over 5 million tonnes of carbon emissions
every year.
LINKS:
1)

Innovation Prize for Africa: The IPA is an initiative of the African Innovation Foundation (AIF) started in
2011. IPA honours and encourages innovative achievements that contribute toward developing new
products, increasing efficiency or saving cost in Africa. Website: http://innovationprizeforafrica.org

2)

Champions of the Earth Award: The Champions of the Earth Award recognizes outstanding
environmental leaders, whether individuals or organizations, that have exemplified inspiration, vision,
innovation, leadership and action for the environment. This international award was established by
UNEP in 2004. Website: unep.org/awards/

3)

The SEED Awards: The SEED Award recognizes innovation in local, environmentally-responsible and
sustainable entrepreneurship. This international award is the flagship programme of the SEED Initiative,
a partnership founded by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNEP, and the
International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Website: seedinit.org

4)

Green Star Awards: The Green Star Awards recognize those who have made remarkable efforts to
prevent, prepare for, and respond to environmental disasters around the world. This international award

is a joint initiative between UNEP, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs and Green
Cross International. Website: http://www.gcint.org/green-star-awards3

4)

Innovative Ways to Collect Water from Air

World water resources are being depleted quickly as populations grow, urbanize and demand better living
standards. Many scientists believe we are reaching peak water - the point at which fresh water is consumed faster
than it is replenished.
According to Ensia (ensia.com), a magazine showcasing environmental solutions in action, 70 per cent of the
earth's fresh water reserves are locked up in snow or ice, and are expensive to tap and bring to the world's waterstressed places. Of the remainder, most is in groundwater, soil moisture, swamps or permafrost, while just 0.3 per
cent is easy to access in freshwater lakes and rivers.
By far the biggest user of water in the world - accounting for 69 per cent of the total - is farm irrigation. That's a
serious concern when considering the world will need to grow more food to feed an increasing population. Just 1
per cent of water is used for livestock, while 15 per cent is used for electricity generation and 7 per cent for
manufacturing. More water is currently being pumped from underground resources than is being replaced from
underground aquifers.
The average person needs to consume 0.6 to 1.3 gallons (2.72 liters to 6 liters) of water per day to survive in a
moderate climate. For drinking, cooking, bathing and sanitation, an individual needs 13 gallons (59 liters) a day
(Ensia).
In many places, obtaining water requires a long trek to a well or stream. But non-desert climates have water as a
resource readily available all around - trapped in the air. The clue to this resource's existence is in the air's
humidity levels, the most visible sign of which is the dew that is found covering the grass and leaves every
morning when people wake up. The trick is to extract that water from the air and create a steady supply of this
essential resource.
Italian architect and designer Arturo Vittori (http://www.vittori-lab.com/team/arturo-vittori), a lecturer on
aerospace architecture, technology transfer and sustainability, believes he has an answer.
Wired magazine (http://www.wired.com/2014/03/warka-water-africa/) reported that Vittori was inspired by a trip
to Ethiopia, where he observed the daily struggle to get water. Access to water in northeastern Ethiopia often
requires a long walk, which reduces the amount of time left in the day to do other things. Parents often take
along their children, meaning the children cannot go to school. The time consumed by gathering water leaves
people poorer and unable to dedicate more of their day to income-earning activities.
And there is no guarantee the water is safe to drink or free of chemical contaminants. This situation left Vittori
pondering ways of coming up with an inexpensive solution that would eliminate the daily hassle of finding water
and guarantee its quality.
The answer was a WarkaWater Tower (http://www.architectureandvision.com/projects/chronological/84projects/art/492-073-warkawater-2012?showall=&start=1). The bamboo structure - which looks like an upended,
latticework funnel - captures the dew and moisture in the air and collects it in a basket at the bottom.
The water collector is inspired by the Warka tree, or Ficus vasta (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ficus_vasta). Native
to Ethiopia, it is known for providing shade and as a rendezvous point for traditional gatherings.
A WarkaWater Tower stands 8 meters in height and is made from either bamboo or reeds. Inside, a mesh traps
humidity from the air and the water drips down into a basket. One tower can gather around 94 liters of water a
day. The water is right there in the community and not kilometers away, meaning time and energy saved for
income-generating tasks.
A WarkaWater Tower is constructed in sections, which are assembled and then stacked on top of each other. The
construction does not need special scaffolding or special machinery. Once the tower is in place, it can also be
used as a solar-power generator.
The tower is still a prototype and Vittori plans to build two towers for a launch in 2015.
In Peru, reports the Latin American Herald Tribune
(http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=700400&CategoryId=14095), another innovative solution to the water
crisis has been developed by students at the University of Engineering and Technology (UTEC)
(http://www.utec.edu.pe/Utec.aspx). The students have developed a highway advertising billboard that can draw
drinking water out of the air. Inspired by a campaign called "Ingenuity in Action", the students teamed up with a
local advertising agency to design the billboard. It is capable of extracting water from the air and processing it
through a filtration system as it flows down to a series of taps at the bottom.
The water-making billboard is at the 89.5 kilometer distance marker of the Pan-American Highway and has five
electric-powered tanks that can hold a total of 96 liters of drinkable water. It is capable of providing enough
water for hundreds of families. A true sign of our times!

LINKS:
1)

How to Build a Rainwater Collection System. Website: http://www.wikihow.com/Build-a-RainwaterCollection-System

2)

The geopolitical difficulties of access to water covered in The Devil and the Disappearing Sea: A True
Story about the Aral Sea Catastrophe by Robert Ferguson. Website: amazon.com

3)

“Earth may have underground 'ocean' three times that on surface” from The Guardian. Website:
http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/jun/13/earth-may-have-underground-ocean-three-timesthat-on-surface

4)

An article on the impact of the water crisis on food supplies. Website:
http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/jul/09/enjoy-your-coffee-you-may-soon-not-be-able-toafford-it

5)

How to Make Water in the Desert. Website: http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Water-in-the-Desert

WINDOW ON THE WORLD
Check out our website archive: southerninnovator.org
Southern Innovator magazine’s fifth issue (ISSN 2222-9280) (ISBN 978-0-9920217-1-9) is now online and 5,000
copies are available for distribution. The fifth issue’s theme is waste and recycling. View the issue online here:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/207579744/Southern-Innovator-Magazine-Issue-5-Waste-and-Recycling.
Contact us about opportunities to sponsor this issue or any future issues and we can send you more information
on how it works. Southern Innovator needs financial support in order to keep up the good work of sharing
knowledge and innovation around the global South. Don’t miss out on this great opportunity to reach the
pioneers and innovators shaping our new world.
Southern Innovator magazine’s fourth issue (ISBN 978-0-9920217-0-2) is also online and 5,000 print copies are
available for distribution. The fourth issue’s theme is cities and urbanization. View the issue online here:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/133622315/Southern-Innovator-Magazine-Issue-4-Cities-and-Urbanization.
Issue 6 (ISBN 978-0-9920217-2-6) will be on the theme of science, technology and innovation. Get on board now
and support the magazine and help us to reach more people. Please contact the United Nations Office for SouthSouth Cooperation in UNDP if you would like a copy (copies) of Southern Innovator
(http://ssc.undp.org/content/ssc.html).
The covers for Issues 4 and 5 are below:

Follow us on Twitter @SouthSouth1
Issue 1 of Southern Innovator was called “…a terrific tour de force of what is interesting, cutting edge and
relevant in the global mobile/ICT space...” and "Beautiful, inspiring magazine from UNDP on South-South
innovation. Heart is pumping adrenaline and admiration just reading it"
Issue 4 has been called “fantastic, great content and a beautiful design!”

On Southern Innovator: "Btw, I really enjoyed reading them, impressive work & a great resource. Looking forward
to Issue 6. My best wishes to you & your team at SI."
Also check out our SouthSouth Expo: 2013’s Expo was in Nairobi, Kenya from 28 October to 1 November 2013.
The first Arab States Regional South-South Development Expo took place from 18-20 February 2014 in Doha,
Qatar: southsouthexpo.org

BOOKS
Human Development Report 2013: The Rise of the South. The 2013 Human Development Report examines the

profound shift in global dynamics driven by the fast-rising new powers of the developing world and its long-term
implications for human development. Website:
http://hdr.undp.org/en/mediacentre/humandevelopmentreportpresskits/2013report/

Human Development Reports, (1990-2013). Website: http://hdr.undp.org/en/reports/global/hdr2011/
The Frugal Innovator: Creating Change on a Shoestring Budget by Charles Leadbeater, Publisher: Palgrave
Macmillan. Website: amazon.com

African Economic Outlook - Measuring the pulse of Africa, Publisher: African Development Bank (AfDB), the OECD
Development Centre and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Africa's macroeconomic
prospects remain favorable. In 2013, Africa maintained an average growth rate of about 4 per cent. This compares
to 3 per cent for the global economy and underscores again the continent's resilience to global and regional
headwinds. However, growth performance varied widely across country classifications and regions. Website:
http://www.africaneconomicoutlook.org/en/

The New Harvest: Agricultural Innovation in Africa by Calestous Juma, Publisher: Oxford University Press.
Website: http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/publication/20504/new_harvest.html

NEW: The Dollar Trap: How the U.S. Dollar Tightened its Grip on Global Finance by Eswar S. Prasad, Publisher:
Princeton University Press. Website: http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10182.html

The Death of Money: The Coming Collapse of the International Monetary System by James Rickards, Publisher:
Portfolio Hardcover. Website: amazon.com

The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism
by Jeremy Rifkin, Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan. Website: amazon.com

Edible Insects: Future prospects for food and feed security, Publisher: FAO. Website:
http://www.fao.org/docrep/018/i3253e/i3253e00.htm
Innovative Africa: The New Face of Africa: Essays on the Rise of Africa’s Innovation Age by Will Mutua and
Mbwana Ally, Publisher: Afrinnovator. Website: http://book.afrinnovator.com/

The Solution Revolution by William D. Eggers and Paul Macmillan, Publisher: Harvard Business Press. Where

tough societal problems persist, citizens, social enterprises, and yes, even businesses, are relying less and less on
government-only solutions. More likely, they are crowd funding, ride-sharing, app- developing or impactinvesting to design lightweight solutions for seemingly intractable problems. No challenge is too daunting, from
malaria in Africa to traffic congestion in California. Website: solutionrevolutionbook.com

Aid on the Edge of Chaos by Ben Ramalingam, Publisher: Oxford University Press. Website:
http://aidontheedge.info/

Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work and Think by

Viktor Mayer-Schonberger and Kenneth Cukier, Publisher: John Murray. Website: amazon.com

The New Digital Age: Reshaping the Future of People, Nations and Business by Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen,
Publisher: John Murray. Website: amazon.com

Interconnected Economies: Benefiting from Global Value Chains, Publisher: OECD. Website:
http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/global-value-chains.htm

Need, Speed and Greed: How the New Rules of Innovation Can Transform Businesses, Propel Nations to
Greatness, and Tame the World’s Most Wicked Problems by Vijay Vaitheeswaran, Publisher: HarperBusiness.
Website: amazon.com

Living in the Endless City edited by Ricky Burdett and Deyan Sudjic, Publisher: Phaidon. The city is the subject of

the 21st century. All over the world, populations are shifting towards urban centres. Living in the Endless City
depicts an authoritative survey of cities of today and the prospects for our urban future of tomorrow. 36
contributors from across Europe, South America, China, Africa and the U.S. set the agenda for the city - detailing
its successes as well as its failures. Website: http://www.urban-age.net/publications/living-in-the-endless-city/

Consumptionomics: Asia’s Role in Reshaping Capitalism by Chandran Nair, Publisher: Infinite Ideas. Website:
amazon.com

World 3.0: Global Prosperity and How to Achieve It by Pankaj Ghemawa, Publisher: Harvard Business School
Press. Website: amazon.com

The End of Cheap China: Economic and Cultural Trends that will Disrupt the World by Shaun Rein, Publisher: John
Wiley and Sons. Website: amazon.com

The Idealist: Jeffrey Sachs and the Quest to End Poverty by Nina Munk, Publisher: Doubleday. In 2006, Sachs

launched the Millennium Villages Project, a daring five-year experiment designed to test his theories in Africa. For
the past six years, Nina Munk has reported deeply on the Millennium Villages Project, accompanying Sachs on his
official trips to Africa and listening in on conversations with heads-of-state, humanitarian organizations, rival
economists, and development experts. Website: amazon.com

Breakout Nations by Ruchir Sharma, Publisher: Penguin. Breakout Nations offers journeys through more than two
dozen of the most interesting economies in the emerging world. Website: http://breakoutnations.com/

Light Manufacturing in Africa by Hinh T. Dinh et al, Publisher: World Bank. This book examines how light

manufacturing can offer a viable solution for sub-Saharan Africa’s need for structural transformation and
productive job creation, given its potential competitiveness based on low wage costs and an abundance of
natural resources that supply raw materials needed for industries. Website:
http://issuu.com/world.bank.publications/docs/9780821389614

China: And the End of Poverty in Africa – Towards Mutual Benefit? by Penny Davis, Publisher: Diakonia and the
European Network on Debt and Development. Website:
www.eurodad.org/uploadedFiles/Whats_New/Reports/Kinarapport_A4.pdf

State of the Field in Youth Enterprise, Employment, and Livelihoods Development, Publisher: Making Cents

International. This practical resource features learning from over 80 leading organizations that are working
around the world to increase and improve economic opportunities for young people. Topics include youth
enterprise development; workforce development; youth-inclusive financial services; working with adolescent girls
and young women; and monitoring, evaluation and impact assessment. Website:
www.YouthEconomicOpportunities.org/media.asp

Vitamin Green: The Definitive Guide to the World of Contemporary Sustainable Design: Features 100 Innovative
Projects from Around the World by editors of Phaidon Press, Publisher: Phaidon Press. Website:
http://uk.phaidon.com/store/architecture/vitamin-green-9780714862293/

Makers: The New Industrial Revolution By Chris Anderson, Publisher: Crown Business. Website: amazon.com
World Economic Outlook, October 2012: Coping with High Debt and Sluggish Growth, Publisher: IMF. Website:
eurospangroup.com

Information Economy Report 2012: The Software Industry and Developing Countries, Publisher: United Nations
Publications. Website: eurospangroup.com

China and India: Towards Global Economic Supremacy? by Rita Dulci and Jose Miguel Andreu, Publisher:
Academic Foundation. Website: eurospanbookstore.com

Devaluing to Prosperity: Misaligned Currencies and Their Growth Consequences by Surjit S. Bhalla, Publisher:
Peterson Institute for International Economics. Website: eurospanbookstore.com

China’s Silent Army by Juan Pablo Cardenal and Heriberto Araujo, Publisher: Allen Lane. Website: amazon.com
The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States by Fritz Machlup, Publisher: Princeton
University Press. The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States marked the beginning of the
study of our postindustrial information society. Austrian-born economist Fritz Machlup had focused his research
on the patent system, but he came to realize that patents were simply one part of a much bigger "knowledge
economy." He then expanded the scope of his work to evaluate everything from stationery and typewriters to
advertising to presidential addresses - anything that involved the activity of telling anyone anything. The
Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States then revealed the new and startling shape of the
U.S. economy. Website: amazon.com

Chinnovation: How Chinese Innovators are Changing the World by Yinglan Tan, Publisher: John Wiley & Sons.
Website: amazon.com

China’s Uncertain Future by Jean-Luc Domenach, Publisher: Columbia University Press. Website: amazon.com
Hello World: Where Design Meets Life by Alice Rawsthorn, Publisher: Hamish Hamilton. Website: amazon.com
Urgent Architecture: 40 Sustainable Housing Solutions for a Changing World by Bridgette Meinhold, Publisher:
W.W. Norton & Co. Website: amazon.com

When the Money Runs Out: The End of Western Affluence by Stephen D. King, Publisher: Yale Books. Website:
amazon.com

Architecture Now! Vol. 9 by Philip Jodidio, Publisher: Taschen. Architecture Now! 9 includes works in Amsterdam
and Inner Mongolia by architects as famous as Zaha Hadid and Jean Nouvel, and those as little known to the
general public as Carla Juaçaba from Brazil. Website: tashcen.com

Papers and Reports
National Intellectual Property Systems, Innovation and Economic Development: With perspectives on Colombia
and Indonesia Publisher: OECD. Website:
http://www.oecdbookshop.org/oecd/display.asp?sf1=identifiers&st1=9789264204478

OECD Science, Technology and Industry Scoreboard 2013: Innovations for Growth Publisher: OECD. Website:
http://www.oecdbookshop.org/oecd/display.asp?K=5K49GNZP9H5L&LANG=EN
Start-up Latin America: Promoting Innovation in the Region Publisher: OECD. Website:
http://www.oecdbookshop.org/oecd/display.asp?K=5K468NKR9BZR&LANG=EN
Innovation in Southeast Asia Publisher: OECD. Website:
http://www.oecdbookshop.org/oecd/display.asp?K=5K9H35T9ZGTD&LANG=EN
Knowledge-based Start-ups in Mexico Publisher: OECD. Website:
http://www.oecdbookshop.org/oecd/display.asp?K=5K4C7QF5L05G&LANG=EN
Latest publications from UNRISD in Geneva on the Social and Solidarity Economy:
Think pieces by Meyer and Leal on Community Development Banks in Brazil, by Richards and Ruddick on
Complementary Currencies in Kenya. and by Larraitz Altuna-Gabilondo on the Mondragon cooperative in Spain.
The SSE conference event brief is now available in English, French and Spanish at
http://www.unrisd.org/80256B3C005BCCF9/%28httpPublicationsHome%29/$First?OpenDocument
The new Social and Solidarity Economy LinkedIn group is stimulating dialogue and networking between
practitioners, researchers and policy makers around the world. We invite you to join the group today. As a
member you can exchange ideas about SSE, inform others of your work and get connected to colleagues from all
over the world. You are welcome to post comments in your preferred language, and becoming a member is free
of charge. Please share the webpage with your networks: http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Social-SolidarityEconomy-5117299/about?trk=anet_ug_grppro
Clean Air Asia Study 2012: Website: http://cleanairinitiative.org/portal/node/11338

African Economic Outlook 2012: Promoting Youth Employment Publisher: Various. With almost 200 million

people aged between 15 and 24, Africa has the youngest population in the world. This number will double by
2045. Many jobs have been created over the last decade, but the pace needs to accelerate significantly to match
the demand of Africa's next generations. Website: http://www.africaneconomicoutlook.org/en/

State of China’s Cities: 2010/2011: Better City, Better Life Publisher: UNHABITAT. Website:
www.scribd.com/doc/39882697/State-of-China-s-Cities-Report-2010-2011

Still our Common Interest: Commission for Africa Report 2010 Publisher: Commission for Africa. Website:
www.commissionforafrica.info/2010-report

The Emerging Middle Class in Developing Countries Publisher: OECD. Website:

www.oecdilibrary.org/oecd/content/workingpaper/5kmmp8lncrns-en (PDF - 2.09 mb)

The Implications of China’s Ascendancy for Africa by Hany Besada, Publisher: The Centre for International

Governance Innovation. This paper examines the extent to which China’s engagement with Africa has produced
mutual benefits for both and whether Africa is reaping the necessary benefits required for poverty alleviation and
economic development. Website: http://www.cigionline.com/sites/default/files/Paper_40-web.pdf

Global Economic Decoupling Alive and Well Emerging economies decouple from the U.S., come closer to Europe.
Website: http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article23670.html

Africa begins to make poverty history: U.S. economists challenge conventional view that the continent is a basket
case Website: www.guardian.co.uk/business/2010/mar/03/africa-makes-povery-history
The Demise of the Rest: on How the BRICS Are Crumbling and Why Global Economic Convergence Is a Myth by
Ruchir Sharma, Publisher: Foreign Affairs. Website: http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/138219/ruchirsharma/broken-brics

Meteoric Mongolia: Why It’s Ascending So Fast – And How It Might Fall by Morris Rossabi, Publisher: Foreign
Affairs. Website: http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/138794/morris-rossabi/meteoric-mongolia

Innovations in Green Economy: Top Three Agenda by David South, Publisher: Southasiadisasters.net. Website:
http://www.preventionweb.net/english/professional/publications/v.php?id=35990

Magazines
Southern Innovator Issue 1: Mobile Phones and Information Technology Publisher: UN Office for SouthSouth Cooperation. Website: http://www.scribd.com/doc/95410448/Southern-Innovator-Magazine-Issue-1Mobile-Phones-and-Information-Technology
Southern Innovator Issue 2: Youth and Entrepreneurship Publisher: UN Office for South-South Cooperation.
Website: http://www.scribd.com/doc/106055335/Southern-Innovator-Magazine-Issue-2-Youth-andEntrepreneurship
Southern Innovator Issue 3: Agribusiness and Food Security Publisher: UN Office for South-South
Cooperation. Website: http://www.scribd.com/doc/106055665/Southern-Innovator-Magazine-Issue-3Agribusiness-and-Food-Security
Southern Innovator Issue 4: Cities and Urbanization Publisher: UN Office for South-South Cooperation.
Website: http://www.scribd.com/doc/133622315/Southern-Innovator-Magazine-Issue-4-Cities-and-Urbanization
Southern Innovator Issue 5: Waste and Recycling Publisher: UN Office for South-South Cooperation. Website:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/207579744/Southern-Innovator-Magazine-Issue-5-Waste-and-Recycling
New Publication
Southern Innovator Issue 5: Waste and Recycling: Improving Human Development with Finite Resources
Publisher: UN Office for South-South Cooperation in UNDP. Southern Innovator’s fifth issue explores how
innovation can tackle the challenges of improving human development on a planet with finite resources. SI
researchers identified innovative, low-polluting options to the world’s energy needs. They found that it is possible
to alter the way things are made to reduce or eliminate waste and toxic pollutants harming human health and
damaging the environment. Order copies for distribution from the UN Office for South-South Cooperation in
UNDP. ISSN 2222-9280 ISBN 978-0-9920217-1-9 Website: http://www.scribd.com/doc/207579744/SouthernInnovator-Magazine-Issue-5-Waste-and-Recycling

On the Web
Blogs and Websites
Africa Interactive weblog: Africa Interactive is a fast growing multimedia press and content agency in Africa,
with 2,000 local reporters in 50 African countries. Its reporters tell the African story in text, photo or video. Its
database contains filmmakers, journalists, photographers, stringers and marketing experts. Website:
http://africainteractive.wordpress.com/page/2/
Conserve India: Conserve India, a leading not-for-profit organization born out of a desire to reduce and reuse
India’s growing mountain of waste, and simultaneously help the most vulnerable community of rag-pickers.
Website: http://conserveindia.wordpress.com/
Raspberry Pi: The Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized computer that plugs into your TV and a keyboard. It’s a
capable little PC which can be used for many of the things that your desktop PC does, like spreadsheets, wordprocessing and games. It also plays high-definition video. Raspberry Pi want to see it being used by kids all over
the world to learn programming. Website: raspberrypi.org
African Robotics Network: The African Robotics Network (AFRON) is a community of institutions, organizations
and individuals engaged in robotics in Africa. AFRON seeks to promote communication and collaborations that
will enhance robotics-related education, research and industry on the continent. To achieve this, AFRON
organizes projects, meetings and events in Africa at robotics and automation conferences abroad. Website:
http://robotics-africa.org/
Polis: A collaborative blog about cities around the globe. Website: http://www.thepolisblog.org/2012/03/cocacola-in-africa.html
mDirectory: The mDirectory is the most comprehensive database of information on mobile tech for social
change on the Web: case studies, mobile tools, research, and how-to guides. Website:
http://mobileactive.org/directory
Global Development: Launched in September 2010, this website from the Guardian newspaper tracks progress
on the MDGs, encourages debate on its blogs, offers a rich store of datasets from around the world, and features
monthly podcasts and resources for schools. Website: www.guardian.co.uk/global-development
Focus on Land in Africa: Focus on Land in Africa (FOLA) is an educational resource for development
practitioners and policy makers that explores how land and natural resource rights affect, and are effected by,
development in Africa. Through raising awareness of these issues, FOLA aims to elevate land and natural
resource rights as an urgent priority for development in Africa. Website:
http://www.focusonland.com/?utm_source=Com+Plotlines++OCT+2013&utm_campaign=4+Plotlines+SEPT+2013+Plots&utm_medium=email

India Water Tool: The India Water Tool (IWT) is a country customization of the Global Water Tool, and has been
developed by a 14 company working group based in India. The companies pooled their expertise to obtain the
best available data on ground water availability and quality in India and customize the tool to their country
context. The tool will help companies respond to the growing challenges of managing water effectively in this
large, water scarce country. Website: http://www.wbcsd.org/indiawatertool.aspx
International Development Economics Associates (IDEAs): International Development Economics Associates
(IDEAs) is a pluralist network of progressive economists across the world, engaged in research, teaching and
dissemination of critical analyses of economic policy and development. Website: www.networkideas.org/
OECD: Tackling the economic crisis website: The global economic crisis is entering a new phase amid signs of
a return to positive growth in many countries. But unemployment is likely to remain high and much still needs to
be done to underpin a durable recovery. This website will track the recovery. Website:
http://www.oecd.org/general/tacklingthecrisisastrategicresponse.htm
The Global Urbanist: News and analysis of cities around the world: planning, governance, economy,
communities, environment, international. Website: globalurbanist.com
Green Prophet: Green Prophet is a sustainable voice for green news on the Middle East region. A region with
sweeping changes and immense opportunities for sustainable investment and growth, we cover a vast and
unexplored territory from Morocco to Iran. The Middle East and North Africa region includes more than half a
billion people. Controlling about 60 per cent of the world’s oil, and 45 per cent of its natural gas reserves, and
with little environmental awareness in general and dwindling water resources, the region’s activities are of
immense consequence for climate change, human migration, and the future of our planet. Website:
http://www.greenprophet.com/
Inhabitat: Inhabitat.com is a weblog devoted to the future of design, tracking the innovations in technology,
practices and materials that are pushing architecture and home design towards a smarter and more sustainable
future. Website: http://inhabitat.com/
ICT Update: A bimonthly printed bulletin, a web magazine, and an accompanying email newsletter that explores
innovative uses of information technology in agriculture and rural development in African, Caribbean and Pacific
(ACP) countries. Website: http://ictupdate.cta.int/en/Regulars/Perspectives/%28issue%29/56
Youth-Inclusive Financial Services (YFS-Link) Program website: The first space for financial services providers
(FSPs) and youth-service organizations (YSOs) to gather, learn and share about youth-inclusive financial services.
Website: http://www.makingcents.com/ourWork/yfsLink.php

Triple Crisis Blog: Global Perspectives on Finance, Development and Environment Website:
http://triplecrisis.com/
Full Disclosure: The Aid Transparency Blog: A Devex blog, written by members of the international community.
Website: www.devex.com/en/blogs/full-disclosure
Africa Portal: An online knowledge resource offering researchers and opinion leaders a forum to share their
insights on Africa and publish their work on pressing areas of concern to policymakers and the public. It aims to
fill the gap in accessibility to research and information on policy issues on the continent. Website:
africaportal.org
African Economic Outlook: A unique online tool that puts rigorous economic data, information and research on
Africa at your fingertips. A few clicks gives access to comprehensive analyses of African economies, placed in
their social and political contexts. This is the only place where African countries are examined through a common
analytical framework, allowing you to compare economic prospects at the regional, sub-regional and country
levels. Website: africaneconomicoutlook.org/en
Africa Renewal: The Africa Renewal information programme, produced by the Africa Section of the United
Nations Department of Public Information, provides up-to-date information and analysis of the major economic
and development challenges facing Africa today. Website: www.un.org/ecosocdev/geninfo/afrec/
Timbuktu Chronicles: A blog by Emeka Okafor
With “a view of Africa and Africans with a focus on entrepreneurship, innovation, technology, practical remedies
and other self-sustaining activities.” Website: http://timbuktuchronicles.blogspot.com/
AfriGadget: AfriGadget is a must-read for African invention junkies. They are always on the look out for
ingenious innovation that is new or a repurposing of existing technology in a new way, interesting in the sense
that the story captures the imagination of others, inspiring others to see solutions in uncommon ways, practical
ideas that solve problems in a demonstrable way, and entrepreneurs who are inventing new products or
solutions. Website: afrigadget.com

Interesting Blogger
EBP Lab
The EBP LAB is a platform that promotes emerging leaders, thinkers and doers who are pioneering alternative
routes to value creation in the 21st century. Website: http://www.ebplab.com/emerging2emerging/

Notable Websites
UNRISD
The United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD) is an autonomous research institute
within the UN system that undertakes multidisciplinary research and policy analysis on the social dimensions of
contemporary development issues. UNRISD’s new website is packed with resources and publications and always
has a new event worth checking out. Website: http://www.unrisd.org/
Social Media
Africa Entrepreneurship Platform
This ground breaking initiative is created as a forum to showcase innovative ideas and businesses from Africa
that have the ability to scale internationally, driving job creation and sustainable economic development between
Africa and the Americas. Website: www.sacca.biz
AfriGadget on Facebook: ‘Solving everyday problems with African ingenuity’: Website:
www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=2402629579
Start-up Funding
Venture Capital for Africa
Venture Capital for Africa (www.vc4africa.biz) is the continent’s leading founder’s network, the largest and fastest
growing community of entrepreneurs and investors building promising companies in Africa. The community
currently supports more than 1000 + ventures in more than 30 African countries. Already entrepreneurs have
been featured in mainstream media, established joint ventures and secured funding. Website:
https://vc4africa.biz/
Ashoka - Innovators for the Public
To support social entrepreneurs who are leading and collaborating with changemakers, in a team of teams model
that addresses the fluidity of a rapidly evolving society. Ashoka believes that anyone can learn and apply the
critical skills of empathy, team work, leadership and changemaking to be successful in the modern world.
Website: https://www.ashoka.org/
Betterplace
Betterplace.org is a transparent online donation platform. 5,818 projects already use the free technology and
advice – and 392,264 donors have enthusiastically contributed. Website: http://www.betterplace.org/en
Hubs!:
They are sprouting up all over the place and now there is a map showing where they are in Africa. Website:
https://africahubs.crowdmap.com/# And there are 18 in Latin America too. Website:
http://thenextweb.com/la/2012/08/11/18-latin-american-tech-hubs-know/
The SEED Initiative
Hosted by the UN Environment Programme's World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC), the SEED
Initiative is a global partnership for action on the Green Economy. The annual SEED Awards help to develop the
most promising social and environmental start-ups in emerging economies and developing countries.
Website: http://unep.org/newscentre/Default.aspx?DocumentID=2647&ArticleID=8798&l=en
The Pioneers of Prosperity Grant and Award
This competition is a partnership between the OTF Group and the John F. Templeton Foundation of the United
States, and promotes companies in East Africa by identifying local role models that act as examples of
sustainable businesses in their country/region. It is open to businesses from Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Burundi
and Rwanda. Five pioneers will receive US $50,000 to re-invest in their business. It is open to for-profit
businesses that provide high wages to their workers and that operate in sustainable ways.
Website: http://pioneersofprosperity.org/index.php
Oxford Said Business School Youth Business Development Competition
Open to youth between 16 and 21 across the world, the competition is run by students at Oxford University to
promote social enterprise. A prize fund of £2,000 in seed capital is up for grabs. It calls itself the ‘world’s first
global youth development competition’.
Website: www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/oba/se/ybd
Challenge
InnoCentive (www.innocentive.com/) is a challenge to the world’s inventors to find solutions to real scientific and
technological problems affecting the poor and vulnerable. It is an open marketplace where anybody with a
problem can post it, and rewards for effective solutions stretch up to US $100,000. They use rigorous intellectual
property protection so ideas are not stolen without credit being given to the inventor. Website:
www.rockfound.org/about_us/news/2007/0720first_seeker.shtml
Rwanda Innovation Endowment Fund (RIEF)
Rwanda Research Innovation Endowment Fund (RIEF) was established and is managed by the Government of
Rwanda, through the Ministry of Education (MINEDUC) in partnership with UNECA (SRO-EA & ISTD) under One
UN Rwanda. The objective of this Fund is to stimulate economic transformation through R&D in innovative

market-oriented products and processes in priority areas of the economy, thereby increasing prosperity and the
competitiveness of the Rwandan economy. The orientation can be either for economic growth, social
development or combination of the two. Website: http://www.mineduc.gov.rw/spip.php?article21
The Innovation Prize for Africa (IPA)
The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) and the African Innovation Foundation (AIF) are
delighted to announce the call for applications for the 2013 Innovation Prize for Africa (IPA). Too often,
innovators and entrepreneurs are not highly profiled on the African development agenda. It is IPA’s mission to
elevate attention around innovative work and help support the vision of entrepreneurs. The prize honours and
encourages innovative achievements that contribute towards the development of new products, increased
efficiency or cost savings in Africa. The prize also promotes the efforts of young African men and women
pursuing science, technology and engineering careers as well as business opportunities that aim to contribute to
sustainable development in Africa. Website: http://innovationprizeforafrica.org/
Video
Forum for the Future: Compelling animated videos exploring the hard choices of an urbanizing world and the
need to promote sustainable development and environmental harmony. Website:
http://www.youtube.com/user/forumforthefuture96

EVENTS
Have an event you would like the South-South community to know about? Then send details to
developmentchallenges@googlemail.com.
Africa Events
An excellent resource by Aryan Media Group for all events in Africa in 2014. Look up events by the month or by
country. Website: http://www.events-africa.com/

2014
July
Have an event you would like the South-South community to know about? Then send details to
developmentchallenges@googlemail.com.
Aviation Outlook Africa 2014
Johannesburg, South Africa (1-2 July 2014)
Aviation Outlook Africa is a conference about meeting the demand for aviation solutions. The event targets
decision-makers from local and international airlines, airports, investors and government.
Website: http://www.events-africa.com/aviation-outlook-africa-2014-events-africa.html
2nd International Conference on Global Public Health 2014
Negombo, Sri Lanka (3-4 July 2014)
Offers a valuable opportunity to network with colleagues from many countries who share the same goals.
Scientists and experts in Global public health are invited to participate in Asia’s largest public health event in Sri
Lanka. Session themes for the conference cover a rich and diverse range of research topics. We hope these
sessions will bring researchers from across the globe together to discuss broad questions of common interest
and provide a platform to establish relationships with new colleagues. You will be enlightened with innovative
ideas and solutions at GPH 2014.
Website: http://www.health3000.org/

August
Have an event you would like the South-South community to know about? Then send details to
developmentchallenges@googlemail.com.
U.S.-Africa Leaders’ Summit
Washington, DC, USA (4-6 August 2014)
President Obama in August will welcome leaders from across the African continent to the Nation’s Capital for a
three-day U.S.-Africa Leaders’ Summit, the first such event of its kind. This Summit, the largest event any U.S.
President has held with African heads of state and government, will build on the President’s trip to Africa in the
summer of 2013 and it will strengthen ties between the United States and one of the world’s most dynamic and
fastest growing regions. Specifically, the August 4-6 Summit will advance the Administration’s focus on trade and
investment in Africa and highlight America’s commitment to Africa’s security, its democratic development, and its
people. At the same time, it will highlight the depth and breadth of the United States’ commitment to the African
continent, advance our shared priorities and enable discussion of concrete ideas to deepen the partnership. At its
core, this Summit is about fostering stronger ties between the United States and Africa.

Website: http://www.whitehouse.gov/us-africa-leaders-summit

September
Annual Meeting of the New Champions
Tianjin, People’s Republic of China (10-12 September 2014)
Established in 2007 as the foremost global gathering on science, technology and innovation, the Annual Meeting
of the New Champions convenes the next generation of fast-growing enterprises shaping the future of business
and society together with leaders from major multinationals as well as government, media, academia and civil
society. Join us next September in Tianjin as part of – a community of more than 1,500 participants from 90
countries – for a true global experience addressing today’s unprecedented set of intertwined global challenges –
economic, political, societal and environmental.
Website: http://www.weforum.org/events/annual-meeting-new-champions
World Economic Forum on Europe, MENA and Eurasia
Istanbul, Turkey (28-30 September 2014)
Shaping New Pathways to Development and Growth
Istanbul sits at the intersection of globally important regions and cultures, and within one of the world’s most
dynamic economies, Turkey. Building on a cross-regional platform introduced in Istanbul in 2012, the 2014
meeting will bring together over 1,000 of the foremost leaders from across Europe, the Middle East, North Africa
and Central Asia. These regions share common challenges while remaining emphatically diverse. At the same
time, they are increasingly interconnected, which creates a host of new opportunities and imperatives. Across
these regions, business, government and civil society leaders are looking for ways to strengthen institutions,
boost employment and create inclusive growth by fostering innovation and entrepreneurship. These shared
efforts are critical for Europe’s drive to close its competitiveness divide, North Africa’s complex transitions and
reforms in Central Asia.
Website: http://www.weforum.org/events/world-economic-forum-europe-mena-and-eurasia

October
Global Youth Economic Opportunities Conference
Washington, D.C., USA (6-8 October 2014)
Making Cents International is thrilled to announce the 2014 Global Youth Economic Opportunities Conference
will take place October 6-8 at the Renaissance Arlington Capital View Hotel (2800 South Potomac Ave. Arlington,
Virginia 22202), which is just minutes outside Washington, DC. We look forward to your engagement in a
dynamic exchange of lessons learned, promising practices, and innovative ideas through a "Spotlight on
Technology" and 5 learning tracks: Workforce Development, Youth Enterprise Development, Monitoring,
Evaluation & Impact Assessment, Gender, Youth-Inclusive Financial Services and Capabilities.
Website: youtheconomicopportunities.org/conference and makingcents.com
Twitter: @YouthEconOpps and @MakingCentsIntl
TEDGlobal 2014: South!
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (5-10 October 2014)
TEDGlobal is heading to Latin America. In October 2014, on the beach of Copacabana in Rio de Janeiro, we will
be celebrating the outpouring of innovation, dynamism and creativity taking place all over South America and
the global south. The world is changing fast. Fresh thinking can be found in every direction, in emerging
geographies as well as in the western hemisphere. Prepare to have your world turned upside down: Join us in Rio
to explore the realities of tomorrow.
Website: http://conferences.ted.com/TEDGlobal2014/
Hidden Money, Hidden Resources: Financing Development with Transparency
Lima, Peru (14-15 October 2014)
You are invited to the 2014 annual conference of the Financial Transparency Coalition (FTC), co-hosted by the
Latin American Network on Debt, Development, and Rights (LATINDAD). The event will bring together leaders in
the development and finance communities to draw attention to the growing problem of illicit financial flows and
the impact on development. By conveying a variety of stakeholders, from government officials to civil society
advocates and policy experts from around the world, the conference serves as a global platform to exchange
ideas, engage in creative thinking on the issue of illicit flows, and work together to find solutions. You can submit
any questions to the conference team via email to: conference@financialtransparency.org. We regret to inform
you that the FTC is unable to provide funding for travel, accommodation, or per diems for the conference at this
time. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.
Website: http://conference.financialtransparency.org/conf/?page_id=13

November
Inequality, Democracy and Development under Neoliberalism and Beyond
Chennai, India (3-7 November 2014)
The Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO), the Council for the Development of Social Science
Research in Africa (CODESRIA) and the International Development Economic Associates (IDEAs), are pleased to
announce the call for applications for participation in the Seventh South-South Institute on INEQUALITY,
DEMOCRACY AND DEVELOPMENT UNDER NEOLIBERALISM AND BEYOND. The Institute will be held in Chennai,
India, from November 3 to 7, 2014. Within the ambit of the third phase of the Africa/Asia/Latin America Scholarly

Collaborative Programme, a series of activities have been scheduled, among them an annual South-South
Institute. The Institute is primarily designed to offer research training to younger scholars on the diverse
problems and challenges facing the countries of the South. In doing so, we also seek to promote the revival and
growth of comparative thinking and cross-regional networking among a younger generation of Southern
scholars. As was done during the first phase of this programme, which ran from 2005 to 2007, the different
sessions of the South-South Institute rotate among the three continents where the lead collaborating institutions
are located, namely, Africa, Asia and Latin America. In this way, participants, who will also be drawn from all three
continents, are exposed to the socio-historical contexts of other regions of the South as an input that helps to
broaden their analytical perspectives and improves the overall quality of their scientific engagements.
Website: http://www.networkideas.org/ideasact/jun14/ia25South_South_Institute_2014.htm

World Economic Forum on India
(New Delhi, India (4-6 November 2014)
India is Asia’s third largest economy, the world’s largest democracy and most populous country, with over 1.2
billion inhabitants. In this indispensable emerging market, the country’s entrepreneurs and rapidly globalizing
firms are key contributors to the world economy. However, as a fundamentally bottom-up, state-led and centrally
enabled model, the country’s development is a multidimensional undertaking. As a result, the challenges and
opportunities that India encounters are among the most important yet also least understood in the world.
Marking the thirtieth year of the World Economic Forum’s active engagement in India, taking place at a time
when the energetic optimism for India which has been prevalent in the past decade has given way to questions
about the country’s true potential, the Forum will provide the foremost multistakeholder platform bringing
together international and national leaders in New Delhi who are invested in building a sustainable roadmap for
India’s future. This meeting will offer an opportunity to meet with the new government to discuss key issues that
challenge inclusive growth in India and to focus to craft solutions. This will be an invaluable meeting for all who
have a real interest in the future of India.
Website: http://www.weforum.org/events/world-economic-forum-india-0
AITEC East Africa ICT Summit 2014
Nairobi, Kenya (19-20 November 2014)
The time has come for East Africa's long heralded ICT revolution to start delivering results that improve the
quality of life for the region's citizens. The technology is available, the international communication links are in
place, the need is clear.
Website: http://www.events-africa.com/aitec-east-africa-ict-summit-2014-events-africa.html

December
Have an event you would like the South-South community to know about? Then send details to
developmentchallenges@googlemail.com.

January 2015 – Millennium Development Goals Deadline Year
April
7th World Water Forum
Daegu-Gyeongbuk, Republic of Korea (12-17 April 2015)
The 7th World Water Forum will take place in Daegu-Gyeongbuk, Republic of Korea, from 12 to 17 April 2015.
The 7th Edition of the world’s largest water event is expected to gather over 30,000 people from multistakeholder backgrounds for 6 days of high-quality sessions, intense debates and informative workshops.
Website: worldwatercouncil.org

AWARDS AND FUNDING
CTA Top 20 Innovations for Smallholder Farmers: Call for Proposals
CTA is a joint international institution of the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of States and the
European Union (EU). Its mission is to advance food and nutrition security, increase prosperity and encourage
sound natural resource management in ACP countries. Smallholder production systems in ACP countries are
performing far below the levels required to sustain livelihoods, reduce poverty and contribute to the attainment
of food and nutrition security and ecological sustainability. Research results and technologies that have been
developed in universities and research institutes are said to “remain on the shelf”. Farmer “innovations” are
sometimes ignored and generally not valued or promoted. While it is recognized that, a complex package of
inputs, support systems and management practices would be required to achieve the desired results; there is
need to unleash the innovation potential of ACP scientists, engineers and farmers make visible the knowledge
that remain out of reach of the majority of farmers in most ACP countries.

CTA is calling for proposals on innovations in use or have potential in smallholder agricultural production
systems in ACP countries and which if known and widely promoted can benefit other farming communities.
Website: http://youngfamersfoundation.wordpress.com/2014/01/28/cta-top-20-innovations-for-smallholderfarmers-call-for-proposals/
Agribusiness for Innovation
The Nairobi-based Agribusiness for Innovation Incubator programme is inviting people to apply for the 2014
programme. If you have an innovation that is aimed at improving food production, processing, technology or
distribution and have legalized your idea, then the Incubation Programme is looking for you. The programme
invites 12 agribusiness start–ups with mature ideas to work together with facilitators, mentors and like mined
entrepreneurs in the same environment for 16 weeks. The sessions and workshops will help the start-up teams
analyz e the real need for input and feedback from the market, customers and key stakeholders, and design their
tests and pilots accordingly. After 4 weeks of the sessions the teams will make presentations to a panel of
business angles and their fellow peers and they panel will select 5 start-ups that will be given the pre-committed
funding of $5,000 each, to commence the testing and piloting. The piloting programme will continue for 10
weeks where they will be having guidance from facilitators, advisers and mentors. The activities conclude with a
presentation to potential investors, key stakeholders and the social enterprise community at large what their tests
and pilots revealed, and what the next steps are for their business venture.
Website: http://techmoran.com/where-are-the-kenyan-agribusiness-innovators/
World Habitat Awards 2015
New deadline for World Habitat Award submissions: the World Habitat Awards will now be presented at the
World Urban Forum and UN-Habitat Governing Council events in April of each year, increasing opportunities for
international exposure, networking and dissemination of the award winning approaches. Website:
http://www.worldhabitatawards.org/enter/?lang=00
Mayors Challenge
Innovation comes from an intentional process of experimentation and exploration. The 2013–2014 Mayors
Challenge is an ideas competition for European cities—a chance to win funding for a bold new solution to a
major urban challenge. It exists to bring powerful new ideas to life—not only to help your own city, but to
encourage others to adopt creative approaches as well. Website:
http://mayorschallenge.bloomberg.org/index.cfm?objectid=58B735E0-1A4E-11E3-8975000C29C7CA2F
The EU Contest for Young Scientists
The European Union (EU) Contest for Young Scientists, an initiative of the European Commission, was set up to
promote the ideals of co-operation and interchange between young scientists. Website:
http://ec.europa.eu/research/youngscientists/index_en.cfm?pg=history
2014 Innovation Prize for Africa
The second round of the Innovation Prize for Africa (IPA), which aims to reward innovation across Africa in key
sectors of interest, has been launched. The Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) expect the prize to promote
among young African men and women in the pursuit of science, technology and engineering careers and
business applications. The aims are to:
- Mobilize leaders from all sectors to fuel African innovation;
- Promote innovation across Africa in key sectors of interest through the competition;
- Promote science, technology and engineering as rewarding, exciting and noble career options among the
youth in Africa by profiling success applicants; and
- Encourage entrepreneurs, innovators, funding bodies and business development service providers to
exchange ideas and explore innovative business opportunities.
Website: innovationPrizeForArica.org
World Summit Youth Award
The international contest for young people using the Internet and mobiles to take action on the UN Millennium
Development Goals. Website: www.youthaward.org
Grand Challenges Canada: Request for proposals
Grand Challenges Canada is pleased to announce a new initiative in its Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health
grand challenge. It’s called Saving Brains. Its goal is to unlock potential in children and dramatically transform
lives in the developing world. The money to fund this program comes from the Development Innovation Fund. In
Budget 2008, the Government of Canada committed $225 million CAD over five years to the Development
Innovation Fund, to support the best minds in the world in a collaborative search for solutions to global health
challenges. For the Request for Proposals: Website: http://www.grandchallenges.ca/wpcontent/uploads/2011/05/Request_for_Proposals-Saving_Brains_EN.pdf
Zayed Future Energy Prize
The world is in desperate need of innovative solutions to create a new, sustainable energy future. No one knows
who or where the next great energy solution will come from. Solutions and technologies that could change the
world are being developed globally, and the $2.2 million Zayed Future Energy Prize, managed by Masdar in Abu
Dhabi, recognizes and rewards innovation, leadership, and long-term vision in renewable energy and
sustainability. Website: www.zayedfutureenergyprize.com/
Philips Liveable Cities Award
Philips is looking for individuals and community or non-government organizations and businesses with ideas for
“simple solutions” that will improve people’s health and well-being in a city to enter the Philips Liveable Cities
Award. To help translate these ideas into reality, three Award grants totalling €125,000 are on the line. One

overall winning idea from any of the three categories outlined below will receive a grant of €75,000, while the
two additional ideas will receive grants of €25,000. Website: http://www.because.philips.com/livable-citiesaward/about-the-award
Piramal Foundation in India
Has established a US $25,000 prize for ideas that help advance full access to effective public health care in India.
The Piramal Prize is a $25,000 Social Entrepreneurship Competition focused on democratizing health care in India
that seeks to encourage and support bold entrepreneurial ideas which can profoundly impact access to higher
standards of health for India’s rural and marginalized urban communities. The award recognizes high-impact,
scalable business models and innovative solutions that directly or indirectly address India’s health-care crisis.
Website: www.piramalprize.org
Special Award for South-South Transfer
The aim of the award is to identify, provide visibility, and honour those who have successfully shared their
projects and approaches internationally, thereby increasing the impact of the initiative. The winning practice
receives US $15,000 to further transfer the awarded practice to other communities in developing countries.
Website: www.southsouthexpo.org
South-South Experience Exchange Facility
Supported by Mexico, China, India, Denmark, Spain, The Netherlands, and the U.K. and now Colombia, the SouthSouth Experience Exchange Facility is a multi-donor trust fund that promotes the idea that developing countries
can learn from the successes of other developing countries in overcoming similar challenges. In the past 12
months, the trust has given out 35 grants to countries for learning activities ranging from working with at risk
youth in the Caribbean to outsourcing IT services in Africa. Website: www.southsouthcases.info
African Writers Fund
Together with the Ford Foundation, the Fund supports the work of independent creative writers living on the
continent. The Fund recognizes the vital role that poets and novelists play in Africa by anticipating and reflecting
the cultural, economic and political forces that continuously shape and reshape societies. Website:
http://www.trustafrica.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=91&Itemid=90&lang=fr
Joint NAM S&T Centre - ICCS Fellowship Programme
Centre for Science and Technology of the Non-Aligned and Other Developing Countries (NAM S&T Centre) and
International Center for Chemical Sciences (ICCS), (H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry and Dr. Panjwani Centre
for Molecular Medicine and Drug Research), University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
Contact: namstct@vsnl.com, namstct@bol.net.in, apknam@gmail.com
PhD Plant Breeding Scholarships at the University of Ghana
The University of Ghana (www.ug.edu.gh) has been awarded a project support grant by the Alliance for a Green
Revolution (www.agra-alliance.org) in Africa (a joint venture between the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and
the Rockefeller Foundation, for the establishment of a West African Centre for Crop Improvement (WACCI). This
is available to scientists working at NARIs, universities and international centres in West Africa. Women scientists
are especially encouraged to apply for a fellowship under this programme. Website:
www.acci.org.za/Default.asp?nav=Home&idno=10
Genesis: India’s Premier Social Entrepreneurship Competition
Is a social entrepreneurship competition aiming to bring together social entrepreneurs, students, NGOs,
innovators, incubators, corporations and financiers and encourage them to come up with innovative ideas which
are socially relevant and feasible. Website: http://genesis.iitm.ac.in/

Jobs and Careers
Weitzenegger’s International Development Job Market
Website: www.weitzenegger.de/new/jobmarket.php
Global Knowledge Initiative
The Global Knowledge Initiative seeks to build global knowledge partnerships between individuals and
institutions of higher education and research. It seeks to help partners access the global knowledge, technology,
and human resources needed to sustain growth and achieve prosperity for all."
Website: www.globalknowledgeinitiative.org/
ExportHelp - Promoting and supporting access to the European market
The European Commission runs a database for the explicit support of market players in developing countries who
want to bring their products to the EU market. The database gives an overview on the EU´s preferential trade
regimes established for developing countries as well as lists all tariffs, taxes and other requirements for goods
imported into the EU.
Website: http://exporthelp.europa.eu
Development Executive Group Devex Networking Website
Over 90,000 global experts can network and connect and learn about more than 47,000 registered projects.
Website: www.devex.org

Website Offers Career Advice to Young Africans
Set up by the Commonwealth Secretariat, Africancareerguidance.com is aimed at providing career guidance to
African youth and helping them to link with prospective employers. AfricaRecruit is a human resources
organization that provides skills training for African professionals in the Diaspora and on the continent. The
website has an inbuilt email subscriber list for all its users and offers a searchable database of career profiles for
job seekers and prospective employers. It also offers skills and interest assessments and advice on CV and résumé
preparation. It provides tips about interviewing techniques, as well as information on internship and volunteer
opportunities, and entrepreneurial skills.
Website: www.africacareerguidance.com
African Diaspora Skills Database
This database was compiled to provide an overview of qualified African Diaspora professionals with varied areas
of expertise and experience. The African Diaspora contributes substantially to the social, economic and political
development of Africa, and this database is set up to further mobilize this considerable potential.
Website: www.diaspora-centre.org/NEWSLETTER/Database
Aid Workers Network (AWN)
Aid Workers Network (AWN) is an online platform for aid, relief and development workers to ask and answer
questions of each other, and to exchange resources and information. AWN is registered in the United Kingdom as
a charity. You will find discussions about a range of questions and issues on the AWN forum from aid, relief and
development workers all over the world and representing a variety of fields, with new threads or responses
posted daily. The forum is a great way to get in contact with
other aid and development workers in your geographic area or working in a similar area of work.
Website: www.aidworkers.net
Bizzlounge
Bizzlounge is where people committed to ethical behaviour meet, who want to establish and maintain business
contacts in an exclusive and relaxed environment.
Website: http://bizzlounge.com
Business Action for Africa
Business Action for Africa is a network of businesses and business organizations working collectively to accelerate
growth and poverty reduction in Africa.
Website: http://businessactionforafrica.blogspot.com
Business Fights Poverty
Business Fights Poverty is a professional network for all those passionate about fighting world poverty through
the power of good business.
Website: http://businessfightspoverty.ning.com
Business in Development Network (BiD)
The BiD Network Foundation runs the BiD Challenge to contribute to sustainable economic development by
stimulating entrepreneurship in developing countries.
Website: www.bidnetwork.org
Zunia
By Development Exchange, it offers news, publications and networking opportunities with the world’s
development community.
Website: www.zunia.org
Catalogue of Poverty Networks
UNDP is organizing an online catalogue of Poverty Networks as a means to facilitate access to knowledge and
sharing this to a wider audience in 189 countries. Poverty Networks are web-based platforms that provide space
for sharing and disseminating development-related information and initiatives. Below you will find information
on IPC’s collaborating networks, which help foster dialogue between researchers, policymakers, civil society and
multilateral organizations.
Website: www.undp-povertycentre.org/povnet.do
Connections for Development (CfD)
CfD is a UK, Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) led, membership based organization committed to ensuring that UK
BME communities, and the organizations they are involved in, are supported in the process of shaping and
delivering policy and projects that affect their countries of origin or interest – collectively ''our world”.
Website: www.cfdnetwork.co.uk
Development Crossing
Development Crossing was set up in 2006 by a small group of friends with diverse backgrounds ranging from
business consulting to international development. In a world where the environment, corporate responsibility,
and sustainable development are becoming increasingly intertwined, our goal was to create a site where
individuals that shared our passion could keep up-to-date with relevant happenings in the world and connect
with like-minded individuals. The idea behind Development Crossing is to provide a social network that brings
together people from a variety of sectors, countries and professions to discuss corporate social responsibility and
sustainable development.

Website: www.developmentcrossing.com
DevelopmentAid.org
The one-stop-information-shop for the developmental sector, DevelopmentAid.org is a membership organization
that brings together information for developmental professionals, NGOs, consultancy firms and donors.
Website: www.developmentaid.org
dgCommunities on the Development Gateway (Zunia.org)
Zunia.org, a free online service by the Development Gateway Foundation is devoted to knowledge-sharing and
collaboration for people working to reduce poverty in the developing world.
Website: http://topics.developmentgateway.org
Diaspora African Forum
This Forum exists ''to invite and encourage the full participation of Africans in the Diaspora in the building of the
African Union, in its capacity as an important part of the Continent''. We will provide the vital linkage for Diaspora
Africans to become involved in Africa's development as well as reap the fruits of African unity.
Website: www.diasporaafricanforum.org
Business Planet: a new data map on Entrepreneurship
Business Planet, an interactive Google map, now includes data on new business creation around the world.
Measures of entrepreneurial activity are based on the number of total and newly registered corporations. Click on
colour markers to learn more about each country.
Website: http://rru.worldbank.org/businessplanet/default.aspx?pid=8

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme
WASTE

Turning Waste into Wealth in the 21st Century
RECYCLING

Building Green Businesses That Work: From Fashion to Fuel to Farms
KEY DATA

Facts and Figures
STATE OF PLAY

Mobiles Transforming Green Solutions: A How-to Guide Pages 26-27
Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 05

www.southerninnovator.org

2014

IN THIS ISSUE:

Designing for a New Africa

98%

Recyclable
Zero-waste
Solutions

Cradle-to-cradle Pen
Solution

Waste &

Recycling Issue
Improving Human Development with Finite Resources

Check out

the Southern Innovator website
for more content and updates:
www.southerninnovator.org

About UNDP

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

UNDP partners with people at all levels of society to help build
nations that can withstand crisis, and drive and sustain the
kind of growth that improves the quality of life for everyone. On
the ground in 170 countries and territories, we offer global
perspective and local insight to help empower lives and build
resilient nations.
The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect
those of the United Nations, the United Nations Development
Programme or governments. The designations employed and
material presented on maps do not imply the expression of any
opinion whatsoever concerning the legal status of any country,
territory or area, or its frontiers or boundaries.

Welcome
to the fifth issue of Southern Innovator (SI) magazine. Our
fourth issue, on the theme of cities and urbanization, was launched in October
2013 at the Global South-South Development Expo in Nairobi, Kenya. It was a joy
to meet so many innovators at the Expo, hear their stories and receive feedback on
the magazine.

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme
WASTE

Turning Waste into Wealth in the 21st Century
RECYCLING

Building Green Businesses That Work: From Fashion to Fuel to Farms
KEY DATA

Facts and Figures
STATE OF PLAY

Mobiles Transforming Green Solutions: A How-to Guide Pages 26-27
Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation

This fifth issue tackles the dilemma of how to continue to improve human development on a planet heading for a population of more than 9 billion by 2050 and with
a finite quantity of physical resources. To achieve this, a radical new perspective is
required; one that values all resources and sees ways to turn waste into wealth and
to transform the way that things are made.

ISSUE 05

Designing for a New Africa

98%

Recyclable
Zero-waste
Solutions

One solution gaining more advocates is the “cradle-to-cradle” philosophy. It goes
beyond the “reduce, reuse and recycle” approach, instead calling for a revolution in
how goods are made. It seeks to eliminate all waste in the life cycle of a product and
to eradicate forever the idea that items can just be thrown away when they are used
up, only to then pollute the planet with toxic waste.
       
Another discovery made while researching this issue is that it is possible to meet all
the world’s energy needs using clean technologies and renewable resources. Tapping the geothermal resources bubbling and hissing under the ground could supply vast amounts of energy. One eco-city in China is getting 20 per cent of its energy
from renewable sources and is using solar panels stretching 6 kilometres as a power
source, along with wind turbines and ground heat energy. In short, energy does not
have to be dirty and poisoning.

www.southerninnovator.org

2014

IN THIS ISSUE:

Cradle-to-cradle Pen
Solution

Waste &

Recycling Issue
Improving Human Development with Finite Resources

One of the vexing issues in creating a sustainable, new green economy is how to
make it economically viable. Many try and fail, give up, and go back to doing things
the conventional way. But, as the innovators in this issue show, it is possible to succeed by doing things differently, being persistent and placing good design at the
centre of green solutions.
Buckminster Fuller, the twentieth-century futurist, architect, engineer and inventor,
who believed in radical change through a design revolution, once said: “You never
change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model
that makes the existing model obsolete.” And this is what the innovators featured
in this issue are doing.
In each issue of Southern Innovator, you will find contact information for further follow-up. We have attempted to provide the most current information, but given the
quick pace of change in the global South, this is not always possible. We apologize in
advance for any out-of-date information, including Internet links. We hope that this
magazine makes a useful contribution to your work and helps to inspire all to act!
Cosmas Gitta
Editor-in-Chief
Southern Innovator
www.southerninnovator.org

3

2014 Southern Innovator

Waste & Recycling
Contents

Waste
6

More People, One Planet
More People, One Planet

7 billion

Solar photovoltaic (PV) has been
growing annually by 40% since 2000

Source: Global Footprint Network

Wind

HOW MANY PLANETS WOULD BE NEEDED TO PROVIDE RESOURCES IF
EVERYONE IN THE WORLD LIVED LIKE PEOPLE IN THESE COUNTRIES:

Wind energy could provide 9%
of the world’s electricity by 2030
20%: Amount of electricity
Denmark gets from wind power

United States:

China:

Costa Rica:

United Arab Emirates:

earths

earths

earths

earths

20% of people

1.4

3.5-fold

France:

hectares of land

A reasonable resource
demand per person

2.2 billion tonnes
per year MSW
(2025)

Hydropower

400%: Amount by which hydropower
could still be increased in the world
83%: Amount of electricity that
Brazil gets from its hydroelectric
power

New Urban World
70%: Projected global increase in urban solid waste as the world

Copy Editor: Barbara Brewka

US$187 billion for renewables (2011)
2.3 million jobs in renewable energy created in 2011
US$157 billion for natural gas, oil and coal (2011)
Total investment in clean energy: US$260 billion (2011)

PICTOGRAPHY: A QUICK GUIDE TO GREEN SYMBOLS FOR RECYCLING

Global market for waste management – collection

US$30 billion: Global market for scrap metal and paper
(World Bank)

How much land it takes to
provide the average person
with everything that person
consumes - food, goods and
energy - for one year.

every year

Source: Living Planet Report 2012

24%: Amount of textiles in the United Kingdom that are recycled

New trend: The fashion recycling and upcycling market
United Kingdom: 2

million tonnes of textiles are thrown away

10%: Waste textiles used to make new items (Defra)

Editor and Writer: David South

GREEN WASHING
Greenwashing is like whitewashing with a green (environmental) brush: companies and
organizations making themselves and their products sound or look like they’re really helping
the environment. And they lure you in, creating the perception that you can help, too. In some
cases, you are helping. In some cases, it’s greenwashing.
(greenwashingindex.com)

8 Waste: Introduction
11 TREND: Using Design for a Waste-free, Energy-efficient
Future

Web Design: Carina Figurasin

12 Texting for Cheaper Food with SokoText

Design and Layout: Sólveig Rolfsdóttir

15 INNOVATION: Cairo’s Green Technology Pioneers

Illustrations: Sólveig Rolfsdóttir
Printer: Wyndeham Grange Ltd. United Kingdom

Amount of energy
in the European
Union consumed
by buildings.

continues to urbanize (World Bank)

US$400 billion:

Editor-in-Chief: Cosmas Gitta

electricity
comes from
renewables

ENERGY INVESTMENT

Sources: Sustainable Energy For All (se4all.org)
and World Bank

and recycling (UNEP)

Definition – Ecological footprint: noun

15.3% of

The potential game-changer
40 countries can meet most of their
energy needs with geothermal (World Bank)

BOTTLE BANK

40%:

Germany:

Geothermal

(UNEP)

1.8

13% from geothermal and 87% from
hydropower = 100% from renewables.
Almost 100% of Iceland’s space heating
and water heating come from geothermal sources.

Sustainably grown biomass could
produce up to 4X global electricity
needs by 2050

earths

Source: Global Footprint Network
footprintnetwork.org

1.3 billion tonnes
per year current
MSW

Iceland:

Biomass

2.5

5.4

WASTE
World municipal solid
waste (MSW): World
needs to increase
MSW recycling

electricity from
geothermal by
2031

Solar

40% of world’s garbage

Wealthiest

Could produce

27% of its

growth from 2010 to 2035

15% of world’s consumed meat

consume 75% of planet’s
resources (World Bank)

Kenya:

Energy
30%: Global energy demand

20% of world’s energy use

1.1

World population
(2050)

GREEN ECONOMY

THE US: 5% of global population

4.1

9 billion

World population
(2011)

A World Needing to Better Use Its Resources

15 Turning Human Waste into Fertilizer: An African Solution
16 Saving Water to Make Money

ISSN 2222-9280

16 Solar-powered Mobile Clinics to Boost Rural
Health Care in Africa

ISBN 978-0-9920217-1-9

17 Solar Bottle Bulbs Light Up Dark Homes

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation

18 Information Technologies Transforming Africa

Website: ssc.undp.org

19 CLEANING UP: A Solution to Stop Garbage
from Destroying Tourism
20 The Water-free South African Bathing Solution
21 Biogas Digester-in-a-Bag Brings Portability
22 Ending Gang Violence while Cleaning the Streets in Haiti
23  Turning Animal Waste into Paper
24  How an Eco-city Works
25  Global South Urbanization Does Not Have to Harm
Biodiversity
26  Turning Waste into Wealth: A Southern Innovator’s Guide

4

Contents

54 Books, etc.
54 Papers + Reports
55 Online Content
56 Contacts and Resources

Recycling

57 Additional Resources
58 Key Terms and Abbreviations

28  21st Century Resource Solution

Explanation
Turning waste into wealth and learning how to value
finite resources by recycling them pose a challenge for
the 21st century. Pioneers and innovators are showing
how this can be done and that it does not have to be a
burden but instead a bounty of riches yet to be
discovered. By respecting the planet’s resources and
by not seeing waste but rather an opportunity to build
wealth, human development can be increased without
sacrificing the world. As living standards improve and
people increase their consumption of products, it
becomes critical that those products are produced in
a way that does not poison the environment or damage
human health.
On these pages, SI shows how thinking about the
production cycle can radically alter the relationship
with resources. By turning away from just using and
discarding and also by moving further ahead from the
reduce, reuse and recycle approach, it is possible to
take another approach – cradle to cradle – that
radically demands that people think about designing
every product and process so that nothing is wasted
and all things always find their way back into the earth
as a non-toxic by-product or back into the production
cycle to be turned into a new good again.

FROM TOXIC WASTE TO FOOD FOR
THE EARTH
02 When the product is finished, it is also waste, often toxic and
harmful to the environment.
03 Eventually a plastic pen made from oil-based plastic will end
up in a landfill where it will become toxic waste.
04 The reduce - reuse - recycle (3Rs) production cycle is an
improvement on the old cycle of production – use and throw away
– but it still produces waste, much of which can be toxic.

OLD CYCLE OF PRODUCTION AND WASTE

Resources

Product 02

07 When the DBA 98 Pen has finished its life cycle, rather than just
being discarded as waste, it is dismantled and becomes either
food for the earth or “food” for another product and the life cycle
starts again.

01

CRADLE TO CRADLE – (C2C)

Decreasing

Increasing

08 Cradle-to-cradle certification establishes a process where
producers can gradually evolve their products to use the cradleto-cradle process and become better designed and free of harmful
waste. It is an eco-label administered by the Cradle to Cradle
Products Innovation Institute (c2ccertified.org), which assesses a
product’s safety to humans and the environment and its design for
future life cycles.
09 The majority of the pen – 98 per cent – can biodegrade in 180
days and does not leave any toxic waste behind when it does get
thrown away.
10 The Dipshikha Electrical Skill Improvement (DESI) School in
Bangladesh was built using cradle-to-cradle principles. Designed
for rural areas of the country by architect Anna Heringer
(anna-heringer.com), the idea was to show that it wasn’t necessary
to import expensive building materials to make a solid structure.
Made from earth and bamboo, the school is powered by solar
energy, and heating and cooling are done passively, relying on
natural air circulation through the building. Natural light is used
as much as possible and the building has all the modern facilities
expected in a school, including toilets and showers.

Waste 03

The Making of the DBA 98 Pen

Increasing

04

08

07

Bioplastic
from potatoes
100% recyclable

05

Wind energy
100% free and
non-polluting

Forest Stewardship
Council (FSC) paper
for packaging
100% recyclable

Resources

Non-toxic ink
from vegetables
100% recyclable

Life Cycle of a Plastic Pen

Resource Solution

Ink reservoir from renewable,
biodegradable fibre

Products

0%

Reduce

Definition – Cradle to Cradle: Concept
Cradle to cradle seeks to spark a new industrial
revolution but this time one that is ecological. By using
ecologically intelligent design, the initiators of the
concept, William McDonough and Dr. Michael Braungart, believe that human beings can have a positive,
restorative, beneficial impact on the environment by
turning the making of things into a positive force for
society, the economy and the planet. Cradle to cradle
is “a systemic approach to product innovation that
spurs the creation of truly beautiful, high-quality
products, and transforms the production of consumer
products into a positive force for society and the
environment.” All products can be designed for
continuous recovery and reuse as a nutrient for
something else. They believe that the best way to tackle
resource scarcity is to do better design.

06 Built using the principles of the cradle-to-cradle production
life cycle, the DBA 98 Pen produces just 2 per cent waste when it
is discarded at the end of its life cycle.

Production and Waste Cycle for a Plastic Pen

REDUCE – REUSE – RECYCLE – (3RS)

21st Century

05 The DBA 98 Pen (dba-co.com/pen) was developed as the first
cradle-to-cradle pen by a company in the United States and is 98
per cent biodegradable. The manufacturing plant where the pen is
made is powered by wind energy. Rather than oil-based materials,
the pen is made from bio-plastic from sustainable crop resources
and has non-toxic ink. It can decompose in a compost facility
within 180 days without leaving behind a toxic trace. The pen’s
nib is the only part that is disposed of as waste.

01 Every step produces waste in the old cycle of production.

Recycle
Resources

steel nib

Product

Waste

Waste

Reuse

2%

06

Hybrid and
zero-emission
delivery vehicles

98%
2% not
biodegradable

09

98% biodegradable
in 180 days

10

The DESI School in Bangladesh

Read on!
Sources: Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute (c2ccertified.org); Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things.

A sketch of the DESI School.

The completed DESI School.

31 Recycling: Introduction
32 RECYCLING FOR PROFIT: Banning of Plastic Bags and
Containers Brings New Opportunities
32 Fashion Recycling: How Southern Designers Are
Reusing and Making Money
33 Creating Green Fashion in China
34 Recycling Waste to Boost Incomes and Opportunities

Page 14

36  Southern Innovator: The 5-issue Milestone
38 ENERGY: Kenya Turns to Geothermal Energy for
Electricity and Growth
39 Geothermal Energy to Boost Development of the
Global South
40 Prisons with a Green Solution
42 African Fuel Pioneer Uses Crisis to Innovate
43  Indonesian Wooden Radio Succeeds with Good Design
45  Powerful Solar Light Spurring Income-making
Opportunities
47  Baker Cookstoves: Designing for the African Customer
49  Innovations Summary
51  Southern Innovator Knowledge Summary
52  Money, Money: Where to Get It

5

Building a New World That Is
More Urban

SUBJECT DIVIDERS

2014 Southern
Southern Innovator
Innovator
2013

More People, One Planet
A World Needing to Better Use Its Resources
THE US: 5% of global population
20% of world’s energy use
15% of world’s consumed meat
40% of world’s garbage
Source: Global Footprint Network

HOW MANY PLANETS WOULD BE NEEDED TO PROVIDE RESOURCES IF
EVERYONE IN THE WORLD LIVED LIKE PEOPLE IN THESE COUNTRIES:

United States:

China:

Costa Rica:

United Arab Emirates:

France:

earths

earths

earths

earths

earths

4.1

20% of people
consume 75% of planet’s
Wealthiest

resources (World Bank)

1.1

1.4

Source: Global Footprint Network
footprintnetwork.org

WASTE
World municipal solid
waste (MSW): World
needs to increase
MSW recycling

3.5-fold

2.5

5.4

1.3 billion tonnes
per year current
MSW

2.2 billion tonnes
per year MSW
(2025)

BOTTLE BANK

(UNEP)

1.8

hectares of land

A reasonable resource
demand per person

New Urban World
70%: Projected global increase in urban solid waste as the world
continues to urbanize (World Bank)
US$400 billion:
and recycling (UNEP)

Definition – Ecological footprint: noun
How much land it takes to
provide the average person
with everything that person
consumes - food, goods and
energy - for one year.
Source: Living Planet Report 2012

6

Global market for waste management – collection

US$30 billion: Global market for scrap metal and paper
(World Bank)

New trend: The fashion recycling and upcycling market
United Kingdom: 2
every year

million tonnes of textiles are thrown away

24%: Amount of textiles in the United Kingdom that are recycled
10%: Waste textiles used to make new items (Defra)

SUBJECT DIVIDERS

Waste

7 billion

9 billion

World population
(2011)

World population
(2050)

GREEN ECONOMY
Kenya:

Energy
30%: Global energy demand

Could produce

27% of its

growth from 2010 to 2035

electricity from
geothermal by
2031

Solar

Solar photovoltaic (PV) has been
growing annually by 40% since 2000

Wind

Wind energy could provide 9%
of the world’s electricity by 2030
20%: Amount of electricity
Denmark gets from wind power

Iceland:

13% from geothermal and 87% from
hydropower = 100% from renewables.
Almost 100% of Iceland’s space heating
and water heating come from geothermal sources.

Biomass

Sustainably grown biomass could
produce up to 4X global electricity
needs by 2050

Geothermal

The potential game-changer
40 countries can meet most of their
energy needs with geothermal (World Bank)

Germany:

15.3% of
electricity
comes from
renewables

40%:
Amount of energy
in the European
Union consumed
by buildings.

Hydropower
ENERGY INVESTMENT
400%: Amount by which hydropower
could still be increased in the world
US$187 billion for renewables (2011)
83%: Amount of electricity that
2.3 million jobs in renewable energy created in 2011
Brazil gets from its hydroelectric
power

US$157 billion for natural gas, oil and coal (2011)

Sources: Sustainable Energy For All (se4all.org)
and World Bank

Total investment in clean energy: US$260 billion (2011)

PICTOGRAPHY: A QUICK GUIDE TO GREEN SYMBOLS FOR RECYCLING

GREEN WASHING
Greenwashing is like whitewashing with a green (environmental) brush: companies and
organizations making themselves and their products sound or look like they’re really helping
the environment. And they lure you in, creating the perception that you can help, too. In some
cases, you are helping. In some cases, it’s greenwashing.
(greenwashingindex.com)

7

W a s t e :
Introduction

Waste
Introduction

The world’s growing population is becoming ever more urban. This transition has the potential to dramatically
improve human development while reducing the stress that we place on the world’s resources. But this is not a
certain outcome and will not happen unless people make radical changes to the way in which they live their lives.
The products and resources that people use to improve their living standards also deplete finite resources
and often leave pollution and toxic waste behind. It has become clear that the current approach to manufacturing and developing products is wasteful and generates vast quantities of refuse. And the current approach
to creating energy, heavily dependent on burning polluting fossil fuels, is contributing to climate change and
harming the planet. In short, things have to change, and dramatically.
However, it is not a time to lose hope: the range of solutions to these challenges is vast, and many innovators
and pioneers are developing new ways to do things. Too few people realize it, but tapping geothermal resources
could transform access to energy for many developing countries. In East Africa, Kenya is investing in geothermal energy and hopes to get 27 per cent of its electricity from this source by 2031. The World Bank believes
that about 40 countries worldwide have geothermal resources that could meet a very significant portion of
their national electricity demand.
Is it possible to earn an income in this green economy, however? Based on the evidence in the stories presented in this issue, the answer is yes. Taking urban waste as an example, it is forecast that global municipal
solid waste (MSW) recycling needs to increase 3.5-fold (UNEP) as the world continues to urbanize. This could
either be a disaster for living conditions and the planet or an opportunity to change views towards waste,
seeing it as a wealth-creating opportunity. Many are seizing this waste “problem” and creating solutions.
1 Bosnia and Herzegovina
2 Croatia
3 Serbia
4 Montenegro
5 Slovenia
6 The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Greenland
(Denmark)
Iceland

United
Kingdom

St. Pierre
and Miquelon (Fr.)

United States of America

Bahamas

Mexico

Cuba

page 22

Turks and Caicos Islands (U.K.)
Dominican Republic
Antigua and Barbuda
PuertoSt.Rico
(U.S.A.)
Kitts and Nevis St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Dominica Barbados
St. Lucia Trinidad and Tobago
Grenada

Haiti

Belize Jamaica

Guatemala Honduras
El Salvador

Nicaragua
Costa Rica Panama

Venezuela

Colombia

Guyana
page
Suriname
French Guiana (Fr.)

Algeria

Western
Sahara

Mauritania
Mali
Niger
Senegal
Chad
Gambia
Burkina
Guinea-Bissau Guinea
Faso Benin
Ghana Nigeria
Sierra Leone
Central
Liberia Côte
d'Ivoire Togo Cameroon African Rep.
Equatorial Guinea
Gabon Congo

Cape Verde

25

Brazil

Peru
Bolivia

Ascencion(U.K.)

page 16

Argentina

Ethiopia

Uganda

of Tanzania

Namibia

Botswana

Swaziland
Lesotho

Map No. 4170 Rev. 13 United Nations
Map has been altered to fit page.

April 2012

Mauritius
Réunion
(Fr.)

Mongolia
Dem. People's
Rep. of Korea

China

Maldives

Japan

page 24

Viet Nam
Cambodia

Sri Lanka

Brunei
Darussalam

page 23

Chagos
Archipelago/
Diego Garcia**

Republic
of Korea

Bhutan

Bangladesh Lao People's
Myanmar Dem. Rep.

Thailand

Malawi
Tromelin Island
Cargados Carajos Shoals
Mozambique
Zimbabwe
Rodriges Island
Madagascar

Northern
Mariana
Islands (U.S.A.)

Philippines

Guam (U.S.A.)

Palau

M a l a y s i a
Singapore

Federated States
of Micronesia

Indonesia
Christmas
(Austr.)
Cocos (Keeling)
Islands (Austr.)

page 23

Papua
New Guinea

Timor-Leste

Australia

The boundaries and names shown and the designations used
on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance
by the United Nations.
*Dotted line represents approximately the Line of Control
in Jammu and Kashmir agreed upon by India and Pakistan.
The final status of Jammu and Kashmir has not yet been
agreed upon by the parties.

Gough (U.K.)

Falkland Islands (Malvinas) (U.K.)***
South Georgia (U.K.)

pages 9/12/21
Seychelles
Agaleda Island

Zambia

Tristan Da Cunha (U. K.)

Chile

Nepal

India

pages 15/ 25

Somalia

Comoros

South
Africa

Uruguay

South
Sudan

Pakistan

Oman

Eritrea
Yemen
Djibouti

Republic of Burundi
the Congo
United Rep.

Angola
St. Helena (U.K.)

Sudan

Saudi
Arabia

Kenya
Democratic Rwanda

Angola
(Cabinda)

Paraguay

Kuwait
Bahrain United Arab
Qatar Emirates

Egypt

Libya

Sao Tome and Principe

Ecuador

Russian Federation

Estonia
Latvia
Denmark
R.F. Lithuania
Belarus
Ireland
Netherlands
Belgium GermanyCzechPoland
Ukraine
Luxembourg
Slovakia Rep. of Moldova
Austria Rep.Hungary
Kazakhstan
France
52
Liechtenstein
Romania
1 3
Switzerland
Andorra
Uzbekistan
Georgia
Bulgaria
4 6
San
Kyrgyzstan
Turkey Armenia Azerbaijan
Monaco Marino Italy Albania
Portugal Spain
Turkmenistan
Tajikistan
Holy See
Syrian
Greece
Jammu and
Tunisia
Cyprus Arab Rep.
Islamic
Lebanon
Kashmir *
Iraq
Malta
Rep. of Iran Afghanistan
Morocco
Israel Jordan

Canada

Bermuda (U.K.)

Finland

Norway Sweden

pages

9/15/17/20

**Appears without prejudice to the question of sovereignty.
***A dispute exists between the Governments of Argentina and
the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
concerning sovereignty over the Falkland Islands (Malvinas).
The initials in parentheses refer to the administering Power
or the Power involved in a special treaty relationship.

Department of Field Support
Cartographic Section

easing

Increasing

Bioplastic
from potatoes
100% recyclable

Increasing

UCE – REUSE – RECYCLE – (3RS)

04

Wind energy
100% free and
non-polluting

Forest Stewardship
Council (FSC) paper
for packaging
100% recyclable

Resources

Non-toxic ink
Waste
from vegetables
100% recyclable

ycle of a Plastic Pen

le

African Innovation Ecosystem Taking Shape

As websites such asReduce
AfriGadget (afrigadget.com)
amply prove, there is already an entrenched
do-it-yourself
innovation culture hardwired into
Resources
steel nib
daily life on the continent.
But nowProduct
new technologies will also accelerate the
Waste
spread of new ideas and solutions.

Waste

Identifying the elements that are making this
innovation culture flourishReuse
came under analysis
in a recent post on the Afrinnovator website 10
(afrinnovator.com).

0%

2%
2% not

Seebiodegradable
infographic pages 6-7

06

Hybrid and
zero-emission
delivery vehicles

At the Alexander von
Humboldt Research Institute
in Bogota, Colombia,
researchers have been
thinking about how to balance
urban development and the
environment to make
the
98%sure
biodegradable
in 180
days are
growing cities of the
future
not ecological disasters.

98%

Quick Facts

The DESI School in Bangladesh

Afrinnovator argues that there are four
elements that have come together to change
circumstances for innovators on the continent:
education, mentoring and incubators, funding
and showcase events.

Q& A

Ink reservoir from renewable,
biodegradable fibre

Products

• The Oslo Manual for measuring innovation
has defined four types of innovation: product
innovation, process innovation, marketing
innovation and organizational innovation.

09

According to Juana Marino
at the Institute’s Biological
Resources Policy Programme
– which investigates
“Biodiversity, Ecosystem
Services and Urban-Regional
Environments” – how cities
grow and develop must
change.

• Since 2005, six new science academies have
been established in Mauritius, Morocco,
Mozambique, Sudan, United Republic of
Afrinnovator concludes: “This is the last virgin
Tanzania
and Zimbabwe. This compares
A sketch of the
DESI School.
Theto
completed DESI School.
How is the trend towards
tech landscape left on the planet. The best time
nine established between 1902 and 2004.
rapid urbanization affecting
to become a player in the African technology
the planet and the creation of
innovation ecosystem is now.” – (July 2012)
• The UNESCO Science Report 2010 found that
waste?
Burkina Faso, Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa
The more people who arrive
had adopted laws to support biotechnology
in cities, the more they
research.
demand goods and services
• The Innovation Prize for Africa, begun in 2011,
(in a massive way!) – roads,
awards US$100,000 for the top innovation
housing, infrastructure,
that matches its criteria of marketability,
food, water – [creating] an
originality, scalability, social impact and
impressive amount of waste,
business potential.
challenging traditional waste
Sources: UNESCO and OECD
management and sanitation
Image: iHub Nairobi (ihub.co.ke)
policies.

Profile of African
Innovators
Continues to Rise
A mix of developments is
proving that African innovators
no longer need to see
themselves as lone operators
working in isolation. Awareness
of the continent’s talent has
never been higher and is
grabbing attention from the
world’s media.
This summer saw the launch
of a new publication called
African Innovator Magazine
(africaninnovatormagazine.
com). It is a good example of
how perceptions have switched
to recognizing that the
continent is awash with innovators who have a lot to say.
Billing itself as “Technology
insights for Africa’s decision
makers,” African Innovator
interviews business leaders
on the continent about how
they are driving innovation
within their organizations.
– (September 2012)

2030

The United
Nations goal for
universal access
to modern energy services

1.6 billion

Number of people still
lacking access to electricity

23%

Amount of
electricity
generated from
geothermal
sources in
the Philippines

24

Number of countries
using geothermal
energy to meet the
needs of 60 million
people (GEA)
Sources: World Bank, Geothermal
Energy Association and United Nations

African
Supercomputers
to Power
Next Phase of
Development
Increasing computing power
in Africa will bring in its wake,
it is hoped, a surge in economic
and research opportunities.
The new supercomputer, the
iHub Cluster, is being built in
the Kenyan capital by one of
Africa’s pioneering information
technology hubs – iHub Nairobi (ihub.co.ke/pages/home.
php) – in partnership with Internet products and services
company Google and microchip maker Intel Corporation.

What role can innovation
play?
Innovation is not just an option;
it is a “must”, and not just the
technical innovation already
being carried out by infrastructure, transport and building
sectors that are rapidly changing their patterns based on
mitigation technologies.
Innovation is also needed in
terms of biodiversity, biotechnology, information and
knowledge production; appropriation, use and management.
Knowledge turns into innovation when appropriated by
social spheres, when it enters
the social and political arenas.
(humboldt.org.co)

The iHub supercomputer
hopes to help universities and
colleges to gain a competitive
edge and be able to undertake more complex research
in the fields of media, pharmaceuticals and biomedical
engineering.
– (October 2012)

9

TREND

2014 Southern Innovator

Read about how the Baker cookstove
is using design to boost take-up of
energy-efficient cookstoves in Kenya
on pages 47-48.

10

TREND

Waste

Using Design for a Waste-free,
Energy-efficient Future
As the world continues to become a majority
urban place in the 21st century, the issue of
waste will become even more vexing. Just as
people move to urban areas to improve their life
chances and standard of living, the things that
they use to improve their standard of living –
consumer electronics, clothing, higher-quality
foods, furniture – all generate waste. Much of this
waste, as a result of current production methods,
produces toxic waste that ends up in municipal
dump sites or is thrown away to clutter streets and
green spaces. Toxic waste created in the developed
countries often is shipped to developing countries,
where it is recycled or disposed of, sometimes
using child labour and in violation of appropriate
environmental standards.
A World Bank study projects a 70 per cent global increase in urban solid waste, with developing countries facing the greatest challenges. This report
estimates that the amount of municipal solid waste
(MSW) will rise from the current 1.3 billion tonnes per
year to 2.2 billion tonnes per year by 2025. Much of
the increase will come in rapidly growing cities in developing countries.
By 2050, two out of every three people on the planet
will live in a city. This will place unprecedented
stress on the world’s natural resources if things do
not change.
As living standards rise and the number of middleclass consumers grows in developing countries
and emerging markets, it is clear that replicating
the wasteful consumption patterns of the developed world will do irreparable harm to the planet. At
present, the world’s wealthiest 20 per cent of people consume 75 per cent of the planet’s resources
(World Bank).
“We are living as if we have an extra planet at our disposal. We are using 50 per cent more resources than
the Earth can sustainably produce and unless we
change course, that number will grow fast: by 2030
even two planets will not be enough,” said Jim Leape,
Director General of WWF International.
The Living Planet Report uses the global Living
Planet Index to measure changes in the health of
the planet’s ecosystems by tracking 9,000 populations of more than 2,600 species. The global Index

shows almost a 30 per cent decrease since 1970, with
the tropics the hardest hit – where there has been a 60
per cent decline in less than 40 years. Just as biodiversity is on a downward trend, the earth’s ecological
footprint, one of the other key indicators used in the
report, illustrates how the planet’s demand on natural
resources has become unsustainable.
In order to calculate what is a sustainable use of resources per person, the ecological footprint was
devised. Given the current world population and
available land area, an ecological footprint of less
than 1.8 global hectares per person makes a country’s resource demands globally replicable. The top10 countries with the biggest ecological footprint per
person are: Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Ireland, Kuwait, Netherlands, Qatar, United Arab Emirates and the United States of America. Citizens of
the United States are consuming resources at a rate
that, if done by every person on earth, would require
4.1 earth-sized planets.
Wealthy countries have an ecological footprint five
times larger than that of low-income countries.
“We can create a prosperous future that provides
food, water and energy for the 9 or perhaps 10 billion people who will be sharing the planet in 2050,”
added Leape. “Solutions lie in such areas as reducing
waste, smarter water management and using renewable sources of energy that are clean and abundant –
such as wind and sunlight.”
The world needs to build a genuine green economy
to tackle these challenges. A green economy tends
to be seen as an economy that produces goods and
services with an environmental benefit. And the energy sources for this green economy need to change.
United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has
called for a doubling of renewable energy in the mix of
energy sources by 2030.
Read on to find innovators building a green economy
that works and learn from their experience.
In addition, the infographics on pages 6 to 7 and on
pages 28 to 29 attempt to paint a picture of the challenges and offer a new way of looking at things to find
better solutions.
Sources: World Bank, WWF International, Living Planet Report.

400 per cent: Amount by which hydropower could still be increased in the world (UNEP).

Image: Top Third Ventures Global.

11

TREND

2014 Southern Innovator

Texting for Cheaper
Food with SokoText
Graduate student social entrepreneurs from the London
School of Economics (LSE) are pioneering a way to reduce
food prices in Kenya using mobile phones.
Answering a call to action to address global food insecurity
by the Hult Prize, the team looked at how they could make
food cheaper for urban slum dwellers.
The Hult Prize is a start-up accelerator for budding young
social entrepreneurs emerging from the world’s universities.
The winner receives US$1 million and mentorship to make
her/his idea become real.

The interested retailers would be
required to send us an SMS every evening
detailing what they need
SokoText uses short message service (SMS) messages
from mobile phones to empower vegetable sellers and kiosk
owners in slums when it comes to bargaining the price for
wholesale fresh produce. It makes it possible for them to
benefit from bulk prices by pooling all their orders every day.
Usually the vendors lack the funds to buy in bulk and have
to make numerous time-consuming trips to the centre of
Nairobi to buy stock.

Suraj Gudka (above), the 21-year-old co-founder and Chief Executive
Officer of SokoText.

According to SokoText, slum dwellers are spending 60 per
cent of their daily budget on food.
Mobile phones are a good choice since they are now a common communications tool, even in slums.
On their website, Erik Hersman, the respected blogger
and commentator on technology in Africa, said of SokoText
that it “represents a fantastic low-tech approach that
could really scale for decreasing the inefficiencies in urban
slum markets.”
Telling the blog 140friday.com, 21-year-old co-founder
and Chief Executive Officer of SokoText Suraj Gudka explained: “From our research, the Mama Mbogas [smallscale vegetable retailers] spend between 150-200 K Sh
[Kenyan shillings] [US$1.70 to US$2.30] daily, about 25 per
cent of their revenue, to buy their stock, and since they
do not buy in bulk, they get their goods at a higher price.”

SokoText reduces the price of fresh produce by 20 per cent
for kiosk owners by buying the produce earlier in the supply
chain. SokoText then delivers the food to a wholesale outlet
at the entrance to the slum.
This approach makes available a wider range of produce and
reduces the price. And best of all, it will knock down prices
for the poorest people and enable them to buy more and
better-quality food.
The team members behind SokoText are from a variety of
countries: Canada, Colombia, Germany, Kenya and the
United Kingdom.
Hatched at the LSE, the enterprise prototyped its service in Mathare Valley, Nairobi, Kenya, for four weeks
during the summer of 2013. They started with 27 users
of the service and began the second phase of testing in
November 2013; they are working with a local NGO,
Community Transformers.

12

Images: SokoText (sokotext.com).

The SokoText website (sokotext.com).

TREND

Waste

Getting the market traders to cooperate is very difficult, Gudka found, because competition is fierce and trust
is low. SokoText sees itself as a solution to this situation.

SokoText’s summer pilot test confirmed that taking the orders can
work but found that getting the
product to the market in time was
difficult.

It gathers together all the orders from
the traders using SMS text messaging and then buys the goods in bulk at
a much cheaper price.

The next step will be to set up a presence in the Mathare slum: “We will
be selling about seven to 10 different
kinds of produce, and from our calculations, according to our projections
for how much the Mama Mbogas buy
every day, we hope to get 40-50 customers within three months.”

“To use our service, the interested retailers would be required to send us
an SMS every evening detailing what
they need,” according to Gudka, “and
then we will source the produce and
they come pick it up from us the next
morning. In this way, they do not have
to incur the additional costs of transporting their goods and it also saves
them time.”
SokoText co-founder Sofia Zab (left). She oversees SokoText’s marketing strategy and manages
SokoText’s technology products.

• sokotext.com
• nailab.co.ke
• hultprize.org
• whiteafrican.com/about

SokoText is being incubated at the
Nailab in Nairobi, a start-up accelerator that offers a three-to-12 month
entrepreneurship programme, with a
focus on growing innovative technology-driven ideas.

Meet Southern Innovator
The fourth issue
Southern Innovator (SI) comes
packed with stories, images
and contact details about a
new generation of pioneering
innovators across the global
South.

Global reach
SI is distributed around the
world, from the buzzing new
urban megacities of the
South to the poorest places
on earth.

Stories to learn from
There isn’t a better way to
learn than from others in the
same situation. SI’s stories
share details on success and
innovation and have links to
resources – so that readers
can get down to work.

Agribusiness & Food Security

Rich infographics
Complex data and trends
are transformed into
clear graphics for ease of
understanding.

Eye-catching illustrations and graphics
Concepts are reinforced
through visual images to aid
understanding.

Getting connected
Southern Innovator is packed
with resources and is backed
up with a website and a
monthly e-newsletter. Each
issue is intended to provide
inspiration and practical
information to get started
on the journey to being a
Southern innovator!

13

2014 Southern Innovator

About 2.7 billion people in developing
countries lack access to clean energy
for cooking. By turning to biogas from
waste as a solution, access to this
affordable gas for cooking and heating
can cut household costs.
(International Energy Agency, 2010)

In Cairo, Egypt, a pioneering
innovator is making biogas
using a roof-top, solar-powered digester.

Follow @SouthSouth1

14

INNOVATION

Waste

An African “long-drop” toilet.

Turning Human
Waste into Fertilizer:
An African Solution

The biogas digester system (above left) and making the solar panels (bottom left and right).

Innovation: Cairo’s Green
Technology Pioneers
An enterprising Egyptian man is showing his community how it is possible to lower
the cost of gas and hot water while also avoiding the service disruptions common with
municipal utilities. In the process, he is pioneering a local green innovation model that
can be replicated elsewhere.
Biogas generators – which can transform
organic household waste into fuel – have
been very successful in China and India.
It is estimated that there are 20 million
small-scale urban biogas digesters in
China and 2 million in India.
Hanny Fathy’s roof in the Manshiyet
Nasser neighbourhood, home to the Coptic Christian Zabaleen community of Cairo
– the city’s traditional garbage collectors
and recyclers – is now a utility system, providing biogas and hot water.
Fathy plops kitchen scraps, stale tea
and tap water into a jug that he empties
into a homemade biogas maker on the
roof of his house. The stew of waste mixes
with water and a small quantity of animal
manure used to start the process and
overnight makes biogas, which is then
Images: Solar Cities (solarcities.blogspot.co.uk)

used for cooking. The digester is able to
provide an hour’s worth of cooking gas a
day in winter months, and two hours in
the summer, from around 2 kilograms of
waste. The remaining waste by-product
becomes liquid organic fertilizer for the
garden.
Fathy has been developing the biogas digester with the NGO Solar Cities, which
provides designs, technical advice and
support to Cairo citizens keen to embrace
green technologies.
“I’m planning to collect the organic waste
from restaurants in the neighbourhood to
increase my gas output,” he told IPS News.
“I’ll give the restaurants plastic bags and
they can separate out the organics, and
I’ll collect the bags at the end of each day.”
– (January 2010)

According to the Council
for Scientific and Industrial
Research, some 11 million South
Africans have received access
to basic sanitation services
since 1994, but 13.3 million still
lacked basic sanitation services
by 2008.
The Water Research
Commission (WRC) believes
that there is a crisis with South
Africa’s toilet pit latrines, which
are quickly filling up past their
original design capacity. WRC’s
solution is to turn the human
faeces or faecal sludge deposited
in pit latrines into fertilizer for
farming and agriculture. The
Water Research Commission is
advocating using the fertilizer
either for fruit trees or for trees
that will be turned into income
sources such as paper and fuel.
The WRC project and series of
experiments are called “What
happens when pit latrines get full?”
“Only one third of municipalities
have a budget to maintain onsite sanitation,” WRC researcher
and scientist David Still told
Inter Press Service (IPS). “If pits
fill up, all the hard work that was
done to address the sanitation
backlog will be wasted. Why not
use faecal sludge to address
the growing problem of food
insecurity by planting fruit
trees? Or use the sludge to
cultivate trees for fuel or paper
production?” – (July 2012)
• wrc.org.za
• csir.co.za
• water.worldbank.org/shw-resourceguide/infrastructure/menu-technical-options/pit-latrines
Image: Water Research Commission

15

INNOVATION

2014 Southern Innovator

Solar-powered Mobile
Clinics to Boost Rural
Health Care in Africa
One recently launched new solution is a solarpowered mobile health clinic that is bringing
21st-century medical diagnostic services to
rural areas.
The US$250,000 Solar Powered Health Centre
has been built by the Korean technology
company Samsung.

How the Landwasher toilet works.

Saving Water to Make Money
The world’s water supplies are running low, and according to the World
Health Organization (WHO), four out of every 10 people are already
affected. But despite the gloomy reality of this problem, entrepreneurs
in the South are rising to the challenge to save water.
One unnecessary waste of water is car washing. The number of cars in
developing countries is growing fast, with a 27 per cent increase in sales
in China this year and South America overtaking Asia as the world’s fastest-growing regional vehicle market (Global Auto Report). And all these
cars will be washed, wasting this precious resource.

A truck packed with medical equipment that
draws electricity from solar panels is travelling
to rural, underserved parts of sub-Saharan
Africa. The truck is seven metres in length and
comes packed with medical goods, including a
fully equipped eye and blood clinic and a dental
surgery. It hopes to make it easier to reach the
six in 10 residents of sub-Saharan Africa who
live in rural areas and who are often very far from
affordable medical services.
Samsung hopes to scale the initiative to a million
people in Africa by 2015.
“This experience has shown us how desperately
medical treatment is needed across the
continent and inspired us to develop a
sustainable and innovative solution to reach the
people who need it most,” said Ntutule Tshenye,
Business-to-Government and Corporate
Citizenship Lead for Samsung Africa. “While our
CSR [corporate social responsibility] strategy
in Africa is largely focused on education, our
efforts to enrich lives will not be felt if people’s
basic needs, such as access to health care, are
not met.” – (August 2013)
• samsung.com

The large informal car-washing market in Brazil has long been known for
paying low wages and avoiding taxes. On top of this, it also wastes water.
Lots and lots of water. In Brazil, 28.5 per cent of the population (41.8 million people) do not have access to public water or wastewater services
and 60 per cent do not have adequate sanitation (Brazilian Institute of
Applied Economic Research).
Started in 1994, Drywash uses a locally available Brazilian organic carnauba wax to clean cars without using water. Drywash has also developed
a line of cleaning products that cleans every part of a car without the need
for water. It estimates that it has saved 450 million litres of water in its
first 10 years of operation. From the start, it set out to change the status
quo and run a business that “thinks like a big corporation,” said its international partner, Tiago Aguiar.
To do this, Drywash’s management team focused on operating an efficient and professional business. When the Government of Brazil passed
strict laws against informal selling of products, Drywash was well positioned to benefit, with companies preferring to work with a legal business.
Customers have also been attracted to Drywash because they know that
the service is consistent and to a high standard. Drywash made US$2.7
million in 2005.

16

Samsung’s solar-powered classroom.

viding flush toilets to the country’s
1.32 billion people. Landwasher has patented a process using a special agent and
sterilization to dispose of human waste
without using water and using very little
electricity.
Landwasher has seen its sales grow to
40 million yuan (US$5.2 million) and has
six sales offices covering 27 provinces.
– (September 2007)

In China, Landwasher toilets are tackling the growing problem of pro-

• drywash.com.br

Image: Landwasher

Image: Samsung

• nextbillion.net

• landwasher.com

INNOVATION

Waste

Solar Solution to
Lack of Electricity
in Africa
After witnessing the struggle that
African health clinics have to access
electricity, a Nairobi, Kenya-based
company has developed a simple
solution to ensure a steady supply of
solar electricity. One Degree Solar’s
founder, Gaurav Manchanda, sells
the BrightBox solar charging system
for lights, mobile phones, tablet
computers and radios.
How to assemble the “Moser Light”.

How to make the “Moser Light” (above) and the light
installed in the roof (right).

He first gained experience working in
the West African country of Liberia
with the Clinton Health Access
Initiative. Working at the Ministry of
Health, he found that most health
clinics operated without electricity.

Solar Bottle Bulbs
Light Up Dark Homes

He identified solar power as the only
viable energy source. Trying to deliver
fuel to power generators by the road
network had two impediments: the
diesel fuel was expensive and the
road conditions were poor.

Brazilian innovator and mechanic Alfredo Moser has taken the common plastic water bottle and created a low-cost lighting solution for dark spaces. Often
makeshift homes lack decent lighting or a good design that lets the light in during the day. This means that it may be a bright, sunny day outside, but inside the
home or workplace, it is very dark and reading or working is difficult.

After seeing that large solar-powered
systems required significant
maintenance and upkeep, he started
to explore the possibility of low-cost
and simple-to-use solar electricity
products that would be useful to
community health-care workers.

The “Moser Light” involves taking plastic bottles, which are usually just
thrown away or recycled, and filling them with water and bleach to draw on a
basic physical phenomenon: the refraction of sunlight when it passes through
a water-based medium.
It is a simple idea: Holes are drilled in the ceiling of a room and the bottles are
placed in the holes. The liquid-filled bottle amplifies the existing sunlight (or
even moonlight) and projects it into the dark room. This turns the plastic bottle
into a very bright light bulb that does not require any electricity.
Moser uses a solution of two capfuls of bleach added to the water to prevent anything growing in the water such as algae because of the exposure to
sunlight.
“The cleaner the bottle, the better,” he said.
Polyester resin is used to seal the hole around the plastic bottle and make it
watertight from rain.
Moser’s bottle innovation can produce between 40 and 60 watts of light.
Liter of Light, run by the MyShelter Foundation, offers instructions on how
to install the lighting system on its website.
– (September 2013)

The company’s main product is the
BrightBox, a cleverly designed solar
charger. A bright orange box with a
folding, aluminium handle at the top
for easy carrying, it switches on and
off simply with a bright red button.
It has a waterproof solar panel. The
BrightBox has universal service bus
(USB) ports so that mobile phones
and radios can be plugged in. It is
also possible to plug in four lights at
once using the four outports on the
side of the box.
A full charge can power two light
bulbs for 20 hours. Manchanda told
How We Made It In Africa that he
has sold 4,000 units of the BrightBox
since its launch in October.
The products are designed to be
repaired using locally sourced parts
and can be fixed by local electricians.
– (June 2013)
• onedegreesolar.com
• clintonfoundation.org
• howwemadeitinafrica.com

• aliteroflight.org

Images: Liter of Light

17

INNOVATION

2014 Southern Innovator

Information Technologies
Transforming Africa
Africa is in the midst of an Internet revolution that is set only to
accelerate. The continent is one of the last places to experience
the information technology revolution that has swept the world
in the past two decades.
Africa has been at a disadvantage for several reasons, the most
basic of which has been the lack of bandwidth capacity available from the undersea cables that connect other continents
to the Internet. A map showing the world’s undersea cable links
says it all: the majority of traffic goes between Europe and the
United States.
But this is changing: a glance at recent developments with the
launching of the Seacom, EASSy, MainOne and other cables
shows a continent becoming better connected by the year. This is
increasing the continent’s Internet capacity and bandwidth.

A plethora of innovation hubs and centres have emerged across
Africa. For further details, go to the image’s website here:
mhealthafrica.com/infographic-2-reinvent-africa

These communications links will revolutionize the type and scale
of innovation that can happen in Africa.
Between 2011 and 2015, seven out of the 10 fastest-growing economies in the world are projected to be in sub-Saharan Africa. The
conditions are ripe to grow African Internet businesses.
According to the World Bank, “Kenya has put in place the secondfastest broadband on the continent (after Ghana), which has reduced the wholesale Internet capacity prices by over 90% and
increased Internet penetration from 3% to 37% of the population
in the past decade. Today, about 90% of Kenyan adults have or
have the use of a mobile phone.”
Identifying the elements that are making this information technology innovation culture flourish came under analysis in a post
on the Afrinnovator website. Afrinnovator is dedicated to “telling
the stories of African startups, African innovation, African made
technology, African tech entrepreneurship and entrepreneurs.”
While it is well known that new infrastructure, better governance,
new policies, and new services such as mobile phones and mobile money have made a big difference in shifting perceptions of
Africa from despair to optimism, Afrinnovator found that there
were other key ingredients in this innovation renaissance.
Afrinnovator argues that four elements have come together to
change circumstances for innovators on the continent: education, mentoring and incubators, funding, and showcase events.
Afrinnovator found that education was critical to the quality of
emerging technological innovations. Information and communication technology (ICT) education has moved from just computer
science courses to a vast array of options.

18

Images: mHealth Africa and manypossibilities.net.

A plethora of undersea cables linking Africa to Europe, Asia and
North America. For further details, go to the image’s website here:
manypossibilities.net/african-undersea-cables

For mentoring and incubators, Afrinnovator found
that hubs and incubators are providing places for
young educated people to go to and get down to
work.
Examples include iHub, mLab East Africa, ccHub
(Co-Creation Hub Nigeria), Lusaka, Zambia’s
Bongohive, iLab Africa, NaiLab, iBid Labs, and
Uganda’s HiveColab. These places offer likeminded fellowship and access to mentors to take
them on the journey from “idea to viable profitable
business.”

CLEANING UP

Waste

According to Business Daily Africa, “There
are more than 3,000 software developers
who have come up with both mobile and
personal computer-based software applications that are changing lives across the
continent.”
A transformation in funding access has
also led to a renaissance in new thinking
that is transforming tech start-ups into viable businesses. Kenya has the Kenya ICT
Board and it awards US$50,000 through
its Tandaa grant programme.
Because of this enthusiastic local support, the World Bank is now committing a
US$55 million grant targeting Kenya’s
technology innovators to be distributed
through the Kenya ICT Board.
While Africa has come late to the Internet
party, the continent can benefit from two
decades of experience elsewhere to avoid
making the mistakes that others have
made. Africa can upload tried and tested
Internet platforms and can also create new,
Africa-specific platforms that tackle the
continent’s own needs and challenges.
– (July 2012)
• africaninnovatormagazine.com
• innovationprizeforafrica.org

Garbage is collected for recycling, cleaning up tourist areas.

A Solution to Stop Garbage
from Destroying Tourism
The small, tourist-friendly Indonesian island of Bali – known for its idyllic pleasures of spas, surf and serenity – is being overwhelmed by garbage. A survey of tourists found that two thirds would not return to the
island because of the problem.
Tourism took off on the island in the 1970s. The economic benefits are
clear: the island went from being economically marginal to ranking
second only to the country’s capital, Jakarta, in wealth creation. The
island received more than 2.38 million tourists in 2009, up 14.5 per cent
compared with 2008, according to Ida Komang Wisnu, head of the
provincial statistics office. But tourism produces on average 5 kilograms of waste a day per tourist – 10 times what the average Indonesian
produces (Bali Fokus).
In the past, the traditional way of serving food in Indonesia was to wrap it in,
or serve it on, a palm leaf: a biodegradable approach. But with the huge expansion in the use of plastics and non-biodegradable packaging, the waste
disposal problem is out of control.
In Indonesia, government garbage disposal services tend to collect between 30 and 40 per cent of solid waste, most of this from high-income
communities. The majority of the poor population is left to fend for itself
when it comes to waste disposal.

Fibre-optic cables are
used to carry electronic
communications between
continents.

A solution by Yuyun Ismawati, an environmental engineer and consultant, has since 1996 focused on helping poor communities to find ways
to safely dispose of waste. In 2000, she started her own NGO, Bali Fokus,
and opened a waste management facility in the Bali village of Temesi. The
recycling plant employs 40 people from the village, who sort garbage into
recyclables, compost and residual waste. Income from the recycled waste
and compost goes to helping local farmers. – (March 2010)
• balifokus.asia/balifokus
• goldmanprize.org
Image: Bali Fokus.

19

CLEANING UP

2014 Southern Innovator

The Water-free South
African Bathing Solution
A clever South African, Ludwick Marishane, has developed a clear gel that works like soap and water but
doesn’t need H2O to get a person clean.
The product is called DryBath® and uses a “proprietary
blend of a biocide, bioflavonoids and moisturisers.” It differs from common liquid hand anti-bacterial cleanser
products that people use to sterilize hands. Those products use alcohol to simultaneously kill germs and evaporate the liquid.
DryBath® works in a different way by not requiring water or
alcohol to complete the washing. The liquid gel is odourless
and biodegradable, moisturizes and does not need to be
rinsed off. It instead leaves users smelling fresh and “tackles the hygiene and water consumption problems in a manner that has never been used before.”
It also comes in a special package developed in South Africa.
EasySnapTM sachets allow users to quickly snap the package
and dispense the solution onto their hands to have a wash.

DryBath® will go a long way in
helping communities

Marishane, a 22-year-old student at the University of Cape
Town, told Reuters that the idea for DryBath® had come to
him when he was a teenager living in his rural home. It was
wintertime and his friend didn’t want to bother washing because there was no hot water available.
“He was lazy and he happened to say, ‘Why doesn’t somebody invent something that you can just put on your skin and
you don’t have to bathe’,” Marishane said.
Intrigued, he started doing research on his web-enabled
mobile phone. He trawled through the search engine
Google and the online encyclopedia Wikipedia to find what
would work as a water-free wash. After six months of research, he came up with the formula for DryBath® and acquired a patent. Now the strategy of Headboy Industries
Inc., – the company set up by Marishane, is to sell DryBath® to corporate clients and in turn donate a free sachet for each sale to DryBath®’s global charity partners,
who will distribute DryBath® to poor communities either
for free or at a subsidized cost.

20

Images: DryBath

DryBath® comes in a handy plastic dispenser for ease of use.

Marishane believes that his product will be particularly
popular with certain industries: flight crews and passengers on airlines; hotels looking to save on water usage; the
military for soldiers serving in the field; and NGOs and charities providing services to poor communities, in particular
during emergency situations when it is difficult to provide a
reliable water supply.
Marishane has won several awards for his invention, including Global Champion of the Global Student Entrepreneurs
Awards 2011, and is considered South Africa’s youngest patent holder.
“DryBath® will go a long way in helping communities,” he believes. – (September 2012)
• headboy.org/drybath
• headboy.org

CLEANING UP

Waste

Biogas Digester-in-a-Bag
Brings Portability
Biogas is fuel made from biodegradable organic material such as kitchen,
animal or human waste. It can be converted into gas either by being heated
or using anaerobic bacteria to break down the material and turn it into
combustible methane gas.
Most biogas systems are complex and large, involving an enormous domed
biodigester.

Flexi Biogas digester before it has filled up with gas.

But a clever solution from Kenya, the Flexi Biogas system, is different. It is
designed to be highly portable and scalable depending on a person’s needs.
The Flexi Biogas system is a pillow-shaped PVC tarpaulin, measuring 6 metres by 3 metres. It comes in two parts: a plastic digester bag on the inside
and a greenhouse-like plastic tunnel on the outside. The tunnel traps heat
and keeps temperatures between 25 and 36 degrees Celsius.
Subjected to the heat of the sun, the environment inside the bag encourages microbes to digest the organic material, or substrate as it is known, releasing biogas bubbles and inflating the bag with methane. This gas is then
sent through a PVC tube that can be connected to a gas-burning appliance
such as a cooking stove.

IMAGES

1 The Flexi Biogas digester filled with gas.
2 Assembling the Flexi Biogas system.
3 Filling the Flexi Biogas digester with
excrement.

The Flexi Biogas digester sits on the ground and thus is easy to observe
and understand.

company partnered with – the United Nations’ International Fund for Agricultural
Development ( IFAD) to install nine systems
on dairy farms in Kenya. These Flexi Biogas
systems use kitchen and human waste to
produce electricity for lighting and to provide Internet service.
– (December 2012)

The Flexi Biogas system is designed, built and sold by Kenya’s Biogas International, which has sold 200 of the systems since 2011. In 2012, the

• biogas.co.ke
• ifad.org

Currently, most people use the biogas for lighting and cooking but the
system also produces enough gas to run agricultural machinery.

Images: Flexi Biogas

21

CLEANING UP

2014 Southern Innovator

Ending Gang Violence while
Cleaning the Streets in Haiti
The Caribbean country of Haiti is the poorest country in the western
hemisphere, with 80 per cent of the population living below the poverty line (CIA World Factbook). The country had been enjoying some
positive economic growth since 2005 after decades of economic and
political turmoil.
The country’s political vacuum and economic problems gave rise to
violent gang rule on its streets and a collapse in public services, in
particular garbage collection. The piles of waste became a source of
disease and squalor as well as providing barricades for gangs to wage
their street battles.
Haiti was also hit by four devastating hurricanes in 2008, with heavy damage to the country’s agricultural sector and transport infrastructure.
But a project by the UNDP Special Unit for South-South Cooperation
has turned around a Haitian neighbourhood by simultaneously cleaning
up the garbage, creating employment and income and reducing gang violence and despair. The United Nations has been working in Haiti to restore the economy and bring peace and good government to the country
since the 1990s. Its most recent mission, MINUSTAH, has been running
since 2004.
Called “Love n’ Haiti” and located in the Carrefour Feuilles district of the
capital Port-au-Prince, the project used a ground-up strategy to tackle
the problem of waste removal.
The neighbourhood has a population of 150,000. Nine community leaders
were identified and a management committee was set up called the Committée d’action sanitaire de Carrefour Feuilles (CASCAF). The management committee then undertook difficult negotiations with local street
vendors to establish garbage collection points. A waste collection plan
was drawn up, and around 400 workers were hired to clean the streets
and canals and collect the waste.
The workers were divided into nine street cleaning teams and three waste
collection teams, comprising people who were members of rival groups.
The project started in 2006 from a very basic point: generating awareness
in the population about the dangers of waste and the need for its disposal.
The breakdown in public services from decades of political turmoil and
poverty had meant that a culture of waste disposal no longer existed. The
project drew on similar experiences in Brazil and used Brazilian expertise.
A triage centre was set up to sort the waste into paper, plastic, metal,
glass and organic matter for recycling. Two products are made from the
waste to earn income: cooking briquettes and fertilizer.
The cooking briquettes may also help stem Haiti’s horrific deforestation.
The country shares the island with the Dominican Republic and anyone

22

Images: Love n’ Haiti

Waste is turned into cooking briquettes and fertilizer.

flying over the island can see a sharp dividing line between the green and lush forests
of the Dominican Republic and the almost
barren and dusty Haitian hills.
By turning the trash into cooking briquettes, people are being offered an alternative to chopping down the forests
and burning trees to make charcoal fuel
for cooking.
Income for the waste collectors has increased to US$3 a day and the project
has removed 70 per cent of the neighbourhood’s waste, making it easier to get
around and get things done (another boost
to incomes).
Prior to the project, the neighbourhood
was one of the most dangerous in Portau-Prince. The project unexpectedly found
that the history of violence and conflict
were quickly overcome when the project
began to make rapid progress.
– (October 2009)
• ssc.undp.org/Home.118.0.html
• minustah.org
• theworldchallenge.co.uk

Waste

Turning Animal Waste into Paper
Animal waste is a messy fact of daily life in rural communities across the global
South. This by-product of life has many uses but an ingredient for making writing
paper is probably not the first that springs to mind.

and make them more desirable.
Design is critical to making any
product – no matter how ethically produced and how green –
desirable to consumers.

The dung products that Mr.
Ellie Pooh makes include a wide
variety of coloured papers,
scrapbooks, note boxes, stationery pouches, greeting cards,
“to do” list pads, memo books
and a children’s book.
The elephant excrement is laid out flat and then dried to make paper.

But animal dung is cleverly being recycled into high-value products in Sri
Lanka and Thailand. Animal waste has
many uses: it can be turned into fertilizer for crops and fuel for cooking, placed
in a digester and fermented into biogas
for heating, and, cooking, and, if from a
herbivore, into fibrous products such as
paper and cardboard. Packing boxes can
also be made from the excrement.

the technique. This business was started
by dung paper pioneer Mr. Wan Chai. He
tells a story of how he became enchanted
by the paper-making process when he
walked past a paper factory one day.
Later, when he was at the Thai Elephant
Conservation Center in Lampang, northern Thailand, he noticed that the elephant
dung was rich in fibres like those used in
making paper from wood pulp.

Since the elephant is a vegetarian its
excrement or dung is made up of vegetable matter and is rich in cellulose. And
cellulose is what makes up the majority
of traditional wood-pulp paper.

Inspired, he embarked on a process of
trial and error using his wife’s food processor to turn elephant dung into a fibrous stew that is then shaped, dyed and
dried to make paper.

Dung produces a natural, recycled paper.
While harvesting trees for paper is an expensive and energy-wasting process, the
elephant’s digestive tract does the hard
work by breaking down the cellulose,
making it ideal for the next stage in becoming a paper product.

Another dung paper business is Mr. Ellie
Pooh in Sri Lanka. Established with the
goal of reducing conflict between humans and elephants, it has turned to
making paper products to boost local
incomes and create a direct economic
incentive to protect the elephants. It is
setting up handmade paper workshops
in rural areas and teaming them up with
artisans to add value to the products

The Elephant Dung Paper company in
Thailand was one of the first to pioneer
Images: Mr. Ellie Pooh

The process of making elephant dung paper takes about
13 days: three days of sorting, boiling and disinfecting,
followed by 10 days to pulp,
mix, press and dry the paper.
Mr. Ellie Pooh makes about
1,000 sheets a day and 30,000
a month. Each sheet makes six
A4-size pieces of paper.
The company was founded by
Dr. Karl Wald and Thusitha
Ranasinghe and is managed by
recycled paper firm Ecomaximus based in Colombo, Sri
Lanka, with a workshop in Kegalle. – (January 2011)
• environmentalpaper.org/stateofthepaperindustry/confirm.htm
• elephantdungpaper.com
• changthai.com
• mrelliepooh.com
• ecomaximus.com

23

2014 Southern Innovator

How an Eco-city Works
An eco-city is rising from former
industrial wasteland in China. The
Sino-Singapore Tianjin Eco-city
is pioneering new ways of living
by combining a green city with
research labs and development
of new, green technologies.
Energy
The Tianjin Eco-city gets its
energy from a mix of sources:
solar, wind, heat groundsources, and biomass.

Planning
The Eco-city is a planned city and is
developing in phases. Its development
is controlled and includes a provision
for business activities and services
such as schools.

Smart technology
The Eco-city is hi-tech, uses smart
technologies to monitor energy
use and offers its residents highspeed Internet. It uses passive
technology to exploit daytime
sunlight and wind to
warm and cool buildings.

24

Images: Sino-Singapore Tianjin Eco-city and David South.

Economy
The Eco-city is
near the vibrant
Tianjin industrial
zone with
many foreign
manufacturers
and hi-technology
companies. Within
the Eco-city itself,
there are creative
businesses such
as animation
studios and green
businesses and
research and
development (R&D)
labs working on
developing original
green technologies.

Waste

Global South Urbanization Does
Not Have to Harm Biodiversity
Global urbanization will have significant implications for biodiversity and ecosystems if current
trends continue, harming human health and development, according to a new assessment by the
United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity
(CBD).
Cities and Biodiversity Outlook – the first global
analysis of how projected patterns of urban land
expansion will affect biodiversity and crucial ecosystems – argues that promoting low-carbon, resource-efficient urban development can counter
urbanization’s adverse effects on biodiversity while
improving quality of life.
“The way our cities are designed, the way people
live in them and the policy decisions of local authorities will define, to a large extent, future global
sustainability,” said Braulio Dias, Executive Secretary of the CBD. 
“The innovation lies not so much in developing new
infrastructural technologies and approaches but to
work with what we already have. The results often require fewer economic resources and are more sustainable,” he added.
The report says that urban expansion is occurring
fast in areas close to biodiversity “hotspots” and
coastal zones. And rapidly urbanizing regions, such
as large and mid-size settlements in sub-Saharan
Africa, India and China, often lack resources to implement sustainable urban planning.
But the study found that cities do not need to be in
conflict with plant and animal species and ecosystems. They can, in fact, protect species, as is the case
with Belgium, where 50 per cent of the country’s floral species are found in Brussels, or Poland, where
65 per cent of the country’s bird species are found
in Warsaw.
At the Alexander von Humboldt Research Institute
in Bogota, Colombia, researchers have been thinking about making sure that the growing cities of the
future are not ecological disasters.
According to Juana Marino and Maria Angélica Mejia
at the Institute’s Biological Resources Policy Programme, which investigates “Biodiversity, Ecosystem Services and Urban-Regional Environments”,
how cities grow and develop must change.
Images: David South

They believe that cities need to take into
account the resources that they require to
function and the impact that this has on
biodiversity and ecosystems.
“The more people who arrive in cities, the
more they demand goods and services (in a
massive way!): roads, housing, infrastructure, food, water, [creating] an impressive
amount of waste, challenging traditional
waste management and sanitation policies,” said Marino. In short, “Cities enhance
consumption.”

Use natural habitats in urban
areas to create recreational
spaces and protect wildlife.

The way our cities are designed, the way
people live in them and the policy decisions of
local authorities will define, to a large extent,
future global sustainability
The Humboldt researchers believe that
common patterns can be seen across the
global South, where ecosystems “surrounding urban areas are deforested and
have significant levels of water and air
pollution; they also become deeply transformed by informal settlements.”  
This process means that cities “lose their
ability to be resilient, they become highly
vulnerable to global change and they decrease their production of ecosystem services to maintain human well-being in
cities.”
They argue that human settlements must
be sustainably planned for, with ecological
resilience and human well-being. If this is
not done, areas suitable for agricultural
production and biodiversity preservation
will be harmed.  

Make green spaces welcoming
by providing services such as
potable water fountains.

And they see innovation as the way to do
this. Innovation is critical if cities and urban
areas are to avoid widespread destruction
of biodiversity as urbanization increases.  
– (December 2012)
• humboldt.org.co

25

2014 Southern Innovator

1.

Turning Waste
into Wealth
A Southern
Innovator’s Guide

Step 1

How do I process
the waste?

Making a master
plan

How will I collect
the waste?
Where do
I store the
waste?

In researching this issue of the
magazine, we identified some common
steps that have been factors in the
success of waste innovators in the
global South.

Making wealth from waste isn’t as easy as
it first seems and successful innovators
have thought about the software of their
idea as well as the hardware of the solution.
In this issue’s scenario, we have chosen
a plastic bag recycling innovator – Waste
Not - which is using three methods to recycle or remove waste plastic bags from the
local community: turning the plastic bags
into fuel, turning them into pellets to sell
to manufacturers and using an enzyme to
break down the plastic bags in return for
payments from the city for cleaning the
streets of plastic bags and waste plastic
refuse.

Who is going to
buy my waste
product?
What incentive
will people
have to give me
the waste?

How do I pay people
to work for the
business?

Waste is everywhere in modern society. It comes from a
wide variety of sources but it
tends to be the by-product of
industrial and consumer societies. It is a sign that there
is a disconnection between
the production of a product
and its consumption and
disposal. Without an alternative, waste will just pile
up on streets, in fields, rivers and water bodies or in
landfills. Wise innovators
see this problem and devise
a way to handle this waste
that makes them money, too.
Looking to go into the waste
business? Then ask yourself
some hard questions and
make a plan.

1. Making a master plan.
2. Designing your brand and
logo.

2.

Step 2

Designing your brand and logo
Thinking about your brand and designing how your innovative solution
will work from the beginning will greatly improve your chances of success. It does not have to be expensive or complicated: a good idea and a
plan costs no more.
Using a brand, a logo and a compelling story about your innovation will
set you apart from everyone else and make it easier for people to remember who you are and what you do. Make sure that your actions match
your words.
Look at how others working in waste present themselves. Who do you
think is successful at getting attention? How would you describe yourself
to others or how would others describe you? What are your values? What
are your strengths and weaknesses?

26

Typography:
Font family: Ubuntu
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
0123456789
()¿?! #[]$@{|}:;"*

Waste

3.

COLLECTION DEPOT

prizes!!

RECYCLE

credits!!

PLASTIC

BOTTLES

PAPER

Step 3

Waste Not as a planned business
Waste Not has decided to make use of the wide
presence of mobile phones in the neighbourhood.
In order to create the incentive to gather and donate
plastic bags and waste plastic, people can receive
on their mobile phone credits and prizes. The rewards are so good that it could be a full-time job if
somebody wanted to do it!
6.

4.

Step 4

Managing the workflow:
Getting things done
Managing the deposit banks spread
around the neighbourhood in common areas needs a plan. Weekly pickups empty the deposit banks and are
an opportunity to check on the mechanism to pay mobile phone credits and
awards to people. The plastic waste is
then taken to a processing centre to
be either recycled or destroyed. Every
month the plastic pellets are picked
up by a seller and the fuel is sold to
another vendor.

FIND OUT MORE

5.

THE SERVICE

MANAGING WORKFLOW:
Establish a processing centre
Find customers for the
processed plastic waste
Set up collection points
Notify people through leaflets
and mobile phone text messages
Set up weekly collections
from deposit banks

THE MARKETPLACE:
Advertise service to the neighbourhood

Advertise to potential buyers

Monitor quantity of waste plastic collected

Provide incentives to
encourage more waste
plastic to be collected

YouTube

3. Set up a collection point for the waste.
4. Develop a mobile phone application.
5. Distribute leaflets to let people know about the service.
6. Develop a flowchart to help to work out the steps to take.
7. Use a laptop computer to manage all the
waste collection points.

7.

COLLECTION POINTS

Step 5

Meeting the neighbourhood
Waste Not started with just one deposit bank but it is now six
months later and there are seven spread around the neighbourhood. To keep track of the deposit banks and manage the weekly
pick-ups and handle repairs and maintenance, a communications
centre has been set up at the innovator’s home. The centre has a
laptop computer and a mobile phone connected to radio transmitters in the deposit banks that let the centre know when something is wrong or when the deposit bank is full. It looks like “waste
not, want not” is still good advice in the 21st century!
At least 40 countries have enough geothermal potential to meet a significant proportion of their electricity demand (World Bank).

27

21st
Urban
SUBJECT DIVIDERS
Environment

Explanation
Turning waste into wealth and learning how to value
finite resources by recycling them pose a challenge for
the 21st century. Pioneers and innovators are showing
how this can be done and that it does not have to be a
burden but instead a bounty of riches yet to be
discovered. By respecting the planet’s resources and
by not seeing waste but rather an opportunity to build
wealth, human development can be increased without
sacrificing the world. As living standards improve and
people increase their consumption of products, it
becomes critical that those products are produced in
a way that does not poison the environment or damage
human health.
On these pages, SI shows how thinking about the
production cycle can radically alter the relationship
with resources. By turning away from just using and
discarding and also by moving further ahead from the
reduce, reuse and recycle approach, it is possible to
take another approach – cradle to cradle – that
radically demands that people think about designing
every product and process so that nothing is wasted
and all things always find their way back into the earth
as a non-toxic by-product or back into the production
cycle to be turned into a new good again.

2014 Southern Innovator

FROM TOXIC WASTE TO FOOD FOR
THE EARTH
01 Every step produces waste in the old cycle of production.

02 When the product is finished, it is also waste, often toxic and
harmful to the environment.
03 Eventually a plastic pen made from oil-based plastic will end
up in a landfill where it will become toxic waste.
04 The reduce - reuse - recycle (3Rs) production cycle is an
improvement on the old cycle of production – use and throw away
– but it still produces waste, much of which can be toxic.

OLD CYCLE OF PRODUCTION AND WASTE
Production and Waste Cycle for a Plastic Pen
Resources

Decreasing

Product 02

Increasing

Waste 03

Increasing

REDUCE – REUSE – RECYCLE – (3RS)

21st Century

01

04

Life Cycle of a Plastic Pen

Resource Solution
Reduce

Definition – Cradle to Cradle: Concept
Cradle to cradle seeks to spark a new industrial
revolution but this time one that is ecological. By using
ecologically intelligent design, the initiators of the
concept, William McDonough and Dr. Michael Braungart, believe that human beings can have a positive,
restorative, beneficial impact on the environment by
turning the making of things into a positive force for
society, the economy and the planet. Cradle to cradle
is “a systemic approach to product innovation that
spurs the creation of truly beautiful, high-quality
products, and transforms the production of consumer
products into a positive force for society and the
environment.” All products can be designed for
continuous recovery and reuse as a nutrient for
something else. They believe that the best way to tackle
resource scarcity is to do better design.
Read on!
Sources: Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute (c2ccertified.org); Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things.

28

Recycle
Resources

Product
Waste

Reuse

FEATURES

05 The DBA 98 Pen (dba-co.com/pen) was developed as the first
cradle-to-cradle pen by a company in the United States and is 98
per cent biodegradable. The manufacturing plant where the pen is
made is powered by wind energy. Rather than oil-based materials,
the pen is made from bio-plastic from sustainable crop resources
and has non-toxic ink. It can decompose in a compost facility
within 180 days without leaving behind a toxic trace. The pen’s
nib is the only part that is disposed of as waste.
06 Built using the principles of the cradle-to-cradle production
life cycle, the DBA 98 Pen produces just 2 per cent waste when it
is discarded at the end of its life cycle.
07 When the DBA 98 Pen has finished its life cycle, rather than just
being discarded as waste, it is dismantled and becomes either
food for the earth or “food” for another product and the life cycle
starts again.

CRADLE TO CRADLE – (C2C)
The Making of the DBA 98 Pen

Recycling

08 Cradle-to-cradle certification establishes a process where
producers can gradually evolve their products to use the cradleto-cradle process and become better designed and free of harmful
waste. It is an eco-label administered by the Cradle to Cradle
Products Innovation Institute (c2ccertified.org), which assesses a
product’s safety to humans and the environment and its design for
future life cycles.
09 The majority of the pen – 98 per cent – can biodegrade in 180
days and does not leave any toxic waste behind when it does get
thrown away.
10 The Dipshikha Electrical Skill Improvement (DESI) School in
Bangladesh was built using cradle-to-cradle principles. Designed
for rural areas of the country by architect Anna Heringer
(anna-heringer.com), the idea was to show that it wasn’t necessary
to import expensive building materials to make a solid structure.
Made from earth and bamboo, the school is powered by solar
energy, and heating and cooling are done passively, relying on
natural air circulation through the building. Natural light is used
as much as possible and the building has all the modern facilities
expected in a school, including toilets and showers.

08

07

Bioplastic
from potatoes
100% recyclable

05

Wind energy
100% free and
non-polluting

Forest Stewardship
Council (FSC) paper
for packaging
100% recyclable

Resources

Ink reservoir from renewable,
biodegradable fibre

Products

steel nib

Waste

0%

2%

06

Non-toxic ink
from vegetables
100% recyclable

Hybrid and
zero-emission
delivery vehicles

98%
2% not
biodegradable

09

98% biodegradable
in 180 days

10

The DESI School in Bangladesh

A sketch of the DESI School.

The completed DESI School.

29

Recycling: Introduction

Recycling
Introduction
While the world has yet to adopt waste-free and non-polluting manufacturing practices on a wide scale, it is
possible to ramp up recycling of waste and make a significant difference in how resources are used and reused. Recycling also helps in cleaning up neighbourhoods and communities, improves quality of life, and creates sustainable, long-term jobs. Where there are people, there will inevitably be waste – and the opportunity
to clean it up and use it again.
By turning to recycling for profit and income, innovators can find themselves joining a global market estimated
to be worth US$400 billion (UNEP). The global market for scrap metal and paper alone is worth US$30 billion
(World Bank).
As an example of the possibilities, fashion recycling and so-called “upcycling” – in which waste materials are
turned into new materials or better-quality products – is already a major trend around the world. In Great
Britain, for example, 2 million tonnes of textiles are thrown away every year, with 24 per cent recycled and
10 per cent upcycled.
Issue 5 of Southern Innovator features fashion recycling and upcycling pioneers from around the world who are
showing how recycling can work and create sustainable incomes. It also includes innovators turning the scourge
of plastic bags into useful, everyday items. Others are taking waste cooking oil, which is often just thrown away,
and making biofuel. What they all share is the ability to derive an income, and create jobs, from recycling waste.

1 Bosnia and Herzegovina
2 Croatia
3 Serbia
4 Montenegro
5 Slovenia
6 The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Greenland
(Denmark)
Iceland

Canada
St. Pierre
and Miquelon (Fr.)

United States of America
Bermuda (U.K.)
Bahamas
Cuba Turks and Caicos Islands (U.K.)
Dominican Republic
Antigua and Barbuda
Jamaica Haiti
Belize
PuertoSt.Rico
(U.S.A.)
GuatemalaHonduras
Kitts and Nevis St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Dominica Barbados
El Salvador Nicaragua
St. Lucia
Grenada Trinidad and Tobago
Costa Rica Panama
Venezuela

Mexico

Guyana
Suriname
French Guiana (Fr.)

Colombia

Equatorial Guinea
Sao Tome and Principe Gabon
Congo

Ascencion (U.K.)

page 33

page 33
pages 33/34

Tristan Da Cunha (U. K.)

Chile

Gough (U.K.)

Falkland Islands (Malvinas) (U.K.)***
South Georgia (U.K.)

April 2012

Angola
Namibia

Pakistan

Oman

Eritrea Yemen
Djibouti

Ethiopia

Somalia

Kenya

Zambia

Malawi
Mozambique

Zimbabwe
Botswana

Nepal

India

Dem. People's
Rep. of Korea

Republic
of Korea

Bhutan

Japan

page 39

Bangladesh Lao People's
Myanmar Dem. Rep.
Thailand

page 9

Viet Nam
Cambodia

page 38

Sri Lanka

pages 31/32 Maldives
page 40 Chagos

Burundi
Democratic
United Rep.
Republic of
of Tanzania
Seychelles
the Congo
Comoros
Agaleda Island

Swaziland
South Lesotho
Africa

Uruguay

Map No. 4170 Rev. 13 United Nations
Map has been altered to fit page.

Saudi
Arabia

Uganda
Rwanda

Angola
(Cabinda)

St. Helena (U.K.)

Argentina

Kuwait
Bahrain United Arab
Qatar Emirates

Egypt

Mauritania
Mali
Niger
Sudan
Senegal
Chad
Gambia
Burkina
Guinea-Bissau Guinea
FasoBenin Nigeria
South
Sierra Leone Côte Ghana
Central
Sudan
Liberia
d'ivoire Togo Cameroon African Rep.

Bolivia
Paraguay

Libya

Cape Verde

Brazil

Peru

Algeria

Western
Sahara

page 33

Ecuador

Finland

Norway Sweden

Russian Federation
Estonia
Latvia
Denmark
R.F. Lithuania
Belarus
Ireland
Netherlands
Belgium GermanyCzechPoland
Ukraine
Luxembourg
Slovakia Rep. of Moldova
Austria Rep.Hungary
France
Kazakhstan
52
Liechtenstein
Mongolia
Romania
1 3
Switzerland
Andorra
Uzbekistan
Georgia
Bulgaria
4 6
San
Kyrgyzstan
Azerbaijan
Turkey
Italy
Monaco
Marino
Armenia
Albania
Portugal Spain
Turkmenistan
Tajikistan
Holy See
Syrian
Greece
Jammu And
Tunisia
Cyprus Arab Rep.
Islamic
China
Lebanon
Kashmir *
Iraq Rep. of Iran Afghanistan
Malta
Morocco
Israel Jordan
United
Kingdom

Archipelago/
Diego Garcia**

pages

Brunei
Darussalam

Philippines

Guam (U.S.A.)

Palau

M a l a y s i a
Singapore

31/32

Tromelin Island
Cargados Carajos Shoals
Rodriges Island
Mauritius
Réunion
(Fr.)

Federated States
of Micronesia

I n d o n e s i a
Christmas
(Austr.)
Cocos (Keeling)
Islands (Austr.)

Northern
Mariana
Islands (U.S.A.)

Papua
New Guinea

Timor-Leste

Madagascar

Australia

The boundaries and names shown and the designations used
on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance
by the United Nations.
*Dotted line represents approximately the Line of Control
in Jammu and Kashmir agreed upon by India and Pakistan.
The final status of Jammu and Kashmir has not yet been
agreed upon by the parties.
**Appears without prejudice to the question of sovereignty.
***A dispute exists between the Governments of Argentina and
the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
concerning sovereignty over the Falkland Islands (Malvinas).
The initials in parentheses refer to the administering Power
or the Power involved in a special treaty relationship

Department of Field Support
Cartographic Section

Recycling

Indian Entrepreneur Brings
Dignity to Poor Women

Q& A

Driven by the revelation that his wife was
torn between spending money on milk for the
children and buying commercially manufactured
sanitary napkins, Indian innovator and inventor
Arunachalam Muruganantham embarked on a
long and intensive journey to find a solution. His
achievement – a simple machine – is bringing
dignity to poor women and providing them with a
much-needed income source.
Muruganantham has come up with a simple
machine to manufacture affordable hygienic
sanitary napkins for poor women. It works by
turning the pulp of pine wood into the flat, white
sanitary pads commonly used by women during
their monthly menstruation. The machine’s
simplicity means that its use can be expanded
easily to other communities. The machine also
is designed to fit well with the way women’s
cooperatives work and help them earn an income.
– (July 2012)

Image: Kati Farms (katifarms.org)

Image: Arunachalam Muruganantham.

Quick Facts
• In 2011, estimates placed the number of industrial robots in China at 52,290.
• Three of the biggest metro systems in the
world are now in Chinese cities – Beijing,
Guangzhou and Shanghai. Beijing has a metro
system stretching 442 kilometres and is used
every day by 5.97 million people.
• According to Mass Transit magazine, China is
using domestic consumption and increasing
urbanization to spur economic growth and is
hoping to increase investment in metro systems in the country by 10 per cent per year. Ten
Chinese cities are expecting to receive permission soon to begin work on building new metro
systems: Chengdu, Chongqing, Donggu, Hangzhou, Kunming, Ningbo, Tianjin, Tsingdao, Wuxi
and Xian.
Sources: International Federation of Robotics and The
Economist

Ugandan Fish Sausages
Transform Female Fortunes
What to do when your food production enterprise
is not making much money? It is a common
problem in the global South, where farmers
and fishers often struggle to survive and where
they can face the threat of bankruptcy and
destitution while trying to provide essential
food for their communities.
Lovin Kobusingya is the former secretary and
university graduate who, through tenacity
and ingenuity, has built a business selling fish
sausages that has become a hit in Kampala,
Uganda, in East Africa.
The product, basically unknown in Uganda
before, became a tidy solution to the dilemma
of how to sell fish at a premium price that could
boost the income of the farmers.
The 29-year-old mother of two set up Kati Fish
Farms (katifarms.org) and Kati Farm Supplies Ltd.
and now sells 500 kilograms of fish sausage a day.
– (November 2012)

Wind energy could provide

9% of the world’s
electricity by 2030
(se4all.org).

Image: Meter Down magazine

Lucas Belenky, Chief Executive
Officer (CEO) of Top Third
Ventures Global, maker of the
Baker cookstove (bakerproduct.
com), placed design and the
production life cycle at the
centre of the enterprise since its
start in 2011. It manufactures
the cookstoves in Nairobi,
Kenya.
While many initiatives to
improve access to energyefficient products for lowincome households are well
intentioned, what are some of
the common mistakes you see
in the products on offer?
I think that some initiatives
lose their focus of who their
customers are and do not place
enough emphasis on design,
branding and marketing.
It is more common in subSaharan Africa for a company
or organization pushing their
revolutionary product to
change their customer (i.e.,
move operations to another
country) instead of changing
their product.
How can social enterprises
create more appealing
products for low-income
households? What, in your
view, needs to change before
there will be greater take-up
of energy-efficient products?
There needs to be more focus
on and dialogue with the
customer. Social enterprises
often focus more on the
interests of grant or donor
organizations because there
is a lot of grant/donor money
available. Removing the free
money from the equation and
encouraging investment will
shift the focus back to business
fundamentals, such as paying
attention to the customer.

Free Magazine Boosts
Income for Rickshaw Drivers All-in-one Solar
Kiosk Business
In the bustling, congested cities of Asia,
rickshaws and auto-rickshaws are common
Solution for Africa
forms of transport. Smaller, cheaper and more
nimble than cars, they play a key role in the
transit infrastructure, helping to get people to
work and to get around.

The monthly magazine Meter Down
(meterdown.co.in) – launched in 2010 – is
targeting the large captive audience of Mumbai’s
rickshaw passengers with news and advertising.
It is modelled on the familiar free newspapers
found in cities around the world.
– (September 2012)

Created by a team of German
architects, the Solarkiosk
(solarkiosk.eu) is an
autonomous business unit
designed for remote, off-grid
areas. With solar panels
across the top of the kiosk, it
generates its own electricity
and is basically a mini solar
power plant.
– (November 2012)

31

RECYCLING FOR PROFIT

2014 Southern Innovator

Banning of Plastic Bags
and Containers Brings
New Opportunities
Uganda banned plastic bags in 2007, outlawing their import, manufacture
and use and joining a growing list of African countries seeking to sweep
cities of this menace. Uganda’s ban followed similar moves in Kenya and
in the United Republic of Tanzania, where even plastic drinks containers
were banished. Rwanda, also a member of the East African Community,
has gone further: in 2005, the country banned any product made of very
thin plastic (below 100 microns). The thinner plastic found in plastic bags
(under 30 microns) is particularly troublesome because it is easily blown
around by the wind. The proliferation of plastic bags and plastic containers across the developing world has not only become an eyesore, but it is
also an environmental catastrophe that is poisoning the land.
In Uganda’s capital, Kampala, discarded plastic has combined with toxic
waste management practices to make the problem worse. While Kampala
has 30 companies dealing in solid waste management, the process is mired
in corruption. Poor areas of the city receive no service because it is more
profitable for the companies to target wealthy areas for the user fees that
they collect to remove rubbish.
Scavengers in the municipal dump of Kampala earn 50 Ugandan pence a
day collecting plastic bags. Most plastic bags do not make it to the dump,
ending up blown around the city by the wind, washed into drains and water
courses. Worse, the rich soil around Uganda’s towns and villages is now

Trashy Bags (trashybags.org) in Ghana makes fashionable carryalls and handbags from plastic bags.

covered in plastic bags. A new layer of polythene and contaminated soil has formed in
many areas, with an impenetrable crust
that stops rain from soaking through. It
leaves water stagnating in pools gurgling
with methane gas bubbles.
For entrepreneurs, tackling the mountains
of plastic waste is an opportunity – as is providing a replacement once they are banned.
A boon time is emerging for the market in
recycled and reusable materials and biodegradable alternatives.

Fashion Recycling:
How Southern Designers Are Reusing
and Making Money
In Ghana, the cheeky Ghanaian businessman-cum-fashion
designer Kwabena Osei Bonsu wanted to do something about
the ubiquitous plastic bags that pollute the landscape of the
capital, Accra.
In Accra, a small city of 2.2 million people, up to 60 tonnes of
plastic packaging is dumped on the streets every day, a figure
that has risen by 70 per cent over the past decade.
“I wanted to come up with an idea that would solve problems in
my lifetime,” he said to The Independent.
He came up with the brilliantly simple solution of turning this
waste and plastic bags back into usable and fashionable carryalls and handbags. He collects the plastic sacks and stitches
them together. The business, Trashy Bags, employs a dozen

32

Image: Trashy Bags

A Trashy Bag worker makes a bag.

tailors and seamstresses. Launched in December
last year, it so far has collected 10 million used
plastic bags from the streets and sold more than
6,000 bags. Handbags go for US$7.79.
– (August 2008)
• thewrendesign.com
• melissa.com.br

• modulab.cl
• trashybags.org

RECYCLING FOR PROFIT

Recycling

Anita Ahuja, president of the NGO Conserve in India, has set up a business
making fashionable handbags, wallets and shopping bags from recycled
plastic bags in New Delhi. Begun in 2003, the project collects plastic bags on
the streets and keeps 60 women employed. The recycling process does not
require additional dyes or inks and is non-toxic. The bags are sold in London,
United Kingdom, and will soon be sold in Italy by the Benetton clothing chain.
“We braided them and tried weaving them, but the plastic would come loose.
Then we hit upon the idea of pressing them to make sheets,” Ahuja said.
But this issue can be more complex than it first seems. After South Africa
banned plastic bags of less than 30 microns in 2003, many poor entrepreneurs have complained that it hit hard their making of hats, handbags,
purses and scrubbing brushes from them.
After the bags are banned, environmentalists say the best option is to use
reusable bags made of materials that do not harm the environment during
production and do not need to be discarded after use.
Alternatives to plastic bags include traditional African baskets or kiondos
as they are known in Kenya. Made from sisal and sometimes with leather or
wooden handles, the handmade bags support many local women.
– (July 2007)
• theindiashop.co.uk
• conserveindia.org

• propoortourism-kenya.org/african_bags.htm
• eac.int

Creating Green
Fashion in China
China is the world’s largest manufacturer (Euromonitor) and the largest
clothing maker, producing a quarter of
all textiles and clothing. It is a global
fashion production hub, and many major
global clothing brands have their products made there – whether they admit
it or not. 
Although most people probably do not
give it a second thought, the fashion and
clothing industries can be highly polluting and exploitive.
According to the Ethical Fashion Forum, “it is difficult for companies sourcing from China to be sure of fair working
practices. There have been many reports
of low wages, long hours, and unfair
working conditions in factories in China.”
But one innovative fashion brand is out to
transform the way that the garment business works in China and to develop a template that could be used in other places
such as Africa. 
The design duo of Hans Martin Galliker
and Amihan Zemp has set up their clothing brand’s studio in one of Beijing’s
historic hutong (alley) neighbourhoods –
narrow streets of low-rise buildings that
were the traditional urban dwelling environments for generations of Chinese
people. The NEEMIC brand, founded in
2011, makes sustainable fashions and
champions green production methods
in China.
The business belief is that the world
has enough fabric already to meet
the clothing needs of the population. In
response, NEEMIC makes its clothing
from a mix of recycled natural materials and new organic materials. According to its website, NEEMIC collaborates
“with young designers from London
to Tokyo to create a particular metropolitan aesthetic.” 
– (December 2012)

A selection of designs by NEEMIC in China.

Images: NEEMIC

• neemic.com
• neemic.asia/organic

33

RECYCLING FOR PROFIT

2014 Southern Innovator

Recycling Waste to Boost
Incomes and Opportunities
Brazil, a world leader in waste recycling and green technologies, has pioneered the recycling of plastic bottles, aluminium,
steel cans, solid plastic waste and glass. And now energy companies in Brazil have created credit schemes that encourage
waste recycling while giving people real economic benefits in
return for doing the right thing for the environment. The first
scheme went so well that it quickly inspired others to replicate
its programme in other poor communities.
Coelce is a power company in Ceará State in northeastern
Brazil. The company is engaged primarily in the distribution of
electrical power for industrial, rural, commercial and residential
consumption. In 2007, it set up Ecoelce, a programme allowing
people to recycle waste in return for credits towards their electricity bills. The success of the programme led to an award from
the United Nations.

In VietNam, the NGO Anh Duong or “Sun Ray”
shows schoolchildren how to collect plastic waste
to sell for recycling. In return, their schools receive
improvements and the students can win scholarships. It is estimated that rural VietNam is littered
with 100 million tonnes of waste every year. Much
of it is not picked up.

The programme works like this: people bring the waste to a central collection place, a blue and red building with clear and bright
branding to make it easy to find. In turn, they receive credits on a
blue electronic card – looking like a credit card – carrying a picture
of a child and arrows in the familiar international recycling circle.

The project is operating in 17 communities in the
Long My and Phung Hiep districts in southern VietNam, mobilizing children from primary and secondary schools. School children wearing their uniforms
fan out in groups and collect the plastic waste. The
money made from selling the plastic waste is being
used to improve school facilities and fund scholarships for poor children.

These credits are then used to calculate the amount of discount
that they should receive on their energy bill. The scheme is flexible, and people can also use the credits for food or to pay rent.
In 2008, after its first year, the scheme had expanded to 59 communities collecting 4,522 tonnes of recyclable waste and earning
622,000 reais (US$349,438) in credits for 102,000 people. People
were receiving an average of 5 to 6 reais (US$2.80 to US$3.37)
every month towards their energy bills. A clear success leading
to an expansion of the scheme.
Now in Ceará’s state capital, Fortaleza – population 3.5 million
– there are more than 300,000 people recycling a wide range of
materials, from paper, glass, plastics and metals to cooking oil to
get electricity discounts, according to the Financial Times.

In 2010, the project reported that 10,484 kilograms
of plastic waste were collected by 26,015 pupils. This
provided for 16 scholarships for school children.
The Anh Duong NGO was set up by a group of social
workers with the goal of community development.
They target the poorest, bringing together the entire
community, and seek out “low cost and sustainable
actions”. The NGO has a mix of specialties, from agriculture to aquaculture, health, microfinance and
social work. – (November 2011)
• coelce.com.br/default.aspx
• light.com.br/web/tehome.asp
• anhduonghg.org/en

South Africa’s Wren Design is an online
store for chic recycled bags, purses and
accessories (thewrendesign.com).

34

Kenya could produce 27 per cent of its electricity from geothermal by 2031 (Kenya Geothermal Development Company).

Images: Wendren Setzer (thewrendesign.com).

Recycling

Global energy demand
is forecast to grow by 30
per cent from 2010 to
2035. Sustainably grown
biomass could produce
four times the world’s
global electricity needs
by 2050. Nearly 40
countries have enough
geothermal energy
potential to meet a
significant proportion of
their electricity needs.
Wind energy could
provide 9 per cent of the
world’s electricity needs
by 2030.
(sustainableenergyforall.org;
World Bank Global Geothermal
Development Plan)

A wind-driven air conditioning system being prototyped at the Tianjin Eco-city in China

Image: David South.

35

2014 Southern Innovator

Mobile Phones
Apps to innovations to pioneers
Information Technology
Digital decade delivers huge changes
Key Data
Facts and figures
State-of-Play
What is going on across the South?

Southern Innovator:

ISSUE 01

NOVEMBER 2010

THE SOUTH RISES IN FAST-CHANGING WORLD

The 5-issue Milestone

Development 2.0: The pioneers re-shaping technology and development
MOBILE PHONES

Apps to innovations to pioneers
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Digital decade delivers huge changes

The fourth issue of Southern Innovator (southerninnovator.
org) was launched in October 2013 at the Global South-South
Development Expo (southsouthexpo.org) held in Nairobi, Kenya
at the headquarters of the United Nation’s Environment Programme (UNEP) (unep.org). The first issue of Southern Innovator
was inspired in part by the many developments taking place in
Kenya’s mobile phones and information technology space, and
it seemed fitting to see the fourth issue, on cities and urbanization, launched in Kenya.

KEY DATA

Facts and figures
STATE OF PLAY

What is going on across the South?

Mobile phone &
Information Technology

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 01

NOVEMBER 2010

UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME

From books to great sites to ways to raise cash

Prototype 1.
Design work began in 2010
on Southern Innovator’s
first issue.

Mobile Phones &

Information Technology Issue
How these tech tools can aid in push to meet MDGs

Prototype 2.
Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme
MOBILE PHONES

Apps to innovations to pioneers

Final design.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Digital decade delivers huge changes
KEY DATA

Facts and figures
STATE OF PL AY

What is going on across the South?

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 01

MAY 2011

www.southerninnovator.com

Southern Innovator is
designed and laid out
using 100 per cent
renewable energy.
It is also printed
on paper from
sustainable forest
sources.

Mobile Phones &

Information Technology Issue
How these tech tools can aid in the push to meet the MDGs

Volunteers (above) help to launch Southern Innovator’s fourth issue at the
Global South-South Development Expo in Nairobi, Kenya.

The magazine’s journey, from its prototype development in 2010, to
its “soft launch” in early 2011, until the first issue’s print launch in
September 2011, involved extensive research and revision to find
the best format for communicating these stories of innovation from
the global South. It was a pleasure to receive positive comments
from our readers about that first issue and it helped us to continue
to refine and improve the magazine over the following issues.
Typography:
Font family: Akkurat (light - regular - bold)
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
0123456789 ()?!&@:; “”
Issue 5 colour palette

36

Image: David South.

Examples of comments include: “What a tremendous magazine your team has produced! It’s a terrific tour de force of what is interesting, cutting edge
and relevant in the global mobile/ICT space... Really
looking forward to what you produce in issues #2
and #3. This is great, engaging, relevant and topical
stuff.”, and “Looks great. Congratulations. It’s Brill’s
Content for the 21st century!”
The magazine has tried to embrace the culture of
innovation in its production and development and
also be as “green” as possible. For example, all the
magazine’s design and layout are done using energy
derived from renewable energy sources, and the
paper on which it is printed is from sustainable forest resources.
On these pages, we show how the initial cover design developed.
We are proud to present the fifth issue and hope that
it is a joy to read and useful for your work!

Southern Innovator magazine designed by Sólveig Rolfsdóttir (solla.net).

Recycling

Southern Innovator was first launched as an e-magazine
in May 2011. It was the culmination of several years’ worth
of research and extensive testing and prototyping. The idea
was to create a magazine that would celebrate the growing global innovator culture that was accelerating as access
to information technologies widened, reaching the poorest
and most isolated places on earth.

The issue that you are reading now is a major milestone for
the magazine. Having five issues makes it easier to see the
concept behind the magazine and to show the breadth of innovation to be found across the global South.
The archive of past issues can be found online here:
scribd.com/SouthernInnovator

Design to show and teach

Covers
Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

MOBILE PHONES

YOUTH

AGRIBUSINESS

Agribusiness Models and Success Stories

URBANIZATION

WASTE

How to Engage for a Brighter Future

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

FOOD SECURITY
From Crisis Strategies to Small-scale Farming Innovators

CITIES

RECYCLING
Building Green Businesses That Work: From Fashion to Fuel to Farms

Apps to innovations to pioneers

Great Ideas for Pro-poor Businesses

Digital decade delivers huge changes

Facts and Figures
Best Policies and the “Demographic Dividend”

ISSUE 01

MAY 2011

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
www.southerninnovator.com

ISSUE 02

SPRING 2012

www.southerninnovator.org

KEY DATA
Facts and Figures

STATE OF PLAY
Solutions for Planned and Unplanned Cities

STATE OF PLAY
Mobiles Transforming Green Solutions: A How-to Guide Pages 26-27

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation

KEY DATA
Facts and Figures

STATE OF PLAY
Making the 21st Century Farm: A How-to Guide

STATE OF PLAY

STATE OF PL AY

What is going on across the South?

Great Housing Solutions and Building Technologies

KEY DATA
Facts and Figures

KEY DATA

KEY DATA

Facts and figures

Turning Waste into Wealth in the 21st Century

Making Urban Environments Liveable

ISSUE 03

2012

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
www.southerninnovator.org

ISSUE 04

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
www.southerninnovator.org

2013

ISSUE 05

www.southerninnovator.org

2014

IN THIS ISSUE:

IN THIS ISSUE:

Smart Cities Up Close

Designing for a New Africa

98%

Recyclable
Urbanization
Trends

Innovative
Home Designs

Zero-waste
Solutions

Do
ha

LAGOS

Mobile Phones &

Youth&

How these tech tools can aid in the push to meet the MDGs

How youth and entrepreneurship can help in the push to meet the MDGs

Information Technology Issue

Entrepreneurship Issue

Agribusiness &
Food Security Issue

How agribusiness and food security can help in the push to meet the MDGs

Cities &

Urbanization Issue

k
gko
Ban

Xian
is
Add ba
Aba

Wu
ha

Beijing

ACCRA

Tianjin

Cradle-to-cradle Pen
Solution

n

Shanghai

Sao
o
Paul

Source: McKinsey

Bue
Air nos
es

Global Institute

The Global South's Increasing Urbanization: Challenges to City Living

Waste &

Recycling Issue
Improving Human Development with Finite Resources

37

ENERGY

2014 Southern Innovator

Around 1,400 steam wells will be drilled by companies to meet these goals.
Kenya is currently building a 52-megawatt (MW)
geothermal project with funding from the Government of the United States. It is also receiving
US$149 million in funding from the African Development Bank (AfDB) Group to build the Menengai
Geothermal Development Project. This plant will
be able to generate 400 megawatts of renewable
electricity from the Menengai geothermal sources
in the steam field located 180 kilometres northwest of the capital, Nairobi.
Where geothermal energy
comes from.

Kenya Turns to
Geothermal Energy for
Electricity and Growth

In an effort to diversify its power supply and meet growing electricity demand, Kenya is looking to increase its use of geothermal
energy sources. Tapping the abundant heat and steam that lurk
underground to drive electric power plants offers a sustainable
and long-term source of low-cost energy.
Kenya currently gets most of its electricity from hydroelectric
projects. This is great until there is a drought, which there is now.
With water resources low, the country has had to turn to fossil
fuels to power electricity generators. This means relying on imported diesel, which is both expensive and polluting. It is also not
generating enough electricity to keep up with demand.

Geothermal generation yields
energy that is clean, affordable,
reliable and scalable
Electricity blackouts have become common in the country and
this is harming economic development. This is a particularly damaging setback in a country that has, in the last five years, gained
a deserved reputation for its technological advances in mobile
phone applications and Internet services – all needing reliable
supplies of electricity.
Kenya is Africa’s largest geothermal producer and has geothermal resources concentrated near a giant volcanic crater in the
Great Rift Valley with 14 fields reaching from Lake Magadi to Lake
Turkana. There are also low temperature fields in Homa Hills
and Massa Mukwe.

38

30 per cent: Global energy demand growth from 2010 to 2035 (UNEP).

Speaking at a press conference this month, Gabriel
Negatu, AfDB Regional Director, said that he sees
geothermal technology as an important driver of
Kenya’s green growth ambition.
“Geothermal generation yields energy that is clean,
affordable, reliable and scalable,” he said.
The Geothermal Development Company
(GDC), a State-owned
company in Kenya, recently declared that it
had tapped steam with
a well in the Menengai
steam field. GDC started
surface exploration in
2009 and has been using
two drilling rigs to look
for geothermal steam.

Tapping geothermal energy
sources to generate power.

The Menengai Geothermal Development Project is
slated to be completed by 2016 and will boost the
country’s geothermal capability by 20 per cent. It is
estimated to be able to power the electricity needs
of 500,000 Kenyan households and power the needs
of 300,000 small businesses.
It is estimated that Kenya could generate 7,000 megawatts of geothermal power and the Government of
Kenya is looking to increase the country’s geothermal capacity from the current 198 MW to 1,700 MW
by 2020 and 5,530 MW by 2031.
– (March 2012)

• gdc.co.ke/index.php?option=com_conte
nt&view=article&id=191&Itemid=163
• gdc.co.ke
• nea.is/geothermal

Images: Renewable Energy World.com | Knut Gangåssæter/SINTEF
and keepbanderabeautiful.org.

ENERGY

Recycling

Geothermal Energy to Boost
Development of the Global South
The geothermal heat produced by the
earth’s molten core is a resource receiving
more and more attention across the global
South. Properly harnessed, geothermal
energy offers a low-cost, non-polluting
source of power and hot water that does
not harm the environment or contribute to
climate change.
The country that has made the most of this
resource is the Scandinavian island country
of Iceland, one of the world’s most volcanically active places.
The country was once one of the poorest in
Europe, dependent on fishing as its main
income source. But by 2007-2008, Iceland
was ranked as having the highest level of
human development in the world.
One of the contributors to this impressive improvement in human development
is the tapping of the country’s geothermal
energy reserves.
According to the Geothermal Energy
Association (GEA), “Iceland is widely
considered the success story of the geothermal community. The country of just over
300,000 people is now fully powered by renewable forms of energy, with 17 per cent
of electricity and 87 per cent of heating
needs provided by geothermal energy.”
Worldwide, geothermal energy supplies
power to 24 countries, producing enough
electricity to meet the needs of 60 million
people (GEA).
The Philippines generates 23 per cent of
its electricity from geothermal energy and
is the world’s second-biggest producer behind the United States. Geothermal energy
is also helping to provide power in Costa
Rica, Guatemala, Indonesia and Mexico.
Energy is critical to advances in human
development. Electricity enables the introduction of lighting in homes and the use of
washing machines and other modern appliances and communications tools.

And, crucially, it does not harm the natural environment like conventional energy sources such as coal, gas or nuclear
power with its legacy of radioactive waste.
While not all countries are as well positioned as volcanically active Iceland or
the Philippines, many can find a way to
tap this natural resource.

Iceland is widely
considered the success
story of the geothermal
community
Interest in this power source is increasing in Central and South America, whose
energy consumption is forecast to increase by 72 per cent by 2035 (International Energy Outlook 2011).
South America currently relies heavily on
hydroelectric power, but this is proving
insufficient to meet the growing demand.
A World Bank study says that “Latin
American and Caribbean countries could
boost region-wide electricity supply by
30 per cent by 2030 by diversifying the
energy mix to include hydropower, natural gas, and renewable energy” (ESMAP).

Iceland Scene of Major
Global Geothermal
Scale-up Plan
The World Bank announced in
March 2013 in Reykjavík, Iceland, a
major international effort to expand
renewable power generation in
developing countries by tapping an
underutilized resource: geothermal
energy.
World Bank Managing Director Sri
Mulyani Indrawati called on donors,
multilateral banks, governments and
the private sector to join a Global
Geothermal Development Plan
(GGDP) to better manage and reduce
risks of exploratory drilling to bring
what is now a marginal renewable
energy source into the mainstream
and deliver power to millions.
“Geothermal energy could be a triple
win for developing countries: clean,
reliable, locally produced power.
And once it is up and running, it is
cheap and virtually endless,” said
Sri Mulyani Indrawati.
Sri Mulyani launched the plan at the
Iceland Geothermal Conference in
Reykjavík. Already, the World Bank
and Iceland are working together
under a “Geothermal Compact” to
support surface exploration studies
and technical assistance for countries
where Africa’s Rift Valley is located.
Many developing world regions
are rich in geothermal resources,
including East Africa, Southeast
Asia, Central America, and the
Andean region. At least 40 countries
have enough geothermal potential
to meet a significant proportion of
their electricity demand.

The areas best placed to tap this resource are located along the Pacific Rim
from Mexico to Chile and in parts of the
Caribbean.
The 2012 Geothermal: International Market Overview Report by the Geothermal
Energy Association (GEA) found that
Argentina, Chile and Peru are moving
ahead with plans. – (October 2012)
• visiticeland.com
• geothermal.is
• geo-energy.org/reports.aspx
• earthheat.com.au/
• ecpamericas.org/initiatives/?id=23
• change to: glencorexstrata.com

Iceland is an island and a European
country in the North Atlantic 1,474
kilometres to the West of Norway
on the continent of Europe. It has
substantial geothermal resources.

39

ENERGY

2014 Southern Innovator

Biogas plant under construction at Kitarama prison, Rwanda.

Prisons with a Green Solution
An ingenious solution is helping Rwanda to reduce the cost of running its bursting prisons while improving conditions for the prisoners and helping to protect the environment.
The country’s prison population soared to a peak of 120,000 suspects awaiting trial for their role in the 1994 genocide in which
800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus were killed. The traditional
court system, gacaca, is being used for national reconciliation,
but the process is slow and costly for a country where 90 per cent
of the population exists on subsistence agriculture and where
food production has dropped below 70 per cent of the levels
needed for self-sufficiency (USAID).
But thanks to enormous, beehive-shaped human manure digesters, a steady supply of biogas is on tap for cooking and lighting at
prisons – Rwanda is the first country in Africa to do this. Five of
the country’s largest prisons – two in Gitarama and one each in
Butare, Kigali and Cyangugu – now have biogas plants producing
50 per cent of the gas needed to cook for prisoners. It has also
saved half of each prison’s US$44,000-a-year firewood costs.
Biogas is produced from the fermentation of household or agricultural waste or animal or human faeces and has become a
viable alternative when traditional gas sources become more expensive. The waste is placed in a 150 cubic metre beehive-shaped

40

20 per cent: Amount of electricity that Denmark gets from wind power (UNEP).

digester and fermented until a gas is produced.
According to lead engineer on the project Ainea
Kimaro, 100 cubic metres of waste are turned into
50 cubic metres of fuel by bacteria devouring the
manure in just four weeks.
The digesters are a project of the Kigali Institute
of Science, Technology and Management‘s Center for Innovations and Technology Transfer.
“Biogas kills two birds with one stone,” Kimaro told
the BBC. It gets rid of all the human waste and covers the costs of feeding so many prisoners.
Many would think that this is a smelly affair, but
in fact the whole process isn’t that pungent. Most
of the digester is underground and the gas produced burns a clean, blue, smokeless flame. It is
much cleaner than the smoke from firewood. The
remaining sludgy residue is used as an odourless
compost for soil. This is used in the prison gardens
to grow maize, mangos, bananas and tomatoes.
– (February 2008)
• kist.ac.rw/index.php?id=2

Image: Ashden.org

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme
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2

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES,
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Agribusiness Models and Success Stories
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Making the 21st Century Farm: A How-to Guide

Entrepreneurship Issue
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ISSUE 03

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1. African Afro Beats Leads New Music
Wave to Europe
A surge in interest in African music in Britain is creating new
economic opportunities for the continent’s musicians. The new
sound heating up the U.K. music scene is “Afro Beats” - a high
energy hybrid that mixes Western rap influences with Ghanaian
and Nigerian popular music.
Afro Beats draws its inspiration from the “Afrobeat” sound
popularized in the 1970s (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afrobeat).
Afrobeat recordings from that time are still making money as
long-forgotten tunes are re-packaged by so-called ‘crate divers’
- enterprising people who rummage through old vinyl record
collections and re-brand scenes and sounds.
This is part of the global creative economy, which is thriving
despite the recent years of economic turmoil. Musicians
offer many lessons for businesses in the South, both in their
adaptability to new conditions and their resourcefulness in
experimenting with new business models to earn an income.
Afrobeat stars and pioneers like Nigeria’s Fela Kuti (http://
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fela_Kuti) have been popular outside
Africa for many decades. But Afro Beats - a new name with
the addition of the crucial letter “s” - is being declared as the
beginning of a new phase in taking African music global.
As the digital music revolution has rocked the global music
business, artists have had to adapt and change their business
models. For all but a very few “big names,” it is no longer possible
to build a career on royalties from recordings and hits. Stars
and novices alike must battle with music pirates, who sell CDs
and downloads of other people’s tunes and keep the money for
themselves. Legitimate income often comes in micropayments
from large music platforms like iTunes as people pay to download
an individual song or mix and match tunes they like from an
artist’s catalogue, rather than buying a whole album as they
would in the past.

www.southerninnovator.org

2012

In this issue:
African Afro Beats Leads New
Music Wave to Europe
Venture Capital Surge in Africa to
Help Businesses
Business Leads on Tackling
Violence in Mexican City

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

3

URBANIZATION

Making Urban Environments Liveable
CITIES

Great Housing Solutions and Building Technologies
KEY DATA

Facts and Figures
STATE OF PLAY
Solutions for Planned and Unplanned Cities
Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

Agribusiness &

Africa’s Tourism Sector Can Learn
from Asian Experience

Food Security Issue

Designed in China to Rival ‘Made
in China’

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation

How agribusiness and food security can help in the push to meet the MDGs

ISSUE 04

www.southerninnovator.org

2013

IN THIS ISSUE:

4

Featured links:
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FUNDING

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Turning Waste into Wealth in the 21st Century
RECYCLING
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LAGOS

Empowered lives.
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Cities &

Window on the World
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k
gko
Ban

Xian
dis
Ad ba
Aba

Wu
ha

n

Shanghai

Beijing

ACCRA

Tianjin

Sao
lo
Pau

Source: McKinsey

Bu
eno
Air
s
es

Global Institute

The Global South's Increasing Urbanization: Challenges to City Living

www.southerninnovator.org

2014

IN THIS ISSUE:

5

Bookmark with:

Designing for a New Africa

98%

Recyclable

what is this?

Clever musicians have turned to building their brand, using
live performances and the ability to sell other services and
merchandise to make a living. They create their own web
platforms, or mobile phone apps (applications), and do the
marketing and distribution on their own to build a loyal fan base.
Others are creating their own mobile radio stations by distributing
CDs to the ubiquitous taxi mini buses that are the main means of
transport in most African cities.

Zero-waste
Solutions

Cradle-to-cradle Pen
Solution

Waste &

Recycling Issue
Improving Human Development with Finite Resources

But some things remain the same as in the past, such as the
importance of having a champion, such as a radio DJ (disc jockey),
who acts as a “taste maker,” discovering new acts and telling their
audience about them.

“I’ve been playing this music to three or four thousand people
at African events in the U.K. for years,” DJ Abrantee told The
Guardian. “For years we’ve had amazing hiplife, highlife,
Nigerbeats, juju music, and I thought: you know what, let’s put it
all back together as one thing again, and call it Afro Beats, as an
umbrella term. Afrobeat, the 60s music, was more instrumental this Afro Beats sound is different, it’s inter-twined with things like
hip-hop and funky house, and there’s more of a young feel to it.”

Innovative
Home Designs

STATE OF PLAY
Mobiles Transforming Green Solutions: A How-to Guide Pages 26-27

Quick links:

The DJ most associated with pushing the Afro Beats sound and
scene is London-based DJ Abrantee (http://www.facebook.com/
djabrantee).

Urbanization
Trends

KEY DATA
Facts and Figures

Do
ha

February 2012

www.southerninnovator.org

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41

ENERGY

2014 Southern Innovator

African Fuel Pioneer Uses
Crisis to Innovate
Crisis, as the old saying goes, is also a window of opportunity.
And there is one African entrepreneur who knows this better than
most. Daniel Mugenga has been on a journey of innovation that
has led him to become a pioneer in the emerging new field of algae
technologies. The story of how he got there is a testament to the
power of using business to both solve problems and make profits.
Kenyan entrepreneur Daniel Mugenga has found a solution to the
problem of high fuel costs for the transport sector in his country. He has been making money from turning waste cooking oil and
inedible vegetable oil into biodiesel. He then discovered that he
could boost his production of biodiesel by using marine algae as
a source for oil.

Pure Fuels makes a bold statement on
algae fuel development: it “may actually be
Kenya’s next cash crop
According to the body that represents the algae fuel industry,
Oilgae, algae are “plant-like organisms that are usually photosynthetic and aquatic, but do not have true roots, stems, leaves,
vascular tissue and have simple reproductive structures. They are
distributed worldwide in the sea, in freshwater and in wastewater.
Most are microscopic, but some are quite large, e.g., some marine
seaweeds that can exceed 50 m in length.”
His business, Pure Fuels Ltd., is currently seeking venture capital
funding for expansion and innovation. Pure Fuels is “a commercial
producer of biodiesel and also manufactures biodiesel processors,
which we sell to budding entrepreneurs,” says Mugenga.
The Pure Fuels website educates readers on biodiesel as well as
offering opportunities for investors and news updates. Pure Fuels
was registered as a business in Kenya in 2010.
The business was born out of crisis: in 2008, there were frequent
fuel shortages in Kenya and prices were volatile. That was bad news
for Daniel Mugenga’s job, working for a transport company with a
fleet of trucks. Rising or volatile fuel prices can destroy businesses
in areas such as trucking, where the biggest expense is fuel.
Mugenga began to do research into fuel alternatives in the crisis and
came upon biodiesel. He then set about training in how to produce
biodiesel. A period of testing, trials and research ensued between
2008 and 2010, which enabled Pure Fuels to build confidence that it
had something that was high quality. The company started producing 120,000 litres of biodiesel in 2010 and increased production to

42

100% Biodiesel
360,000 litres in 2011 and 700,000 to date in 2012.
In 2011, Pure Fuels had revenue of US$230,000
from selling biodiesel.
“We started off using jatropha oil, but when its
price went up, it was no longer profitable,” Mugenga told the VC4Africa website blog. “Having invested in the machinery, we switched to the next
quickest alternative, which is used cooking oil. We
source it from several of the tourist hotels along
the Kenyan coast.”
Turning to cooking oil for biodiesel at first was a
good idea. The company was able to obtain enough
waste cooking oil from Kenyan hotels and tourist
resorts to meet demand. But as demand rose, the
thorny problem of Kenya’s tourism business being
seasonal arose.
“For about five months of the year, many hotels
in Mombasa temporarily shut down or operate
at lower capacity. Of course, this is affecting the
amount of waste cooking oil,” Mugenga said. This
is where algae come in.
Pure Fuels found a biotechnologist in Kenya to
help to develop a solution using algae as a source
for fuel. While the company is keeping details of its
innovation secret, it is currently hunting for investors to help to increase the quantity of biodiesel
that it can make – and, in turn, revenues.
Investor funds would be used to import non-edible vegetable oil and to continue the company’s
work on extracting oil from marine algae.
Pure Fuels makes a bold statement on algae fuel
development: it “may actually be Kenya’s next
cash crop.”
– (July 2012)
• oilgae.com
• purefuels.co.ke
• kebs.org

• seambiotic.com
• cgdc.com.cn
• univervebiofuel.com

Iceland’s energy: 13 per cent from geothermal and 87 per cent from hydropower = 100 per cent from renewables. Almost 100 per cent
of Iceland’s space heating and water heating come from geothermal sources (National Energy Authority of Iceland).

Recycling

Indonesian Wooden
Radio Succeeds with
Good Design
One Indonesian industrial designer has pioneered an innovative
business that has rejuvenated the economy of a farming village
and improved the sustainability of local forests – and he’s doing
it all with wood.
A range of wooden radios hold pride of place for the Magno brand,
which has carved out a niche as a maker of high-quality, crafted
products that marry traditional skills with modern design. Magno
is creating jobs and skills while also creating a unique, exportable
product that commands a good price.
Indonesian designer Singgih Susilo Kartono developed the radio
design concepts while at the Faculty of Fine Art and Design in Bandung, Java, Indonesia, in the 1990s.
He takes an organic approach to designing, enjoying the journey and
not necessarily being sure where he is going.
“I never start my design according to the market research or demand. I design by absorbing events, global or local events and even
mundane daily life things that happen around me. Consequently, I
start to think what will be good and better for these people,” he explains in his brochure.
The workshop in which the radios are made is a handsome woodenroofed building and craftspeople sit at long wooden tables to assemble the models.
Each radio is made from a single piece of wood and takes a craftsperson 16 hours to construct, drawing on traditional woodworking
skills. The radios are made from Indian rosewood, which is often
used to manufacture many musical instruments because of its excellent sound resonance.
The radios are made in stages, with more than 20 steps involved
in assembling each one. The individual parts are precision cut by
machines before being assembled using a tongue-and-groove
construction technique.
Some radio models have a chunky, retro appearance and mix dark
and light wood to give an eye-pleasing contrast. Others are more
modern designs with a sleek profile. There is a large version, a “Mini”,
a sleek modern “Cube” version and a rectangular version. There is
also a round clock and a wooden desktop office set with various
essentials such as a wooden stapler.
The radios sell for between 99 euros (US$124) and 220 euros
(US$276), and are shipped to Europe via Singapore to Hamburg
in Germany.

Magno wooden radio with chunky, retro buttons.

“To me, wood is somewhat a perfect material, especially if I compare it to synthetic ones,” Kartono
said. “In wood, we could find strength and weakness, advantages and disadvantages or roughness and also softness. Wood is hard and solid but
yet it is 100 per cent eco-friendly as it is degradable and leaves no waste materials on the earth.”
Great care is taken in selecting the wood and ensuring that it is from local, sustainable plantation
sources. According to its website, Magno used 80
trees in 2010 for its radios but in turn planted 8,000
trees around the village. This regeneration has become part of the process of creating the radios.
Magno has won numerous awards, including the
Brit Design Award (United Kingdom), Design Plus
Award (Germany), Good Design Award/G-Mark
(Japan) and the Indonesia Good Design Selection
Awards.
“The wood I use for the manufacturing process
may need as long as 50 years to reach maturity,”
Kartono said. “I want people not only to think about
exotic or precious woods but likewise about the
fact that good things require time. All objects that
surround us should be thought-provoking. Craftsmanship originally was the art of dealing with raw
materials in a sensible and economical way.”
Kartono was inspired by one of his teachers at
university, an advocate of the “new craft”
Image: Magno Radio.

43

2014 Southern Innovator

approach, which applies modern management techniques to traditional craftsmanship. The idea is simple
but very effective. It begins with making sure that every
step of the manufacturing process is standardized to ensure consistent quality and materials. A new product or
design is first broken down into steps and a product manual is put together. Only then is the manufacturing process carried out.
While the “new craft” method sounds simple and obvious,
many craft makers do not take this approach. By following this methodology, it is possible to quickly train new
craft workers and start up manufacturing in a new village
or community. Craft is increasingly being seen as a good
way to re-employ people who formerly worked in farming.
The “new craft” approach can create high-quality products
that would sell well in the export market. A common problem with crafts is either poor quality control or inconsistent
manufacturing methods. This can feed stereotypes of craft
products and make them look second-rate in comparison
to machine-manufactured products in the marketplace.
“Design for us is more than just creating a well-designed
product that is produced and consumed in colossal
amounts,” Kartono said. “Design must be a way to solve
and minimize problems.”
– (June 2012)
• wooden-radio.com
• magno-design.com/?id=wr01a

Magno Radio user manual.

Magno wooden product
range, including clock.

44

US$400 billion: Global market for waste management – collection and recycling (UNEP).

Recycling

Powerful Solar Light
Spurring Income-making
Opportunities
A clever innovator from India has built a highly durable solar lantern that also doubles as a mobile phone charger.
The Sunlite lantern – the JS 30 MOB Sunlite - made by Sunlite Solar
is an LED light packed with clever innovations. It is completely selfcontained and does not require any extra parts, cables or separate solar panel to charge it. The clever design includes a pop-up,
fold-down handle, a powerful solar photovoltaic (PV) panel on its
top that – with a day out in the sun – charges the lantern battery
enough to provide around 8 hours of 360-degree light when the sun
goes down. It is also highly durable and moisture- and heat-resistant and can withstand a drop on a hard floor.
The manufacturer of the Sunlite lantern is India Impex, which focuses on making and exporting high-quality off-grid solar lighting
products and sees itself as a “socially driven company.” Founded
in 2009, it has built up its reputation as a global vendor to humanitarian and relief agencies.
“For the size of the lamp, for the number of hours, for the features we give, including the mobile [phone] charging, we are
100 per cent portable; it is all integrated,” said Sunlite representative Divyesh Thakkar, while demonstrating the lantern at
the 2012 Global South-South Development Expo, held recently in
Vienna, Austria.
The mobile phone charging capability has been seized as a great
way to turn the lantern into an income-generating opportunity.
Already, people are forming co-ops and charging rent time on the
lantern for recharging mobile phones. And there are a few clever
tweaks to the lantern to help control this.
“I don’t want this to be abused; I want it to be smart,” said Thakkar.
“When someone comes in and charges the mobile phone and forgets, it is going to cut off after 20 minutes.”
Sunlite lanterns have many uses, according to the product’s
maker. One aspect that the manufacturer is emphasizing is the
importance of light to the security of women and children. There
is overwhelming evidence that better lighting makes for a more
secure environment and allows people to do more things safely
at night. Children can look out for environmental threats such
as poisonous snakes and spiders, and women and girls can feel
safe doing things such as going to the toilet without worrying that
somebody might attack them in the dark.
Solar power is being seen as a way to get electricity to people
in areas bypassed by conventional electricity grid networks. It
Images: Sunlite Solar.

The Sunlite Solar light
with handy carrying
handle and solar
panel on top
for recharging.

also helps to move people away from expensive,
polluting and dangerous alternatives such as diesel
generators, paraffin lamps, gas stoves and coal or
dung fires.
“We compare our solar lantern to the kerosene lantern,” Sunlite representative Sagar Mehta explained.
“On a payback basis, you use an approximate of
30 to 40 cents of a US dollar of kerosene every day
for a four-hour light. First of all, it is very harmful:
smoke inhalation, illnesses, burns, all sorts of things,
security issues.
“That will cost a family one third or half of its income
on a daily basis. If we can change this around where,
if we can make a solar lantern, where the sun is free,
that can pay back in three months and you start
earning rather than paying, [they are] making a living.”
Sunlite lanterns are currently being distributed to
people in disaster situations and also in refugee
camps and displaced persons communities.
– (December 2012)
• sunlite-solar.com
• southsouthexpo.org

45

2014 Southern Innovator

Agribusiness & Food Securit
y

Forward with Southern Inno
vator

magazine.
Order copies from the United
Nations Of fice for South-Sou
th Cooperation.
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46

70 per cent: Projected global increase in urban solid waste as the world continues to urbanize (World Bank).

Image: David South.

Recycling

Baker Cookstoves:

Designing for the African Customer
An innovative social enterprise is using design to create an
energy-efficient cookstove for Kenya. The Baker cookstove has
been designed in order to be a high-quality and desirable product that also accomplishes the goal of saving money for the user.
This unique product is being developed at the company’s factory
in Nairobi, Kenya.
Baker’s owner is Top Third Ventures Global, a social impact company registered in Kenya. It was founded by Lucas Belenky and
Björn Hammar in 2011.
While cooking is a daily necessity for billions of people, it is also
costly and polluting. By switching to energy-efficient cookstoves, families will be able to reduce the cost of cooking daily
meals and, if the stove is designed right, reduce the amount of
pollution generated while cooking. One of the great obstacles
holding back the take-up of energy-efficient cookstoves has
been the absence of sustainable business models to sell and
distribute energy-efficient cookstoves.
The Baker cookstove, by being designed as an aspirational product and backed up with a seven-year guarantee, hopes to change
this dynamic. And if things go to plan, then Baker hopes to significantly scale up its production based on customers wanting
to have a Baker cookstove taking pride of place in their home.

The Baker cookstove is benefiting from new financing being made available through carbon credits
and Baker’s founders believe that this will add sustainability to the energy-efficient cookstove market
and bring big changes over the next 10 years.

Interview

Baker’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Lucas
Belenky, explained to Southern Innovator the
thinking behind the Baker cookstove.
SI: What role does design play in the Baker cookstove social enterprise? At what stage did Top Third
Ventures start to think through the production life
cycle for the Baker cookstove? What did you feel was
missing in the other cookstove models currently
available on the market?

Björn Hammer inspects the Baker cookstove
being built in the Nairobi factory.

The Baker cookstove is the product of a deliberate attempt to use
design and a well-thought-out production life cycle to ensure that
the cookstove is eye-catching, effective, and manufactured consistently and to a high standard. Engineering and design teams
also constantly monitor the product and make adjustments to
the cookstove as they receive feedback from customers.
Images: Top Third Ventures Global.

The Baker cookstove is the cornerstone of the social enterprise. Top Third Ventures is at its core a
product company. There are different aspects to
the business model to make it work (i.e., carbon
credits and big data) but everything depends on the
success of the Baker product. We started thinking
through the production life cycle from the day the
company was founded in late 2011. The Baker is designed for usability, aspirational value and performance, prioritized in that order. The most important
thing is that the Baker is easy to use and does not
require its users to change their daily routines or

47

2014 Southern Innovator

cooking habits. Cooking cultures vary
greatly across the developing world so
it is important to understand exactly
who your customers are and focus on
meeting their requirements. When
you have a product that is easy to use,
it needs to be desirable as well. Beyond the service provided, the product should make the customers feel
good about themselves. Finally, the
Baker cooks the same food with half
the fuel and much less smoke.
The priorities seem reversed for other
cookstove models on the market. Efficiency comes first, then the aesthetic
design, and cultural conformity is
last. Hyper-efficient cookstoves are
great for health and the environment
on paper but the benefits are not realized because widespread adoption
isn’t achieved. Most products are imposed through a top-down approach
instead of starting with the customers
and designing the stove around them.
SI: Why did you choose to have the
Baker cookstove designed by Claesson Koivisto Rune? What were some
of the challenges encountered when
designing the product and the production life cycle? What advice do
you have for other social enterprises
looking to offer an appealing product
to low-income households?
We wanted the Baker cookstove to be
an aspirational product that you use
as much because of the performance
(less fuel and less smoke) as because
it is beautiful. Claesson Koivisto Rune
believed in our vision at a very early

stage and I doubt we could have gotten where we are today without them.
Challenges around the design mainly
involve keeping the costs down. Our
customers do not have a lot of disposable income so balancing affordability with performance and world-class
design is tough.
For other entrepreneurs selling to
low-income households, my advice is:
identify your customer, listen to them,
and never stop listening. This is obvious to most businesses but for social enterprises, sometimes the grant
organizations or other dispersers of
donor funding become the customer
without your noticing.
Finally, often just because the consumer is in a developing country, enterprises neglect aesthetic appeal
and branding. Do not do this. Your consumers behave for the most part like
their counterparts in the developed
world. They want products that look
nice and make them feel good.
SI: What role is information technology playing in the Baker cookstove’s
development? How do mobile phones
help with reaching customers in Africa? How does offering software
products such as Top3Tracker help
Baker cookstoves?
Information technology has a huge
impact in decentralized areas because it enables the cheap flow of information. For Top Third Ventures, it
allows us to track our sales in realtime, communicate with current and

The Baker cookstove
designed by Claeson
Koivisto Rune.

Lucas Belenky with a Baker cookstove
painted a distinctive orange.

future customers instantly and gain
valuable insights about how to improve the sales pitch and marketing
strategy. The Baker cookstove also
depends on carbon finance, which
requires a dialogue with current customers to ensure the usage of the
cookstove is accurately measured.
Information technology such as our
Top3 Tracker significantly reduces
the cost of accessing carbon finance.
SI: It is said that an innovator is somebody who disrupts existing products
and ways of doing things. How is Top
Third Ventures innovating and disrupting the current approach to energy-efficient cookstove distribution?
We hope to change the way products
for low-income households are designed, marketed and sold. Top Third
Ventures’ Baker cookstove embodies our conviction that these products should be customer-centric,
have aspirational value and conform
to local cultures. The success of our
product will show that consumers in
the developing world want the same
thing as their counterparts in developed countries.
Top Third is a partner of the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves.
• bakerproduct.com
• topthirdventures.com
• cleancookstoves.org

48

Innovations Summary
Issue 1

Issue 2

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

YOUTH

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Apps to innovations to pioneers

Southern Innovator has profiled many innovations
since 2011. Here is a summary of those innovations and
how to find them in SI’s back issues.

Issue 3

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

MOBILE PHONES

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Issue 4

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

URBANIZATION
CITIES

KEY DATA
Facts and Figures

Facts and Figures

KEY DATA

KEY DATA
Facts and Figures

STATE OF PLAY

STATE OF PL AY

STATE OF PLAY

Making the 21st Century Farm: A How-to Guide

Best Policies and the “Demographic Dividend”

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 01

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
www.southerninnovator.com

MAY 2011

ISSUE 02

SPRING 2012

www.southerninnovator.org

RECYCLING

Building Green Businesses That Work: From Fashion to Fuel to Farms
KEY DATA

Facts and Figures
STATE OF PLAY

Solutions for Planned and Unplanned Cities

Mobiles Transforming Green Solutions: A How-to Guide Pages 26-27

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

ISSUE 03

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
www.southerninnovator.org

2012

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme
WASTE

Turning Waste into Wealth in the 21st Century

Great Housing Solutions and Building Technologies

KEY DATA

What is going on across the South?

Issue 5

Making Urban Environments Liveable

From Crisis Strategies to Small-scale Farming Innovators

Great Ideas for Pro-poor Businesses

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

AGRIBUSINESS

FOOD SECURITY

Agribusiness Models and Success Stories

How to Engage for a Brighter Future

Digital decade delivers huge changes
Facts and figures
STATE OF PL AY

ISSUE 04

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
www.southerninnovator.org

2013

IN THIS ISSUE:

ISSUE 05

www.southerninnovator.org

2014

IN THIS ISSUE:

Smart Cities Up Close

Designing for a New Africa

98%

Recyclable
Urbanization
Trends

Innovative
Home Designs

Zero-waste
Solutions
Wuha

Cradle-to-cradle Pen
Solution

n

Doh

a

LAGOS

Mobile Phones &

Youth&

How these tech tools can aid in the push to meet the MDGs

How youth and entrepreneurship can help in the push to meet the MDGs

Information Technology Issue

2011

Entrepreneurship Issue

Agribusiness &
Food Security Issue

How agribusiness and food security can help in the push to meet the MDGs

Cities &

Urbanization Issue

ok
Bangk

Xian

Shanghai

Bueno
Aires s
Sao
Paulo

Addis

Ababa

Beijing

ACCRA

Tianjin

Source: McKinsey

Global Institute

The Global South's Increasing Urbanization: Challenges to City Living

Waste &

Recycling Issue
Improving Human Development with Finite Resources

2012

2013
Pages 28-29

Page 9
Issue 3

Issue 3
Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

AGRIBUSINESS

AGRIBUSINESS

Agribusiness Models and Success Stories

Agribusiness Models and Success Stories

FOOD SECURITY
From Crisis Strategies to Small-scale Farming Innovators

FOOD SECURITY
From Crisis Strategies to Small-scale Farming Innovators

KEY DATA

KEY DATA
Facts and Figures

Facts and Figures
STATE OF PLAY
Making the 21st Century Farm: A How-to Guide

STATE OF PLAY
Making the 21st Century Farm: A How-to Guide

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 03

2012

ISSUE 03

www.southerninnovator.org

2012

Agribusiness &

Agribusiness &

Food Security Issue

Food Security Issue

How agribusiness and food security can help in the push to meet the MDGs

How agribusiness and food security can help in the push to meet the MDGs

Powerful information tools + data for farmers

21st century “smart farms” are now possible
Page 21

Page 20
Issue 3

Issue 3

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

AGRIBUSINESS

AGRIBUSINESS

Agribusiness Models and Success Stories

Agribusiness Models and Success Stories

FOOD SECURITY
From Crisis Strategies to Small-scale Farming Innovators

FOOD SECURITY
From Crisis Strategies to Small-scale Farming Innovators

KEY DATA

KEY DATA

Facts and Figures

Facts and Figures

STATE OF PLAY
Making the 21st Century Farm: A How-to Guide

STATE OF PLAY
Making the 21st Century Farm: A How-to Guide
Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 03

2012

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
www.southerninnovator.org

ISSUE 03

2012

Agribusiness &

How agribusiness and food security can help in the push to meet the MDGs

How agribusiness and food security can help in the push to meet the MDGs

Food Security Issue

Natural ways to keep soil healty

New food products create new markets
Pages 28-29

Page 11
Issue 3

Issue 3

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

AGRIBUSINESS

AGRIBUSINESS

Agribusiness Models and Success Stories

Agribusiness Models and Success Stories

FOOD SECURITY
From Crisis Strategies to Small-scale Farming Innovators

FOOD SECURITY
From Crisis Strategies to Small-scale Farming Innovators

KEY DATA
Facts and Figures

KEY DATA
Facts and Figures

STATE OF PLAY
Making the 21st Century Farm: A How-to Guide

STATE OF PLAY
Making the 21st Century Farm: A How-to Guide
Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 03

2012

Innovative products for new markets

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
www.southerninnovator.org

ISSUE 03

2012

www.southerninnovator.org

Agribusiness &

Agribusiness &

How agribusiness and food security can help in the push to meet the MDGs

How agribusiness and food security can help in the push to meet the MDGs

Food Security Issue

Issue 3 – Pages 12-16

www.southerninnovator.org

Agribusiness &
Food Security Issue

Innovative ways to sell food

www.southerninnovator.org

Food Security Issue

Clear branding + new products boost farmer income
Issue 3 – Page 34

Innovative ways to stop food waste

49

Innovations Summary
Contact us:

Do you have an innovation that you would
like to share with the global South?

www.southerninnovator.org

Page 24

Page 21
Issue 4

Issue 4

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

URBANIZATION

URBANIZATION

Making Urban Environments Liveable

Making Urban Environments Liveable

CITIES

CITIES

Great Housing Solutions and Building Technologies

Great Housing Solutions and Building Technologies

KEY DATA

KEY DATA

Facts and Figures

Facts and Figures

STATE OF PLAY
Solutions for Planned and Unplanned Cities

STATE OF PLAY
Solutions for Planned and Unplanned Cities
Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 04

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
www.southerninnovator.org

2013

ISSUE 04

IN THIS ISSUE:

Smart Cities Up Close

Urbanization
Trends

www.southerninnovator.org

2013

IN THIS ISSUE:

Smart Cities Up Close

Innovative
Home Designs

Urbanization
Trends
Wuha

Innovative
Home Designs
n

a
Beijing

Shanghai

Bueno
Aires s

ACCRA

Cities &

Sao
Paulo

Tianjin

Addis

Ababa

Urbanization Issue

Doh

Doh

Cities &

Wuha

LAGOS

n

a

LAGOS

ok
Bangk

Xian

Source: McKinsey

Global Institute

Energy-efficient homes save money

ok
Bangk

Beijing

Shanghai

Bueno
Aires s

ACCRA

Xian

Sao
Paulo

Tianjin

Addis

Ababa

Urbanization Issue

The Global South's Increasing Urbanization: Challenges to City Living

Source: McKinsey

Global Institute

The Global South's Increasing Urbanization: Challenges to City Living

Debt-free homes for the poor
Pages 42-43

Pages 48-49

Issue 4

Issue 4

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

URBANIZATION

URBANIZATION

Making Urban Environments Liveable

Making Urban Environments Liveable

CITIES

CITIES

Great Housing Solutions and Building Technologies

Great Housing Solutions and Building Technologies

KEY DATA
Facts and Figures

KEY DATA
Facts and Figures

STATE OF PLAY
Solutions for Planned and Unplanned Cities

STATE OF PLAY
Solutions for Planned and Unplanned Cities
Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 04

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
www.southerninnovator.org

2013

ISSUE 04

IN THIS ISSUE:

Smart Cities Up Close

Urbanization
Trends

www.southerninnovator.org

2013

IN THIS ISSUE:

Smart Cities Up Close

Innovative
Home Designs

Urbanization
Trends
Wuha

Innovative
Home Designs

Urbanization Issue

Beijing

Bueno
Aires s

ACCRA

Tianjin

Addis

Ababa

Cities &

Sao
Paulo

Source: McKinsey

Global Institute

Smart cities use data to work

ok
Bangk

Xian

Urbanization Issue

The Global South's Increasing Urbanization: Challenges to City Living

Shanghai

Ababa

Bueno
Aires s
Sao
Paulo

Source: McKinsey

Global Institute

Page 9
Issue 2

Issue 2

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

YOUTH

YOUTH

How to Engage for a Brighter Future

How to Engage for a Brighter Future

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Great Ideas for Pro-poor Businesses

Great Ideas for Pro-poor Businesses

KEY DATA

KEY DATA

Facts and Figures

Facts and Figures

STATE OF PLAY

STATE OF PLAY

Best Policies and the “Demographic Dividend”

Best Policies and the “Demographic Dividend”
Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 02

SPRING 2012

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
www.southerninnovator.org

ISSUE 02

SPRING 2012

www.southerninnovator.org

Youth&

Youth&

How youth and entrepreneurship can help in the push to meet the MDGs

How youth and entrepreneurship can help in the push to meet the MDGs

Entrepreneurship Issue

Entrepreneurship Issue

Cambodian bloggers champion freedom

Fab Labs innovate for development

Page 20

Page 42

Issue 1

Issue 1

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

MOBILE PHONES

MOBILE PHONES

Apps to innovations to pioneers

Apps to innovations to pioneers

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Digital decade delivers huge changes

Digital decade delivers huge changes

KEY DATA

KEY DATA

Facts and figures

Facts and figures

STATE OF PLAY

STATE OF PLAY

What is going on across the South?

What is going on across the South?

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 01

MAY 2011

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
www.southerninnovator.com

ISSUE 01

Mobile Phones &

Frugal mobile phone charger

Beijing

ACCRA

Tianjin

Addis

The Global South's Increasing Urbanization: Challenges to City Living

Eco-cities go green to work

Page 20

50

n

a
Shanghai

Doh

Doh

Cities &

Wuha

LAGOS

n

a

LAGOS

ok
Bangk

Xian

MAY 2011

www.southerninnovator.com

Mobile Phones &

Information Technology Issue

Information Technology Issue

How these tech tools can aid in the push to meet the MDGs

How these tech tools can aid in the push to meet the MDGs

Illiterate get Internet at touch of button

Southern Innovator Knowledge Summary

FEATURES

Southern Innovator

Recycling

KNOWLEDGE SUMMARY
Issue 5 of Southern Innovator joins a growing stable of off- and online
resources capturing unique knowledge on Southern innovation.
Waste

5

1

E-newsletter
Published every month since 2006, the Development Challenges, South-South Solutions
e-newsletter has chronicled the many changes
in the global South from the rise of mobile
phones to the move to cities and urban areas
to the proliferation of innovative solutions.

4
The Southern Innovator website archive presents by theme the
back catalogue of stories from the Development Challenges, SouthSouth Solutions e-newsletter. It also joins an extensive range of
resources offered on the web portal of the United Nations Office
for South-South Cooperation (ssc.undp.org).

2

Recycling

3
Southern Innovator Issue 4
Southern Innovator’s fourth issue was
on the theme of cities and urbanization. It was launched in October in Nairobi, Kenya, at the Global South-South
Development Expo.

SouthernIn
novator
#5 Availab
le Now!

51

2014 Southern Innovator

MONEY, MONEY:
Where to Get It
AWARDS
Innovation Prize for Africa: The Innovation Prize for
Africa , begun in 2011, awards US$100,000 for the
top innovation that matches its criteria of
marketability, originality, scalability, social impact
and business potential.
Website: innovationprizeforafrica.org
Saïd Global Entrepreneur Challenge: SGEC is a
global business-plan challenge hosted by the
University of Oxford’s Saïd Business School. It is
more than just a competition; based on the quality
of an initial one-page business plan, applicants will
receive mentorship and guidance from the
University of Oxford’s business students and
alumni to help to grow the ideas into practical,
10-page business plans.
Website: www.sbs.ox.ac.uk
InnoCentive: InnoCentive is a challenge to the
world’s inventors to find solutions to real scientific
and technological problems affecting the poor and
vulnerable. It is an open marketplace where
anybody with a problem can post it, and rewards
for effective solutions stretch up to US$100,000.
It uses rigorous intellectual property protection so
that ideas are not used without credit being given
to the inventor.
Website: innocentive.com
Grand Challenges Canada: A grand challenge is a
specific critical barrier that, if removed, would help
to solve an important health problem in the
developing world, with a high likelihood of global
impact through widespread implementation. Grand
Challenges Canada awards funding to innovative
solutions to five challenges.
Website: grandchallenges.ca
The Pioneers of Prosperity Grant and Award: This
competition is a partnership between the OTF
Group and the John F. Templeton Foundation of the
United States. It promotes companies in East
Africa by identifying local role models that act as
examples of sustainable businesses in their
country/region. It is open to businesses from
Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, the United Republic of
Tanzania and Uganda. Five pioneers will receive
US$50,000 to reinvest in their businesses. It is open
to for-profit businesses that provide high wages to
their workers and that operate in sustainable ways.
Website: pioneersofprosperity.org/index.php

BUSINESS SUPPORT
West Africa Trade Hub: The Hub works with people
to improve transport, access to finance, the
business environment and ICT to make WestAfrican
businesses more competitive.
Website: watradehub.com
ExportHelp: Promoting and supporting access to
the European market: The European Commission
runs a database for the explicit support of market
players in developing countries who want to bring
their products to the European Union market. The
database gives an overview of the European Union
preferential trade regimes established for
developing countries and lists all tariffs, taxes
and other requirements for goods imported into
the European Union.
Website: exporthelp.europa.eu
African Diaspora Skills Database: This database
was compiled to provide an overview of qualified
African diaspora professionals with varied areas of

52

expertise and experience. The African diaspora
contributes substantially to the social, economic
and political development of Africa, and this
database is set up to further mobilize this
considerable potential.
Website: diaspora-centre.org
Development Executive Group:
Over 90,000 global experts can network and
connect and learn about more than 47,000
registered projects.
Website: devex.com
African Economic Outlook: A unique online tool
that puts rigorous economic data, information
and research on Africa at your fingertips. A few
clicks give access to comprehensive analyses of
African economies, placed in their social and
political contexts. This is the only place where
African countries are examined using a common
analytical framework, enabling users to compare
economic prospects at the regional, subregional
and country levels.
Website: africaneconomicoutlook.org/en

GRANTS
Google.org: While small and medium-sized
enterprises (SMEs) in rich countries represent
half of GDP, they are largely absent from the formal
economies of developing countries. Today, there
are trillions of investment dollars chasing returns,
and SMEs are a potentially high-impact,
high-return investment. However, only a trickle of
this capital currently reaches SMEs in developing
countries.Google.org’s goal is to increase this flow.
It wants to show that SMEs can be profitable
investments and do this by focusing on lowering
transaction costs,deepening capital markets to
increase liquidity and catalysing capital for
investment.
Website: google.org
Echoing Green: Social Entrepreneurs Fund: To
accelerate social change, Echoing Green invests
in and supports outstanding emerging social
entrepreneurs to launch new organizations that
deliver bold, high-impact solutions. Through a
two-year fellowship programme, it helps its
network of visionaries to develop new solutions to
society’s most difficult problems. To date, Echoing
Green has invested nearly US$30 million in seed
funding to almost 500 social entrepreneurs and
their innovative organizations.
Website: echoinggreen.org
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation: Guided by the
belief that every life has equal value, the Bill
&Melinda Gates Foundation works to help all
people lead healthy, productive lives. In developing
countries, it focuses on improving people’s health
and giving people the chance to lift themselves out
of hunger and extreme poverty. The Foundation disburses grants to people in more than 100 countries.
Website: gatesfoundation.org
Skoll Foundation: Skoll is one of the leading
foundations in the field of social entrepreneurship.
Over the past 10 years, it has awarded more than
US$250 million, including investments in 85 social
entrepreneurs and 70 organizations on five
continents around the world who are creating a
brighter future for underserved communities. In
addition to grant-making, it funds a
US$20 million-plus portfolio of programmerelated and mission-aligned investments.
Website: skollfoundation.org
Rockefeller Foundation: The Rockefeller
Foundation supports work that expands
opportunity and strengthens resilience to social,
economic, health and environmental challenges to
promote the wellbeing of humanity.
Website: rockefellerfoundation.org

Landesa: Landesa helps millions of families to
receive assistance in gaining legal control over their
land. Landesa works mainly in China and India and
sub-Saharan Africa. Land rights are a great spur to
wealth creation and give families a stake in growing
local economies.
Website: landesa.org
Ashoka: Innovators for the Public: Ashoka is the
largest network of social entrepreneurs worldwide,
with nearly 3,000 Ashoka Fellows in 70 countries
putting their system-changing ideas into practice
on a global scale.
Website: ashoka.org

INVESTMENT FUNDS
African Agricultural Land Fund: The Fund has
raised almost €2 billion from an American pension
fund to invest in African agriculture. The African
Agricultural Land Fund, created by the United
Kingdom-based hedge fund, Emergent Asset
Management, wants to raise a total of €3 billion and
is canvassing a range of investors. It plans to invest
in agricultural land and livestock, including African
game, which will be sold to private reserves and
safari parks. The Fund also plans to develop biofuel
crops on marginal land, saving prime agricultural
acreage for crops to feed people.
Website: emergentasset.com
Aureos Africa Fund: Small and medium-sized
enterprises across Africa are set to benefit from a
multimillion-dollar investment fund set up by
private equity firm Aureos Capital with the
Commonwealth Secretariat’s assistance. The
Aureos Africa Fund will provide long-term
capitaland support for promising and successful
businesses across the continent.
Website: aureos.com

MICRO-LENDERS
Kiva: A non-profit organization with a mission to
connect people through lending to alleviate
poverty. Leveraging the Internet and a worldwide
network of microfinance institutions, Kiva lets
individuals lend as little as US$25 to help to create
opportunity around the world.
Website: kiva.org
United Prosperity: People can select the
entrepreneur to support. Each US$1 contributed
acts as collateral or a loan guarantee with a bank.
Based on the guarantee, the bank makes a loan of
nearly US$2 to the entrepreneur through a partner
microfinance institution (MFI). Once a guarantee
has been made, the entrepreneur’s progress can be
tracked online. On loan repayment, you receive your
money and can choose to recycle it by guaranteeing
the loan to another entrepreneur.
Website: Unitedprosperity.org
Grameen Foundation: Grameen Foundation helps
the world’s poorest, especially women, improve
their lives and escape from poverty by providing
them with access to loans, essential information
and viable business opportunities. Through two of
the most effective tools known – small loans and
the mobile phone – they work to make a real
difference in the lives of those who have been left
behind: poor people, especially those living on less
than US$1.25 per day.
Website: grameenfoundation.org

SOCIAL FUNDING AND PATIENT CAPITAL
Acumen Fund: Its mission is to create a world
beyond poverty by investing in social enterprises,
emerging leaders and breakthrough ideas.
Website: acumenfund.org
Omidyar Network: A philanthropic investment firm,
it creates opportunities to improve lives by

Waste and Recycling

investing in market-based efforts that catalyse
economic, social and political change.
Website: Omidyar.com
Ashoka: Innovators for the Public: Ashoka
provides a wide range of services and funding for
social entrepreneurs and now has over 2,000
Fellows in over 60 countries on five continents.
Website: ashoka.org
Africa Entrepreneurship Platform: This
groundbreaking initiative is created as a forum to
showcase innovative ideas and businesses from
Africa that have the ability to scale up internationally, driving job creation and sustainable economic
development between Africa and the Americas.
Website: sacca.biz

TOOLKITS AND BUSINESS ADVICE
SME Toolkit Kenya.
Website: kenya.smetoolkit.org/kenya/en
HSBC Knowledge Centre: News and know-how
for your business.
Website: knowledge.hsbc.co.uk
HSBC Business TV website.
Website: businesstv.hsbc.co.uk
SME Toolkit: Build Your Business.
Website: smetoolkit.org/smetoolkit/en
Branding Strategy Insider: Small businesses
looking to develop their brand can find plenty of
free advice and resources here.
Website: brandingstrategyinsider.com
Brandchannel: The world’s only online exchange
about branding, packed with resources, debates
and contacts to help businesses to intelligently
build their brand.
Website: brandchannel.com
Just Food: A web portal full of the latest news on
the global food industry and packed with events
and special briefings to fill entrepreneurs in on the
difficult issues and constantly shifting market
demands.
Website: just-food.com
Dutch Design in Development: DDiD will help
Southern entrepreneurs and small enterprises to
develop their brand and design identity and production processes by using experienced Dutch
designers.
Website: ddid.nl/english/index.html
Making Cents International: Making Cents’
curricula are effective tools for creating,
strengthening and supporting current and future
entrepreneurs and delivering financial literacy for
all. In over 25 languages, Making Cents offers a
range of classroom materials to training
institutions, schools and after-school programmes
that strengthen the quality and impact of their
business and entrepreneurship training and
advisory services.
Website: makingcents.com/products_services/
curriculum.php

CROWDFUNDING
Betterplace: Betterplace.org is a transparent
online donation platform. Anybody can help, on
betterplace.org – as an individual or as a group.
And equally, anybody can receive help not just
large, well-known charitable organizations but also
small grass-roots initiatives around the corner from
you, or anywhere in the world. The main thing is:
everything is transparent.
Website: betterplace.org

Kickstarter: Project creators set a funding goal and
deadline. If people like a project, they can pledge
money to make it happen. Funding on Kickstarter is
all or nothing: projects must reach their funding
goals to receive any money.
Website: kickstarter.org

a broad range of people, such as entrepreneurs,
NGOs, researchers, investors, institutions,
representatives and the press, an opportunity for
networking in an ethical environment to meet,
exchange ideas and build projects together.
Website: socialventureforum.com

VENTURE CAPITAL
The Social Venture Forum: The Social Venture
Forum was started with the objective of informing,
inspiring and encouraging actions in favour of
harmonious development through social venture in
China. In addition to the portal, the Social Venture
Forum aims to be a monthly event in Beijing. It gives

The resources listed here are for information
purposes only and do not indicate an endorsement. When seeking funding, do the research and
ask questions. If something sounds too good to
be true, it probably is.

Quotables and Notables
”I told hotels: Your job is to sell rooms, not to sell garbage,” recalls
Yuyun Ismawati, an environmental engineer and consultant and
founder of Bali Fokus in Indonesia (balifokus.asia/balifokus).
“We have to protect Bali or else tourists won’t want to come here
anymore.”
“You don’t see drugs and guns any more but you do see lots of
rubbish,” said Fernanda Mayrink, Light’s community outreach
officer, to the Financial Times. Light S.A. is a Brazilian energy
company working in the generation, transmission, distribution and
marketing of electricity. “This project encourages recycling within
the company’s concession area and at the same time contributes
to sustainable development and the consumer’s pocket. Light wins,
the customer wins [and] the environment wins.”
“The problem with the renewable-energy industry is that it is too
fragmented,” Sultan Al Jaber told The Sunday Times. “This is where
the idea for Masdar City came from. We said, ‘Let’s bring it all
together within the same boundaries, like the Silicon Valley model
[in California, United States].’” Sultan Al Jaber is the chief executive
of Masdar, Abu Dhabi’s renewable-energy company. He sees the
city as a beacon to show the way for the rest of the Emirate to
convert from a highly inefficient consumer of energy to a pioneer in
green technology.
“I never start my design according to the market research or
demand. I design by absorbing events, global or local events
and even mundane daily life things that happen around me.
Consequently, I start to think what will be good and better for
these people.” Indonesian designer Singgih Susilo Kartono makes
a range of wooden radios (wooden-radio.com) under the Magno
brand (magno-design.com/?id=wr01a).
“Iceland is widely considered the success story of the geothermal
community. The country of just over 300,000 people is now
fully powered by renewable forms of energy, with 17 per cent of
electricity and 87 per cent of heating needs provided by geothermal
energy.”
“I always knew I was a businesswoman,” Lovin Kobusingya of Kati
Fish Farms (katifarms.org) told The New York Times. “When I was in
high school, I used to sell illegal sweets. And I made money.” “I am
very happy and proud” of being a female entrepreneur. “When I was
young, they said: ‘A woman is a woman. A man should take care of
you.’ But women are actually contributing a lot more than men. We
always find ourselves multitasking.”
“Growing cotton is highly chemical- and labour-intensive, which
degrades the soil and pays people very low salaries. And the dyeing
and colouring processes pollute rivers and people receive low
salaries but have to work long hours. The whole textile industry
is really bad for the environment.” Hans Martin Galliker of the
NEEMIC (neemic.com) fashion brand based in Beijing, China.

53

2014 Southern Innovator

Books, etc.

Vitamin Green by Johanna
Agerman Ross et al. Publisher:
Phaidon. Design is on the cusp of
a green revolution. Vitamin Green
is an inspirational overview of
global, contemporary sustainable
design and architecture.

Sustainable Cities: Local
Solutions in the Global
South by Mélanie Robertson.
Publisher: Practical Action
Publishing. The book
showcases sustainable
solutions developed by the
urban poor at the margins of
urban life in the global South.

EcoCities: Rebuilding Cities
in Balance with Nature by
Richard Register. Publisher:
New Society Publishers.
EcoCities is about rebuilding
cities and towns based on
ecological principles.

From Eco-Cities to Living
Machines: Principles of
Ecological Design by Nancy
Jack Todd and John Todd.
Publisher: North Atlantic Books.
The book further develops
the idea of eco-cities and
introduces living machines, a
way to purify wastewaters.

Eco-Cities: A Planning Guide
by Zhifeng Yang. Publisher:
CRC Press. It details how several cities and regions around
the world have already enacted
policies that signal the emergence of a paradigm of sustainability in eco-city planning.

Towards a Liveable and Sustainable Urban Environment:
Eco-Cities in East Asia by Lye
Liang Fook and Chen Gang.
Publisher: World Scientific Publishing Company. The “eco-city”
proposes an innovative way to
design, build and operate cities.

Waste, Recycling and Reuse
by Sally Morgan. Publisher:
Evans Brothers Ltd. Waste,
Recycling and Reuse answers
questions on kerbside recycling schemes to building homes
from old aluminium cans.

Economies of Recycling edited by
Catherine Alexander and Joshua
Reno. Publisher: Zed Books. Combining fine-grained ethnographic
analysis with overviews of international material flows, the book
radically changes the way in which
we understand economies.

Papers + Reports
Towards a Green Economy: Pathways to Sustainable Development and Poverty Eradication
Publisher: UNEP. The Green Economy
Report is compiled by the UNEP Green
Economy Initiative in collaboration with
economists and experts worldwide. It demonstrates that the greening of economies is
not generally a drag on growth but rather a
new engine of growth.

54

Website: unep.org/greeneconomy/
GreenEconomyReport/tabid/29846/
language/en-US/Default.aspx
Green Jobs: Towards Sustainable Work in a Low-Carbon World
Publisher: Worldwatch Institute. The report, produced by Worldwatch Institute,
has compiled evidence of green jobs available and how a “green” economy could

create and transform jobs in the future.
Website: unep.org/GreenEconomy/InformationMaterials/Publications/
Publication/tabid/4613/language/
en-US/Default.aspx?ID=4002
Global Geothermal Development Plan
Publisher: ESMAP, World Bank.
Website (PDF): grmf-eastafrica.
org/news/wb-esmap.pdf

Waste and Recycling

Online Content
www.southerninnovator.org

Issue 1

Issue 2
Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

YOUTH

How to Engage for a Brighter Future
MOBILE PHONES

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Apps to innovations to pioneers

Great Ideas for Pro-poor Businesses

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

A wide range of online resources is available to
Southern entrepreneurs through our various
websites. Check it all out!

KEY DATA
Facts and Figures

Digital decade delivers huge changes
KEY DATA

STATE OF PLAY

Facts and figures

Best Policies and the “Demographic Dividend”

STATE OF PL AY

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

What is going on across the South?

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
A magazine celebrating South-South innovation

ISSUE 02
ISSUE 01

www.southerninnovator.org

SPRING 2012

www.southerninnovator.com

MAY 2011

Mobile Phones &

Youth&

Information Technology Issue

Entrepreneurship Issue
How youth and entrepreneurship can help in the push to meet the MDGs

How these tech tools can aid in the push to meet the MDGs

Youth &
Entrepreneurship.

Mobile Phones
& Information
Technology.

Issue 3

Issue 4

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme

AGRIBUSINESS

URBANIZATION

FOOD SECURITY

CITIES

KEY DATA

KEY DATA

Making Urban Environments Liveable

Agribusiness Models and Success Stories

Great Housing Solutions and Building Technologies

From Crisis Strategies to Small-scale Farming Innovators
Facts and Figures

Facts and Figures

STATE OF PLAY

STATE OF PLAY

Making the 21st Century Farm: A How-to Guide

Solutions for Planned and Unplanned Cities
Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 03

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
www.southerninnovator.org

2012

ISSUE 04

www.southerninnovator.org

2013

IN THIS ISSUE:

Smart Cities Up Close

Urbanization
Trends

Innovative
Home Designs

Do
ha

LAGOS

South-South Global Assets and
Technology Exchange
SS-GATE is a virtual and physical platform
where entrepreneurs in developing
countries can interact and obtain needed
technology, assets and finance in a secure
environment. SS-GATE facilitates the
realization of actual business transactions
through a market mechanism, offering
both online and offline beginning-to-end
support services.
Website: www.ss-gate.org

Wu
han
Shanghai

Beijing

ACCRA

Bue
Air nos
es

Cities &

How agribusiness and food security can help in the push to meet the MDGs

The Global South's Increasing Urbanization: Challenges to City Living

Xian

Urbanization Issue

Food Security Issue

Southern Innovator website
The Southern Innovator website archive
is home to stories going back to 2006. This
site is intended to be a resource for sharing
the solutions and innovations found in
the South. It is also a tool for weaving and
fostering South-South networking around
the world.
Website: www.southerninnovator.org

k
gko
Ban

Agribusiness &

Agribusiness &
Food Security.

Tianjin

is
Add ba
Aba

Sao
o
Paul

Source: McKinsey

Global Institute

Cities &
Urbanization.

Issue 5
United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation, United Nations Development Programme
WASTE

Turning Waste into Wealth in the 21st Century
RECYCLING

Building Green Businesses That Work: From Fashion to Fuel to Farms
KEY DATA
Facts and Figures
STATE OF PLAY

Mobiles Transforming Green Solutions: A How-to Guide Pages 26-27
Empowered lives.
Resilient nations.

A magazine celebrating South-South innovation
ISSUE 05

www.southerninnovator.org

2014

IN THIS ISSUE:

Designing for a New Africa

98%

Recyclable
Zero-waste
Solutions

Cradle-to-cradle Pen
Solution

Waste &

Recycling Issue
Improving Human Development with Finite Resources

Global South-South Development Expo
The Global South-South Development
Expo (GSSD Expo) is the first-ever Expo
solely from the South and for the South.
It showcases successful Southerngrown development solutions (SDSs) to
address the need to meet the Millennium
Development Goals (MDGs).
Website: www.southsouthexpo.org

Global South-South
Development Academy
The Global South-South Development
Academy is an online, action-oriented
service platform that facilitates access
to Southern development solutions and
Southern expertise for learning and
application.
Website: tcdc2.undp.org/GSSDAcademy

Southern Innovator’s fifth issue
tackles the world’s growing waste
problem as populations become
urban and how this waste can turn
into wealth, boosting incomes and
conserving the earth’s resources.

55

Contacts and Resources

Waste
TREND
Texting for Cheaper Food with
SokoText

a pressure cooker below. In field tests in
Nicaragua, the Solarclave can reach the
CDC-recommended heat and pressure
levels – 250°F at 15 psi – in an hour”.
Website: popularmechanics.com/science/
health/med-tech/7-medical-upgrades-fordeveloping-countries-6#slide-6

2014 Southern Innovator

Suns manufactures, sources and
distributes the portable solar generator
range.

Website: thousandsuns.com

• Little Sun: An attractive, high-quality
solar-powered lamp in the shape of a
hand-sized sun developed by artist
Olafur Eliasson and engineer Frederik
Ottesen.

• SokoText: SokoText is a smart solution
with a big idea: To make food affordable
for everyone.

• Solar Sister: Solar Sister eradicates
energy poverty by empowering women
with economic opportunity.

• Nailab: Nailab is a start-up accelerator
that offers a 3-to-12 months entrepreneurship programme with a focus on
growing innovative technology-driven
ideas. This is done by providing business
advice, technical training and support,
professional mentoring and coaching,
access to market, strategic partnerships
and, most important, investors.

• SOL - Solar Powered Laptop: The
world’s first fully solar-powered laptop.
Calling itself the “All-Terrain Off-Road
Sport Utility Laptop”, it is made by a
Canadian company.

Turning Human Waste into
Fertilizer: An African Solution

Saving Water to Make Money

• Latrine video: A video on how to
construct a ventilated pit latrine.

Website: sokotext.com

Website: nailab.co.ke

• Hult Prize: The Hult Prize is a start-up
accelerator for budding young social
entrepreneurs emerging from the
world’s universities.
Website: hultprize.org

• White African: Where Africa and
technology collide.
Website: whiteafrican.com/about

INNOVATION
Innovation: Cairo’s Green
Technology Pioneers

• Solar Cities: Founded in 2006, Solar
Cities is a non-profit organization that
works on capacity-building in developing
countries through an industrial ecology
approach to sustainable development.
Website: solarcities.blogspot.com

• Practical Action: Practical Action has
technical drawings and guidelines for
making a small biogas digester.
Website: practicalaction.org/
practicalanswers/product_info.
php?products_id=42

• The Anaerobic Digestion Community:
Here is an excellent technical
explanation of how a digester works,
including a short film.
Website: anaerobic-digestion.com

• China biogas: China boasts a
fast-growing biogas economy using farm
waste. Here is a full summary of its
experience.
Website: i-sis.org.uk/BiogasChina.php

Solar-powered Mobile Clinics to
Boost Rural Health care in Africa

• Solar-powered Hearing Aid: “The
Solar Ear is an innovative design for a
hearing aid that is both low in cost and
eco-friendly. By using solar power
technology and cost-effective
manufacturing, it aims to bring sound to
the millions globally who are deaf”.
Website: envirogadget.com/solar-powered/
solar-powered-hearing-aid

• Solar-powered Blood Pressure
Device Enables Off-grid Medical Aid:
Researchers have developed a new
solar-powered device that will allow
doctors to measure blood pressure and
dispense critical medical aid in
developing countries around the world.
Website: inhabitat.com/solar-poweredblood-pressure-device-enables-off-gridmedical-aid

• The Solarclave, a Solar-powered
Medical Instrument Sterilizer: The
Solarclave is made from repurposed
parts and is a reflective satellite TV dish
focusing sunlight onto a modified wine
bottle above it. “The sunlight heats
water in the bottle and forces steam into

56

Website: solarsister.org

Website: solaptop.com

• World Water Council: Established in
1996, the World Water Council promotes
awareness and builds political
commitment to trigger action on critical
water issues.
Website: worldwatercouncil.org

• Water Supply and Sanitation
Collaborative Council: Works on
sustainable sanitation, hygiene and
water services to all people, with special
attention to the underserved poor.
Website: wsscc.org

• Stratus Group: The Stratus Group is a
Brazilian fund looking for sustainable
SMEs in Brazil’s high-growth green
sectors.
Website: stratusbr.com

Solar Bottle Bulbs Light Up Dark
Homes

• D-Lab, MIT: Development through
Dialogue, Design and Dissemination:
D-Lab is building a global network of
innovators to design and disseminate
technologies that meaningfully improve
the lives of people living in poverty.
The programme mission is pursued
through interdisciplinary courses,
technology development and
community initiatives, all of which
emphasize experiential learning,
real-world projects, community-led
development and scalability.
Website: d-lab.mit.edu

• d.light Solar: d.light is a for-profit
social enterprise whose purpose is to
create new freedoms for customers
without access to reliable power so that
they can enjoy a brighter future. d.light
designs manufactures and distributes
solar light and power products
throughout the developing world.
Website: dlightdesign.com

• Liter of Light: It brings the eco-friendly
bottle light to communities living without
electricity.
Website: aliteroflight.org

Solar Solution to Lack of
Electricity in Africa

• Global Off-Grid Lighting Association:
Global Off-Grid Lighting
Association(GOGLA) has been
established to act as the industry
advocate with a focus on small and
medium enterprises. It is a neutral,
independent, not-for-profit association
created to promote lighting solutions
that benefit society and businesses in
developing and emerging markets.
GOGLA will support industry in the
market penetration of clean, quality
alternative lighting systems.

Website: globaloff-gridlightingassociation.org

• Solarpod: Sunbird Solar/Thousand

Website: littlesun.com

• Latrines: World Bank guide to pit
latrines.

Website: water.worldbank.org/shw-resourceguide/infrastructure/menu-technical-options/
pit-latrines

Website: youtube.com/watch?v=n4yfAyhiV74

South Africa.

Website: sabs.co.za

• SABS Design Institute: The SABS
Design Institute promotes the benefits of
good design in order to stimulate the
economic and technological development of South Africa.
Website: sabs.co.za

Biogas Digester-in-a-Bag Brings
Portability
• Anaerobic digestion: The official
portal on anaerobic digestion.
Website: biogas-info.co.uk

• REA Biogas: REA Biogas has been
championing the cause of anaerobic
digestion (AD) and has been the unifying
force that has helped to bring the
industry forward.
Website: biogas.org.uk

• Human waste pathogens: The Control
of Pathogens from Human Waste and
Their Aquatic Vectors by L. E. Obeng.

• Practical Action: Various renewable
energy solutions including biogas.

Information Technologies
Transforming Africa

Website: futurebiogas.com

Website: jstor.org/discover/10.2307/4312882?u
id=3738032&uid=2129&uid=2&uid=70&uid=4
&sid=21100919752851

Website: practicalaction.org/biogas_expertise

• Future Biogas: Future Biogas
specializes in the construction and
operation of biogas plants for the United
Kingdom.

• African Innovator Magazine:
Technology insights for Africa’s decision
makers. It is a good example of how
perceptions have switched to
recognizing that the continent is awash
with innovators who have a lot to say.

Ending Gang Violence while
Cleaning the Streets in Haiti

• Innovation Prize for Africa: The
Innovation Prize for Africa, begun in 2011,
awards US$100,000 for the top
innovation that matches its criteria of
marketability, originality, scalability,
social impact and business potential.

• Ethical Superstore: The Ethical
Superstore has a wide range of recycled
shopping bags and handbags made to
Fair Trade standards.

Website: africaninnovatormagazine.com

Website: innovationprizeforafrica.org

• Tandaa grant programme

Website: sites.google.com/a/ict.go.ke/tandaa

• Kenya ICT Board

Website: www.ict.go.ke

• iHub Nairobi

Website: ihub.co.ke

• mLab East Africa
Website: mlab.co.ke

• ccHub (Co-CreationHubNigeria)

Website: cchubnigeria.com/about-cchub

• Lusaka, Zambia’s Bongohive
Website: bongohive.com

• iLabAfrica

Website: ilabafrica.ac.ke

• NaiLab

Website: nailab.co.ke

• iBid Labs

Website: ibidlabs.com

• Uganda’s HiveColab
Website: hivecolab.org

• Afrinnovator: Technology, innovation
and entrepreneurship in Africa.
Website: twitter.com/Afrinnovator

CLEANING UP
A Solution to Stop Garbage from
Destroying Tourism

• Recycling: A guide to establishing
recycling projects based on experience
in Mongolia.

• Social entrepreneurs: A Bangladesh
case study on social entrepreneurs
turning refuse into wealth.
Website: proxied.changemakers.net/
journal/01may/index.cfm

Website: ethicalsuperstore.com/search/bag/
recycled.htm

• The India Shop: A collective of women
in the slums of Delhi, India, sells
fashionable recycled shopping bags
online.
Website: theindiashop.co.uk

• Proyecto Alcatraz (Project Alcatraz):
This Venezuelan project offers violent
gang members the opportunity to go
straight and make their way into the
economic mainstream with real job
opportunities and skills.

Website: proyectoalcatraz.org/home_eng.php

Turning Animal Waste into Paper

• Creative Paper Wales: Makers of
Sheep Poo Paper, this company in
Wales uses sheep dung to make a range
of paper products. Sheep are plentiful in
Wales and are found all over the hills
grazing.
Website: creativepaperwales.co.uk/index.
aspx

• Paper High: Paper High sells online
paper products made from Sri Lankan
elephant dung. This includes notebooks,
greeting cards, photo frames and photo
albums.
Website: paperhigh.com

• Red Dot: Red Dot stands for belonging
to the best in design and business. It
champions design in business through
awards and events.

Website: tinyurl.com/yfkn2dp

Website: en.red-dot.org

• Jakarta waste disposal: A video
showing the problem of waste disposal in
poor communities in Jakarta.

How an Eco-city Works

Website: videosift.com/video/Garbage-ringThe-slums-of-Jakarta-Indonesia

The Water-free South African
Bathing Solution

• Patent: How to register for a patent in

• Tianjin Eco-city: The Sino-Singapore
Tianjin Eco-city’s vision is to be a thriving
city that is socially harmonious,
environmentally friendly and
resource-efficient.
Website: tianjinecocity.gov.sg

Contacts and Resources

Global South Urbanization Does
Not Have to Harm Biodiversity

• Environmental Public Awareness
Handbook: Case Studies and Lessons
Learned in Mongolia.
Website: tinyurl.com/yhjyd7h

• Hyderabad Case Study: During the
recent United Nations biodiversity talks
in Hyderabad, the International Union for
Conservation of Nature gave journalists
the opportunity to see how biodiversity
can thrive in the middle of a bustling
metropolis.
Website: rtcc.org/hyderabad-a-showcase-ofurban-biodiversity

• UNEP: A Global Partnership on Cities
and Biodiversity was launched by UNEP,
the Secretariat of the Convention on
Biological Diversity (CBD), UN-Habitat,
ICLEI, IUCN Countdown 2010, UNITAR,
UNESCO and a Steering Group of Mayors
from Curitiba, Montreal, Bonn, Nagoya
and Johannesburg to bring together
existing initiatives on cities and
biodiversity.
Website: unep.org/urban_environment/
issues/biodiversity.asp

• Nature in the City: Nature in the City,
a project of Earth Island Institute, is San
Francisco’s first organization wholly
dedicated to ecological conservation,
restoration and stewardship of the San
Francisco bioregion.
Website: natureinthecity.org

Recycling
RECYCLING FOR PROFIT
Banning of Plastic Bags and
Containers Brings New Opportunities
• Change Makers: A Bangladesh case
study on social entrepreneurs turning
refuse into wealth.
Website: proxied.changemakers.net/
journal/01may/index.cfm

• Recycle Bag: Hong Kong’s first
enterprise to make and sell recycled
bags.
Website: recyclebag.net

Fashion Recycling: How Southern
Designers Are Reusing and Making
Money
• RE: Fashion Awards: The RE: Fashion
Awards show is a brand new fashion
phenomenon, set to transform social
and environmental standards in the
fashion industry within a decade.
Website: refashionawards.org

• Ethical Fashion Show: Isabelle Quehe,
who established the event, said “You
almost never see designers from
developing countries doing shows in
Paris, so this brings together natural
products, local fair labour, respect for
the environment and finding sales
outlets in Paris.” Potential designers and
exhibitors can contact the Ethical
Fashion Show by sending collection
photos and a brief explanation on how
the fashions contribute to the ethical
fashion movement.
Send contributions to: 4, rue Trousseau,
75011 Paris, France.
Email: unilove@wanadoo.fr

Creating Green Fashion in China
• Ethical Fashion Forum: The Ethical
Fashion Forum is the industry body
dedicated to a sustainable future for
fashion. A not-for-profit organization,
EFF aims to make it easy for fashion

professionals to integrate sustainability
into the heart of what they do.
Website: ethicalfashionforum.com

• Hong Kong Organic Textile
Association: Its mission is to promote
organic textiles in Hong Kong.
Website: facebook.com/
HKOrganicTextileAssociation

• Upcycling: Tips on how to upcycle.
Website: independent.co.uk/property/
interiors/the-insider--how-to-upcyclewithout-much-effort-2343100.html

• Lookbook: How to create a Lookbook
for a fashion brand.
Website: noisetteacademy.com/2011/05/
creating-a-lookbook

Recycling Waste to Boost Incomes
and Opportunities
• EPAP guide: Based on extensive
research throughout Mongolia by UNDP,
this guide includes the application of the
Blue Bag project to Mongolia’s sprawling
slum districts surrounding the capital,
Ulaanbaatar.
Website: tinyurl.com/yfkn2dp

ENERGY
Kenya Turns to Geothermal Energy
for Electricity and Growth
• Home geothermal: A feature from
Popular Mechanics on how geothermal
can work in the home.
Website: popularmechanics.com/science/
energy/hydropowergeothermal/4331401

• Geothermal Energy Systems: A South
African company specializing in setting
up geothermal systems for customers.

• Making biodiesel: How to make your
own biodiesel.
Website: journeytoforever.org/biodiesel_
make.html

• Oilgae: Oilgae is the global information
support resource for the algae fuels
industry.
Website: oilgae.com

• Chlorella: Algae as a superfood and
cancer fighter: chlorella.
Website: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlorella

Website: mcdonough.com/cradle_to_cradle.
htm

• Rio+20: At the Rio+20 Conference,
world leaders, along with thousands of
participants from governments, the
private sector, NGOs and other groups,
will come together to shape how we can
reduce poverty, advance social equity
and ensure environmental protection on
an ever more crowded planet to get to
the future we want.
Website: uncsd2012.org

Powerful Solar Light Spurring
Income-making Opportunities
• Solar: More information on how
renewable solar technologies work.

• Geothermal Education Office: The
basics on tapping this energy source
and how it works.

Additional Resources

Website (PDF): climateinvestmentfunds.org/
cif/sites/climateinvestmentfunds.org/files/
SREP%205%20Kenya%20Project.pdf

Geothermal Energy to Boost
Development of the Global South

• Geothermal: Geothermal basics from
the Geothermal Energy Association.
Website: geo-energy.org/currentUse.aspx

• Children: Geothermal information for
children.
Website: eia.gov/kids/energy.
cfm?page=geothermal_home-basics

• Geoexchange: A website connecting
contractors, manufacturers , drilling
contractors, ground loop installers,
engineers, designers, distributors,
architects, builders, utilities, training,
financing, software and suppliers.
Website: geoexchange.org

• Iceland Geothermal: Icelandic
geothermal cluster mapping, geothermal
energy consumption.
Website: icelandgeothermal.is/index.
php/e-samstarfsverkefni/data-collection.
html

Prisons with a Green Solution

• China: China is boasting a fast-growing
biogas economy using farm waste. Here
is a full summary of its experience.
Website: i-sis.org.uk/BiogasChina.php

African Fuel Pioneer Uses Crisis to
Innovate

• Biodiesel: A website with all the details
on biodiesel and how to make it.
Website: biodiesel.org

Website: afdb.org/en

• Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way
We Make Things by William McDonough
and Michael Braungart. It is a manifesto
calling for the transformation of human
industry through ecologically intelligent
design.

Website: energysavingtrust.org.uk/
Generating-energy/Choosing-a-renewabletechnology/Solar-panels-PV

• Menengai Geothermal Development
Project: A detailed explanation of the
project.

African Development Bank: The
overarching objective of the African
Development Bank (AfDB) Group is to
spur sustainable economic development
and social progress in its regional
member countries (RMCs), thus
contributing to poverty reduction.

Indonesian Wooden Radio
Succeeds with Good Design

Website: africanecosystems.co.za/
about%20us.html

Website: geothermal.marin.org/pwrheat.html

Quick Resources

• Waste

Veolia Environment: Veolia manages
municipal and industrial waste
processes, from flow logistics upstream
to technologically advanced treatments
downstream. As the only global operator
to provide a complete range of waste
management solutions, Veolia covers the
entire waste cycle, including urban
cleaning services, soil and site
remediation, collection, sorting, transfer,
treatment and recycling/recovery.

Buckminster Fuller Institute: The
Buckminster Fuller Institute is dedicated
to accelerating the development and
deployment of solutions which radically
advance human well-being and the
health of our planet’s ecosystems. We
aim to deeply influence the ascendance
of a new generation of design-science
pioneers who are leading the creation of
an abundant and restorative world
economy that benefits all humanity.
Website: bfi.org

Bloomberg New Energy Finance:
Bloomberg helps clients to navigate the
global, European, North American and
Australian carbon markets.Website:

about.bnef.com/coverage/carbon

Website: veolia.com

Viridor: Viridor is one of the United
Kingdom’s leading recycling, renewable
energy and waste management
companies. Part of the FTSE 250 Pennon
Group, Viridor puts waste into action,
transforming it into high-quality
recyclables, raw materials and energy.
Each year, Viridor transforms over two
million tonnes of materials into
high-quality recyclate and yet more
into over 760 gigawatt hours of
renewable energy. In total, it safely
manages over eight million tonnes of
recyclables and waste materials for
customers from all sectors across the
United Kingdom.

Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation
Institute: Cradle to cradle product
certification is both comprehensive and
rigorous. It requires a paradigm shift in
thinking about how a product is
designed, what’s in it, and where it goes
after use. As a guidance system for
product designers and manufactuers, it
leads to the creation of products that
redefine quality, beauty and innovation.
Website: c2ccertified.org

Website: viridor.co.uk

• Recycling
Handbook of Plastics Recycling by F. de
la Mantia. Publisher: Smithers Rapra
Technology.
Website: amazon.com

100 Products That Empower People by
Emily Pilloton. Publisher: Metropolis
Books.
Website: amazon.com

57

Contacts and Resources

Dutch Design in Development: DDiD is
the agency for eco design, sustainable
production and fair trade. We work with
Dutch importers and designers and
connect them to local producers in
developing countries and emerging
markets. Together products are made
that are both profitable and socially and
environmentally sustainable.

2014 Southern Innovator

Inhabitat: Design for a Better World:
Inhabitat.com is a weblog devoted to the
future of design, tracking the innovations
in technology, practices and materials
that are pushing architecture and home
design towards a smarter and more
sustainable future.
Website: inhabitat.com

Website: ddid.nl

Global Geothermal Development Plan:
The World Bank launched a fund to
expand renewable energy generation in
developing countries with a substantial
investment in geothermal power. The
Global Geothermal Development Plan
(GGDP) will provide assistance and
support in bringing geothermal energy
– a currently underutilized resource –
into the mainstream as a clean, cheap
and reliable source of locally produced
power. The fund was launched at
the Geothermal Conference in
Reykjavík, Iceland, a country in which
around 26.2 per cent of energy is
supplied by geothermal sources.

International Carbon Market: The
European Union emissions trading
system (EU ETS) is by far the world’s
biggest carbon market and the core of
the international carbon market. To
reduce global greenhouse gas emissions
most cost-effectively, the international
carbon market needs to be developed by
creating a network of linked cap-andtrade systems. In this process,
international crediting mechanisms can
play a valuable but transitional role.
Website: ec.europa.eu/clima/policies/ets/
linking

Website (PDF): esmap.org/sites/esmap.org/
files/ESMAP_Paris_Geothermal_Energy_
KEF_Optimized.pdf

United Nations Green Climate Fund:
The purpose of the Green Climate Fund is
to make a significant and ambitious
contribution to the global efforts
towards attaining the goals set by the
international community to combat
climate change.
Website: gcfund.net

World Bank: The World Bank is a vital
source of financial and technical
assistance to developing countries
around the world. We are not a bank in
the ordinary sense but a unique
partnership to reduce poverty and
support development. The World Bank
Group comprises five institutions
managed by their member countries.
Website: worldbank.org

Geothermal | National Energy
Authority of Iceland: Iceland is a pioneer
in the use of geothermal energy for
space heating. Generating electricity
with geothermal energy has increased
significantly in recent years. Geothermal
power facilities currently generate 25 per
cent of the country’s total electricity
production.
Website: nea.is/geothermal

Green Building Council: The U.S. Green
Building Council (USGBC) is a 501(c)(3)
non-profit organization committed to a
prosperous and sustainable future for
our nation through cost-efficient and
energy-saving green buildings.
Website: usgbc.org

International Organization
for Standardization (ISO): ISO is the
world’s largest developer of voluntary
International Standards. International
Standards give state-of-the-art
specifications for products, services
and good practice, helping to make
industry more efficient and effective.
Developed through global consensus,
they help to break down barriers to
international trade.
Website: iso.org/iso/home.html

Red Dot: Red Dot stands for belonging
to the best in design and business. Our
international design competition, the
“Red Dot Design Award”, is aimed at all
those who would like to distinguish their
business activities through design. The
distinction is based on the principle of
selection and presentation. Excellent
design is selected by competent
expert juries in the areas of product
design, communication design and
design concepts.
Website: en.red-dot.org

58

Geodesic dome: Noun: A dome
constructed of short struts following
geodesic lines and forming an open
framework of triangles or polygons. The
principles of its construction were
described by Buckminster Fuller (Oxford
English Dictionary).
Hexagon: Noun: A plane figure with six
straight sides and angles (Oxford English
Dictionary).
Recycling: Verb: Convert [waste] into
reusable material (Oxford English
Dictionary).
Smartphone: Noun: A mobile phone that
is able to perform many of the functions
of a computer, typically having a
relatively large screen and an operating
system capable of running general-purpose applications (Oxford English
Dictionary).
UNDP: The United Nations Development
Programme is the United Nations’ global
development network.
UNEP: UNEP, established in 1972, is the
voice for the environment within the
United Nations system. UNEP acts as a
catalyst, advocate, educator and
facilitator to promote the wise use and
sustainable development of the global
environment.

How to read Southern
Innovator
Icons indicate sections in the magazine.
Turn the pages and look for the icon at the
top of the page.

Waste

Recycling

Key Terms and
Abbreviations
Apps: Apps is an abbreviation for
applications. An app is a piece of
software. It can run on
the Internet, on your computer or on your
phone or other electronic device.
Carrying capacity: Noun: Ecology the
number of people, animals, or crops
which a region can support without
environmental degradation (Oxford
English Dictionary).
Eminent domain: Noun: The right of a
government or its agent to expropriate
private property for public use, with
payment of compensation. In the United
Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern
Ireland, it is used chiefly of international
law, whereas in the United States, it is
used of federal and state governments
(Oxford English Dictionary).
Ecological footprint: Noun: The impact
of a person or community on the
environment, expressed as the amount of
land required to sustain their use of
natural resources (Oxford English
Dictionary).

Southern Innovator
Knowledge Summary

Information

NEXT ISSUE OF
SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY
AND INNOVATION

Southern Innovator is published by the United
Nations Office for South-South Cooperation,
New York, New York, USA. The Office also publishes a monthly e-newsletter, Development
Challenges, South-South Solutions. The online
archive is here: southerninnovator.org.
The views expressed in this publication are
those of the author(s) and do not necessarily
represent those of the United Nations, the
United Nations Development Programme or
governments.

SOLUTIONS!
www.southsouthexpo.org
United Nations Office for South-South Cooperation

World population
in 2050:

9 billion

27%:

Amount of
electricity
Kenya hopes
to get from
geothermal
sources
by 2031

70%:
United Nations
Development Programme
One United Nations Plaza
New York, NY 10017
www.undp.org

www.southerninnovator.org

Global increase in urban
solid waste by 2025