A communi t y ser vi ce of the Busi ness Wor kf orce Devel opment Depar tment of The Ur ban League of San

Di ego Count y   www. ul sdc. org
Employment/Career & Small Business Guide
U r b a n L e a g u e
Multicultural awards honor
firms promoting diversity
See The Winners on page 14
W
ells Fargo and the San
Diego Business Journal’s
11th Annual Multicultural
Heritage Awards were held Mar.
29, at the San Diego Marriott
Hotel and Marina.
Tis program was created to
recognize and honor San Diego
area companies that go above
and beyond to celebrate ethnic
diversity in the workplace and in
the community.
Tese outstanding non-proft
Ten success keys to use
at job and career fairs
frms of small, medium and large
businesses not only participate in
San Diego’s diverse community:
they defne it. Leading their
industries through programs,
policies and plans, they set the
bar for others to attain.
Congratulations to each of
these honorees for their contin-
ued commitment to nurturing a
multicultural workplace.
July 2006 Vol. 1 - No. 1
Premiere Issue
a product of the
San Diego Urban League
See 10 Keys on page 25

By Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.
There are many types of job
and career fairs – from ones
scheduled during Spring Break
for college students to industry
specifc ones for professionals.
But they all have one common
theme: it’s a chance for company
recruiters to meet and screen a
large volume of potential job
candidates in one place.
Whether you’re a college
student new to the job-hunting
process or a seasoned professional,
these ten strategies will improve
your odds of not being screened-
10
Keys to
Success
Di versi tyWorks!
Creating jobs should
always be America’s
number one priority
I
t is time to stop
the outsourcing of
American jobs. It is time
to start investing in our
greatest resource: the
American worker and
American ingenuity.
We need to create jobs, jobs
and more jobs if we want to
restore real economic growth
and promise to every
American.
Now is the time
when America needs
the largest, most far
reaching efort to train
and retrain American
workers for the jobs of
the 21st century.
Here are a few things that
Which are the top companies to work for in town?
See the diversity rundown...
page
Are employers finally “getting it”?
A wave of trendy multicultural events and meetings is
taking place throughout the country.
Healthcare & Hospitality:
Two thriving industries emerge
Finding the right job is easy if you know who’s diversity
friendly. We’ve partnered with some of the best companies.
See our Diversity Works! Employer Partners list today and get an edge...
12
8
By Marc Morial, NUL
President and CEO
9
See OuTsOurcing on page 9
22
What’s an Affinity Group Partner?
Find out what it means to be a member.
Check out what the experts say. Turn to page 7
Read the Definition: page
| July 2006 | Diversity Works!
Diversity Works! | July 2006 |
Welcome to the premiere edition of the Diversity Works! Employment &
Career Guide. We are pleased to provide you, the job seeker, with this publication
paid for by our Diversity Works! Afnity Partners who are actively seeking you for
employment and work closely with League staf to ensure that you are aware of
their commitment to diversity and inclusion. Tese “investors” appreciate the value
of a diverse workforce and believe in creating opportunities for all people within
their organizations. Each month we will provide you with insights, information
and resources on employment opportunities throughout the San Diego County.
Tis will help you make informed choices about the company you want to work for
as well as preparing you for a successful career. You will also see which employers
are investing in diversity and the current positions available at their companies.
So please, enjoy this publication and we wish you much success on your search for
the right employer.
Contents
Welcome!
Maurice D. Wilson
ONLINE AT www.ULSDC.COM
T
he
URBAN LEAGUE OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY
recognizes that an inclusive workforce with a variety of views,
perspectives, and backgrounds is integral to our client’s success.
—This unique mixture in the workforce provides unlimited
ideas and innovative solutions that are imperative to thriving and
propelling our economy forward.
—The urban league is dedicated through our extensive net-
work of partners and unparalleled reach into the urban market to
efectively recruit, train and inspire a diverse workforce and driv-
ing a commitment to inclusion and diversity.
—As a non-proft organization, founded in 1953, the urban
league of San Diego County, is one of more than 100 afliates na-
tionwide, and seeks to eliminate the equality gap by empower-
ing citizens to spread educational information that provides the
tools for social, political and economic success.
—Our current services focus on the following areas:
[1] Education
[2] Housing
[3] Employment.
—We are committed to helping build a better community.
Diverse NAtioN
Retail careers on the rise
Reality check: A parolee’s plight
Diversity: Do managers disagree?
iNDustry WAtch
San Diego County Job Industry Report
Health & Hospitality: Two SD sectors show growth
Top local companies to work for
Diversity helps bottom line: How managers react
HigH impact diversity training: WHat is it?
Business & Employer Rankings: The Lists
DW! Employer Partners: Get on track
multicultural Heritage aWards: 2006 Winners
AETNA gets real about smoking and cancer issues
DW! employer pArtNers
The Directory, where employers get noticed
Membership has benefts: Become a DW! Partner
Social Venture Partners unite through diversity
AffiNity Groups Directory
Work closely through the employment network
by referring your constituents to our job bank
cAreer DevelopmeNt
Straight talk about your next great job
Ten keys for success at job fairs: Getting hired
Work-Readiness seminars start at The League
Stafng agencies directory: Need a job fast?
seven tips for effective resume Writing
Career Tools: Suggested reading on jobs & hiring
2006 Career Fair Expo: A recap
Warm spirit consultants
African-American women
support with afrmations
youth opportuNities
Golden Pyramid recognition to 580 students
Literacy training for young people
mArketplAce
Diversity Works! advertising for everyone
Cecil H. Steppe
President & CEO

Maurice Wilson
Publisher/Exec. Vice President, COO

Barbara Webb
Director, Workforce Development
Paul S. Wong II
Art/Design Editor

URL
www.ulsdc.org

Governance
Non-proft

Hours of Operation
Mon. - Fri.
8 am - 5 pm
United Way
Agency Code: 6496
Mailing Address
720 Gateway Center Drive
San Diego CA, 92102
(619) 263-3115
(619) 263-3660, Fax
email: sdul@sdul.org
The Diversity Works! Employment/Career &
Small Business Guide is a monthly publication
compiled by the Business & Workforce
Development Department of
The Urban League of San Diego County.

For information on editorial
submissions, or display advertising
please call (619) 266-6244 or
email diversityworks@sdul.org.
established in 1910, learn about the history of
Te National Urban League and how the San Diego
afliate got its start on June 23, 1953, when visiting
the website. You’ll also have
quick access to Te League’s
Mission Statement which
explains our role in the com-
munity and the fve-point
strategy to implement goals.
Also, be sure to bookmark
the site for your job search
campaign. Explore the
pages for important news
and information on Te
League’s Workforce Devel-
opment programs where
you’ll fnd links to the
Diversity Job Bank, Entre-
preneur Network, Work
Readiness Training, and
other employment related
content. And young people
can tap into Te League’s
network for scholarship and
programs information. As
a member of the online
community, and the diverse
community you live in, Te
League pledge’s to keep you
informed via the internet.
An afiliate of Te National Urban League
4
6
10
14
18

4
6
1

4
INSIDE JULY 2006


4 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!



By Claudia D. Wheezler
Te retail feld has become
increasingly competitive and
complex as the nation’s retailers
require job candidates with more
professionalism, top-notch skills,
as well as college degrees, depend-
ing on the position.
Retailers step-up recruitment
eforts of graduates who are
members of minority groups
Te State of California Dept. of
Corrections and Rehabilitation is
focusing its attention on provid-
ing the resources that parolees
need to assist them in their
reintegration, which decreases
the recidivism rate and makes the
community safer.
As a result of the state’s dedi-
cation to the efort, the parole
ofce in El Cajon, California has
developed an orientation program
for parolees called Parole and
Community Team (P.A.C.T.).
Te P.A.C.T. program is made-
up of community and faith-based
organizations, local businesses,
educational facilities, health care
programs, government agencies,
local police departments and the
parolee’s parole agency.
P.A.C.T. orientation meetings
are held every three weeks. Te
meetings include approximately
80-100 newly released parolees
and lasts about 1 1/2 hours.
Te State of California Dept.
of Corrections and Rehabilita-
tion is recruiting organizations
which might want to take part in
Diverse Nation
on college campuses, as well as
through professional organiza-
tions, job fairs, and recruitment
events throughout the United
States. Te demand for talented
candidates to fll key job positions
in many areas has increased.
Professionals in the retail
feld have varying educational
backgrounds, however, in general,
coursework in accounting,
Retail careers
are on the rise
Parolee support in
the community
Minority communities are rapidly
becoming the most sought after
sources of new employees and
customers.
Te Urban League of San Diego
County’s Urban Marketing and
Research Division efectively con-
nects job seekers with employers.
Tap into
emerging
markets
P.A.C.T. meetings by ofering a
provision of community resources
for parolees. Your role would be
to speak for approximately three
minutes on the objectives your
organization and the services your
agency provides.
In addition, time is allotted
at the end of the meeting for
parolees to speak with you one-on-
one about your agency’s services.
Tis is also an optimal time to
network with other organizations
and bond with the community as
a whole.
If this is something your
agency might be interested in, we
would love to hear from you at
the earliest convenience.
Contact one of the following
representatives:
Deme Hill - Coordinator,
Parole & Community Services
Division (East County, Escondido,
Oceanside & El Centro Regions)
(619) 441-2302, ext. 276 or:
Steve Kiser, Parole Agent II,
Parole & Community Services
Division (East County & El Cen-
tro) (619) 441-2302 ext. 278.
Certain veterans and disabled veterans receive preference in hiring and
retention for government jobs, based on a point system for active duty
served. Find out more about where you stand in the point system. For
more information on the Jobs for Vets program, go to http://www.dole-
ta.gov/programs/VETS/
vets: Did you know?
Te Internet is becoming
more and more essential
to getting and keeping a
job. Increasingly, com-
panies are moving their
recruitment eforts online,
and larger numbers of
job seekers each day are
posting their resumes on career
oriented web sites.
More and more frequently,
those without internet access fnd
themselves taking what’s left after
the electronic job matches already
have been made. And those
already “on the job” are fnding
that the internet is giving a whole
Why use the internet
to look for a job?
new meaning to the term, as more
and more people are working
remotely from home, using PCs
to stay connected to the ofce.
Ofce workers without
internet access will be increasingly
at a disadvantage, as companies
move to increase their numbers of
“teleworkers.”
Please send your diversity related news and information by
email to diversityworks@sdul.org or call (619) 266-6244
By Pamela Friedman
Making efective fnancial
decisions and knowing how to
manage money are skills critical to
enjoying a secure fnancial future.
Yet many individuals and
families lack the knowledge
necessary to make sound fnancial
choices, as evidenced by falling
savings rates, mounting consumer
debt, and a growing dependence
on alternative banking institutions.
Tese indicators suggest
that access to fnancial literacy
programs is a pressing need in
our society, especially youth and
families transitioning from welfare
to self-sufciency.
Tese fndings are a sum-
mary of what’s contained in the
complete document at: http://
www.fnanceproject.org/publica-
tions/FESfnancialliteracy.pdf, in
Literacy programs for low-income families
Do you have what it takes to
work for a competitive retailer?
PDF format.
Te brief outlines key prin-
ciples and related funding sources
for designing and operating
fnancial literacy programs for
low-income adults and youth.
It is intended to give com-
munity leaders, policy makers,
and program developers a
better understanding of efective
approaches to providing fnancial
literacy training.
For more information visit our
Diversity Job Bank (www.ulsdcjobs.
net), or call (619) 263-8196.
marketing, management, and
sales, as well as psychology,
sociology, communications, and
information technology (IT) is
helpful.
Recruiters look for leadership
abilities, self-confdence, motiva-
tion, and decision-making skills
when interviewing candidates,
particularly for supervisory
positions.




Diversity Works! | July 2006 |
Te Urban League of San Diego County hosts a monthly
Employer Diversity Networking luncheon at its corporate
ofce in the Gateway Center business complex. Te meeting
features discussions on diversity practices and a thirty-minute
presentation by a diversity professional. Its purpose is to foster
a deeper understanding of diversity and a greater appreciation
for cultural diferences found in the workplace. Each month
employers attend to hear progressive ideas on how to integrate
diversity into the workplace. For scheduling and other
information, contact Ms. Barbara Webb at 619-266-6232 or
email barbara@sdul.org
the urban league of san Diego holds
monthly diversity networking luncheons
A
s more global enterprises seek
to improve employee perfor-
mance, they soon learn that local
cultural diferences can be an
impediment, according to Nova-
tions Group, consultants who
studied manufacturing operations
on three continents.
Programs aimed to man-
age employee performance face
particular resistance, according to
Joe Kaplan, director of Novations
Group’s measurement practice.
“Even though nearly 90% of
managers agree it’s essential to
measure performance, 60% think
a new system would do more
harm than good if it violates the
prevailing norms and values of
their country, “Kaplan explained.
“At one location, more than 70%
of managers criticized a proposed
system as culturally inappropriate
or irrelevant.”
Employees’ most common
complaint is that such programs
lack validity or objectivity, notes
Kaplan, who says a typical
comment is: “It doesn’t measure
the right things.” In some cases,
Kaplan believes, cultural objec-
tions may just be a way to mask
nationalistic sentiments.
At a Western European plant,
one employee dismissed a planned
program as an “American thing.”
According to Kaplan, American
management innovations have
taken on a negative connotation
after publicity showed European
Handling cultural diversity,
managers often disagree
companies trying to cut down
vacation time to United States
equivalents.
Moreover, seeking to boost
productivity or improve global
competitiveness is increasingly
seen as unwelcome American
interference. In Asian countries,
Kaplan adds, resistance to compe-
tency-based performance mea-
surement takes a diferent form.
“Tese societies place high
value on hierarchy, tenure, and
experience and employees aren’t
comfortable with a system based
on merit. Any new performance
evaluation system is not likely to
gain acceptance if it’s used to rate,
rank or promote people.”
American employees, concedes
Kaplan, are no less skeptical of
new performance management
systems. “In the U.S., employees
are suspicious or mistrustful of
any initiative championed by
management. A performance
improvement program might be
considered a scheme to impose
forced rankings and reduce
head count.”
According to Kaplan, no
performance management system
is perfect, nor need it be. “Our
research shows that a new system
will be accepted if it’s shown to
lead to individual growth and
development and also has top
management buy-in. If there are
clear, positive payofs, employees
will willingly participate.”
Getting a decent job is already
difcult if you don’t have a
good education. Imagine hav-
ing a felony conviction; add
on some racism, class issues,
sexism, and sprinkle that with
Dept. of Revenue & Recovery
collection proceedings and/or
child support issues.
I sat and imagined how
hard it would be to be in a
parolee’s shoes. I would feel
deeply discouraged, over-
whelmed and depressed.
To the contrary of popular
belief, employers defnitely
beneft by hiring parolees.
Here are a few reasons why:
• Most parolees have an incen-
tive to do good: they do not
want to return to custody.
• Most want to provide for
themselves and their families.
• Many parolees have a
skill trade, prior training
and/or expertise to ofer after
developing a work history
within the penal system.
Parole agents, community
based organizations, religious
organizations and other
agencies have stepped-up to
assist with parolee reentry
evicted from the community:
Reality check: A parolee’s plight
Diverse Nation
by providing housing, job
opportunities, transportation,
child care, mentoring and
other benefts.
Te California Dept. of
Labor issues a sizable tax
credit to businesses that hire
parolees if the parolee is
retained (up to $2400). Even
the United States federal
government is fnding creative
ways to help with re-entry.
Six states including
California have adopted
a new law which assists
ex-felons by authorizing
“Certifcates of Rehabilitation,”
which after a period of time
and proven stability helps
ex-felons gain recognition
for changing their lives. Tis
is also a tool that assists in
gaining occupational licenses,
which a parolee might have
not previously been privy to.
Several major cities are
adopting a new policy called
Te Second Chance Labor
Project, which eliminates the
question: “Have you ever
been convicted of a crime?”
from the initial hiring
application. Te question
will now only be asked after
seriously considering hiring
an individual.
On Feb. 8, 2006 President
Bush signed legislation
S.1932 into law pertaining
to students who have been
convicted of drug crimes.
Previously not eligible for
college fnancial aid, these
students will become eligible
as long as the drug crime
did not occur at the school
location. Te law goes into
efect on July 1.
Te future of parolee
reintegration into society is
brighter by the fact that now
millions of dollars in federal
grants are being dispersed
to organizations to assist
ex-ofenders.
I am in agreement with the
philosophy that if a parolee
were my next door neighbor,
I would rather that they were
employed and educated. If a
parolee has paid a debt to the
community, and is attempt-
ing a better life, we should
not shut them out with a
deadbolt lock on the door.
Rather, let’s give them a
hand up as if we were in
their shoes.
Tere is a demonstrable need for
shipyard employees, and positions
in all levels from deckhand and
engineer to U.S. Merchant Marine
jobs, according to Coordinated
Maritime Services of San Diego™,
a non proft organization, that
promotes maritime careers, educa-
tion, and service opportunities.
CMS rescues derelict or dete-
riorated vessels, restores them
with volunteers and students,
and provides hands-on training,
internships, apprenticeships, and
new job opportunities to young
people and employable adults in
transition.
CMS ofers pathways to navi-
gate a future with the Maritime
Career Exploring Program for
ages 14 and up. Activities include
training at the Maritime Learn-
ing Center™ aboard vessels. CMS
school ships include the US Army
Tug Boat Museum and the 43-ft.
sailboat, the Lady Dee. Advanced
training includes boat building
and small boat repair.
Te CMS Maritime Career
Training and Apprenticeship
Program, for ages 18-24, is a two
or three month paid training
program with classroom and on
the job instruction. A certifcate
and cash stipend is awarded at the
conclusion of the program.
Program objectives include:
Basic Shipyard Skills Orientation
Basic Deckhand Training
Surface prepping and coating
Fundamentals in Basic Diesel
Engine & Forklift Operation
Basic Rigging and Crane Service.
For additional information, call
619-696-0797 or email cmsofsd@
surfree.com
Are you interested in a
job on the waterfront?
By Deme Hill


6 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!


The unemployment rate in San Diego
County was 3.9 percent in March 2006, down
from 4.1 percent in February 2006, and below
the year-ago estimate of 4.5 percent. Tis com-
pares with an unadjusted unemployment rate
of 5.0 percent for California and 4.8 percent
for the nation during the same period.
• Between February 2006 and March 2006,
nonfarm wage and salary employment in San
Diego County rose by 4,200 jobs to reach
1,294,300 jobs.
• Leisure and hospitality recorded the larg-
est increase, up 1,200 jobs. Two-thirds of the
growth occurred in accommodation and food
services.
• Educational and health services added 900
jobs over the month. Te job growth was con-
centrated in private educational services.
• Construction grew by 900 jobs, with growth
occurring mostly in specialty trade contractor
services where many electricians, carpenters
and other trades are classifed.
• Professional and business services expanded
by 700 jobs. Over half of the increase was
recorded in professional, scientifc and techni-
cal services.
• Between March 2005 and March 2006, total
nonfarm employment was up by 23,000 jobs,
an increase of 1.8 percent.
• Leisure and hospitality recorded the largest
increase, up 6,400 jobs. Te job gains were
concentrated in accommodation and food
services.
• Construction grew by 5,200 jobs. Most of the
gain occurred in the specialty trade contractors
sector.
• Professional and business services added
3,900 jobs over the year. Te majority of the
job growth occurred in professional, scientifc
and technical services.
• Manufacturing lost 900 jobs as increases in
nondurable goods manufacturing were ofset
by losses in durable goods manufacturing.
From February to March 2006, employment in
San Diego rose by 4,200 jobs, with 1,200 occurring
in leisure and hospitality, and 900 coming in educa-
tion and health services. Despite warnings of a slowing
housing market, construction grew by 900 jobs, and
professional and business services expanded by 700
jobs, mostly in professional, technical, and scientifc
services. (EDD Monthly Press Release, April 2006)
Between March 2005 and March 2006, San Diego’s
employment base grew by 23,000 jobs, a 1.8%
annual increase. Tis growth is attributed to several
industries: leisure and hospitality recording the largest
increase, 6,400, mostly in accommodation and food
services; construction growing by 5,200 jobs, with
most of its gain in the specialty trade contractors
segment; professional and business services adding
approximately 3,900 jobs, most of which were con-
centrated in the professional, scientifc, and technical
services segment; and education and health services
growing by 3,300 positions, 2,900 of which were in
healthcare and social assistance. (EDD Monthly Press
Release, April 2006)
Te demand for direct health care workers
Job Industry Report
San Diego, Carlsbad & San Marcos
23,000 Jobs Added to The Region
– certifed nursing assistants, home health care work-
ers, nursing assistants, and other health care profes-
sionals – is continuing to grow across the nation and
specifcally in the San Diego region. Tough there is
turnover in these occupations, much of it is attributed
to upward mobility, advancing up the career ladder
into other nursing positions, such as licensed voca-
tional nurses (LVNs) and registered nurses. Golden
Hill Health Careers Academy, the county’s Regional
Occupational Program, Maric College, MiraCosta
College, and the Glenner Alzheimer’s Family Center
are among the programs throughout the county that
provide training in these occupations. Te Workforce
Partnership has documented the need for workers in
these and other healthcare occupations in a series of
recently released publications that provide data on the
healthcare sector and occupations and ofer recom-
mendations for providing a sufcient and skilled
workforce for the healthcare sector in the years ahead.
Visit www.sandiegoatwork.com/generate/html/LMI/
healthcare_sector_studies_06.html to view the three
Workforce Partnership reports on the healthcare sector.
(SignOnSanDiego.com, April 24, 2006)
Industry Watch




Diversity Works! | July 2006 |
the region only has one program for training dental hygienists, and no programs for
preparing physical therapists.
• Despite the immediate need for qualifed healthcare professionals in many occupa-
tions, limited budgets, a lack of physical space, and a lack of faculty prevent schools in
our region from increasing their education and training capacity.
The sector will continue to promote career advancement opportunities
and target specifc populations for entry into the healthcare sector
• Education and training providers and healthcare employers should increase the
amount of training that is ofered to individuals wishing to enter into the healthcare
feld, as well as career ladder training that is ofered to healthcare professionals wanting
to advance within the sector.
• Educational institutions should increase the productivity of the space and resources
they have by screening program entrants and adopting distance learning strategies.
• Educational institutions and employers should develop programs that help healthcare
professionals from the military or foreign countries qualify for work in our healthcare
sector. Recognizing the medical training that these two target populations have already
received can help relieve some of the region’s healthcare stafng shortages.

San Diego’s healthcare sector is a thriving sector:
• Te healthcare sector is that part of the economy involved in preventive care, vac-
cination, diagnosis, prescription and administration of medicine, surgery, observation,
and attendance at childbirth.
• San Diego’s healthcare sector employed 80,573 people across 5,626 facilities in
2004.
• Te sector is expected to grow 23 percent between 2004 and 2010.
San Diego’s healthcare sector is experiencing and will likely continue to
experience occupational shortages:
• A number of healthcare occupations are currently understafed, and an analysis of
several economic indicators within the healthcare sector reveals that there may be more
job openings than qualifed candidates in the future as well.
• Shortages of qualifed candidates are most likely for dental assistants, dental hygien-
ists, licensed practical and vocational nurses, radiologic technologists and technicians,
and registered nurses.
Education and training opportunities exist in San Diego for those seek-
ing healthcare careers, but enrollment is limited for some jobs:
• Education and training for most healthcare sector careers can be found in San Diego.
• Training programs, including certifcate, associate’s, bachelor’s, and master’s degree
programs, are available at the region’s four-year universities and colleges, community
colleges, private institutions, regional occupational and adult education programs, and
high schools.
• In addition, upgrade training is available for licensed practical and vocational nurses
seeking to become registered nurses.
• Unfortunately, enrollment capacity in healthcare programs is severely limited,
particularly for occupations with some of the largest gaps between job openings and
qualifed candidates.
• Long waiting lists limit the region’s capacity to develop nurses of all types, while
Healthcare & Hospitality Sectors:
Two Thriving Industries
New Studies Reveal Rapid Industry Growth
W
orkforce
Partnership,
Inc., released six
studies today:
three on the
healthcare sector
and three on
the hospitality
industry.
“Tese studies
will help us meet the workforce needs of
our healthcare and hospitality industries,
two of the most dynamic sectors in our
region,” said Lawrence G. Fitch, San Diego
Workforce Partnership’s president & CEO.
Careers in San Diego’s Healthcare
Industry: A Healthy Future and Careers
in San Diego’s Hospitality Industry:
Opportunities Abound are comprehensive
resource reports containing information
on industry trends, frms, employment,
occupations, wages, and career ladder
opportunities, along with 37 occupational
profles for the healthcare sector and 61 for
the hospitality industry.
Two abbreviated versions of these
publications, San Diego’s Healthcare
Sector – Prognosis: Positive and San Diego’s
Hospitality Industry – Outlook: Sunny,
were also produced.
“San Diego’s Hospitality Industry,
Outlook: Sunny, provides a detailed
overview of San Diego’s extensive and
diverse hospitality industry workforce,
with an added emphasis on opportunities
for advancement through defned career
ladders,” said Sal Giametta, VP of Public
Afairs and Communications at the San
Diego Convention & Visitors Bureau.
Te reports are designed to meet the
needs of policy makers, employers, educa-
tion and training providers, job seekers
and youth. Policy makers can use these
publications to gain a better understanding
of the dynamics of the healthcare sector
and the hospitality industry.
Employers can use the publications to
compare their human resource practices to
industry norms.
Education and training providers can
use them to plan programs and instruc-
tional content.
Job seekers can use the publications
to learn more about the healthcare and
hospitality industries and their occupations.
Youth and their parents can use them
to select and prepare for careers in the
healthcare or hospitality industries.
Te two additional reports, San Diego’s
Hospitality Industry: Keeping it Vibrant and
San Diego’s Healthcare Sector: A Prescription
for Strength, provide policy recommenda-
tions to ensure that the region’s hospitality
and healthcare employers are able to
fnd the skilled workers they need to stay
proftable, while hospitality and healthcare
employees have the career opportunities
they need to thrive in our region.
Te fndings of the studies show that
both industries are thriving. Te healthcare
sector is projected to grow by 23 percent
and the hospitality industry by 27 percent
between 2004 and 2010.
Te rapid growth in the healthcare sec-
tor could exacerbate the shortage of skilled
workers that already exists in the region.
Tis shortage not only impacts the ability
of our region’s healthcare providers to fnd
qualifed employees and our residents to
fnd quality healthcare services, but also
illustrates the critical need for the region
to expand its capacity to educate and train
future healthcare professionals.
“Te release of these workforce publica-
tions demonstrates the collaboration of the
healthcare community with the region’s
education and training providers, as well
as its commitment to assuring a competent
and well-educated healthcare workforce for
the residents
of this entire
region,”
said Steve
Escoboza,
President
and CEO of
the Hospital Association of San Diego and
Imperial Counties.
Rapid growth in San Diego’s hospitality
industry provides employers with the
opportunity to move existing employees
up the career ladder into higher paying
jobs. Taking advantage of this opportunity,
however, will require programs to upgrade
the skills of current hospitality workers,
particularly in the areas of english language
and computer skills.
All six reports are available online in
PDF format at www.SanDiegoAtWork.
com. A limited number of print copies are
available by contacting Terri Bergman at
terri@workforce.org or 619-228-2936.
San Diego Workforce Partnership is an
organization committed to coordinating
a comprehensive workforce development
system that ensures a skilled and produc-
tive workforce and supports a healthy
economy throughout the San Diego region.
Trough its network of countywide One-
Stop Career Centers, SDWP continues
to be the leading authority in workforce
development issues in San Diego County.
Visit www.SanDiegoAtWork.com or call
619-228-2900 for more information.
SUMMARY OF HEALTHCARE FINDINGS
8 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!
Genentech, the cutting edge biotechnology
reseach frm, was listed number one on Fortune’s list
of 100 Best Companies To Work For in the January 9,
2006 issue of the fnancial magazine.
Tis is the frst number one ranking for the company,
which has been named to the list for eight consecutive
years.
Te list is compiled for Fortune based on two sources:
an evaluation of the policies and culture of each com-
pany; and the opinions of the company’s employees.
Tis year, Genentech was considered among 466 can-
didate companies, up from 356 companies evaluated
last year.
Genentech was also named Top Employer this year
by Essence magazine.
In May 2005, the company was listed by Essence
as among the top 35 Great Places to Work for the 3rd
year in a row for its commitment to diversity in career
advancement, work-life balance, representation in the
workforce, and community support and involvement.
Candidate companies were asked to provide actual
data on their practices in three key areas. Genentech
led all other companies in the following criteria:
1) the number of African-American women employed
in all positions at all levels
2) the amount of money spent with minority vendors
3) the amount in contributions given to organizations
of interest to African-American women.
Company In Focus
TOP SAN DIEGO COMPANIES
15 Whole Foods Market 18 Large 33,248
23 Qualcomm 23 Medium 7,562
29 Starbucks 26 Large 91,056
43 Intuit 6 Medium 6,516
46 Nordstrom 3 Large 45,112
47 AFLAC 5 Medium 4,034
64 FedEx 7 Large 212,241
71 PricewaterhouseCoopers 11 Large 26,392
72 Booz Allen Hamilton 9 Large 15,582
87 Washington Mutual 7 Large 54,396
92 Men’s Warehouse 9 Large 10,757
96 IKEA (U.S.) 18 Medium 9,499
99 Marriott International 3 Large 126,704
RANK COMPANY JOB GROWTH COMPANY SIZE EMPLOYEES
(PERCENTAGE)
BEST
COMPANIES
TO WORK FOR
Genentech
Te following list, compiled from Fortune magazine’s annual report entitled 100 Best Companies to Work
For, shows local and nation presence, companies which scored highest in employee satisfaction and diversity.
Diversity Works! | July 2006 |
By Dorcy Bowman Rose
Issues of multicultural-
ism and diversity are taking
on a new focus in business,
impacting every aspect of
corporate development,
growth and operations in
every industry imaginable.
Gone are the days
when “multicultural” and
“diversity” were terms
used primarily by human
resources departments to
merely tout a company’s equal employment
opportunity policies.
Now more than ever, multicultural is
a method of doing business that reaches
from the corporate hierarchy to its bottom
line and every department in between,
including its meetings.
Recently, the San Diego Meeting
Professionals International (MPI) hosted a
Multicultural Trade Show and Luncheon
in San Diego with eight community
and industry organizations in support of
the MPI Multicultural Initiative, which
focuses on multiculturalism within the
meetings market.
Te keynote speaker, Roy Jay, President
of the Oregon Convention and Visitors
Network, discussed leading issues that
can enhance the success of multicultural
meetings, and how Portland has developed
strong multicultural
partnerships leading to
signifcant new business
opportunities for the city
and its hospitality industry.
Jay answered questions
with a panel of commu-
nity and industry partners,
which included San Diego
MPI, San Diego Conven-
tion and Visitors Bureau,
Te Urban League of San
Diego County, San Diego
County Hispanic Chamber
of Commerce, Southwest Chapter of the
Professional Convention Management
Association (PCMA), Asian Business
Association, Barona Band of Mission
Indians, and Multicultural Convention
Services Network.
Te attendees included a diverse group
of suppliers and companies interested in
better understanding their opportunities
for multicultural business growth.
“Tere is a growing number of cities,
convention bureaus, centers, hotels
and others in the lodging, meeting and
hospitality business that are ’getting it’,”
Jay said. “And San Diego needs to be
among them.”
Without a doubt “getting it” means
recognizing and understanding the value
of the multicultural marketplace, and then
addressing those key audiences in the most
appropriate, knowledgeable and culturally
sensitive methods possible without alienat-
ing other audiences.
But how can companies that hold
multiple meetings each year “get it” to
the point of enhancing their meetings to
ensure that all participants and attendees
have a memorable, fulflling, educational
and enjoyable experience? It begins with
knowing the facts. Multicultural markets
include Asian, Hispanic/Latino, and
African-American populations, as well as
other growing segments.
Recent research indicates that the
annual buying power of multicultural
groups in the United States will reach $1.5
trillion by 2009 and will collectively reign
with the largest buying power of any other
group in the country.
By 2008, in the U.S. alone, the Asian
population is projected to reach more than
14 million, the African-American popula-
tion will grow to more than 39 million,
and the Hispanic/Latino population will
increase to more than 52 million. Just
in San Diego County, one out of three
persons is identifed as a Latino.
For companies interested in holding
meetings as a part of their business
development and marketing strategies,
these demographics ofer important insight
into the change that is expected among the
population of attendees at their meetings.
Corporate diversity and understanding
multiple cultures will become more valu-
able for these organizations if they truly
want to maximize the potential of all their
employees and gain interest and loyalty of
their multicultural audiences.
And for suppliers, expanding business
opportunities by joining multicultural
associations will help gain insight into the
needs and concerns of these groups to more
efectively service them.
For those who still don’t “get it” there
is a choice: either ignore the research that
points to change on the horizon and watch
your meetings sufer a slow and costly
decline; or alternatively, maximize the
potential of all people and resources by
seeking assistance from professionals who
can help you gain the maximum beneft
from this lucrative and growing multicul-
tural marketplace.
Dorcy Bowman Rose, CMP is the Executive
Director of Rendezvous a meetings planning
company, focusing on the strategic business
of meetings. She can be reached at dorcy@
meetingplanner.com; her website is www.
meetingplanner.com
Multicultural eforts help the company bottom line while providing
minority group benefts but managers are slow to get the message
could be done and
what every public of-
fcial seeking ofce in
the near future should
respond to:
• America must re-
store vocational edu-
cation in high schools
that ft a 21st century model. In 2010 there
will be a 10 million person gap, a shortage
of both blue collar and white collar skills.
• America should invest in programs
that develop more skilled workers for the
construction industry. Just rebuilding on
the Gulf Coast alone will require tens of
thousands more workers. If America could
rebuild Europe after WWII, why can’t
we create jobs to rebuild part of our own
country?
• We must insist on investment in prisons
to provide education training for inmates
instead of expensive senseless warehousing.
Te bottom line is that we want Americans
in bank lines, not unemployment lines. We
want workfare, not welfare.
America needs to provide its workers
with a path so they can realize their prom-
ise and stand with pride.
Today, more than ever, every American
must get that opportunity.
OuTsOurcing continued from page 1
As corporate diversity programs and
initiatives continue to gain strength and
gather momentum across the country, the
boundaries of diversity are extending well
beyond the more traditional concepts of
race and sex to include sexual orientation,
national origin and religion.
Today, creating a corporate culture of
inclusion means embracing and leveraging
the benefts of building and maintaining a
work force with a broad variety of language
skills and cultural backgrounds, as well as
a wide range of ages, physical abilities and
disabilities.
Te most enlightened companies are
using their diversity initiatives to spread
this expanded, more inclusive concept of
diversity to their vendors and suppliers,
who themselves are demanding that
diversity become an integral part of the
way companies do business.
Te most successful companies will be
those that recognize the power of diversity
in their work forces and in their product
mix, and efectively create products and
services that appeal to their increasingly
diverse customer bases.
Tese companies know that diversity will
become even more important in the coming
years, and that the leading companies will
be those best refecting the increasingly
diverse marketplaces they serve.
Diversity becoming
priority as employers
get enlightened
10 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!
Race? Gender? Sexual orientation? Disability? Change?
What is diversity about?
Diversity, Beyond Race and Gender which
includes a 30-minute play about a fctional
corporation, and an “interactive” session
with the actors returning after the show “in
character,” has been presented nearly 1,000
times in the United States for organizations
such as Merck Medco, American Express,
HP, Te Federal Reserve and many more.
“But,” says Gregg Ward, Orlando-Ward
& Associates’ Producing Director and
primary creator of all their programs,
“GlaxoWellcome wanted more than the ‘All
of Us’ program. Tey wanted what we call
an ‘experiential learning’ program from
which sales reps would walk away with
a deep understanding of the diversity of
their clients and within the situations they
would encounter.”
So, after several fact-fnding sessions
with Bradford and his senior sales reps,
Orlando-Ward & Associates developed a
half-day intensive training program named
“Sales Calls,” which they delivered to 50
GlaxoWellcome sales representatives in the
Bay Area last year. Te meat and potatoes
of “Sales Calls” was a series of vignettes,
performed by professional actors with
the Orlando-Ward & Associates southern
California team.
One vignette, called “Te Assistant,”
involved a fctional sales representative
named Stan (played by San Diego actor
Walter Murray), visiting Doctor M. Lee’s
ofce for the frst time in San Francisco’s
Chinatown district. Stan got through the
door easily enough. But, he then made the
unfortunate assumption that the young
Asian woman behind the counter was the
doctor’s assistant.
“I’m Stan Murray with GlaxoWellcome,”
Stan said, “I wonder if I could speak with
the doctor for a moment?” Te woman,
(played by Asian-American actor Kimberly
Miller), replied coolly, “You’re speaking
with Doctor Lee right now.”
As Stan did his utmost to apologize for
his mistake, Dr. Lee maintained her com-
posure and informed him that she would
be happy to meet with him and discuss his
company’s new medications, “...in about
a year from now.” She refused to take his
samples and headed of to see a patient.
Stan left, his proverbial tail between
his legs.
Te response from the GlaxoWellcome
sales reps to “Te Assistant”, and the other
vignettes in the “Sales Calls” program, was
instantaneous and very enthusiastic.
“I was instantly reminded of the mis-
takes I had made when I started out,” said
one senior rep who attended the program.
“I’m really glad my colleagues are getting
this training so they don’t have to learn
about diversity like I did, in the school of
hard knocks.”
After each scenario Ward, who has
worked in the diversity training feld for
many years, leads the attendees on an
interactive debriefng wherein the diversity
mistakes and the skills needed to avoid
them are identifed and discussed.
“It’s imperative that the attendees are
actively engaged in spotting mistakes
and coaching their colleagues on how
to address them,” says Ward. “Sharing
organizational knowledge and personal
experience is a key to high impact diversity
training. It can’t be just me up there giving
a lecture.”
When the mistakes and corrective
skills are identifed by the group, Ward
and his team then ratchet the training up
another notch using a technique Ward calls
“Te Replay.”
In replay, volunteers from the audience
are identifed, and they step into the
vignette, opposite the professional actors.
It’s the volunteer’s job to practice avoiding
assumptions and mistakes, and handle the
situation more efectively. And the actors,
playing the “ofended” doctors, are trained
to respond to the
volunteers “in kind.”
If the volunteer
handles the situation
efectively, the doctor
is cooperative. If
not, the doctor
pushes back and
subtly guides the
volunteer into the
appropriate behavior,
without ever breaking
character.
“It’s in the replays,”
says Ward, “where
the rubber really
meets the road for
sales reps. Tey’re
practicing what they
preach, in front of
their colleagues.”
And the good news,
Ward says, in 99%
of the replays, the
volunteers handle the
situation far better
than anyone could
have imagined. “People really rise to the
occasion. It’s impressive.”
On top of this success, the “Replay”
technique is also a great morale booster for
the attendees who don’t volunteer. Here is
one of their own, managing a very complex
and stressful situation with confdence
and grace.
“I’ve seen groups jump up to cheer and
pat a volunteer on the back after they
come out of a successful replay,” says Ward.
“People are really moved by it.”
As for Bradford and his Bay Area sales
reps, they gave the Orlando-Ward &
Associates “Sales Calls” live drama diversity
training program top marks.
“Tis is some of the most powerful and
efective sales rep training I’ve ever seen,”
says Bradford. “Anything that can give my
reps a realistic sense of the diverse people
and situations they’ll encounter is abso-
lutely golden to me.”

I
f you ask a feld sales representa-
tive to tell you about some of their
biggest screw-ups, nine times out
of ten, they’ll talk about mistakes
they made because they assumed some-
thing about their potential clients.
One of the classics: assuming a client’s
gender by looking at the frst name. For
example, names such
as Leigh, Frances or
Kit - although most of
us assume are women’s
names - are also com-
mon to men.
Another easy
mistake that many
pharmaceutical
sales reps talk about:
assuming the family
doctor you’re calling
on is of the same race
as the community in
which he or she prac-
tices. Sales reps will
tell you, when they
make mistakes like
these, it usually takes a
long time, and a lot of
visits, to win back the
potential client’s trust.
Tese kinds of
assumptions and
mistakes are clearly
under the “diversity”
umbrella. And they
always come up when people talk about
diversity training for feld sales reps.
So, when Harry Bradford, a regional
sales VP with GlaxoWellcome, was looking
to expand his sales force in the Bay Area,
he wanted to make sure his team would
avoid diversity mistakes and assumptions
when calling on potential clients.
“I wanted the reps to see, frst hand, how
diversity mistakes and assumptions can
cost us.” Bradford, an African-American,
says, “But I needed them to get this experi-
ence in a safe environment, where they
could spot the assumptions, learn to avoid
them, and practice their diversity skills.”
So, Bradford turned to a unique con-
sulting group, Orlando-Ward & Associates,
which specializes in using live, profes-
sional drama as a diversity-training tool.
In response, Orlando-Ward & Associates
created a series of realistic scenarios or
vignettes, specifc to Bradford’s target
region, that replicated the situations his
sales reps would encounter.
With teams in New York City, south-
ern California and London, England,
Orlando-Ward & Associates are considered
top experts in the use of live, professional
drama and interactive, interpersonal facili-
tation and communication as training and
education tools.
Teir fagship program is All of Us:
Orlando-Ward Associates, based in San Diego,
with ofces in New York City and London,
provides educational workplace training with
a unique twist. Te company specializes in
live-action professional drama as a tool for
facilitating communication within organiza-
tions about issues usually too uncomfortable
to discuss, such as diversity, sexual harassment
and organizational change.
By Geof Pierce
Diversity Works! | July 2006 | 11
demographics: DIVERSITY at a glance
1 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!
AIG
American Airlines
Bank of America
Cardinal Health
Citibank
CIC Research
Cost Plus World Markets
Cox Communications
Cubic Corporation
Curtis Moring Insurance Agency, Inc.
Enterprise Rent-A-Car
Federal Bureau of Investigations
Genentech Inc.
Hawthorne Machinery
Keith Goosby Inspirations & Motivations
Kaiser Permanente
Kyocera
Lockheed-Martin, Maritime Systems & Sensors
Loews Coronado Bay Resort & SPA
Manpower of San Diego
National University
Neighborhood National Bank
NorLab Business Solutions
North Island Financial Credit Union
San Diego Padres
Qualcomm
Science Application International Corp. (SAIC)
Scripps Research Institute
SDSU Research Foundation
San Diego Business Journal
San Diego Gas & Eletric
San Diego Monitor News
San Diego National Bank
San Diego County Sherif’s Department
SeaWorld San Diego
Sempra Utilities
Solar Turbines
Sony Corporation
Southern California Edison
Starbucks Cofee Company
Sycuan Casino
The Hartford
The San Diego Union Tribune
The Pacifc Institute
Timmis J Moore
UCSD
Union Bank of California
Union Tribune
United Way of San Diego
UPS
Viejas Casino
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
Wells Fargo Bank
Washington Mutual Bank
The employers below have made an extra
committment to hiring diverse jobseekers by investing in
Te Urban League of San Diego County. You can learn
more about them by visiting: www.ulsdcjobs.net
For additional details on becoming a Diversity
Works! Employer Partner, please turn to page
18 for more information and company profles.
Join today and help us reap the
benefts of a strong workforce.
Call 619-266-6244
or email us at
diversityworks@sdul.org
that have a U.S. or Alberta, Canada, disclosure document,
and only those whose information Entrepreneur verifed
from the disclosure documents, are eligible to be ranked-
giving us the top 500 franchises. Search by keyword or
state/region or browse by business category.
THE INC. 500
Te top 500 “small businesses” according to Inc. Magazine.
Also includes a benchmarking form so you can see how
your business ranks against these. Te current list is
available online, along with a searchable database of all Inc
500 winners for the past 8 or 10 years. Te new list is issued
each November.
NASDAQ 100
See online FlashQuotes for their top 100 trading stocks,
which may give indicators to a top performing company to
take note of. Note that this list is presented in alphabetical
order, not by ranking.
POST 200 from the Washington Post
Te Post 200 starts with a list of the 125 largest public
companies with headquarters in Washington and its
suburbs. Completing the 200 are the 20 largest fnancial
institutions with headquarters in the region, the 15 largest
private companies with headquarters in the area and the
20 largest public companies in Maryland and Virginia,
respectively, with headquarters outside the Washington
area. Te list is issued annually in April, and past rankings
are also available so you can track a company’s progress (or
decline...or disappearance).
TOP 100 U.S. FOUNDATIONS
Te Top 100 U.S. grant making foundations ranked by
value of assets, based on current data in the Foundation
Center’s database. Tere are other ranking lists available
accessible from the home page, including top corporate
grant makers and largest community foundations. Updated
as new audited fnancial information becomes available.

Business & Employer
Rankings
Diversity Works!
Employer Partners
When job hunting, target the best employers
and the top companies according to these invalu-
able online surveys. Of course, this couldn’t pos-
sibly be a comprehensive list of every survey out
there. Always keep an eye out for other updated
lists from up and coming sources and specialty
business magazines.
the main lists
Te Fortune 500 from Fortune Magazine is the venerable
leader of all such lists and a must for all serious job seekers.
Go online and browse the list by company, CEO, or
industry. Te list is issued each year in April. Under the
main 500 you’ll fnd mini-listings for the best employers,
the diversity leaders, and a list entitled Women CEOs.
FORTUNE’S Global 500
A ranking of the largest companies in the world, browse
the online list by company name, CEO, or industry.
Forbes requires readers to register to read some articles on
their web site. It’s free, fast, you don’t have to give them
your name, and you only get their e-newsletters if you
decide to check the boxes (the default is you don’t get any
of them.)
Go online to see a variety of lists which updates each
year. For employer rankings compiled according to size of
company flters, this includes:
200 Best Small Companies
400 Best Big Companies
Forbes’ 500s
Forbes International 500
Global 2000
Largest Private Companies.
Other Lists
BRANHAM GROUP’ Branham 300
Each year, the Branham Group ranks the top 300 Canadian
Information Technology (IT) companies. Te rankings are
divided into 8 categories, including the 100 Top Software
Companies, 100 Top IT Professional Services, 25 Top IT
Multinationals in Canada, 25 Up and Coming Technology
Firms, 20 Top Wireless Technology Companies, 10 Top
Internet Service Providers, 10 Top Application Service
Providers, and 10 Top Telecom Wireless Service Providers.
Click on the company’s name for very short profle. Neat
feature - they watch these companies during the year and
update the list as needed.
You’ll fnd the annual ranking of the best franchising
opportunities in the world. Tey do an extensive
background check on these too. “Only franchise companies
that submitted full Uniform Franchise Ofering Circulars
(UFOCs) disclosure documents were eligible to receive a
listing in the magazine. In addition, only those companies
FORTUNE
FORBES
THE FORBES’ Lists
ENTREPRENEUR.COM’S Franchise 500
Diversity Works! | July 2006 | 1
14 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!
Non-Proft
Family Health Centers
of San Diego (FHCSD)
Family Health Centers of San Diego is a
private, nonproft community clinic orga-
nization founded by community activists in
1970. At that time, a neighborhood resident
helped to lead a sit-in at the existing Neigh-
borhood House building to bring needed
medical services to the barrio. From this
remarkable beginning, the organization has
grown from one clinic to a comprehensive
health center system serving more than
100,000 diverse individuals per year at 24
service sites.
KPBS Radio and Television
KPBS radio and TV continues to feature a
diverse blend of local, regional and national
programs that celebrate diverse cultures.
Te mission of KPBS is to enrich the lives
of people in the San Diego region through
unique media services. Tese high quality
radio, TV, web and community activities
educate, inspire, entertain and advance civic
involvement, celebration of culture and the
power of diverse perspectives.
YMCA of San Diego County
YMCA of San Diego County is dedicated
to improving the quality of human life and
to helping all people realize their fullest
potential through the development of the
spirit, mind and body. To remain true to
this mission, each branch and department
of YMCA of San Diego County develops a
proactive, deliberate Branch Diversity Plan
in order to be representative of all the com-
munities they serve, as well as address the
management and appreciation of cultural
diversity.
Small Business
The Centre City Develop-
ment Corporation (CCDC)
Te Centre City Development Corporation
recognizes that cultural bridging has proven
to be a successful strategy throughout the
San Diego region. In addition to its 8th An-
nual San Diego Multicultural Festival 2006
(held on the Martin Luther King, Jr. prom-
enade and attracted approximately 25,000
attendees), the organization has an African-
American female who serves as community
relations manager. Tis position was created
in 2000 to focus on ethnic outreach via its
external communications program. CCDC
deliberately drew a bigger circle to bring
everyone in to live, work, shop, play, dine
and invest in downtown San Diego.
Gray Systems, Inc.
Gray Systems, Inc., is a 15 year old IT
service corporation in Mission Valley
owned by an African-American woman.
Te company enjoys a staf of network
and programming professionals from a
broad group of cultural backgrounds, and
demonstrates through many initiatives that
it appreciates diversity in the community
throughout the year.
Southwestern College Sun
Te Southwestern College Sun, a student
newspaper, has been a clarion for the
power and light of diversity by highlighting
inspiring examples of multiculturalism at
work and creating understanding through
education. Te Southwestern College Sun
has a highly diverse staf representing nearly
every segment of San Diego County’s rich
cultural blend, and actively recruits people
of color, linguistic talent, diferently-abled,
gays and lesbians, minority religious groups
and other under represented and under
served voices in the community. Te Sun
includes a range of ages from high school
seniors on special admission to retirees. Te
team is also diverse in socioeconomic status,
which greatly expands the organization’s
point of view and leads to robust,
productive discussions of news value and
community journalism.
Medium Business
Gordon and Reese
Gordon and Reese’ commitment to diver-
sity encompasses both lawyers and staf
alike, including people of diferent races,
religions, cultural backgrounds, national
origins, sexual orientations, gender, gender
identity, disabilities or medical conditions
and ages. Te frm is a supporter of numer-
ous community groups in promoting diver-
sity and multiculturalism, including SDSU’s
President’s Diversity Gala, the Hispanic Bar
Association, Te San Diego Urban League,
San Diego Hispanic Chamber of Com-
merce, the Corporate Director’s Forum,
Big Brothers/Big Sisters and the San Diego
Legal Aid Society. It has also participated in
the National Black Law Students Associa-
tion’s Western Regional Job Fair.
House of Blues San Diego
House of Blues San Diego’s mission is
to create a proftable, principled, global
entertainment company to celebrate the
diversity and brotherhood of world cultures:
to promote racial and spiritual harmony
through love, peace, truth, righteousness
and nonviolence. Its fagship program,
Blues School House, transforms the venue
into a multimedia classroom where students
and teachers learn about music, history and
cultural impact of the blues and traditions
of related folk art. It also highlights Afri-
can-American cultural contributions and
The Winners:
explores the traditions and cross-infuences
of diverse cultures. Te program is ofered
free of charge to students and teachers in
the San Diego City Schools District and
hundreds of students and teachers from the
local community and the San Diego region
have participated in the program.
Sullivan International Group
Sullivan ofers its staf a welcoming diverse
environment where everyone is an integral
part of a dynamic team of professionals.
Te appreciation for diferent cultures stems
from the people that make up Sullivan
International Group by employing people
originating from all over the world. Sul-
livan has employees from Asia, Australia,
Indonesia, Laos, Latin America, Philip-
pines, South Africa and Vietnam as well as
military veterans, the previously retired and
people with disabilities. It also sponsors a
number of foreign employees, assisting with
legal paperwork and fees to obtain their
H1B Visas.
Large Business
Pfzer
Pfzer colleagues come from many difer-
ent countries and cultures and speak many
languages. Because Pfzer has a diverse
workforce, this means that its colleagues
have the beneft of drawing experience from
diferent backgrounds and perspectives.
With a nearly equal ratio of men to women
and almost 40 percent of employees are mi-
norities, Pfzer La Jolla’s workforce refects
its local community.
Qualcomm

Qualcomm employees see themselves as
a catalyst to transforming the local com-
munity and region’s understanding and ap-
preciation for diversity and various cultures,
committed to forming meaningful commu-
nity partnerships that develop multicultural
education and appreciation.
San Diego Convention
Center Corp.
Te San Diego Convention Center Corp.
actively recruits minorities: 60 percent of its
employees are African American, Hispanic,
Pacifc Islander and Native American and
collectively speak more than 39 diferent
languages.
Diversity Works! | July 2006 | 1
Multicultural
Heritage Awards
hosts author,
educator,
entrepreneur
Stedman Graham is chairman
and CEO of S. Graham & Associates,
a management, marketing and consulting company.
Graham presents, consults and conducts training with
corporations, organizations and nonprofts on the topics
of maximizing leadership, achieving success, growing a
business, embracing diversity, achieving optimal health and
personal and professional branding.
Graham has authored nine books, including two New
York Times bestsellers and is actively involved in education.
He is currently an adjunct professor at Temple University,
is a former adjunct professor at the University of Illinois,
Chicago, and taught a management strategy course at the
Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern
University.
He also founded and directed George Washington
University’s Forum for Sport and Event Management and
Marketing – the frst of its kind in the country.
Graham has shown a lifelong commitment to youth
and community, and serves on several boards for various
foundations.
16 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!
SUNDAY M ONDAY TUESDAY W EDNESDAY THURSDAY FRI DAY SATURDAY
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
1889: Frederick Douglass named U.S.
M inist er t o Hait i.
1872: Elijah M cCoy pat ent s f irst self -lubricat ing
locomot ive engine. The qualit y of his invent ions
helped coin t he phrase “ t he real M cCoy.”
1688: The Quakers in Germant ow n,
Pennsylvania, make f irst f ormal prot est
against slavery.
Independence Day
1900: Tradit ional birt hdat e of Louis
“ Sat chmo” Armst rong, jazz pioneer.
1892: Andrew J. Beard pat ent s rot ary engine.
1991: Nelson M andela elect ed president of
t he Af rican Nat ional Congress.
1957: Alt hea Gibson w ins w omen’s singles
t it le at Wimbledon, f irst black t o w in t ennis’s
most prest igious aw ard.
1948: Cleveland Indians sign pit cher
Leroy “ Sat chel” Paige.
1943: Faye Wat t let on, f irst black direct or
of Planned Parent hood, bor n.
2000: Venus Williams w ins w omen’s singles
championship at Wimbledon.
1893: Dr. Daniel Hale Williams perf orms
f irst successf ul open-heart operat ion.
1875: Educat or M ary M cLeod Bet hune,
f ounder of Bet hune-Cookman College, bor n.
1905: W.E.B. DuBois and William M onroe
Trot t er organize t he Niagara M ovement ,
a f orerunner of t he NAACP.
1937: Act or, comedian Bill Cosby bor n.
1949: Frederick M . Jones pat ent s cooling
syst em f or f ood t ransport at ion vehicles.
1965: Thurgood M arshall becomes f irst black
appoint ed U.S. solicit or general.
1951: George Washingt on Carver M onument ,
f irst nat ional park honoring a black, is dedicat ed
in Joplin, M issouri.
1867: M aggie Lena Walker, f irst w oman and
f irst black t o become president of a bank, born.
1822: Violet t e A. Johnson, f irst black w oman
t o pract ice bef ore t he U.S. Supreme Court , born.
1862: Ant i-lynching act ivist Ida B. Wells-
Bar net t bor n.
1959: Singer Billie Holiday dies. 1899: L.C. Bailey issued pat ent f or t he f olding bed.
1998: Af rican American Civil War Soldiers
M emorial dedicat ed, Washingt on, D.C.
1925: Paris debut of Josephine Baker,
ent ert ainer, act ivist and humanit arian.
1950: Black t roops (24t h Regiment ) w in f irst
U.S. vict ory in Korea.
1896: M ary Church Terrell elect ed f irst presi-
dent of Nat ional Associat ion of Colored Women.
1939: Jane M . Bolin of New York Cit y
appoint ed f irst black f emale judge.
1962: Jackie Robinson becomes f irst black
baseball player in t he major leagues induct ed
int o baseball’s Hall of Fame.
1807: Shakespearean act or Ira Aldridge bor n
in New York Cit y.
1916: Garret t M organ, invent or of t he gas
mask, rescues six people f rom gas-f illed
t unnel in Cleveland, Ohio.
1948: President Harry S. Truman issues
Execut ive Order 9981, ending segregat ion
in armed f orces.
1880: Alexander P. Ashbour ne pat ent s
process f or ref ining coconut oil.
1868: 14t h Amendment , grant ing blacks
f ull cit izenship right s, becomes part of
t he Const it ut ion.
1895: First Nat ional Conf erence of Colored
Women Convent ion held in Bost on.
July 2006
1822: James Varick becomes f irst bishop of
Af rican M et hodist Episcopal Zion Church.
1874: Rev. Pat rick Francis Healy inaugurat ed
president of Georget ow n Universit y,
Washingt on, D.C.
FACT
About 8.6 million
people in t he Unit ed
St at es have at least
one serious illness
caused by smoking.
It seems simple, and you’ ve no doubt heard it bef ore:
If you smoke, quit . If you don’ t smoke, don’ t st art .
“Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among
men and women; and African American men have the
highest lung cancer incidence and death rates, compared
to other racial and ethnic groups,” said Dr. Pebbles Fagan,
a health scientist in the Tobacco Control Research Branch
at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). “If you prevent
tobacco use, you prevent many of the cancers associated
with it.”
According to the NCI, smoking causes 87 percent of lung
cancers. “People’s lifestyles have a big impact on their quality
of life and longevity. A lot of people don’t know the lifestyle
risk factors they have – or how to modify those risk factors,”
said Fagan. “Smoking is addictive. Smokers need help, but
they may not know how to quit or have access to resources
to help them quit.”
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Surgeon
General’s Report states that smoking and tobacco use can
cause cardiovascular disease and stroke; respiratory disease;
and infertility; as well as leukemia, and cancers of the kidney,
pancreas, uterine cervix, larynx, oral cavity, pharynx,
esophagus, bladder and stomach.
Through her research, Fagan hopes to stimulate new ways
to intervene in tobacco use among racial, ethnic and low-
socioeconomic groups. “Smoking is a big problem among
the poor, the unemployed, those with less than 12 years of
education, the lower class and those who work in service and
blue-collar jobs. African Americans have the lowest median
income and the highest percentage of persons below poverty
level. We have to consider how to address the macro-social
context of tobacco use,” she said.
Tobacco use is not just harmful to the user, said Fagan.
“People still don’t think secondhand smoke is dangerous,”
she said. “Exposure to secondhand smoke in the home or in
the workplace can lead to tobacco-related illnesses. Of the
440,000 deaths that occur each year due to tobacco use,
approximately 40,000 are due to secondhand smoke.”
Fagan said that no matter how long a person has been
smoking, it’s never too late to quit. She suggested calling
1-800-QUIT-NOW or visiting www.smokefree.gov to find
resources to help. “Quitting smoking early in life decreases
the chances of smoking-related illnesses. You can’t go back
to zero risk, but you can reduce your chances of becoming
ill and dying,” she said.
Fagan, who takes time to meditate in the morning, hopes to
continue to help build research capacity in tobacco control.
“I truly enjoy mentoring young women scientists. It’s
important to pass on the torch,” she said. “If we can build
our research capacity, ultimately we can shift the paradigm
on how we address tobacco-related health disparities.”
Pebbles Fagan, Ph.D.,
M.P.H.
Healt h Scient ist in t he Tobacco Cont rol Research
Branch at t he Nat ional Cancer Inst it ut e
Residence: Hyat t sville, Maryland
“ Smoking is addict ive. Smokers need help,
but t hey may not know how t o quit or have
access t o resources t o help t hem quit .”
Tobacco Cont rol
1973: First U.S. f ederal rest rict ion on
smoking. Of f icials rule all airlines must creat e
nonsmoking sect ions.
Af rican American Hist ory Calendar
w w w.aet naaf ricanamericancalendar.com
STAGE OF LIFE – Young Adult
Educate
AETNA highlights smoking
risks and lung cancer issues
SUNDAY M ONDAY TUESDAY W EDNESDAY THURSDAY FRI DAY SATURDAY
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30
1968: Henry Lew is becomes f irst black musical
direct or of an American symphony orchest ra
— New Jersey Symphony.
1971: Samuel L. Gravely Jr. becomes f irst
Af rican American admiral in U.S. Navy.
1890: L.H. Jones pat ent s cor n harvest er.
1904: Charles R. Drew, w ho developed
process f or preserving blood plasma, bor n.
1967: Bill Cosby receives an Emmy Aw ard
f or his w ork in t he t elevision series I Spy.
1972: Act ivist Angela Davis acquit t ed
of all murder and conspiracy charges.
1987: Dr. M ae C. Jemison becomes f irst
Af rican American w oman ast ronaut .
1831: First annual People of Color convent ion
held in Philadelphia.
1917: Poet ess Gw endolyn Brooks, f irst black
t o w in t he Pulit zer Prize (poet ry, 1950), bor n.
1953: Supreme Court ruling bans discriminat ion
in Washingt on, D.C., rest aurant s.
1962: W.W. Brait hw ait e, poet , ant hologist
and lit erary crit ic, dies in New York Cit y.
1995: Lincoln J. Ragsdale, pioneer f ight er
pilot of World War II, dies.
1854: James August ine Healy, f irst black
Roman Cat holic bishop, is ordained a priest
in Not re Dame Cat hedral.
1964: Nelson M andela sent enced t o lif e
imprisonment by Sout h Af rican gover nment .
1963: M edgar W. Evers, civil right s leader,
assassinat ed in Jackson, M ississippi.
1967: Thurgood M arshall nominat ed t o
Supreme Court by President Lyndon Johnson.
Flag Day
1864: Congress rules equal pay f or all soldiers.
1927: George Washingt on Carver pat ent s
process of producing paint s and st ains.
1913: Dr. Ef f ie O’ Neal Ellis, f irst black w oman
t o hold an execut ive posit ion in t he American
M edical Associat ion, bor n.
1970: Kennet h A. Gibson elect ed mayor of
New ark, New Jersey, f irst Af rican American
mayor of a major East er n cit y.
1775: M inut eman Pet er Salem f ight s
in t he Bat t le of Bunker Hill.
Fat her’s Day
1942: Harvard Universit y medical st udent
Ber nard Whit f ield Robinson commissioned
as t he Navy’s f irst black of f icer.
1865: Blacks in Texas are not if ied of
Emancipat ion Proclamat ion, issued
in 1863. “ Junet eent h” marks t he event .
1953: Albert W. Dent of Dillard Universit y elect ed
president of t he Nat ional Healt h Council.
1945: Col. Benjamin O. Davis Jr. becomes f irst
black t o command an Army Air Corps base.
1897: William Barry pat ent s post marking
and cancelling machine.
1940: Sprint er Wilma Rudolph, w inner of t hree
gold medals at 1960 Summer Olympics, bor n.
1964: Carl T. Row an appoint ed direct or
of t he Unit ed St at es Inf ormat ion Agency.
1941: Franklin D. Roosevelt issues execut ive
order est ablishing Fair Employment Pract ices
Commission.
1975: Dr. Samuel Blant on Rosser becomes f irst
Af rican American cert if ied in pediat ric surgery.
1991: Supreme Court Just ice Thurgood
M arshall announces his ret irement .
1864: Fugit ive slave law s repealed by Congress.
1911: Samuel J. Bat t le becomes f irst black
policeman in New York Cit y.
1886: Phot ographer James Van Der Zee bor n. 1921: Charles S. Gilpin aw arded Spingar n
M edal f or his perf ormance in Eugene O’ Neill’s
Emperor Jones.
June 2006
FACT
By t he end of December
2003, 195,891 Af rican
Americans w it h AIDS had
died.
Human immunodef iciency virus (HIV) and acquired
immune def iciency syndrome (AIDS) have plagued
t he Unit ed St at es since 1981, and it s incidence and
prevalence have grow n rapidly among minorit y
populat ions ever since. How ever, many adolescent s
and young adult s st ill do not underst and t he disease
or t he at -risk behaviors t hat can lead t o it s t ransmission,
said Dr. Loret t a Sw eet Jemmot t , a prof essor of nursing
at t he Universit y of Pennsylvania and an expert on
HIV prevent ion.
“Often, young adults simply do not want to hear that their
behaviors can harm them,” Sweet Jemmott said. “They feel
invulnerable. I try to show them that they are not, and that
they need to protect themselves.”
Although African Americans make up 12.3 percent of the
U.S. population, they have accounted for 40 percent of the
almost 1 million AIDS cases diagnosed since the start of
the epidemic and approximately half of the 43,171 cases
diagnosed in 2003 alone, according to the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention.
AIDS is caused by HIV, the virus that destroys the body’s
ability to fight infections and certain cancers by killing or
impairing immune-system cells. According to the health
Web site BlackHealthCare.com, HIV infection can be
transmitted in a variety of ways – most commonly by
unprotected sexual contact with an infected partner. It is
also spread through contact with infected blood, drug
needles and syringes, as well as from infected mother to
fetus through pregnancy, birth or breast-feeding.
“Young adults should be told everything about HIV and
AIDS. We can’t sugarcoat it. We need to stop this epidemic
as a community,” said Sweet Jemmott, who is nationally
recognized for her award-winning programs and materials
that address major issues such as sex, teen pregnancy, HIV,
AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases, puberty and drugs.
These programs aim to reduce HIV-risk-related behavior
among African American adolescents and are implemented
internationally.
Sweet Jemmott said young people often do not understand
the links between behavior and consequences. “They need to
be shown how one behavior can affect another. They need
help figuring out how to be safe.
“We live in a difficult time today. Young adults are getting
bombarded with messages from media, clothing, their peers
and their partners – messages that encourage and glorify
unsafe sexual practices,” Sweet Jemmott said. “There are too
many negative messages out there. I try to get them to look
at the right message.”
Her message is clear: Go out and get tested. “Get tested
every six months. When it comes to HIV and AIDS, the
earlier the diagnosis the better. The faster you receive treat-
ment, the better your health outcomes will be,” she said.
Loret t a Sweet Jemmot t ,
Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N.
Prof essor of Nursing at t he Universit y of
Pennsylvania and expert on HIV prevent ion
Residence: Wynnewood, Pennsylvania
“ Young adult s should be t old everyt hing
about HIV and AIDS. We can’ t sugarcoat
it . We need t o st op t his epidemic as a
communit y.”
HIV and AIDS
Knowledge
The red ribbon became an int er nat ional symbol of AIDS
aw areness during 1991. The organizat ion Visual AIDS in New
York, t oget her w it h Broadw ay Cares and Equit y Fight s AIDS,
est ablished t he w earing of a red ribbon as somet hing t hat
signif ied support f or people living w it h HIV/AIDS.
Af rican American Hist ory Calendar
w w w.aet naaf ricanamericancalendar.com
STAGE OF LIFE – Young Adult
SUNDAY M ONDAY TUESDAY W EDNESDAY THURSDAY FRI DAY SATURDAY
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
1889: Frederick Douglass named U.S.
M inist er t o Hait i.
1872: Elijah M cCoy pat ent s f irst self -lubricat ing
locomot ive engine. The qualit y of his invent ions
helped coin t he phrase “ t he real M cCoy.”
1688: The Quakers in Germant ow n,
Pennsylvania, make f irst f ormal prot est
against slavery.
Independence Day
1900: Tradit ional birt hdat e of Louis
“ Sat chmo” Armst rong, jazz pioneer.
1892: Andrew J. Beard pat ent s rot ary engine.
1991: Nelson M andela elect ed president of
t he Af rican Nat ional Congress.
1957: Alt hea Gibson w ins w omen’s singles
t it le at Wimbledon, f irst black t o w in t ennis’s
most prest igious aw ard.
1948: Cleveland Indians sign pit cher
Leroy “ Sat chel” Paige.
1943: Faye Wat t let on, f irst black direct or
of Planned Parent hood, bor n.
2000: Venus Williams w ins w omen’s singles
championship at Wimbledon.
1893: Dr. Daniel Hale Williams perf orms
f irst successf ul open-heart operat ion.
1875: Educat or M ary M cLeod Bet hune,
f ounder of Bet hune-Cookman College, bor n.
1905: W.E.B. DuBois and William M onroe
Trot t er organize t he Niagara M ovement ,
a f orerunner of t he NAACP.
1937: Act or, comedian Bill Cosby bor n.
1949: Frederick M . Jones pat ent s cooling
syst em f or f ood t ransport at ion vehicles.
1965: Thurgood M arshall becomes f irst black
appoint ed U.S. solicit or general.
1951: George Washingt on Carver M onument ,
f irst nat ional park honoring a black, is dedicat ed
in Joplin, M issouri.
1867: M aggie Lena Walker, f irst w oman and
f irst black t o become president of a bank, born.
1822: Violet t e A. Johnson, f irst black w oman
t o pract ice bef ore t he U.S. Supreme Court , born.
1862: Ant i-lynching act ivist Ida B. Wells-
Bar net t bor n.
1959: Singer Billie Holiday dies. 1899: L.C. Bailey issued pat ent f or t he f olding bed.
1998: Af rican American Civil War Soldiers
M emorial dedicat ed, Washingt on, D.C.
1925: Paris debut of Josephine Baker,
ent ert ainer, act ivist and humanit arian.
1950: Black t roops (24t h Regiment ) w in f irst
U.S. vict ory in Korea.
1896: M ary Church Terrell elect ed f irst presi-
dent of Nat ional Associat ion of Colored Women.
1939: Jane M . Bolin of New York Cit y
appoint ed f irst black f emale judge.
1962: Jackie Robinson becomes f irst black
baseball player in t he major leagues induct ed
int o baseball’s Hall of Fame.
1807: Shakespearean act or Ira Aldridge bor n
in New York Cit y.
1916: Garret t M organ, invent or of t he gas
mask, rescues six people f rom gas-f illed
t unnel in Cleveland, Ohio.
1948: President Harry S. Truman issues
Execut ive Order 9981, ending segregat ion
in armed f orces.
1880: Alexander P. Ashbour ne pat ent s
process f or ref ining coconut oil.
1868: 14t h Amendment , grant ing blacks
f ull cit izenship right s, becomes part of
t he Const it ut ion.
1895: First Nat ional Conf erence of Colored
Women Convent ion held in Bost on.
July 2006
1822: James Varick becomes f irst bishop of
Af rican M et hodist Episcopal Zion Church.
1874: Rev. Pat rick Francis Healy inaugurat ed
president of Georget ow n Universit y,
Washingt on, D.C.
FACT
About 8.6 million
people in t he Unit ed
St at es have at least
one serious illness
caused by smoking.
It seems simple, and you’ ve no doubt heard it bef ore:
If you smoke, quit . If you don’ t smoke, don’ t st art .
“Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among
men and women; and African American men have the
highest lung cancer incidence and death rates, compared
to other racial and ethnic groups,” said Dr. Pebbles Fagan,
a health scientist in the Tobacco Control Research Branch
at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). “If you prevent
tobacco use, you prevent many of the cancers associated
with it.”
According to the NCI, smoking causes 87 percent of lung
cancers. “People’s lifestyles have a big impact on their quality
of life and longevity. A lot of people don’t know the lifestyle
risk factors they have – or how to modify those risk factors,”
said Fagan. “Smoking is addictive. Smokers need help, but
they may not know how to quit or have access to resources
to help them quit.”
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Surgeon
General’s Report states that smoking and tobacco use can
cause cardiovascular disease and stroke; respiratory disease;
and infertility; as well as leukemia, and cancers of the kidney,
pancreas, uterine cervix, larynx, oral cavity, pharynx,
esophagus, bladder and stomach.
Through her research, Fagan hopes to stimulate new ways
to intervene in tobacco use among racial, ethnic and low-
socioeconomic groups. “Smoking is a big problem among
the poor, the unemployed, those with less than 12 years of
education, the lower class and those who work in service and
blue-collar jobs. African Americans have the lowest median
income and the highest percentage of persons below poverty
level. We have to consider how to address the macro-social
context of tobacco use,” she said.
Tobacco use is not just harmful to the user, said Fagan.
“People still don’t think secondhand smoke is dangerous,”
she said. “Exposure to secondhand smoke in the home or in
the workplace can lead to tobacco-related illnesses. Of the
440,000 deaths that occur each year due to tobacco use,
approximately 40,000 are due to secondhand smoke.”
Fagan said that no matter how long a person has been
smoking, it’s never too late to quit. She suggested calling
1-800-QUIT-NOW or visiting www.smokefree.gov to find
resources to help. “Quitting smoking early in life decreases
the chances of smoking-related illnesses. You can’t go back
to zero risk, but you can reduce your chances of becoming
ill and dying,” she said.
Fagan, who takes time to meditate in the morning, hopes to
continue to help build research capacity in tobacco control.
“I truly enjoy mentoring young women scientists. It’s
important to pass on the torch,” she said. “If we can build
our research capacity, ultimately we can shift the paradigm
on how we address tobacco-related health disparities.”
Pebbles Fagan, Ph.D.,
M.P.H.
Healt h Scient ist in t he Tobacco Cont rol Research
Branch at t he Nat ional Cancer Inst it ut e
Residence: Hyat t sville, Maryland
“ Smoking is addict ive. Smokers need help,
but t hey may not know how t o quit or have
access t o resources t o help t hem quit .”
Tobacco Cont rol
1973: First U.S. f ederal rest rict ion on
smoking. Of f icials rule all airlines must creat e
nonsmoking sect ions.
Af rican American Hist ory Calendar
w w w.aet naaf ricanamericancalendar.com
STAGE OF LIFE – Young Adult
Educate
It seems simple, and you’ve no
doubt heard it before: If you
smoke, quit. If you don’t smoke,
don’t start.
“Lung cancer is the leading
cause of cancer death among
men and women: and African-
American men have the highest
lung cancer incidence and death
rates, compared to other racial and
ethnic groups,” said Dr. Pebbles
Fagan, a health scientist in the
Tobacco Control Research Branch
at the National Cancer Institute
(NCI).
“If you prevent tobacco use, you
prevent many of the cancers asso-
ciated with it.” According to the
NCI, smoking causes 87 percent
of lung cancers.
“People’s lifestyles have a big
impact on their quality of life and
longevity,” said Fagan. “Smoking
is addictive. Smokers need help,
but they may not know how to
quit or have access to resources to
help them quit.”
Te Centers for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention’s Surgeon
General’s Report states that smok-
ing and tobacco use can cause
cardiovascular disease and stroke;
respiratory disease; and infertility;
as well as leukemia, and cancers
of the kidney, pancreas, uterine
cervix, larynx, oral cavity, pharynx,
esophagus, bladder and stomach.
Trough research, Dr. Fagan
hopes to stimulate new ways to
intervene in tobacco use among
racial, ethnic and low socioeco-
nomic groups.
“Smoking is a big problem
among the poor, the unemployed,
and those with less than 12 years
of education. African-Americans
have the lowest median income
and the highest percentage of per-
sons below poverty level.”
Tobacco use is not just harm-
ful to the user, said Fagan. “People
still don’t think secondhand
smoke is dangerous. Of the
440,000 deaths that occur each
year due to tobacco use, approxi-
mately 40,000 are due to second-
hand smoke.”
No matter how long a person
has been smoking, it’s never too
late to quit, suggests Fagan and
calling 1-800-QUIT-NOW or vis-
iting www.smokefree.gov to fnd
resources can be helpful.
“Quitting smoking early in life
decreases the chances of smoking-
related illnesses. You can’t to back
to zero risk, but you can reduce
your chances of becoming ill and
dying,” Fagan said.
Dr. Fagan hopes to build
research capacity in tobacco
control. “I truly enjoy mentor-
ing young women scientists. It’s
important to pass the torch,” she
said.“If we can build our research
capacity, ultimately we can shift
the paradigm on how we address
tobacco-related health disparities.”
Diversity Works! | July 2006 | 1
Lashana,
Wal-Mart Associate,
Tutor
Keya,
Student
©2005 Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
At Wal-Mart, our commitment to diversity is fostered throughout the company and interwoven into all
of our Associate programs, recruitment efforts, supplier relations, charitable initiatives and community
efforts. We believe that success requires an environment where people are respected and valued, along
with a talented workforce that represents our diverse customer base. By embracing diversity, we are
providing each of our Associates with the opportunity to advance, succeed and personally develop
them in everything they do.
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. is proud to support the San Diego Urban League’s 33rd Annual Equal Opportunity
Awards Dinner and salute their commitment to “Making Diversity Work.”
We believe that valuing differences
is fundamental to our success.
®
18 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!
At Cox Communica-
tions, diversity is a
critical part of our
culture, values and
business operations. Here, diversity starts
with understanding, valuing and represent-
ing the varied needs, gifts and priorities of
employees, customers, communities and
suppliers. Tis diversity of people, products
and partners naturally stimulates a diver-
sity of perspectives, which helps create an
enviable company culture and enhance the
growth and vitality of all Cox stakeholders.
http://www.cox.com/CoxCareer/
“Our com-
mitment to
diversity is a commitment to individuals
and to the team. It’s about creating an en-
vironment in which all associates can fulfll
their potential without artifcial barriers,
and in which the team is made stronger by
the diverse backgrounds, experiences and
perspectives of individuals. It’s about giving
all of us — individually and together — the
best possible chance to succeed.” - Kenneth
D. Lewis, Chairman and Chief Executive
Ofcer, Bank of America.
We are proud of Bank of America’s
legacy as a leader in corporate diversity and
in equal employment opportunity. At Bank
of America, we work to foster an inclusive
corporate culture and an environment free
of discrimination or harassment.
http://www.bankofamerica.com/careers/
Cardinal Health is
the world´s leading
contract manufac-
turer of health and
nutrition products. We ofer a wide range of
products and services at multiple facilities with
standardized procedures and processes. Our in-
ternational presence allows easy access anywhere
in the world for your convenience - Americas,
Europe and Asia/Pacifc.
Cardinal Health ofers customers practi-
cal solutions to address the most critical issues
afecting health care: cost, time-to-market,
talent shortage and medication safety. We defne
diversity as openness and appreciation for ideas
that are diferent from one’s own. We see it as a
business imperative.
Cardinal Health is committed to a work-
force that is free of discrimination. We respect
diferences in culture, ethnicity, gender, sexual
orientation, and race. We are committed to
equal opportunity. To learn more about Cardinal
Health, visit us at: www.cardilan.com
Citigroup values a
work environment
where diversity is
embraced, where people are promoted on
their merits, and where people treat each
other with mutual respect and dignity.
Around the world, we are committed to be-
ing a company where the best people want
to work; where opportunities to develop are
widely available; where innovation and an
entrepreneurial spirit are valued; and where
a healthy work/life balance is encouraged.
www.citigroup.com
Join our
growing
retail
company.
We value the talents each employee brings
to Cost Plus World Market, and highly
encourage internal growth opportunities
within the organization. We ofer a world
of benefts to our employees including:
Medical/Dental/Vision, a generous
Employee Discount, 401k with matching
program, Paid Holidays, Sick Pay and
Vacation & many others. Cost Plus World
Market is an equal opportunity employer.
www.worldmarkets.com
Cubic’s
tradition of
innovation
continues into
the 21st century as Cubic’s cutting-edge research
and development holds promise for customers
worldwide. Today, the company’s two major seg-
ments - the Defense Group and the Transporta-
tion Systems Group - have become world leaders
in their respective industries with leading edge
technologies.
Since its founding in 1951, Cubic has helped
make a diference in the San Diego community
by supporting a wide range of nonproft organi-
zations whose issues and values are aligned with
corporate interests and employee values.
www.cubic.com
Enterprise
Rent A Car,
an $8 billion
international transportation leader, is the largest
rental car company in the U.S. in feet size and
locations. A candidate can expect to start as a
Sales Management Trainee learning all of the
facets of how to run our business, including
management, customer service, administration,
and sales/marketing. Te combination of our
100% promotion from within policy and the
upcoming expansions in the San Diego area
has created dynamic opportunities for growth.
Upon successful completion of the Management
Trainee Program, candidates have the opportu-
nity to grow into management positions within
their frst year with the company. If you are in-
terested in career opportunities with Enterprise,
apply online at www.enterprise.com.
Dee Dee Andrews, Regional Recruiter.
http://www.erac.com/recruit/
Directory
Diversity Works! Employer Partners
Te Federal Bureau of Investi-
gations is like no other career
choice you’ve explored. It’s challenging. Compel-
ling. Important. Whatever your background or
expertise, you will fnd an FBI future exception-
ally rewarding. Te work you perform will have
a daily impact on the nation’s security and the
quality-of-life for all citizens. Our mission is
to uphold the law through the investigation of
violations of federal criminal law; to protect the
United States from foreign intelligence activi-
ties; to provide leadership and law enforcement
assistance to federal, state, local and interna-
tional agencies; to provide the executive branch
with information relating to national security.
Join as a Special Agent or in a support role as
a Computer Specialist, Crime Scene Special-
ist, Linguist, Fingerprint Expert, Intelligence
Research Specialist, Laboratory Tech, Accounting
Professional, Laborer, Secretary, etc.
www.fbijobs.com
Considered the
founder of the
biotechnology industry, Genentech has been
delivering the promise of biotechnology for 30
years, using human genetic information to dis-
cover, develop, commercialize and manufacture
biotherapeutics that address signifcant unmet
medical needs. Today, Genentech is among the
world’s leading biotech companies, with multiple
products on the market for serious or life-threat-
ening medical conditions and over 40 projects in
the pipeline. With its strength in all areas of the
drug development process — from research and
development to manufacturing and commer-
cialization — Genentech continues to transform
innovative science into breakthrough therapies
for patients.
Genentech’s commitment to diversity is a
commitment to providing an environment where
each individual is respected, honored and sup-
ported, and is rewarded on the basis of personal
achievement and contribution. (760) 231-2440
directly at: www.gene.com/careers/
Hawthorne
Machinery Co.
has been the
exclusive Caterpillar dealer serving San Diego
County since 1956. Te company’s territory also
includes Northern Baja California, the Hawai-
ian Islands, Tonga, Samoa, Guam and Saipan.
Hawthorne Machinery Co. ofers a complete
line of new and used Caterpillar® and other
quality brand equipment, service contracts, feld
service, repairs, custom fabrication, CAT factory
authorized engine service and rebuilding, and
the most modern service and testing facilities.
We currently have 23 positions available. Visit:
www.hawthorn.cat.com for details.
American Airlines and American Eagle
carriers serve almost 250 cities all over the
globe with more than 3,600 fights per day.
Earning our title as the largest airline in the
United States and the largest regional air
carrier in the world has resulted in a history
rich in achievement. With a combined feet
of over 850 aircraft, the best employees in
the world, the oldest and largest frequent
fyer program - AAdvantage®, and Te
TurnAround plan, we will achieve our
objective of being the world’s leading
airline.
http://www.aacareers.com
AIG, the largest of
United States underwrit-
ers for commercial and
industrial insurance and the most extensive
international property-casualty network,
including personal lines and mortgage guar-
anty insurance. Life insurance and retire-
ment services and the most extensive global
network of any life insurer, AIG is the most
proftable U.S. life insurance organization.
and a retirement services franchise that in-
cludes leadership positions in the U.S. fxed
and variable annuity markets and a growing
international network.
http://www.aig.com/gateway/home
Diversity Works! | July 2006 | 1
For information on becoming a Diversity Works! Employer Partner
Call (619) 266-6244 or email diversityworks@sdul.org
At Kyocera
Wireless
Corp. we
value exploration, innovation and achieve-
ment in our employees. We take pride
in our diverse work force and provide an
internal climate that encourages a global
approach to business. By matching the most
talented individuals with the resources they
need to succeed, we’ve created an environ-
ment that promotes change, growth and
creativity. Competitive compensation and
benefts teamed with exceptional training
are available to those with the skills and
motivation to make a diference.
www.kyocera.com/kai
Tink core values. Look
for a company that be-
lieves workforce diversity is
a major contributor to success. IBM has been the
leader in corporate workforce diversity since its
founding. Did you know that we employ special-
ists dedicated to recruiting women, minorities
and people with disabilities? Visit us and learn
more at:
http://www-03.ibm.com/employment/
Integrits
Corporation is
a progressive
Information Technology (IT) services frm based
in San Diego, California. We provide high-tech-
nology products and services to the commercial
and defense markets. Come JOIN & GROW
with us! Integrits Corporation is a leader in
state-of-the-art Navy C4I, Command & Control
and Weapon Systems Integration. We have many
challenging and rewarding opportunities avail-
able to those individuals that strive to succeed
and excel. We are currently ofering the following
job opportunities:
C41 Test Engineers & Analysts
TADIL Communications Engineers
Information Assurance Project Leads
IT Business Consultants
IT Infrastructure Analysts
IT Administrators & Analysts
Visit our website at: www.integrits.com
Lockheed
Martin is a
corporation
of 125,000 employees engaged in some of the
most important projects in the U.S. and around
the world. We live and work as good citizens
in communities where employees take special
pride in volunteering to serve for the betterment
of all. As such, the Lockheed Martin team is
naturally diverse—encompassing people of all
shapes, colors, perspectives, ages, religions and
nationalities.
We have varied backgrounds, opinions,
lifestyles and talents, and we see the world in
many diferent ways based on our uniqueness
as individuals. Tough diferent, we share
one thing in common. We are linked in some
way to the same enterprise. Collectively, we
contribute to missions of profound signifcance
to the security and advancement of the world.
We create products and solutions that improve
communities, save lives and protect principles
like liberty and tolerance that we hold so dear.

www.lockheedmartin.com
We understand
that a sound
diversity
program is a
critical component of our values and our success.
In order to realize our vision of being the best
worldwide provider of higher-value stafng
services and the centre for quality employment
opportunities, we must continuously dare
to innovate and be pioneers. Tat means
refecting the diversity in our markets and in our
communities.

www.manpowerprofessional.com/sandiego/
National University
is committed
to maintaining
a high quality,
diverse work force
representative of the populations we serve. It
is our policy to provide equal employment
opportunities for all applicants and employees.
Te University does not unlawfully discriminate
on the basis of race, color, religion, sex
(including pregnancy, childbirth, or related
medical conditions), national origin, ancestry,
age, physical disability, mental disability, medical
condition, family care status, veteran status,
marital status, sexual orientation, or any other
basis protected by state or federal laws.
http://www.nu.edu/
Te Padres believe that all
persons are entitled to equal
employment opportunity and
the Club does not discriminate
against qualifed employees
or applicants because of race,
color, religion, sex, pregnancy, national origin,
ancestry, citizenship, military status, age, marital
status, sexual orientation, gender identifcation,
physical disability, mental disability, medical
condition, or any other characteristic protected
by federal, state or local law. Equal employment
opportunity will be extended to all persons in all
aspects of the employer-employee relationship,
including recruitment, hiring, upgrading, train-
ing, promotion, transfer, discipline, layof, recall,
and termination.

www.padres.com
Qualcomm innova-
tions refect the smart
and creative individuals and teams that have
made us the leader in our industry. Many of
those innovations turn into patents—over 3,000
issued or pending. We’re looking
for thinkers with the desire and
initiative to make an impact on
our company and the wireless
evolution. We thrive on ideas and perspective
evident in a diverse and multinational workforce.
Diversity plays an integral role in our global
viewpoint and provides an atmosphere that fos-
ters the kind of free-fow of ideas that has made
us a technology leader. By communicating with
people from diverse backgrounds and groups
all over the world, we engage in a dialogue that
drives the wireless communication’s industry. We
currently have over 890 positions available glob-
ally of which 641 are available in San Diego.
Apply directly at: https://jobs.qualcomm.com/
For 37 years, Science
Applications International
Corporation (SAIC), the
nation’s largest employee
owned engineering and research company, has
worked on solving some of the most complex
technical problems facing our nation and the
world – challenges in national and homeland
security, energy, the environment, space,
telecommunications, health care, and logistics.
Our continuous growth and our success,
providing world-class systems integration,
information technology and eSolutions to
customers, worldwide, is a credit to our staf
– many of whom are the best and the brightest
in their felds. And we help our employees
stay the best and the brightest with highly
praised training, education, and professional
development programs.Tere are currently 105
positions available in San Diego in the following
categories:
Apply at www.saic.com/career/fnd.html
Our philosophy is
to provide a working
environment where
employees can expand
professionally and be
rewarded for achieve-
ment. National Bank is
a full-service bank and a catalyst for economic
development in under served communities.
www.neighborhoodnationalbank.com
At Kaiser
Permanente, we
value the rich
diversity of our
organization and aspire always to demonstrate
respect for the uniqueness of each individual. We
encourage each contribution to the establishment
of an open, inclusive environment that supports
and empowers our employees.
www.kaiserpermanentejobs.org/
“Prepare to become Inspired”
http://kgim.blackportal.com
Te world of
Loews Hotels.
It’s a world
of places, people and services that make us
truly unique. Loews Hotels is a collection
of unique, one of a kind hotels with distinct
personalities. Each is high in quality, fun,
and is unpretentious, a great value and
consistently delivers warm friendly service.
As a company we care about our guests, our
community and our employees. We want to
be a “home away from home” by catering to
discerning business and leisure travelers and
host to the most important business, politi-
cal and industry association events.
Contact us: Loews Hotels, 667 Madison
Ave., New York, NY 10021 (212) 521.2000
http://www.loewshotels.com/
0 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!
Diversity Works! Employer Partners
Directory
As a global
corporation,
Edison Inter-
national makes
every efort to ensure that our suppliers and
work force refect our multicultural marketplace.
As a community partner, Edison International
works closely with low-income, minority, and
women’s groups to advance their employment
opportunities, educational needs, and economic
development. Edison International’s commit-
ment to diversity and equal opportunity is evi-
dent throughout the organization. Minority and
female representatives currently comprise 25% of
Edison International’s Board of Directors.Edison
International’s largest operating company, South-
ern California Edison, promotes equal oppor-
tunity and diversity with leadership programs,
diversity recruiting, and supplier diversity goals.
Te result of these eforts is evident in SCE’s
ranking, for the sixth consecutive year.
www.edisonjobs.com
Te Scripps Research
Institute is one of the
largest, private, non-
proft research organiza-
tions in the U.S. It has
attained recognition as
a center of excellence in
a highly focused branch
of research, the nexus of the structure of
biological molecules and their cellular func-
tions with chemical synthesis.

www.scripps.edu
SDSU
Foundation
has been
organized to
function as a self-contained private corpo-
ration, separate from the University, yet
integrated into the goals and programs of
San Diego State University (the University)
and responsible for the accomplishment of
certain University objectives. SDSU Foun-
dation is responsible for many activities that
require fnancial support not provided by
the State. Tese activities occur in all three
areas of University life including: instruc-
tion, research and community service.

www.foundation.sdsu.edu
Solar Turbines
is a world lead-
ing producer of
mid-range industrial gas turbines for use in
power generation, natural gas compression,
and pumping systems. It provides full prod-
uct support, equipment supply, fnancing,
plus installation and operation and mainte-
nance capability. http://esolar.cat.com/solar/
At Sony, we believe
that diversity is key to
our competitive advantage and we value the
collective strengths of all our employees.
We are proud to be an Equal Opportunity
Employer (EOE), with an unwavering
commitment to Afrmative Action (AA)
for Minorities (M), Women (F), Individu-
als with Disabilities (D), and Veterans (V).
www.sonyjobs.com
Te San Diego
Sherif’s Depart-
ment is looking
for the best and
brightest individuals – those who have the
aptitude and sense of commitment - those
who want to help their community, and
who want to make a diference. Te San
Diego Sherif’s Department’s goal is to
provide the highest level of professional
public service to the wide range of ethnic
and culturally diverse groups that make up
San Diego.
www.sdsherif.net/jobs/
Te ideal
candidate for
the San Diego
Union Tribune has the following attributes:
Punctual, Customer Service Oriented, Team
Player, Can Do Attitude, Media related
experience preferred, but not required
Areas of focus: Custodial, Customer Service,
Clerical/Data Entry, Sales Support, Account
Managers, Pressroom Helpers, And More.
We respect diversity and embrace inclusion.
Cindy Nguyen, Sr. Recruiter

www.signonsandiego.com
Diversity is not
only a corporate
commitment
to respect the
diferences
among people,
but also the recognition that those diferences
are a strength. Diversity is a source of power
that has a positive efect on our customers and
helps us to make the most of business opportuni-
ties. People are at the heart of Sempra Energy’s
strategic diversity policy: people committed to
taking bold action to create a work environment
where competence is recognized and celebrated,
without respect to gender, race, age, sexual
orientation, national origin, physical abil-
ity, religious beliefs, personal prefer-
ences or life experiences.
www.sdge.com/careers or
www.sempra.com/careers.htm
Recipient of the Urban League’s
2005 President’s Award For Diversity
San Diego
National Bank
has often refected
the characteristics
of a big family — quite extraordinary for
a bank. But, it is not so extraordinary,
considering the type of staf, management
and board of directors that SDNB has
attracted and enjoyed. Our success is a
direct result of the type of customers our
company serves. We have been very grateful
for the support and loyalty our customers
have brought us.

www.sdnb.com
For over 50 years, Te Urban League of
San Diego County (ULSDC) has assisted
many of its citizens in preparing for and
fnding meaningful employment. For most of
that time, you, our area employer, has assisted
us along the way. And now more than ever,
your cooperation is needed to help us meet
our mission.
Tat’s why we’re asking you to become a
Diversity Works! Partner (DWP).
According to research by the Hudson
Institute, a nationally recognized social
Diversity Work’s Employer Partners
are also Social Venture Partners (SVP). As it
applies here, SVP’s are employers/profession-
als looking for a way to invest their time,
trends think tank, within the next 10 to 15
years, changing demographics, technological
advances, and economic globalization will
shape the workplace. Te United States work
force will continue to expand, although at a
much slower rate. However, its composition
will shift to a more
balanced distribution
by age, sex, race or
ethnicity.
Keeping pace
with these changing
workplace dynamics
-- while implementing
the mandate of our
mission to assist
African-Americans and other under served
to achieve social and economic equality
-- ULSDC has strategically positioned itself to
better serve San Diego through our Diversity
Works! Initiative.
Trough Diversity Works! we help you
fnd, and if necessary, develop scarce and
diverse human resources. For example, the
online Diversity Job Bank (www.ulsdcjobs.
net) has attracted over 1000 job seekers. And
the students who attend our workshops
undergo behavior modifcation training in
conjunction with our
award-winning work
readiness and diversity
training, producing
outstanding results.
Tis combination
produces employees
who are truly work
ready. Consequently, as
our employer investor-
partner, you will beneft not only from fnding
highly qualifed job candidates in our job
bank, but prospective employees who attend
our workshops are also prepared attitudinally
to enter the workplace.
We are asking you to invest just $1200 a
year. Tis is not a donation, but an investment
and a smart business move. It will provide
you with unlimited posting/reviews at the
Job Bank, mention in our Diversity Works!
magazine, coverage as a featured employer
on our web site, and discounts on upcoming
career fairs.
To facilitate answering your questions,
we conduct monthly luncheon seminars to
explain the benefts of the DWP initiative
here at Te League’s corporate ofce at 720
Gateway Center Dr., San Diego, CA, 92102.
Please RSVP to Barbara Webb, Deputy
Director, (619) 266-6232. Space is limited
and for lunch, we need to hear from you.
Here’s to the continued success of our
social venture partnership, which leads to the
next subject...
“We’re asking you to
become a Diversity Works!
Partner (DWP)...as an
investment and a smart
business move.”
As one of over 57,000
employers in the region
we’re counting on your
support to help make
Diversity Work! here
in San Diego.
Membership as Diversity Works! Employer Partner brings social benefts...
F
Diversity Works! | July 2006 | 1
available to promote your company’s
diversity eforts via Te League’s media
channels
17. eligibility to compete for the Presi-
dent’s Award for Diversity and attendance
at Te League’s annual Equal Opportunity
Awards dinner gala in the fall.
18. participation at our monthly
Employers Diversity Networking luncheons,
usually featuring a 30 minute presentation
by a diversity professional on diversity
related topics of the day.
19. national recognition for being
proactive in diversity.
20. access to over 150,000 people of
color via our Employment Network.
21. socially connect with communities
of color and enhance your cultural compe-
tency and awareness.
22. meet your company’s eeo require-
ments for outreach and involvement
(DOL-OFCCP).
For information on becoming a Diversity Works! Employer Partner
Call (619) 266-6244 or email diversityworks@sdul.org
Wells Fargo
has understood
the importance
of both hiring
and retaining a diverse workforce and serving a
diverse community for more than 150 years.
Our Diversity Mission:
“Wells Fargo Team Members should expect to
work in an environment where each person feels
valued for individual traits, skills and talents,
and has the opportunity to fulfll ambitions and
contribute to the success of the company.” From
senior managers to tellers, 62% of our Team
Members are women, and 29% of our Team
Members are minorities. While these numbers
are positive, we are always working to increase
our diversity. We’re focused on recruiting,
training, and retaining the best and brightest
people today to join our diverse workplace.
https://www.wellsfargo.com/employment/
We believe that the
broad diversity of our
workforce, customer
base and the communi-
ties we serve provide
a clear opportunity to create competitive
advantage. We value and respect the unique
characteristics, skills, and experiences that
employees bring to the workplace. On a
daily basis, diversity and inclusion is evident
at all levels in the company in the way we
listen and respond to our customers, our
community and each other.

http://www.thehartford.com/
At Starbucks,
diversity
is a way of
life. It is the
core of our culture and a foundation for the
way we conduct business. Our goal is to
attract and retain a workforce that refects
the world, to develop policies and practices
that fully utilize the human potential and to
create hopes, fulfll dreams and build equity
in our partners, neighborhoods and
communities. www.starbucks.
com/jobs/
Viejas ofers its
employees an
exciting work
environment with
competitive wages
and benefts including:
·Holidays Accrued vacation and sick leave
·Medical, dental, and chiropractic
·Discounted employee meals
·Retirement Plan (401k)
·Quarterly Incentive Plan
If you are ofered employment with Viejas
you will be required to complete an Em-
ployment/Gaming License Application and
pass a pre- employment drug and alcohol
test and background screening.
Winner of the Urban League’s
2005 President’s Award for Diversity
Sycuan is more
than just a business
enterprise. Sycuan is
a community of people working together
toward a common goal. Whether you work
in our beautiful, state-of-the-art Casino or
become a staf member in one of our other
enterprises, you will be part of the Sycuan
family. In addition to the Casino, Sycuan
operates a Fire Department, Medical Clinic,
Dental Clinic, Day Care Center, Tribal
Police Department, Learning Center, and
Kumeyaay Community College. We cur-
rently employ over 2,500 people in a variety
of positions, including casino operations,
food service, security, accounting, facilities,
and landscaping, just to name a few.
http://www.sycuan.com/sycuan_casino/
human_resources.html
Our commitment
to a Diverse
Employee Base
It is our goal to recruit, select and retain
the most qualifed employees who represent
all segments of the communities we serve
and support. We cultivate a highly talented
workforce by valuing people for who they
are and what they can contribute.
We are the
world’s
largest global
transportation company, operating in more
than 200 countries and territories and
employing 370,000 people worldwide.
Te company’s commitment to its
employees has been recognized by several
notable publications including America’s
Best Part-Time Job (Your Money
magazine), America’s Best Companies for
Minorities (FORTUNE magazine) and
Best Company Benefts (MONEY
magazine.)
https://ups.managehr.com/
Union Bank of
California is proud
to play an integral
role in the many
diverse communities we serve. Our bankers have
the language and cultural skills to help you with
your personal and business banking needs every
step of the way. We make a concerted efort to
support these communities both as a fnancial
institution and as a good neighbor.At Union
Bank of California, our people are our greatest
asset. Our employees come from many difer-
ent backgrounds, bringing with them diferent
experiences and perspectives, which are the key
to our success. We strive to build an employee
group that understands and refects the diverse
communities we serve through our 319 of-
fces. Our eforts have been recognized by the
U.S. Department of Labor, as well as Fortune
Magazine, who, for two years in a row, ranked
us among the top ten companies for diversity in
the workplace. For more information about our
company’s history, visit our website.
Visit: http://cce.uboc.com/ to learn more.
skills and resources in under served communi-
ties with a goal to achieve a specifc outcome.
Our SVP’s work through Te League to
make a hands-on diference. As a Diversity
Works! SVP you help to deliver programs and
services and build the organizational capacity
of the agency.
In turn, we are able to leverage your
investment by ofering needed services to
constituents throughout the county in the
areas of education, employment and housing.
Corporate membership with Te Urban
League of San Diego County for one year
includes the following benefts:
1. unlimited job posting and resume
reviews in the Diversity Job Bank for one
year (www.ulsdcjobs.net)
2. Featured employer in the DW! Job
Bank for the entire year.
3. corporate logo displayed in special
DW! Partners section on the website
4. your oWn Web page on our site featur-
ing your company’s profle and current jobs.
5. live links to other job boards such as
monster.com or careerbuilder.com, which
automatically pulls the jobs posted on these
other job boards into your profle with us.
No need to enter the same jobs in several
places.
6. Five Featured jobs
each year in the Job
Bank.
7. listing in the dW!
Employer Partners direc-
tory in the magazine
8. possible Feature
articles in the DW!
magazine about your company’s diversity
outreach eforts.
9. your company proFile and job listings
(5) in DW! Employment and Career Guide,
a monthly mailing to 300 afnity groups.
10. Free booth at quarterly Mini-Career
Fairs held at Te League’s corporate ofce,
on a frst come frst served basis.
11. discounts on booths at the annual
Career Fair, and at Career Zones held in
conjunction with other civic events such
as the Heritage Day Parade which usually
draws 10,000.
12. “hot job” notices
sent out via our
Employment Network
email distribution
system.
13. direct marketing
to the Urban Market
via our DW! Employ-
ment Guide and email
blasts.
14. listing as an investor in the DW!
Work Readiness Workshops class materials.
15. directly recruit graduates from
workshops and receive invitations to
graduation ceremonies.
16. other promotion vehicles may be
...while Social Venture Partners unite for diversity through League programs
“We treat our
corporate members
like investors.”
| July 2006 | Diversity Works!
The 100 Black Men
of San Diego
An afliate of the
100 Black Men of
America, this group
improves the quality of life of San Diego
city residents we serve. Our programs
enhance educational and economic oppor-
tunities for African-Americans, and African
American youth in particular.
Afnity Group Partners
Afnity Groups
Greater San Diego
Blacks In Government
San Diego Chapter
Te Greater San Diego
Chapter of Blacks in
Government (BIG), as a
501(C)3, non-proft, civil rights organiza-
tion, is dedicated to eliminating discrimina-
tion and racist acts in all forms, against ALL
people, but especially African-Americans,
in all government agencies; whether it is
a city, county, state or federal government
agencies.
NAACP Metro
San Diego Branch
Te mission of the Na-
tional Association for the
Advancement of Colored
People is to ensure the
political, educational, social and economic
equality of rights of all persons and to elimi-
nate racial hatred and racial discrimination.
NAACP Metro
North County Branch
Te mission of the Na-
tional Association for the
Advancement of Colored
People is to ensure the political, education-
al, social and economic equality of rights
of all persons and to eliminate racial hatred
and racial discrimination.
National Society of
Black Engineers
Alumni Extension
NSBE’s mission is to
increase the number of
culturally responsible African-American
engineers who excel academically, succeed
professionally and positively impact the
community.
Directory
The Afnity Group Partners below work closely with The League through the Employment Network by referring their constituents to our job bank.
Definition: An affinity group is a group of people who share interests, issues, and a common bond or background, and offer support for
each other. These groups can be formed between friends, people from the same community, workplace or organization. We outreach to all affinity
groups to deliver the word about our Diversity Works! programs and opportunities. Affinity Groups can represent a narrow or broad definition of
a dimension of diversity: African-American, Asian, Indian, Hispanic, women, veterans, the disabled, the gay and lesbian communities, to name
a few. In fact the list is endless. Become an Affinity Partner by joining today. We’ll add your group to our distinguished list of members.
Now that you’ve made it and are
part of the professional business
world, it’s time to give back to
your community and help our
young kids move forward.
URBAN LEAGUE OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY YOUNG PROFESSIONALS
Visit www.ulsdc.org
to learn how you can join
Te League of Young Professionals.
Students In
Free Enterprise
Te Mission of SIFE is to
provide college students
the best opportunity to
make a diference and
develop leadership, teamwork and commu-
nication skills through learning, practicing
and teaching the principles of free enter-
prise. Visit: www.sdsife.com
Warm Spirit
Independent
Consultants
Warm Spirit is a culturally diverse, self-care
network marketing company, specializing
in spa-quality, aromatherapy products and
herbal remedies. Having surpassed $14
million in sales in 2005, Warm Spirit was
recently voted “Emerging Company of the
Year” by Black Enterprise. “Te heart and
soul of Warm Spirit is empowering people
to care for themselves and to nurture their
potential within.”
Greater San
Diego Business
Development
Council
Its mission is to
expand business opportunities for minor-
ity business enterprises and create mutually
benefcial links between corporate members
and minority business enterprises. Te ulti-
mate outcome is to add economic value to
the supply chain while increasing economic
opportunities for the minority business
community.
Visit us at: www.gsdbdc.org
Diversity Works! | July 2006 |
For information on becoming a Diversity Works! Afnity Partner
Call (619) 266-6244 or email diversityworks@sdul.org
100 Black Men of San Diego
African American Business Women of Vision
African American Chamber of Commerce
African American Writers & Artists, Inc. SD
Alpha Chi Omega
Alpha Delta Pi (University of San Diego)
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority
Alpha Phi
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity
Alpha Phi Gamma Sorority
Alpha Pi Sigma Sorority
Alpha Psi Rho Fraternity
Alpha Tau (San Diego City College)
American Indian Science and Engineering Society
Asian American Journalists Association
Asian Business Association of San Diego
Asian Pacifc Islander Caucus (SDSU)
Association of African American Educators
Assn. of Hispanic Advertising Agencies
Assn of Latino Professionals in Finance and Accounting
Barrio Station
Beta Omega Phi Fraternity
Beta Theta Pi (University of San Diego)
Blackdiego.com
BlackPortal.com
Black Contractors Association (BCA)
Blacks in Government
Black Men United
Brothers Inc.
California Chicano News Media Association
California Council for the Humanities
Centro Cultural de la Raza
Chicano Federation
CNET-Community Network
Conference on Asian and Pacifc Islander Leadership
Delta Sigma Psi Sorority
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority
Delta Tau Delta (University of San Diego)
Diversity Training University International
Earl B. Gillim Bar Association
Federal Asian Pacifc American Council
Filipino American Lawyers of San Diego
Gamma Phi Beta
Gamma Phi Epsilon Fraternity
Gamma Zeta Alpha Fraternity
Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement (HACE)
Hispanic American Chamber of Commerce
Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility
HispanicBusiness.com
Hispanic Employee Council of Foreign Afairs Agencies
Hispanic Employment Program Managers Council
Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards
Hispanic National Bar Association
Jack & Jill Club of San Diego
Kappa Alpha Theta
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Lambda Chi Alpha
Lambda Sigma Gamma Sorority
Lambda Theta Alpha Sorority
Latino Builders Association
Latin Business Owners of America
League of United Latin American Citizens
Links Incorporated
Local Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA)
MANA
Million Man March Local Organizing Committee
Multicultural Convention Services Network
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
(NAACP- San Diego)
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
(NAACP- North County)
National Association of the Advancement of Hispanic People
(NAAHP)
National Society of Black Engineers -SDSU
National Society of Black Engineers
National Association of Black Journalists
National Association of Colleges Employers
National Association of Hispanic Journalists
National Association of Hispanic Nurses
National Association of Social Workers
National Black MBA Association
National Black Law Students Association
National Council of La Raza
National Council of Social Studies
National Organization for the Professional Development of
Black Chemists & Chemical Engineers (NOBCChe)
The National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Execu-
tives (NOBLE)
National Pan-Hellenic Council
National Sales Network (NSN)
National SER
National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)
National Society of Hispanic MBAs
Native American Journalists Association
Native Indian Education Association
The New Leaders
Nu Alpha Kappa Fraternity
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity
Organization of Chinese American
Pan African Association of America
Pan Helenic Association of San Diego
Pan Asian Lawyers of San Diego (PALSD)
Pazzaz Inc.
Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity
Project Employment-Plus
RAYBEN (Raytheon Black Employees Net)
San Diego Association of Black Journalists
San Diego Black Nurses’ Association Inc.
San Diego Black Health Association
San Diego City Black Employees Assn.
San Diego Black Pages.com
San Diego Black Storytellers Assn.
Sigma Alpha Zeta Sorority
Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority
Sigma Lambda Beta Fraternity
Sigma Lambda Gamma Sorority
Sigma Phi Epsilon (University of San Diego)
Sigma Phi Omega Sorority
Sigma Theta Psi Sorority
The Sisterfriend Society
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
Trans Africa Forum
UCSD Black Staf Association
UJIMA Network (UCSD)
United Sorority and Fraternity Council
Upsilon Kappa Delta Sorority
Urban Economic Corporation
Urban League of San Diego County
Urban League of San Diego County Guild
Urban League of San Diego County Young Professionals
The Urban Financial Services Coalition - San Diego
Women in Technology International
Women Inc.
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority
Afnity Groups in San Diego
Afnity Groups
Directory


4 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!


1. Retail Salespersons
2. Food Prep & Service/Fast Food
3. Cashiers
4. Software Engineers, Applications
5. Customer Service
6. Computer Support Specialists
7. Janitors/Ex Maids/Housekeeper
8. Registered Nurses
9. Ofce Clerks, General
10. Operations Managers
Source: California Employment
Development Department
www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/

By Eileen Chalmin
To move or not to move, that is the
question and there’s nothing noble about it.
It’s truly a daunting, overwhelming decision
whether or not to relocate and you will live
with the repercussions of this choice for a
long time.
Tere are so many unknowns and chal-
lenges, so be as thoughtful and prepared as
possible.Tis is not a time to take unnec-
essary chances; it is a time to do all your
homework before you make that decision
Informed is the key word here. Getting
informed takes time and efort, but do meet
the challenge. Investigate everything about
the company, job ofer, growth opportu-
nities, geographic area, support agencies,
transportation options, and other factors.
For an individual with a disability, it
is even more important to investigate all
your options before you actually accept a
new job, especially in another city, state, or
country. I have always cautioned against
disclosure about your disability unless
and until it is necessary, but in the case of
relocation, it is critical you not only disclose,
but investigate all the facts.
a good Fit First...make sure the job
is a good ft as this career opportunity will
provide your fnancial support and you
Move on in your career: straight talk
want it to last. Find out
about growth opportuni-
ties and the willingness
and ability of the company
or government agency to
accommodate your disabil-
ity. Call the local Chamber
of Commerce and ask a
representative to send you
information on transporta-
tion, civic, social, and local
agencies dedicated to your
disability as well as housing
options. Ask the representa-
tive about your proposed
company and if the employer has a reputa-
tion for being disability friendly.
As best as you can, fgure out the physi-
cal requirements of your new job and what
accommodations you may need to perform
all the tasks. Contact the local agencies
that deal with your disability and enlist
their help. If you need assistance on the
job to execute certain tasks, arrange these
accommodations with the human resources
department in advance as well. Te com-
pany may be able to help you rearrange
workstations, improve accessibility, and
even purchase equipment, but, if possible,
utilize local and state agencies that have
experience in this area to help you with the
transition.
planning skills...your investigative
and planning skills do not end with the job
you’re making a total life change for. Te
time spent in the community as well as life
after 5 pm are equally important. Take a
trip to your future location to spend a few
days checking out life after work. Scout
out the neighborhoods that feel most
comfortable, talk to strangers, and get a
sense of the area. Meet with realtors and
explore living options.
Take of those rose-colored glasses and
look around with crystal clear vision. Each
state, city, and country ofers diferent
internal structures and programs, especially
for individuals with disabilities. Te U.S.,
in general, is probably the most disability-
friendly country with greater accessibility
and more agencies geared toward helping
overcome barriers.
Get as smart as you can before embark-
ing on your move. Life is full of tradeofs,
but don’t trade for less than you already
have or less than you ultimately need.
Don’t let the unknown keep you from
personal growth and accepting new chal-
lenges; go for it, but do it knowing you’ve
done all your homework so you are able to
make the right choice.
I want to wish you a bon voyage. Enjoy
the journey, good luck, and let me know
how it works out.
Top 10 occupations
with the greatest
job growth in
San Diego
County:
As a minority, it is essential to
recognize the important role you play in
the workplace now and in the future. As
more and more employers begin to reach
out and embrace diversity, your individual
behavior is seen as a refection of the group
you represent.
To assist you in becoming “diversity-
friendly,” Te Urban League will begin
ofering job seekers a 40-hour Work-Readi-
ness Seminar during the summer of 2006.
Te seminar, sponsored by Diversity
Works! Employer Partners, is a “Fast Track”
solution aimed at assisting jobseekers
in fne-tuning their job hunting and
presenting skills. Te agenda consists of the
following thirteen tracks:
• Track 1: Breaking Barriers
• Track 2: Te Wizard
• Track 3: Conditioning
• Track 4: Your Self-Image
• Track 5: How Your Self-Image is Built
• Track 6: Building Self-Esteem
• Track 7: Comfort Zones
• Track 8: Motivating Yourself
• Track 9: Self-Esteem & Performance
• Track 10: Creating Positive Motivation
• Track 11: Shaping Your Future
• Track 12: Making It Work
• Track 13: Staying on Track
All attendees will receive a seminar
workbook containing company profles on
participating Diversity Works! Employer
Partners which includes information on the
types of candidates they are looking for. In
addition, students will receive a copy of the
Diversity Works! magazine where they will
fnd valuable employment information.
Class capacity is 40 students per seminar.
Please call 619-263-8196 or email diversity-
works@sdul.org for registration.
Work-readiness
seminars begin
summer 006
Career Development
H O U R S O F O P E R A T I O N
MO N D A Y T H R U F R I D A Y
8 : 3 0 A M- 1 1 : 3 0 A M

F O R MO R E I N F O R MA T I O N
P L E A S E C A L L
( 6 1 9 ) 2 6 3 - 8 1 9 6
7 2 0 G A T E WA Y C E N T E R D R I V E
S A N D I E G O C A 9 2 1 0 2
( 6 1 9 ) 2 6 3 - 8 1 9 6
Jumpstart
Is a Computer-Based AdultBasic Educa-
tion Service operated by the Urban
League of San Diego County designed to
assist individuals in improving their basic
skills in reading, writing, math, English,
science, and more.
Jumpstart provides adult basic educa-
tion and literacy enhancement, coupled
with job training, job placement and
support services.
This program is open to the public.
Call 619.263.8196
For more information
Adult Basic Education Service
DiversityWorks!
Funded by
Employer Partners
and the




Diversity Works! | July 2006 |
For information on the Diversity Works! Job Bank, call (619) 266-6244 or email diversityworks@sdul.org
out and should lead
to a deeper level of
satisfaction with your
eforts and increase
your chances of
obtaining a second interview.
Keep in mind that career fairs should be just one small
part of your entire job search process; however, they can be
a successful part.
Will these ten strategies guarantee you success? Of
course not, but by following these strategies, you will
be in position to strategically
place yourself above many of
the other job-seekers who are
attending the fair.
1. Pre-register Some
career fairs allow job seekers
to pre-register for the event,
which usually includes sub-
mitting a resume or summary
resume. With more fairs going
to the Web, pre-registration
will most likely become even
more common. Te idea behind
pre-registering, of course, is
that employers get a chance
to prescreen applicants and
possibly make note of appli-
cants they want to meet at the fair. Does pre-registration
guarantee that you will get noticed or that employers will
even look at the registrations? No, but why would you not
take advantage of such an easy step?
2. Research Many job-seekers go to fairs to “see the
sights” and are not prepared to interview. You can get
a huge jump on the competition by getting a list of the
companies attending the fair and doing some research on
each of the companies you want to interview with; don’t
waste time with companies that do not interest you. While
all of the recruiters will have company literature at their
booths at the fair, you often can’t access those until after
the interview. With so much information about companies
on the Web, there is no excuse not to do your homework.
3. Resumes Bring lots of resumes to the fair — at least
two for each company for which you have an interest. If
you have multiple interests or job objectives, make sure you
bring enough of each version of your resume. You should
also bring scannable versions of your resumes. More and
more recruiters are simply bringing these collected stacks
of resumes back to the corporate ofce and scanning
them into a database. Need assistance with developing a
scannable resume?
4. Portfolios More and more career experts are empha-
sizing the importance of career portfolios. Tese portfolios
should include copies of your resumes, a list of references,
and samples of your best work. While most career fair
interviews are fairly short, there may be opportunities for
discussing your portfolio with a recruiter — either over a
short break or meal or during a second interview on-site. It
is best to always be prepared no matter what happens.
did not prepare for a company you want to interview for,
try eavesdropping on several of the interviews ahead of you
so you can better prepare; do also try to get some company
literature from the booth before getting in line so you can
read about the company while waiting; don’t just stand in
line doing nothing. Tird, do extend common courtesies,
such as ofering to get the recruiter a beverage or snack;
don’t be upset if the recruiter has to take a break before your
interview. Fourth, if your ideal company is hiring computer
technicians and you want to work in accounting, do still
interview with the company at the fair, being sure to leave
the interview with the contact information of the person
responsible for hiring in that area; don’t be discouraged and
walk away.
9. Networking Career
fairs are all about networking.
Of course, you are building
a network with the recruit-
ers — this task is your most
vital. However, you can also
network with your fellow
job-seekers in terms of shar-
ing information about job
leads, companies, and their
recruiting strategies and styles.
Tere may also be professional
organizations or employment
agencies on hand at the fair,
which are also good sources
for networking.
10. Follow-up Don’t take the order of this key to mean
it to be the least important; in fact, some would say it is
one of the most important. You would be surprised at how
few job-seekers actually take the time to follow-up their
career fair interviews, thus when you do it, you will get an
edge over the many others who do not. Tere are two main
methods of follow-up. Some experts suggest actually calling
the recruiter the evening of the fair and leaving a voice mail
message thanking the recruiter again for his/her time that
day. A more concrete and traditional method is to write a
thank you note and mail it the next day to the address on
the recruiter’s business card. In the letter, thank the recruiter
for his/her time, restate your interest and qualifcations for
the position, reiterate your interest in a second interview,
and make a promise to follow-up the letter with a phone
call (and then make sure you do in fact call). You probably
should enclose another copy of your resume to be sure.
What should the letter look like?
Dr. Randall Hansen is currently Webmaster of Quintessen-
tial Careers, as well as publisher of its electronic newsletter,
QuintZine. He writes a biweekly career advice column under
the name, Te Career Doctor. He is also a tenured, associate
professor of marketing in the School of Business Administration
at Stetson University in DeLand, Florida. He is a published
career expert — and has been for the last ten years. He is
co-author, with Katharine Hansen, of Dynamic Cover Letters.
And he has been an employer and consultant dealing with
hiring and fring decisions for the past ffteen years. He can be
reached at randall@quintcareers.com.
5. Attire Conservative business attire is essential, even
for those Spring Break beach side career fairs because
image and frst impressions are critical. Know what is the
expected attire of your profession and dress accordingly. It
is always better to be overdressed than under dressed.
6. Strategy You need to devise a strategy or plan of
attack for the fair. You’ve already done the frst step by
researching the companies you are interested in. Te
second step is seeing if any new companies have registered
when you arrive at the fair. Te third step is surveying the
layout of the fair and determining an order of interviewing.
Some experts suggest meeting with your top choices frst
thing in the morning, interviewing with your other choices
in the middle of the day, and returning to your top choices
at the end of the day to thank them again for their time.
But remember to stay fexible as your top choices may be
the top choices of many, creating long lines that you may
wish to avoid.
7. Interviewing You may only have two to fve
minutes to market yourself and protect yourself from
being screened out, thus you need to make the most of
your time. Many experts suggest that you develop a one-
minute “commercial” that highlights the key benefts that
you can ofer the organization — and then use it at the
beginning of the interview. Also remember the three keys
to all interviews: make eye contact, ofer a frm handshake,
and show enthusiasm. You should also prepare answers
to interview questions just as you would any employment
interview. Te most common question you will face is
something along the lines of “what are you here for today?”
Seems like an easy question to answer, especially if you’ve
done your homework and can tailor your answer to your
interests and the company’s interests, thereby marketing
yourself. Make sure you also have some questions ready
to ask the interviewer. A great concluding question for
you to ask is, “What do I need to do to obtain a second
interview with your frm?” Finally, make sure to avoid
poor communication bad habits, such as fdgeting, rocking,
chewing gum, etc.
8. Intangibles Tere are several other things you can do
to help make your career fair experience a success. First,
don’t waste your time interviewing with companies you
have no desire to work for; do make sure to interview with
all the companies you do want to work for. Second, if you
10
Keys to
Success:
10 Keys continued from page 1
6 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!
Stafng Agencies:
When you need a job in a hurry!
At Your Service Temporary Stafng Services

At Your Service (AYS) is a temporary stafng agency that
is committed to providing highly trained and experienced
Banquet Servers to the Hospitality Industry. As a member
of the San Diego Hotel/Motel Association, AYS is aware of
the industry’s challenges with fnding quality help. For more
information, call us at: (619) 527-0554. Location: 930
Gateway Center Way, San Diego CA, 92102
Smart Stafng

SmartStaf Stafng Solutions provides a full range of
employment opportunities throughout San Diego, South
Bay, East and North Counties. We provide permanent and
temporary placement to professional and semi-professional
applicants in technical, accounting, administrative, and
some engineers, programmers, call centers, clerical, assem-
bly, light industrial laborers, janitorial, driving, and H.R.
professionals. For more information, call: (619) 718-6330
or visit: http://www.smart-staf.com/
Manpower

Manpower Inc. is a world leader in the stafng industry,
providing workforce management services and solutions to
customers through 3,900 ofces in 63 countries. Te frm
annually provides employment to 2 million people world-
wide and is an industry leader in employee assessment and
training. Manpower also provides a range of stafng solu-
tions, engagement and consulting services worldwide under
the subsidiary brands of Brook Street, Elan, Te Empower
Group and Jeferson Wells. For more information, visit:
http://manpower-sd.com
Human Resources Management Specialists
Human Resource Management Specialists is a full service
management consulting frm with over 30 years of experi-
ence in providing training and consulting services to public
organizations, private companies and community based
organizations.
Te company is considered a leader in providing programs
to address EEO, AA, Diversity, Sexual Harassment and
other human resource issues. HRMS is under the direction
of Dr. Larry Marion, an organizational psychologist with
over thirty years experience in the design, implementation
and evaluation of programs to improve the management of
human resources. Human Resource Management Special-
ists, 7960 Silverton Ave, Suite 201, San Diego, CA 92126
Phone: (858) 549 4337 Fax: (858) 549 4341 E-mail:
HRMSPRO @ SBCGLOBAL.NET
Visions Human Resources Services
Visions Human Resources Services (VHRS) is an
independent company of Human Resources Services
Companies, providing high-tech employers with human
resource needs on a contingency basis. Based in San Diego,
CA, Visions Human Resources Services, a minority-owned
company, supports a national and local client base, solving
business challenges through the efective use of technology
and human resources. We provide a full range of Human
Resources services in the areas of: stafng - job fairs
– resumes – focus workshops - training. Quality, reliability,
and professional services are the foundation for VHRS.
For more information, visit the following web site: www.
visions-hrs.com
• PAY ATTENTION TO DETAIL—Don’t cut corners
by, for instance, not proofreading the cover letter, failing to
include information the hiring manager asked for, or begin-
ning the cover letter “Dear Sir or Madam” when the hiring
manager’s name is on the company web site. Take the time
to make sure the correspondence and information sent is
correct and error-free.
• DO THE BASICS—Proofread for spelling, grammar, and
tone, and make sure you have followed the instructions of
the employer. Firing of an e-mail is a convenient method
of communication. However, don’t let the sloppy nature
and informality of e-mail correspondence seep into your
communications—whether it’s emailed or written—with
potential employers.
• CONSTRUCT AN EFFECTIVE RESUME—Organize
your information in a logical fashion and keep descriptions
clear and to the point. Include as much work experience as
possible, even if it obviously doesn’t relate to the job you are
seeking. Also, use a simple, easy-to-read font.
• CUSTOMIZED HEADINGS—Address the hiring man-
ager directly, and include the name of the company and the
position for which it is hiring in your cover letter/e-mail
response. Make it easy for the hiring manager—Use your
name and the word “resume” in your e-mail header so it’s
easy to identify. If the employer asks for information—such
as references or writing samples—provide it.
• FOCUS ON YOU—Bring to the employer not only what
you want from the job, but what is good for both sides.
Tis is an opportunity for you to market yourself and stand
out from the other candidates. What can you do to make
the hiring manager’s life easier? What can you do to help
the company?
• BE PROFESSIONAL—You won’t be taken seriously if
you don’t have e-mail or voice mail/answering machine. If
you don’t have e-mail, set up a free account through Yahoo!
and Hotmail. Provide the recruiter with a cell phone num-
ber if your voice mail/answering machine doesn’t pick up
when you are online. Also, it’s a good idea to ditch the cute
e-mail address or voice mail/answering machine messages in
favor of something that sounds professional.
Courtesy of:
JobWeb.com
Career development and job-search advice
for new college graduates.
Copyright © National Association of Colleges and Employers
62 Highland Avenue • Bethlehem, PA 18017-9085
Phone: 610/868-1421 or 800/544-5272 •
Fax: 610/868-0208
seven tips for efective
Resume Writing
Diversity Works! | July 2006 |
Diversiry & ¦nclusion N Chanqe Manaqemenr N Leacership Developmenr N Team Developmenr N Conlicr Fesolurion
Partnership
Excellence
Transfor mation
Higher Perfor mance
www.jandaconsuIt.com N 800-700-7709
N We value civersiry as a personal, human, anc
comperirive acvanraqe.
N We are cerrain rhe lurure ol Lusiness resrs
scuarely on rhe knowlecqe, creariviry, reamwork,
anc inreqriry ol all employees.
N We are commirrec ro a culrure ol inclusion
where everyone can srrive ro arrain her or
his hiqhesr porenrial.
Embrace Diversity
by Fracflclno lncluslon
Diversiry & ¦nclusion N Chanqe Manaqemenr N Leacership Developmenr N Team Developmenr N Conlicr Fesolurion
Partnership
Excellence
Transfor mation
Higher Perfor mance
www.jandaconsuIt.com N 800-700-7709
N We value civersiry as a personal, human, anc
comperirive acvanraqe.
N We are cerrain rhe lurure ol Lusiness resrs
scuarely on rhe knowlecqe, creariviry, reamwork,
anc inreqriry ol all employees.
N We are commirrec ro a culrure ol inclusion
where everyone can srrive ro arrain her or
his hiqhesr porenrial.
Embrace Diversity
by Fracflclno lncluslon
URBAN LEAGUE OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY GUILD
Te Guild is an auxiliary of Te Urban League of San Diego County. Membership is made up
of volunteers from various backgrounds and professions, most over 40 years of age. Te Guild welcomes
anyone who has an interest in serving the community, assisting with outreach programs, special events,
fund-raisers, and working with youth and adult participants enrolled in Urban League programs.
Whatever your talent, whatever time you have to ofer, belonging to the Guild allows you to meet
others with similar interests, while making a worthwhile contribution to the community.
Please join us!
MISSION: Te Urban League of San Diego County promotes
economic self-sufciency among African-American families
and the under served in our communities, while improving
Te League’s public image and increasing awareness.
Visit us at: www.ulsdc.org
8 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!
CAREER TOOLS
Suggested reading material that will help you get a job and keep it
Job Seekers: You need this
book to ace the interview!
Did you know that corporations
average fve to ten interviews
with an applicant before
making a hiring decision? With
corporate downsizing and an
enormous pool of qualifed tal-
ent, managers now spend more
time disqualifying candidates
than hiring them.
Brenda Greene’s You’ve Got the Interview… Now What?
shows you exactly how to outshine the competition—and
land the job that is right for you.
Greene takes you into the ofces of human resources and
recruitment professionals at Fortune 500 companies to give
you the inside scoop on how they size up their applicants.
In ten chapters packed with tips and strategies, this book
reports survey results from leading companies such as Ofce
Depot, TIAA-CREF, Fannie Mae, Alltel, Continental
Airlines, CarMax, BellSouth, Medco Health Solutions,
Deere & Company, and more. You’ll learn:
• How to research the company before putting a foot in
the door.
• What kind of questions interviewers are likely to ask.
• What kind of answers further your cause.
• What questions you must ask.
• How to handle multiple rounds of interviews—one-on-
one as well as panel interviews.
Whether a seasoned pro, a mid-career candidate, or an
entry-level applicant, Greene will help you create a meeting
of the minds that’s the mark of a successful interview. You’ve
Got the Interview…Now What? coaches you every step of the
way—from that very frst telephone conversation through
salary negotiations—until you’re hired.
Journey to the Ph.D.:
How to Navigate the Pro-
cess as African-Americans
As a new generation of African -
Americans completes college, an
increasing number of students
are aspiring to the Ph.D. as a
stepping stone to a career in the
academy and to fully participate
in shaping our society.
Most African-Americans are conscious that they are
the frst in their families to embark on this journey. Tey
are aware they will meet barriers and prejudice, are likely
to face isolation and frustration, and fnd few sources of
support along the way.
Tis book, by twenty-four black scholars who “have
been there,” ofers a guide to aspiring doctoral students
to the formal process and to the personal, emotional and
intellectual challenges they are likely to face.
Te authors come from a wide range of disciplines
– from computing, education and literature to science and
sociology. Although their experiences and backgrounds
are as varied as they are as individuals, their richly diverse
chapters cohere into a rounded guide to the issues for those
who follow in their footsteps.
From questioning the reader about his or her reasons
for pursuing a doctorate, ofering advice on fnancial issues,
the choice of university and doctoral program, and reloca-
tion, through the process and timetable of application,
interviews, acceptance and rejection, the authors go on
to describe their own journeys and the lessons they have
learned.
Tese men and women write candidly about their
experiences, the strategies they used to maintain their
motivation, make the transition from HBCUs to PWIs,
balance family and work, make the right choices and keep
focussed on priorities.
Tey discuss how to work efectively with advisors and
mentors, make all-important connections with teachers and
build professional and personal support networks. Tey
recount how they dealt with tokenism, established cred-
ibility, handled racism, maintained their values and culture,
and persuaded supervisors to legitimize their research
interests in African American issues.
Tis is both an inspirational and practical book for every
African American considering pursuit of a doctoral degree.
Career Planning and
Job Searching in the
Information Age
Tis book answers key questions
for today’s providers of career-
planning and job searching in-
formation. Librarians and career
development professionals’ con-
cerns such as cost-efective use
of the internet, the reliability
and integrity of electronic resources, and successful search
strategies are addressed in this comprehensive collection.
In this follow-up to Library Services for Career Planning,
Job Searching and Employment Opportunities (1992), real-life
methods used by information providers to reduce costs and
improve quality of service through a better understanding
of today’s technology and audience needs and expectations
are shown.
Readers learn about issues and ethics in the electronic
environment, job searches conducted on the world wide
web, a university placement ofce is a gopher site for
24-hour access to job information, a university library
and career service department collaborate on job search
seminars, how a public library fts electronic job searching
into its mission, and an alumnae network is evolving into a
national career development organization.
Welcome to the 21st
century job market
Whatever you’re doing today will
most likely be history ten years
from now. Your current skills
may well be obsolete. In the
coming decade you will probably
have three diferent jobs with
three diferent employers. You
may change careers and move to
a new community.
So what will you be doing three, fve, ten or twenty years
from now? Will you be working in one of the best or worst
jobs? Here’s the book that identifes what’s happening in the
work world of the new talent driven economy. Forecasting
33 major employment trends, the Drs Krannich take a criti-
cal look at the best jobs in the decade ahead.
Diversity Works! | July 2006 |
The 2006 Career Fair/Expo held on April 27, marked another successful year for
Te San Diego Urban League. Its 17th fair, this annual event, started by Director of Work-
force Development Barbara Webb and coordinated with the help of over 70 volunteers, has
grown from 60-110 booths. Attendance by prospective job seekers also increased to more
than 5000 during the eight-hour event.
Employers from as far away as Los Angeles were on hand recruiting for in-demand va-
cancies at their companies. Sponsors, exhibitors and Diversity Works! Partners, Te League
thanks you for joining us once again in the name of diversity.
Ace Parking, American Airlines, Cardinal Health, Citibank, Cox Communications,
Cost Plus World Markets, Cubic Corporation, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, FBI, Genentech
Inc., Hawthorne Machinery, Integrits, Kyocera, Lockheed-Martin, Maritime Systems &
Sensors, Loews Coronado Bay Resort, Manpower of San Diego, Padres, Qualcomm, SAIC,
SDSU Research Foundation, San Diego Business Journal, SDGE, San Diego County
Sherif’s Department, San Diego Monitor News, San Diego National Bank, Sempra,
Solar Turbines, Sony, Southern California Edison, Starbucks, San Diego Union Tribune
Scripps Research Institute, UCSD, ULSDC, UPS

94th Aerosquadron, Angelica Textile Services, Antico Toscano, Atchison Products, Atlas Mechanical,
Bernard Hodes Group, Boll Weevil Restaurant, California Conservation Corps, Casper Company, Catalyst
Advancement, LLC, Cement Cutting, Inc., Chef ’s Wok, CIC Research, Citibank, City of San Diego,
Cubic Corporation, Da Boyz Pizza, Deaf Community Services, EDD, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Erreca’s,
Inc., Grossmont College, Guard Management, Inc., Hash House A GO GO, Hawthorne Machinery Co.,
Hyatt Hotels, JenMark Industries, Karen Goslin, Kyocera America, Inc., La Mesa Outback Steakhouse,
LiLi Bakery, Manchester Grand Hyatt, Mark Daemon, Mary Kay Mason Consulting, Mike’s Mobile Auto
Detailing, Operation Homefront, Pepsi Cola, Point Loma Nazarene University, RMH Catering, Rubio’s,
SAIC, San Diego City Schools, San Diego Community College Dist., San Diego Customs Baskets, San
Diego Referrals, Inc., San Diego State University, SeaWorld, Select Electric, SignOnSanDiego.Com, Steve
Borseth, Premier Bancorp, Su Casa Property Inspection, Sundt Construction Company, Soup Plantation,
Sony, Southland Envelope, Teri Patterson, Te Arc of San Diego, Te Living Room Cafe, Te San Diego
Union Tribune, UCSD Human Resources Dept, UCSD Prof. Recruitment, UPS Store Copy & Print Ctr.,
Upper Deck, Vietnam Veterans of SD, Workplace Training Network, Inc.
A special thanks to the following companies for their generous support of the
the urban league of san Diego county & the san Diego union-tribune
Career Fair/Expo largest
employment event of 2006
Employment Service Centers
Typically these centers have direct relationships with local employers as well as a wealth
of resources and advice to assist you in fnding a job. Most of their services are free to the
public paid for by tax dollars.
Metro Career Center
3910 University Avenue
San Diego, CA 92105
Phone: (619) 516-2200

South Metro Career Center
4389 Imperial Avenue
San Diego, CA 92113
Phone: (619) 266-4200

South County Career Center
1111 Bay Blvd., Suite E
Chula Vista, CA 91911
Phone: (619) 628-0300
East County Career Center
924 East Main Street
El Cajon, CA 92021
Phone: (619) 590-3900
North County Coastal Career Center
1949 Avenida del Oro, Suite 106
Oceanside CA, 92056
Phone: 760-631-6150
East County Career Center/
Spring Valley Branch
836 Kempton Street
Spring Valley, CA 91977
MI NI - C ARE E R F AI R
Thursday • July 13, 2006
11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
CODE ENFORCED:
Proper business attire.
20 copies of your resume or more.
A positive attitude!
Direct exposure (networking) is the best way to sell yourself to a potential employer.
Employer Partners presents
Empowering Communities.
Changing Lives.
Corporate Office
720 Gateway Center Drive
San Diego, CA 92102
Booths are free for confirmed
and are on a first come first served basis.
Please contact:
Barbara Webb at 619-266-6232
barbara@sdul.org to RSVP your space.
For details call: 619.263.8196
Participating Employer Partners:
• Master hard and soft employment-focused skills
• Computer-based vocational training to help tune-up your literacy skills
• Post your resume on line with the Diversity Job Bank viewed by over 600 employers
• Interviewing and dress for business success training
• Certifcates of completion
Limited space available. Call now: Te Urban League of San Diego Country, 720 Gateway
Center Drive, San Diego, CA 92102, 619-263-8196, fax 619-263-1938
WORKSHOPS
Building Blocks to Success & Personal Growth:
WhERE DREAMS COME TO REALITY
0 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!
VIP Networking Reception and Silent Auction, Westin Horton Plaza, pm
In the Spreckels Theater, Awards Presentation Ceremony, :1 pm, Beneft Jazz Concert with Kirk Whalum, 8:0 pm
Diversity Works! | July 2006 | 1
by Maria D. Dowd and Salimisha Logan
We are Warm Spirit, Self-Care and Empowerment Special-
ists. 99.9% percent of our success hangs in the rafters of
our mind set. With a clear vision, uncompromising faith,
conviction, passion and purpose-driven action, we all have
the capacity to be outrageously successful in our chosen
paths. Start by following these 13 Afrmations:
RULE #1: See It. In living
color, visualize yourself doing
what your heart desires; living
the lifestyle, being the person
you want to be.
RULE #2: Speak It. Be mind-
ful of your language – nonver-
bal and verbal. Practice speak-
ing positively about everything,
all the time. Words heal. Words
transform.
RULE #3: Step Into It. Be the
person you want to be and do
what that person does to realize
his/her fullest potential. Keep
company with people you
admire and respect.
RULE #4: Study It. Learn more
about your desired skill or tal-
ent; and about how the mind
and emotions can work for or
against you. Learn from the
Masters. Most have books
and/or tapes.
RULE #5: Slay It. Slay the self-destructive thought and
emotional patterns that may be blocking your blessings and
paths to wealth. Your thoughts are your reality.
RULE #6: Spiritualize It. Opportunities and blessings will
fow to those who constantly give thanks for each and every
lesson learned. Become a more enlightened partner with
the Almighty.
RULE #7: Share It. Givers get. Give and it will be given to
you. An open heart receives.
Warm Spirit consultants support African
American women and ofer “Afrmations”
RULE #8: Self-Control It. Take control of your thinking.
“Change the way you look at things and the things you look
at will change.” (W. Dwyer) Practice canceling negative
thoughts.
RULE #9: Strategize It. All you need is a good idea and the
commitment to do it. Te “how” can be borrowed from the
masters. Why reinvent any wheels?
RULE #10: Set It Free. To be free, you have to have wealth:
fnancial, physical, emotional, spiritual, relationship, expe-
riential, intuitive and be free to live your genius, your soul
purpose.
RULE #11: Specify It. Te more clarity, the more power-
ful. Better questions yields better results. Be clear about
your intentions and don’t compromise to ft someone else’s
dream.
Salimisha Logan is an independent Warm Spirit Self-Care
Consultant (#740) and founder of Wealth Angels. Her ofce
number is 619-264-8444. www.warmspirit.org/salimisha
Maria Dowd is an author, founder of African-American
Women on Tour and Warm Spirit Director (#1422). She can
be reached at 619-229-7766, email at maria@aawot.com
and website at www.aawot.com
Voted “Emerging Company of 2006” Black Enterprise Magazine
JOURNEY TO A
BLISSFUL LIFE
by Maria D. Dowd
“Perfect for sisters who
want their ‘soul food’ in
bite size chunks.”
Essence, Jan. 2006.
“AN AFTERNOON SIP
OF SERENITY WITH
WARM SPIRIT”

Saturday, July 29, 3-6 pm
Join us to sample and
experience nature-based
self-care & spa products.
Call 619 264-8444
for more information.
Build a
diverse
team.
Let us fnd the right
person for your
current job opening.
Te San Diego County Urban League
has been recruiting for 32 years.
By posting your career opportunities
in our Diversity Job Bank you’ll
have access to a talented and diverse
pool of success-oriented professionals.
POST A JOB TODAY!
Visit http://www.ulsdjobs.net
or call (619) 266-6244
to submit your listing.
Your Journey to Empowerment: A Baker’s Dozen to Manifesting Wealth
Salimisha Logan
RULE #12: Seize It. “Whatever you can do, or dream you
can, begin it; boldness has genius, power and magic in it.”
(Goethe). Seize the opportunity to dream big, think great-
ness and attract wealth.
RULE #13: Succeed and Soar With It: You have this one
opportunity to manifest what you want. Break through,
leverage what you love and achieve outrageous wealth in
this lifetime.
WARM SPIRIT OPPORTUNITY MIxER
6:30 – 8 pm, 2nd & 4th Tursdays of the month,
at Te Urban League of San Diego County, Board
Room, 720 Gateway Dr., San Diego, CA 92102
Free for guests. Consultant fee $5
RSVP:
Maria Dowd, 619-229-7766 or Salimisha Logan, 619-
264-8444; www.sandiegoBOM.mollyguard.com
Maria D. Dowd


| July 2006 | Diversity Works!
Over 580 students who
maintained a 3.0 or higher
grade point average were
recognized at the 15th
Annual Golden Pyramid/
National Achievers Society
Awards ceremony on Sat-
urday June 10, in Balboa
Park’s Organ Pavilion.
Family, friends, community leaders and board mem-
bers were in attendance to salute these exceptional young
people. Te Urban League of San Diego County Young
Professionals, Delta Sigma Teta Sorority, Inc., and the San
Diego Alumnae Chapter presented awards as partners in the
National Urban League’s Achievement Matters campaign.
Together, these community based organizations awarded
more than $20,000 in scholarship funds to be split between
several youth in the county for college education expenses.
Te Golden Pyramid program is designed to identify,
recruit, nurture and support students who are striving to
achieve academic and economic excellence.
Te community goal is to ensure that its future parents,
politicians, scientists, carpenters, doctors and professors are
identifed early and supported continuously in their quest
to achieve excellence.. Te Urban League acknowledges
these distinguished youth in a public forum as a show of
support. Tey are the building blocks of the future.
Te Urban League in partnership with Delta Sigma Te-
ta Sorority, Inc., Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., Omega
Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. and Touching Hands Foundation
hosted the celebration.
The Jump$tart Coalition reports that the average
student graduating from high school lacks basic fnancial
skills. Many are unable to balance a checkbook and most
have no insight into concepts of earning, spending, saving
and investing. Many young people fail their frst credit card.
Te Coalition´s direct objective is to encourage curricu-
lum enrichment to ensure that basic personal fnancial man-
agement skills are attained during the K-12 school experi-
ence. Te wheels of education do not need to be reinvented,
they simply require balancing.
Visit: http://www.jumpstartcoalition.org/ for details.
Financial literacy
training for youth
580 area students receive
Golden Pyramid recognition
youth under age 16 must perform work
between 7am and 7pm
except between June 1 and Labor Day,
when evening hours are extended to 9pm
youth under age 16 may work:
3 hours a day/18 hours a week
in a school week
8 hours a day/40 hours a week
in a non-school week
youth over age 16 have no restrictions
on the hours they may work
For information on Youth Opportunities at The League
Call (619) 266-6244 or email diversityworks@sdul.org
Youth Opportunities


Diversity Works! | July 2006 |
Di versi ty.
The Power Behi nd Our Energy.
©2004 Sempra Energy. All copyright and trademark rights reserved. Sempra Energy is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action/ Disabled Veterans Employer. Find
out more at www.sempra.com/diversity.
At Sempra Energy
®
, diversity is a company
-
wide commitment, connecting every
department, every employee and every country where we conduct business.
From our citizenship and community involvement programs and our Customer
Care Centers where 16 languages are spoken, to our nationally heralded supplier
diversity program and our corporate boardroom where 42-percent of the members
are women and minorities, we “walk our talk.”
We take great pride in demonstrating that diversity not only works... it is the power
behind our energy, as well as our success. For career opportunities, visit
www.sempra.com/careers.


4 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!


Marketplace
For information on placing your Diversity related advertising,
call (619) 266-6244 or email diversityworks@sdul.org
“We provide under-served communi-
ties with fnancial products and ser-
vices that helps them build wealth”
Bob Adkins
President/CEO
www.neighborhoodnationalbank.com




Diversity Works! | July 2006 |
The Power of Inclusion
Our marketplace is becoming more and more diverse
each day. With this constant change comes new growth
opportunities for our nations minority populations
as well as for women, seniors and the physically
challenged.
A diverse workforce is emerging and businesses need
to become stronger with regards to this power of
diference and inclusion.
Inclusion increases opportunities to reach new markets,
improve recruitment and retention and strengthens customer loyalty and the employees
commitment and morale. Tis in turn enhances the market performance and keeps
businesses competitive.
Diversity Works! delivers far beyond the traditional concept of simply facilitating job
placement. Graduates of our workshop for example, undergo behavior modifcation
training developed by Seattle-based Pacifc Institute (TPI) that is presented in conjunction
with our award-winning work readiness and diversity training, producing outstanding
results. Tis combination provides the leading job readiness training in the county, resulting
in employees who are truly work-ready.
A Case For San Diego
According to research by the Hudson Institute, a nationally recognized social trends think
tank, within the next 10 to 15 years, demographic trends, technological advances, and
economic globalization will shape the workplace. Te U.S. workforce will continue to
expand, although at a much slower rate. However, its composition will shift to a more
balanced distribution by age, sex and race/ethnicity.
Getting Connected
Keeping pace with these changing workplace dynamics, while implementing the mandate
of our mission to assist African Americans and other under served people achieve social and
economic equality, the Urban League of San Diego County is uniquely and strategically
positioned to become your social venture partner through our Diversity Works! Initiative.
Diversity Works!: A Model For Success
Orientation
ULSDC conducts monthly employment seminar/orientations around the county to inform
potential participants about the benefts of enrolling in our program. Tese seminars are
designed to attract likely candidates to attend a workshop.
Behavior Modifcation Workshops (Core)
Interested individuals attend a one week Diversity Works! Employment Continuum
workshop. Tese workshops are conducted monthly at the beginning of the month.
Participants are given 40 hours of the TPI/work readiness training and are enrolled in our
Diversity Works! Job Bank.
Diversity Works! Employer Referral
Graduates are referred to participating Diversity Works! Employer Partners. Tese
employers have committed themselves to supporting a diverse workforce and work closely
with League staf and Diversity Works! professionals to ensure success on the job.
“To meet the needs of the nation’s fastest growing minority
groups, many businesses have taken steps to capture these
new and emerging audience segments. Diversity Works! is a
part of business that every layer of a company will need to
refect in the markets that they serve.”
DiversityWorks!
Our Vision
In 1996, the Urban League of San Diego County envisioned the need for a more practical
approach to developing a diverse workplace. Diversity Works! began with changes in
attitudes and then related values which grow behavior.
Jobs Seekers
Call us for more information on the next Diversity Works! Workshop and how they can
help you. To get connected to a Diversity Friendly Employer in San Diego post your
resume in our Diversity Works! Job bank at: www.ulsdcjobs.net
For more information about how Diversity Works! for you
Contact our Workforce Development Department
(619) 263-8196 or email: diversityworks@sdul.org.

You can also visit our Diversity Job Bank at: www.ulsdcjobs.net
Learn how to unlock your potential.
Classes begin May 1st. Call 619-263-8196 to register.

800-426-3660
Helping Jobseekers Prepare For Today’s
Diverse Work Environments and unlocking their potential
Teaching individual and organizations how to manage change, set and
achieve goals, lead more effectively and think in ways that create success.
BUILDING BLOCKS TO SUCCESS WORKSHOPS
6 | July 2006 | Diversity Works!
Diversity Works! | July 2006 |
w w w . u t j o b s . u n i o n t r i b . c o m
Different Jobs. Same Benefits.
We offer a lot to our employees. Our employees offer a lot to us. They make us
look good every day. In return, we provide the same stellar benefits for
everyone, no matter what their job description. Our wide selection of benefits is
larger than most. We even offer a separate company retirement plan aside,
from the exceptional 401k options. That’s a special benefit that’s hard to find
these days. We welcome you to explore our many job opportunities in these
areas: Newsroom, Operations, Marketing, Circulation, Advertising,
Finance, Human Resources and SignOnSanDiego.com. Check out the
current list of job opportunities online at: www.utjobs.uniontrib.com. Or come in
person to our Mission Valley location at: 350 Camino de la Reina, San Diego, CA
92108. We invite you to apply today. Because at The San Diego Union-Tribune,
everyone benefits.
Community Relations
Representative
Pressman
We promote and support diversity in the workplace and we are an equal opportunity employer.
Diverse Opportunities
ADVERTISING
Account Managers
CIRCULATION
P/T Distribution Center Representatives
DISTRIBUTION
P/T Local/Class A Drivers
FINANCE
Junior Buyer
Accounting Clerk
HUMAN RESOURCES
Senior Human Resources Associate
INFO. TECH./COMPUTER SERVICES
Systems Business Analyst III
PRODUCTION/OPERATIONS
Electronic Technicians
Production Mechanics
P/T Pressroom Helpers
P/T Packagers
Visit us at
www.ulsdjobs.net
Connect with over 500 area
employers
Post your resume
online today!