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Revised Course Contents

Of
Interdisciplinary M.Tech. Programmes
Energy Studies and Energy and Environment
Management

Centre for Energy Studies


Indian Institute of Technology Delhi
New Delhi 110016

Revised under Q.I.P. Workshop on July 23, 2009

Centre for Energy Studies


Programme Code: JES
Master of Technology in Energy Studies
Interdisciplinary Programme

Programme Electives (PE)

The overall credits structure


PE
12

OE
06

ESL718

Total
60

ESL722
ESL732

Programme Core (PC)


ESL768
ESL710
ESL711
ESP713
ESL720
ESL730
ESL740
ESL750
ESL760
JSD801
JSD802

Energy,
Ecology
and
Environment
Fuel Technology
Energy Laboratory (JES)
Energy Conservation
Direct Energy Conversion
Non-Conventional Sources
of Energy
Economics and Planning of
Energy Systems
Heat Transfer
Major Project Part 1 (JES)
Major Project Part 2 (JES)
Ten PC (Admissible)

3-0-0

3-0-0
0-0-6
3-0-0
3-0-0
3-0-0

3
3
3
3
3

3-0-0

3-0-0
0-0-12
0-0-24
21-0-42

3
6
12
42

ESL770
ESL774
ESL784
ESL792
ESL810
ESL840
ESL850
ESL860
ESL870
ESL871
ESL875
JSS801
JSD799

Electrical Power Plant


Engineering
Power Generation, Transmission
and Distribution
Integrated Energy Systems
Bioconversion and Processing of
Waste
Wind Energy and Hydro Power
Systems
Solar Energy Utilization
Quantitative Methods for Energy
Management and Planning
Cogeneration and Energy
Efficiency
Advanced Energy Systems
MHD Power Generation
Solar Architecture
Solar Refrigeration and Air
Conditioning
Electrical Power Systems
Analysis
Fusion Energy
Advanced Fusion Energy
Alternative Fuels for
Transportation
Independent Study (JES)
Minor Project (JES)
Four PE (Admissible)
Two OE(s)

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0
3-0-0

3
3

3-0-0

3-0-0
3-0-0

3
3

3-0-0

3-0-0
3-0-0
3-0-0
3-0-0

3
3
3
3

3-0-0

3-0-0
3-0-0
3-0-0

3
3
3

0-3-0
0-0-6
12-0-0
6-0-0

3
3
12
6

II

ESL740

ESL711

ESL760

ESL713

Non-convent
Sour of Energy

Fuel Technology

Heat Transfer

Energy
Laboratories

(3-0-0) 3

(3-0-0) 3

(3-0-0) 3

(0-0-6) 3

ESL720

ESL710

ESL750

ESL730

Energy
Conservation
(3-0-0) 3

Ener, Ecology &


Environment

Econ & Plang


of Energy Sys

(3-0-0) 3

(3-0-0) 3

Direct Energy
Conversion
(3-0-0) 3

Summer

III

JSD801

JSD801 Major Project Part 1 (JES)


PE-3

PE-1

OE-1

(3-0-0) 3

(3-0-0) 3

PE-2

OE-2

(3-0-0) 3

(3-0-0) 3

PE-4

Contact
h/week
L T P

15 0

21 18

18 0

18 18

0
2

12 18 12

24 24 12

Tota

Courses
(Number, abbreviated title, L-T-P, credits)

Sem.

JES
Lecture
Courses

M.Tech. in Energy Studies

Credits

Category PC
Credits
42

ESL714

Maj Proj Part 1


(JES)

(0-0-24) 12

IV

JSD802

(3-0-0) 3 (3-0-0) 3

Maj Proj Part 2


(JES)

(0-0-24) 12

Total = 60

Programme Code: JEN


Master of Technology in Energy and Environment Management
Interdisciplinary Programme
The overall credits structure:
Category PC
PE
OE
Credits
45
9
06

Total
60

Programme Core (PC)


ESP700
Energy Laboratory
0-0-6
3
ESL-711 Fuel Technology
3-0-0
3
ESL-720 Energy Conservation
3-0-0
3
ESL740
Non-conventional
3-0-0
3
Sources of Energy
ESL774
Quantitative Methods
3-0-0
3
for Energy
Management &
Planning
ESL777
Environmental Science 3-0-0
3
& Engineering
JND801
Major Project Part 1
0-0-12
6
(JEN)
JND802
Major Project Part 2
0-0-24 12
(JEN)
Module
A/ B/ C/ D, each
9-0-0
9
having 3 courses of 3
credits each
Compulsory bridge audit courses(credits not
counted)
ESL704
Basic Thermal
1-0-0
0
Engineering #
ESL712
Basic Electrical
1-0-0
0
Engineering*
ESL725
1-0-0
0
Energy Auditing
ESL791
0
Applied Mathematics & 1-0-0
Computational Methods
ESL794
0
Principles of Chemical
1-0-0
Processes and
Combustion +
Total PC
24-0-42 45
# For Non-Mechanical Engineering
* For Non-Electrical Engineering
+ For Non-Chemical /Environmental engineering
students
Module-wise courses (included in PC)
A student must take all courses from one of the
four modules:
Module A
ESL776
Industrial Energy and
3-0-0
3
Environmental Analysis
ESL778
Industrial Waste
3-0-0
3
Management and
Recycling
ESL784
Cogeneration and
3-0-0
3
Energy Efficiency

Module B
ESL756
Energy Policy & Planning
ESL764
Environmental
Economics
ESL766
Environmental Regulation
Module C
ESL718
Power Generation,
Transmission and
Distribution
ESL860
Electrical Power System
Analysis
ESL804
Pollution Control in Power
Plants
Module D
ESL788
Industrial and
Commercial Applications
of Renewable Energy
Sources
ESL736
Power from Renewables
and Environmental
Impacts
ESL742
Economics and
Financing of Renewable
Energy Systems

3-0-0
3-0-0

3
3

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

Programme Electives (PE) and Open Electives (OE):


ESL710
ESL722
ESL730
ESL735
ESL738
ESL745
ESL768
ESL771
ESL785
ESL792
ESL795
ESL796
ESL870
ESL875
JNS800

Energy, Ecology &


Environment
Integrated Energy
Systems
Direct Energy Conversion
Hazardous Waste
Management
Power Systems Planning
& Operation
Environmental Audit and
Impact Assessment
Wind Energy and Hydro
Power Systems
Instrumentation and
Control in Energy
Systems
Energy Analysis
Advanced Energy
Systems
Project Evaluation and
Management
Operation and control of
Electrical Energy System
Fusion Energy
Alternative Fuels for
Transportation
Independent Study (JEN)

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0
3-0-0

3
3

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0
3-0-0

3
3

3-0-0

3-0-0

3-0-0
3-0-0

3
3

0-3-0

Sem.

Lecture
Courses

Courses
(Number, abbreviated title, L-T-P, credits)
ESL711

ESL740

ESL777

ESL791

ESL704/712

Fuel Technology

Non-conv sour energy

Environ. Sc & Engg

Basic Ther/Elec. Engg

(3-0-0) 3

(3-0-0) 3

(3-0-0) 3

App. Math Comp


Meth

Contact
h/week
L T P

Credits

JEN

Total

M.Tech. in Energy and Environment Management

11 0

11 9

14 9

0
2

12 18 12

24 24 12

(1-0-0) 0

(1-0-0) 0

II

ESL720

ESL774

ESL700

ESL725

ESL794

Energy Conservation
(3-0-0) 3

Qnt Meth E Mgmt Plng

Energy Laboratories

(3-0-0) 3

(0-0-6) 3

Energy Auditing
(1-0-0) 0

Prin Chem Proc Comt


(1-0-0) 0

PE-1

PE-2

PE-3

(3-0-0) 3

(3-0-0) 3

(3-0-0) 3

PC-M3

PC-M4

3(3-0-0) 9

3(3-0-0) 9

Summer

III
IV

PC-M1

PC-M2

3(3-0-0) 9

3(3-0-0) 9

Summer

III

JND801

JND801 Major Project Part 1 (JEN)


OE-1

OE-2

Maj Proj Part 1 (JEN)

(0-0-12) 6

IV

(3-0-0) 3

(3-0-0) 3

JND802
Maj Proj Part 2 (JEN)

(0-0-24) 12

PC-M1, PC-M2, PC-M3 and PC-M4 are three courses sets from Module A, B, C or D as part of programme core.

Total = 60

Under Graduate Courses

ESL300
ESL330
ESL340
ESL350
ESL360

Self-organizing Dynamical System


Energy, Ecology and Environment
Non-Conventional Source of Energy
Energy Conservation and Management
Direct Energy Conversion Methods

3-0-0
3-1-0
3-0-2
3-0-0
3-1-0

3
4
4
3
4

Recently added Post Graduate Courses


ESL746
ESL737
ESL755
ESL734

Hydrogen Energy
Plasma Based Materials Processing
Solar Photovoltaic Devices and Systems
Nuclear Energy

3-0-0
3-0-0
3-0-0
3-0-0

3
3
3
3

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES OFFERED BY CES:


ESL300 Self-organizing Dynamical System
3 credits (3-0-0)
Pre-requisites: Earned Credit (EC) 60
Dynamical systems dissipative and area preserving, Patterns in Hamiltonian dynamics invariants and
symmetry, KAM theorem / coherent structures, complexity and pattern formation, BelousovZhabutinsky reaction, Landau-Ginzburg / mean-field models, Caling fractals, Cellular automata, Wavelet
transforms, Phase transitions and order parameter, Criticality the border of order and chaos, Entropy
and direction of time, Negentropic systems, Self-organized criticality, lattice models, Examples:
Electrical circuits, Management systems, Astrophysical systems, Plasma and magnetic surface
systems, Biological systems, Non-linear systems.
ESL330 Energy, Ecology and Environment
4 credits (3-1-0)
Pre-requisites: Earned Credit (EC) 60
Concepts of ecosystems and environment, Characteristics and types of ecosystems, Autecology and
synecology, Energy flow in ecosystems, Feedback loops, Trophic webs, Eco-technology and Ecodevelopment, Energy-environment interaction, Impact of energy sources (coal, oil, natural gas, solar,
wind, biomass, hydro, geothermal, tidal, wave, ocean thermal and nuclear) on environment, local
regional and global implications, Approaches to mitigate environmental emissions from energy sector,
Global initiatives Kyoto Protocol, Clean development mechanism case studies.
ESL340 Non-Conventional Source of Energy
4 credits (3-0-2)
Pre-requisites: Earned Credit (EC) 60
Global & National energy scenarios, Forms & characteristics of renewable energy sources, Solar
radiation, Flat plate collectors, Solar concentrators, Thermal Applications of solar energy, Photovoltaics
technology and applications, Energy storage, Energy from biomass, Thermochemical, Biochemical
conversion to fuels, biogas and its applications, Wind characteristics, Resource assessment, Horizontal
& vertical axis wind turbines, Electricity generation and water pumping, Micro/Mini hydropower systems,
Water pumping and conversion to electricity, Hydraulic ram pump, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion
(OTEC), Geothermal, Tidal and Wave energies, Material aspects of Renewable energy technologies
and systems.
ESL350 Energy Conservation and Management
3 credits (3-0-0
Pre-requisites: Earned Credit (EC) 60
Thermodynamic basis of energy conservation, Irreversible processes, Reversibility and Availability,
Exergy and available energy, Energy conservation in HVAC systems and thermal power plants, Solar
systems, Second law efficiency and LAW, Energy conservation in buildings, U-Value of walls / roof,
Ventilation systems - Fan and ducts Lighting Systems - Different light sources and luminous efficacy,
Insulation use Materials properties, Optimum thickness, Thermo economic analysis, Energy
conservation in electrical devices and systems, Economic evaluation of energy conservation
measures, Electric motors and transformers, Inverters and UPS, Voltages stabilizers, Energy audit and
Instrumentation.
ESL360 Direct Energy Conversion Methods
4 credits (3-1-0)
Pre-requisites: Earned Credit (EC) 60
Energy classification, Sources and utilization, Principle of energy conversion, Indirect / direct energy
conversion, Basic principles of design and operations of (i) Thermoelectric (ii) Thermionic convertors (iii)
Photovoltaic energy systems (iv) Fuel cells (v) Plasma diodes (vi) Magneto hydrodynamic Power
generators and (vii) Advanced energy conversion systems.

POST GRADUATE COURSES OFFERED BY CES:


ESP700 Energy Laboratory
3 credits (0-0-6)
ESL704 Basic Thermal Engineering
0 credit (1-0-0)
First and second law of thermodynamics, Thermal fluid systems, Standard cycles, Mixtures of gases,
Heat transfer, Fluid mechanics, Practical examples, Use of steam tables.
ESL710 Energy, Ecology and Environment
3 credits (3-0-0)
Interrelationship between energy, ecology and environment, Sun as a source of energy, nature of its
radiation, Biological processes, Photosynthesis, Autecology and synecology, Population, Community,
Ecosystems (wetland, terrestrial, marine), Food chains, Ecosystem theories, Sources of energy,
Classification of energy sources, Environmental issues related to harnessing of fossil fuels (coal, oil,
natural gas, geothermal, tidal, nuclear energy, solar, wind, hydropower, biomass, Energy flow and
nutrient cycling in ecosystems, Environmental degradation, Primary and secondary pollutants.
Thermal/ radioactive pollution, Air & water pollution, Micro climatic effects of pollution, Pollution from
stationary and mobile sources, Biological effects of radiation, Heat and radioactivity disposal, Acid rain,
Global warming and green house gases, Ozone layer depletion.
ESL711 Fuel Technology
3 credits (3-0-0)
Solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, Coal as a source of energy and chemicals in India, Coal preparation,
Carbonization, Gasification and liquefaction of coal and lignite, Principle of combustion, Petroleum and
its derived products, Testing of liquid fuels, Petroleum refining processes, Inter-conversion of fuels,
Natural gases and its derivatives, sources, potential, Gas hydrates, Combustion appliances for solid,
liquid and gaseous fuels, Introduction to nuclear fuel, RDF, Bio-fuels, etc.
ESL712 Basic Electrical Engineering
0 credit (1-0-0)
Power circuits and electrical machinery, AC circuit analysis, Three phase circuits, Power circuits
components and energy conservation devices, Variable speed drives, Demand controls.

ESP713 Energy Laboratory


3 credits (0-0-6)
ESL714 Power Plant Engineering
3 credits (3-0-0)
Types of thermal power stations, Steam power stations based on fossil fuels, Economy and thermal
scheme of the steam power stations, Thermal power plant equipment, boilers (coal based, RDF
based), super heaters, super critical steam generator, economizers, feed water heater, condensers,
combustion chamber and gas loop, turbines, cooling towers, etc. Gas turbine power stations,
Combined cycle power plants, Internal combustion engine plant for peak load standby and start up,
Elements of hydropower generation and wind turbine, Elements of nuclear power plants, nuclear
reactors and fuels, Recent advances in power plants, (IGCC, super critical power plant, etc.), Case
studies, Introduction to solar power generation, Sterling engine, Decentralized power technologies.

ESL718 Power Generation, Transmission and Distribution


3 credits (3-0-0)
Generation: Synchronous generator operation, Power angle characteristics and the infinite bus
concept, Dynamic analysis and modeling of synchronous machines, Excitation systems, Prime-mover
governing systems, Automatic generation control, Auxiliaries, Power system stabilizer, Artificial
intelligent controls, Power quality of AC Transmission: Overhead and cables, Transmission line
equations, Regulation and transmission line losses, Reactive power compensation, Flexible AC
transmission, HVDC Transmission: HVDC converters, Advantages and economic considerations
converter control characteristics, Analysis of HVDC link performance, Multi terminal DC system, HVDC
and FACTS, Distribution: Distribution systems, Conductors size, Kelvins law performance calculations
and analysis, Distribution inside and commercial buildings entrance terminology, Substation and
feeder circuit design considerations, Distributions automation, Futuristic power generation.
ESL720 Energy Conservation
3 credits (3-0-0)
Introduction, Thermodynamics of energy conservation, Energy and exergy concepts, Irreversibility and
second law analysis and efficiency of thermal systems such as mixing, throttling, drying and solar
thermal systems, Thermal power plant cycles, Refrigeration and air conditioning cycle, Thermal
insulation in energy conservation, Energy conservation through controls, Electric energy conservation
in building heating and lighting, Energy Efficient Motors, Tariffs and power factor improvement in
Electrical systems, Energy conservation in domestic appliances, transport, Energy auditing, Energy
savings in boilers and Furnaces, Energy Conservation Act, Energy conservation in small scale
domestic appliances and agriculture.
ESL722 Integrated Energy Systems
3 credits (3-0-0)
Pattern of fuel consumption: agricultural, domestic, industrial and community needs, Projection of
energy demands, Substitution of conventional sources by alternative sources and more efficient
modern technologies, Potential, availability as well as capacity of solar, wind, biogas, natural gas,
forest produce, tidal, geothermal, mini-hydro and other modern applications, Hybrid and integrated
energy systems, Total energy concept and waste heat utilization, Energy modeling to optimize
different systems.
ESL725 Energy Auditing
0 credit (1-0-0)
Energy audit concepts, Basic elements and measurements, Mass and energy balances, Scope of
energy auditing industries, Evaluation of energy conserving opportunities and environmental
management, Preparation and presentation of energy audit reports, Some case study and potential
energy savings.
ESL730 Direct Energy Conversion
3 credits (3-0-0)
Basic science of energy conversion, Indirect verses direct conversion, Physics of semiconductor
junctions for photovoltaic and photo-electrochemical conversion of solar energy, Fabrication and
evaluation of various solar cells, Applications of solar cells in photovoltaic power generation systems,
Technology and physics of thermo-electric generations, Thermal-electric materials and optimization
studies, Basic concepts and design considerations of MHD generators, Cycle analysis of MHD
systems, Thermionic power conversion and plasma diodes, Thermodynamics and performance of fuel
cells and their applications.

ESL732 Bioconversion and Processing of Waste


3 credits (3-0-0)
Biomass and solid wastes, Broad classification, Production of biomass, photosynthesis, Separation of
components of solid wastes and processing techniques, Agro and forestry residues utilisation through
conversion routes: biological, chemical and thermo chemical, Bioconversion into biogas, mechanism,
Composting technique, Bioconversion of substrates into alcohols, Bioconversion into hydrogen,
Thermo chemical conversion of biomass, conversion to solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, pyrolysis,
gasification, combustion, Chemical conversion processes, hydrolysis and hydrogenation, Solvent
extraction of hydrocarbons, Fuel combustion into electricity, case studies.
ESL735 Hazardous Waste Management
3 credits (3-0-0)
Sources and classification of hazardous wastes, Assessment of exposure potential: Transport
processes, Overview of waste management problems, Guidelines for handling hazardous wastes,
Energy from organic wastes, Chemical waste treatment processes, Physical waste treatment
processes, Biological waste treatment processes, Thermal waste treatment processes, Waste
elimination option, Domestic hazardous waste, Hazardous waste management options, Toxic metallic
waste, Biomedical waste, Remediation of hazardous waste contaminated soils, Engineering issues in
waste remediation, case studies.
ESL736 Power from Renewables & Environmental Impacts
3 credits (3-0-0)
Environmental impacts of fossil fuel based power generation, Renewable electricity and key elements,
Hydropower and its constraints, Wind energy: technology and economics, Resources, systems and
regional strategies, Solar thermal power, Photovoltaic technology, Biomass power, tidal power, OTEC,
Global climate change, CO2 reduction potential of renewable energy, Social considerations,
standalone systems and grid integration.
ESL738 Power System Planning & Operation
3 credits (3-0-0)
Generation system capacity adequacy planning: Probabilistic models of generating unit outage
performance and system load-evaluation of loss of load and loss of energy indices, Probabilistic
production costing, Inclusion of power generation from renewable energy sources in the reliability
analysis, Interconnected systems: multi-area reliability analysis, power pool operation and power/energy
exchange contracts, Quantification of economic and reliability benefits by pool operation, Demand /
energy forecasting: sector-wise peak demand and energy forecasting by trend and econometric
projection methods, Optimal power system expansion planning: formulation of least cost optimization
problem incorporating the capital, operating and maintenance costs of candidate plants of different
types (thermal, hydro, nuclear, non conventional etc.) and minimum assured reliability constraintoptimization techniques for solution by linear and dynamic programming approaches-case studies.
ESL740 Non-Conventional Sources of Energy
3 credits (3-0-0)
Types of non-conventional sources, Solar energy principles and applications, efficiency of solar
thermal and PV systems, Biomass: generation, characterization, use as energy source, Biogas:
aerobic and anaerobic bio-conversion processes, microbial reactions, purification, properties of biogas
(composition and calorific value), Storage and enrichment, Tidal and wind energy: wind energy
potential and conversion efficiency, Mini / micro hydro power: classification of hydropower schemes,
classification of water turbine, Turbine theory, Jet velocity and nozzle size in pelton wheel turbine,
Essential components of hydroelectric system, system efficiency, grass root innovation energy

technology, Fusion: Basic concepts, fusion reaction physics, Thermonuclear fusion reaction criteria,
Confinement schemes, Inertial confinement fusion, Magnetic confinement fusion, Target gain
requirements, Current status, Geothermal: Introduction, structure of the earth, Geothermal regions,
Geothermal systems/fields, dry rock and hot aquifer analysis, Geothermal energy conversion
technologies, OTEC.
ESL742 Economics & Financing of Renewable Energy Systems
3 credits (3-0-0)
Overview of renewable energy technologies, Relevance of economic and financial viability evaluation
of renewable energy technologies, Basics of engineering economics, Financial feasibility evaluation of
renewable energy technologies, Social cost benefit analysis of renewable energy technologies,
Technology dissemination models, Volume and learning effects on costs of renewable energy
systems, Dynamics of fuel substitution by renewable energy systems and quantification of benefits,
Fiscal, Financial and other incentives for promotion of renewable energy systems and their effect on
financial and economic viability, Financing of renewable energy systems, Carbon finance potential of
renewable energy technologies and associated provisions, Software for financial evaluation of
renewable energy systems, Case studies on financial and economic feasibility evaluation of renewable
energy devices and systems.
ESL745 Environmental Audit & Impact Assessment
3 credits (3-0-0)
Pollution sources and classification, air, water, soil and noise sampling and monitoring,
Instrumentation, Environmental audit-detailed procedure, National environmental policy, Methodology
of environmental impact studies, Methods of impact identification, Environmental setting, Production
and assessment of impacts on the air environment, Prediction and assessment of impacts on surface
water, soil and ground water environment, Socioeconomic environment, Evaluation alternatives, Public
participation in environmental decision making.
ESL750 Economics & Planning of Energy Systems
3 credits (3-0-0)
Relevance of financial and economic feasibility, Evaluation of energy technologies and systems,
Basics of engineering economics, Financial evaluation of energy technologies, Social cost benefit
analysis, Case studies on techno-economics of energy conservation and renewable energy
technologies, Energy demand analysis and forecasting, Energy supply assessment and evaluation,
Energy demand supply balancing, Energy models, Software for energy planning, Energy economy
interaction, Energy investment planning and project formulation. Energy pricing, Policy and planning
implications of energy environment interaction, clean development mechanism, technology transfer
and its financing, carbon credits and trading opportunities, Financing of energy systems, Energy policy
related acts and regulations.
ESL756 Energy Policy & Planning
3 credits (3-0-0)
Energy (and power) policies in the country, Tariffs and subsidies, Energy utility interface, Private
sector participation in power generation, State role and fiscal policy, Energy and development,
National energy plan, Role of modeling in energy policy analysis, Energy data base, Energy balances,
Flow diagrams, Reference energy system, Energy demand analysis, Trend analysis, Econometric
models, Elasticities approach, Input-output models, Simulation/process models, Energy supply
analysis, Costs of exploration and economics of utilization of depletable and renewable resources,
Scarcity rent, International energy supply, Energy demand supply balancing, Energy -economy
interaction, Energy investment planning, Energy environment interaction, Energy Pricing.

ESL760 Heat Transfer


3 credits (3-0-0)
General heat conduction equation with heat generation, Analysis of extended surfaces, transient (and
periodic) heat conduction, Two dimensional heat conduction problems and solutions, Theory of
convective heat transfer, Boundary layer theory, Heat transfer in duct flows laminar and turbulent,
Boiling, condensation and heat exchangers, Laws of thermal radiation, Radiation heat transfer
between black and grey bodies, Numerical solutions of radiation network analysis, Thermal circuit
analysis and correlations for various heat transfer coefficients, Overall heat transfer.
ESL764 Environmental Economics
3 credits (3-0-0)
Economic development and the environment, Relevance of environmental economics, Economic
efficiency and markets, The economics of environmental quality, Frameworks for environmental cost
and benefit analysis: criteria for evaluating environmental, Command and control strategies, Incentive
based strategies - emission taxes and subsidies, Transferable discharge permits, Environmental
policies, International environmental agreements.
ESL766 Environmental Regulation
3 credits (3-0-0)
Environmental legislation and strategies to control pollution, Standards and setting criterion, Role of
national and international agencies in dealing with environmental aspects, Standards developed by
ministry of environment and forest, Sampling and analysis techniques, Data interpretations and
relationships for the design of treatment facilities, Regulations for pollution controls of water, air
industrial, automobile, Noise and hazardous waste environmental audit, Public liability insurance,
Environmental management systems, Catalytic converts in vehicles in metropolitans, EURO
standards, Bharat standards.
ESL768 Wind and Small Hydro Energy Systems
3 credits (3-0-0)
Introduction, General theories of wind machines, Basic laws and concepts of aerodynamics, Micrositing, Description and performance of the horizontalaxis wind machines, Blade design, Description
and performance of the verticalaxis wind machines, The generation of electricity by wind machines,
case studies, Overview of micro mini and small hydro, Site selection and civil works, Penstocks and
turbines, Speed and voltage regulation, Investment issues, load management and tariff collection,
Distribution and marketing issues, case studies, Wind and hydro based stand-alone / hybrid power
systems, Control of hybrid power systems, Wind diesel hybrid systems.
ESL770 Solar Energy Utilization
3 credits (3-0-0)
Solar radiation and modeling, solar collectors and types: flat plate, concentrating solar collectors,
advanced collectors and solar concentrators, Selective coatings, Solar water heating, Solar cooking,
Solar drying, Solar distillation and solar refrigeration, Active and passive heating and cooling of
buildings, Solar thermal power generation, Solar cells, Home lighting systems, Solar lanterns, Solar
PV pumps, Solar energy storage options, Industrial process heat systems, Solar thermal power
generation and sterling engine, Solar economics.

ESL771 Instrumentation & Control in Energy Systems


3 credits (3-0-0)
Basic measurement concepts, Measurement errors, Transducer classification, Static and dynamic
characteristics of transducers, Instruments for measuring temperature, pressure, velocity and flow,
heat flux, liquid level and concentration in energy systems, characterization of combustors, Flue gas
analysers, Exhaust gas analysers, Solar energy measurement requirements and instruments,
Meteorological data measurements, Energy auditing instruments, Energy audit kit, humidity
measurement, characterization of electrical power systems, Instruments for monitoring electrical
parameters, Analysis of power system measurements. Analog signal conditioning, A/D and D/A
converters, Digital data processing and display, Computer data processing and control, Feed back
control system, Stability and transient analysis of control systems, Application of PID controllers,
General purpose control devices and controller design, Air pollution sampling and measurement of
particulates, SOx, NOx, CO, O3, hydrocarbons.

ESL774 Quantitative Methods for Energy Management and Planning


3 credits (3-0-0)
A review of probability concepts, Forecasting and decision making in view of multi-variant techniques,
Linear programming, Graphical solution, Simplex method, Duality and post-optimality analysis, Integer
programming, Optimal technology mix in micro and macro level energy planning exercises,
Sequencing, Quening theory, Networks, PERT and CPM, Decision theory, Markov analysis, Non linear
programming, Decision making with uncertainty decision making with multiple objectives, Deterministic
and probabilistic dynamic programming, Regression analysis.
ESL776 Industrial Energy and Environment Analysis
3 credits (3-0-0)
Energy and the environment, The greenhouse effect, Global energy and environmental management,
Energy management and conservation, Energy in manufacture, Energy technologies, Instrumentation
measurement and control, Energy management information systems, Hazardous waste management,
Contamination of ground water, Treatment & disposal, Pollution from combustion and atmospheric
pollution control methods.
ESL777 Environmental Science and Engineering
3 credits (3-0-0)
Environmental Pollution Sources and their impact on environment, Air, Pollution, The green house
effect, Radiative forcing, due to green house gases, aerosols and land use changes, Global warming
potential, the Carbon Cycle, Changes in Atmospheric Ozone, International Treaties, Kyoto protocol,
Montrelo protocol, Particulate Control Equipment (ESP), Performance Analysis, Risk assessment
Analysis, Ozone depletion in the strato sphere and troposphere.

ESL778 Industrial Waste Management and Recycling


3 credits (3-0-0)
Solid waste management Treatment and disposal sanitary landfills, Leachate collection and gases
emissions estimation, Resource recovery and recycle of materials, Waste management in different
industries-steel, Aluminium, Chemical, Paper, Distilleries, Energy from the waste, waste water
treatment techniques, Agricultural Pollution, Application of air pollution control in Industries.

ESL784 Cogeneration and Energy Efficiency


3 credits (3-0-0)
The concept of cogeneration, main design parameters for cogeneration, cogeneration alternatives,
Bottoming and topping cycles, Steam turbine plants, Gas turbine plant, Diesel and gas engine plants,
Thermodynamic evaluation, Combined cycle applications, Sterling engine, Industry / utility
cogeneration, Trigeneration, Techno economic and Environ-mental aspects, Cogeneration in sugar,
textile, paper and steel industry, Case studies.
ESL785 Energy Analysis
3 credits (3-0-0)
Energy theory of value: Principles and systems of energy flows, Methods of energy analysis, Energy
intensity method, Process analysis input-output method based energy accounting, Energy cost of goods
and services energy to produce fuels: Coal, Oil, Natural Gas, Energy to produce electricity, Energy cost
of various modes of passenger & freight transportation, Industrial energy analysis: Aluminium, Steel,
Cement, Fertilizers, Energetics of materials recycling, Energetics of renewable energy utilization (case
studies), General energy equation, Energy loss, Reversibility & irreversibility, Pictorial representation of
energy, Energy analysis of simple processes, Expansion, Compression, Mixing and separation, Heat
transfer, Combustion, Energy analysis of thermal and chemical plants, Thermo economic applications of
energy analysis and national energy balance.
ESL788 Industrial and Commercial Applications of Renewable Energy Sources
3 credits (3-0-0)
Commercial and industrial energy demand; Qualitative and quantitative features and characteristics,
Renewables & electricity for a growing economy, Water heating, process heating and drying
applications, Solar, Biomass and geothermal energy based systems, Combined space and building
service hot water systems, Electricity generation from renewable to meet commercial and industrial
power requirement, Stand alone and grid connected systems, Ethanol and methanol from cellulosic
biomass, Use of renewable in commercial and industrial buildings for load leveling, lighting and space
heating and cooling, Economics of renewable energy based commercial and industrial installations
case studies, Thermal low and medium energy requirements of different industries.
ESL791 Applied Mathematics and Computational Methods
0 credit (1-0-0)
Fourier and laplace transform, Complex and vector analysis, Matrices, Numerical and computational
methods, Finite difference, Numerical methods of integration, Least square curve fitting, Introduction to
C++ and METLAB.
ESL792 Advanced Energy Systems
3 credits (3-0-0)
Latest topics on energy, Integrated Gasification combined cycle (IGCC), Fuels for power generation,
Advanced energy storage systems, Hydrogen power, Clean coal technologies, Pressurized fluidised
bed combustion, Natural gas cycles, Integrated generation, Fuel cells, Energy conservation in power
plant, Battery vehicles, Electric vehicles, Algal bio fuels, Metal hydrates, Geological CO2 sequestering.

ESL794 Principles of Chemical Processes and Combustion


0 credit (1-0-0)
Process development and chemical manufacture in industries, Major unit operations and unit
processes in chemical industries, Petrochemical industries, Food, Paint, Fertilizer, Drugs, Paper and
pulp industries, Coal based chemicals and combustion.
ESL795 Project Evaluation and Management
3 credits (3-0-0)
Life cycle approach and analysis, conception, definition, planning, feasibility and analysis,
Environmental impact analysis, Project planning matrix, Aim oriented Project planning, Network
analysis for project management-PERT, CPM and CERT, Fuzzy logic analysis, Stochastic based
formulations, Project design, Evaluation and management techniques, Funds planning, Project
material management, Evaluation & analysis, Implementation & monitoring, Performance indices,
Case studies, Supply chain management, Customer relation management.
ESL796 Operation and Control of Electrical Energy Systems
3 credits (3-0-0)
Real Time Monitoring of Power Systems : State Estimation, Topological observability Analysis,
Security Analysis of Power Systems, Economic Dispatch & Unit Commitment
Control of Power & Frequency : Turbine -Governor Control Loops, Single Area and Multi-Area
Systems Control, Effect of high penetration of Wind & Other Renewable/Distributed Generation on P-F
Control
Control of Voltage & Reactive Power : Generator Excitation Systems, & Automatic Voltage
Regulators, Transformer Tap Changes Controls, Voltage Control in Distribution Networks using New
Power Electronic Devices
Introduction to Market operations in Electric Power Systems : Restructured Power Systems,
Short Term Load Forecasting, Power Trading through Bilateral, Multilateral Contracts and Power
Exchanges, Role of Distributed Generators in market Operations.
ESL804 Pollution Control in Power Plants
3 credits (3-0-0)
Coal and Nuclear based Power Plants Fly Ash generation and environment impact, Fly ash
utilization and disposal, Nuclear fuel cycle, Radioactive wastes treatment and disposal, Pollution
control methods (i) Pre-combustion controls, (ii) Combustion controls Low NOx burners, fluidized bed
boilers, (iii) Post Combustion Controls, Particulate controls, Cyclone, Wet scrubbers, ESP and fabric
filters, Gaseous pollutants controls flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, CSR reduction applications
of electron beam and non thermal plasmas for SOx and NOx treatments, Thermal pollution and its
impact on aquatic life.
ESL810 MHD Power Generation
3 credits (3-0-0)
Principle of MHD power generation, Properties of working fluids, MHD equation and types of MHD duct,
Losses in MHD generators, Diagnostics of parameters, MHD cycles, MHD components (air heater,
combustion chamber, heat exchanger, diffuser, insulating materials and electrode walls, magnetic field
etc.) Economics and applications of MHD, Liquid metal MHD generators.

ESL840 Solar Architecture


3 credits (3-0-0)
Thermal comfort, sun motion, Building orientation and design, passive heating and cooling concepts,
thumb rules, heat transfer in buildings: thermal modeling of passive concepts, evaporative cooling,
Energy efficient windows and day lighting, Earth air tunnel and heat exchanger, zero energy building
concept and rating systems, Energy conservation building codes, Softwares for building simulation,
Automation and energy management of buildings.

ESL850 Solar Refrigeration and Air-conditioning


3 credits (3-0-0)
Potential and scope of solar cooling, Types of solar cooling systems, Solar collectors and storage
systems for solar refrigeration and air-conditioning, Solar operation of vapour absorption and vapour
compression refrigeration cycles and their thermodynamic assessment, Rankine cycle, sterling cycle
based solar cooling systems, Jet ejector solar cooling systems, Fuel assisted solar cooling systems,
Solar desiccant cooling systems, Open cycle absorption / desorption solar cooling alternatives,
Advanced solar cooling systems, Thermal modeling and computer simulation for continuous and
intermittent solar refrigeration and air-conditioning systems, Refrigerant storage for solar absorption
cooling systems, Solar thermoelectric refrigeration and air-conditioning, Solar thermo acoustic cooling
and hybrid air-conditioning, Solar economics of cooling systems.
ESL860 Electrical Power System Analysis
3 credits (3-0-0)
Network modeling and short circuit analysis: Primitive network, Y bus an Z bus matrices formulation,
Power invariant transformations, Mutually coupled branches Z bus, Fault calculations using Z bus,
Power flow solutions: AC load flow formulations, Gauss-siedel method, Newton Raphson method,
Decoupled power flow method, Security analysis: Z bus methods in contingency analysis, Adding and
removing multiple lines, Interconnected systems, Single contingency and multiple contingencies,
Analysis by DC model, System reduction for contingency studies, State Estimation: Lone power flow
state estimator, Method of least squares, Statistics error and estimates, Test for bad data, Monitoring
the power system, Determination of variance, Improving state estimates by adding measurements,
Hierarchical state estimation, Dynamic state estimation, Power system stability: transient and dynamic
stability, Swing equation, Electric power relations, Concepts in transient stability, Method for stability
assessment, Improving system stability.
ESL870 Fusion Energy
3 credits (3-0-0)
Fission and fusion, Need for plasma, Lawson criterion, Confinement problem, Laser driven fusion,
Magnetic confinement, Plasma concept, Single particle motions in complex magnetic field geometries,
Equilibrium and stability, Cross field transport, Important heating schemes, Tokamak and magnetic
mirror, Reactor concepts, Current status.

ESL871 Advanced Fusion Energy


3 credits (3-0-0)
Pre-requisite: ESL 870
Tokamak confinement Physics, Particle Motions in a Tokamak, Torroidal equilibrium toroidal Stability,
High-beta Tokamak, Experimental observations, Fusion Technology, Commercial Tokamak Fusion power plant, Tandem - mirror fusion power plant, other Fusion reactors concepts, Inertial confinement
fusion reactors, Reactor cavity, Hybrid fusion / fission systems, Process heat and synthetic fuel
production.

ESL875 Alternative Fuels for transportation


3 credits (3-0-0)
An introduction to hydrocarbon fuelstheir availability and effect on environment, Gasoline and diesel
self ignition characteristics of the fuel, Octane number, Cetane number, Alternative fuels - liquid and
gaseous fuels, Physico-chemical characteristics, Alternative liquid fuels, Alcohol fuels - ethanol &
methanol, Fuel composition, Fuel induction techniques, Fumigation, Emission of oxygenates,
Applications to engines and automotive conversions, Biodiesel formulation techniques, Trans
esterification, Application in diesel engines, DME (Dimethyl ether), properties fuel injection
consideration general introduction to LPG and LNG, Compressed natural gas components, mixtures
and kits, fuel supply system and emission studies and control, Hydrogen combustion characteristics,
Flashback control techniques, Safety aspects and system development, NOx emission control, Biogas,
Producer gas and their characteristics system development for engine application.

Recently added Post Graduate courses

ESL746 Hydrogen Energy


3 Credits (3-0-0)
Hydrogen pathways introduction current uses, General introduction to infrastructure requirement for
hydrogen production, storage, dispensing and utilization, and hydrogen product ion power plants.
Thermal-Steam Reformation Thermo Chemical Water Splitting Gasification Pyrolysis, Nuclear
thermo catalytic and partial oxidation methods. Electrochemical Electrolysis Photo electro chemical.
Biological Photo Biological Anaerobic Digestion Fermentative Micro- organisms.
Physics and chemical properties General storage methods, compressed storage composites
cylinders Glass micro sphere storage Zeolities, Metal hydride storage, chemical hydride storage and
cryogenic storage.
Overview of hydrogen utilization: I.C. Engines, gas turbines, hydrogen burners, power plant, refineries,
domestic and marine applications. Hydrogen fuel quality, performance, COV, emission and combustion
characteristics of Spark Ignition engines for hydrogen, back firing, knocking, volumetric efficiency,
hydrogen manifold and direct injection, fumigation, NOx controlling techniques, dual fuel engine,
durability studies, field trials, emission and climate change.
Safety barrier diagram, risk analysis, safety in handling and refueling station, safety in vehicular and
stationary applications, fire detecting system, safety management, and simulation of crash tests.

ESL737 Plasma Based Materials Processing


3 Credits (3-0-0)
Plasma based processing of materials
Plasma fluid equations, single particle motions, unmagnetized plasma dynamics, diffusion and
resistivity, the DC sheath and probe diagnostics
Chemical reactions and equilibrium, chemical kinetics, particle and energy balance in discharges
DC discharges, RF discharges - Capacitively and inductively coupled, microwave, ECR and helicon
discharges
Etching for VLSI, film deposition, surface modification and other applications (plasma nitriding, plasma
ion implantation, biomedical and tribological applications)
High pressure non-equilibrium plasmas, thermal plasmas the plasma arc, the plasma as a heat
source, the plasma as chemical catalyst
Air pollution control, plasma pyrolysis and waste removal, plasma based metallurgy ore enrichment,
applications in ceramics, plasma assisted recycling

ESL755 Solar Photovoltaic Devices and Systems


3 Credits (3-0-0)
Photovoltaic materials, Materials in bulk and thin film forms. The role of microstructure (single crystal,
multicrystalline, polycrystalline, amorphous and nanocrytalline) in electrical and optical properties of the
materials. Need for different cell design, The technology route for making solar cells, Different methods
of characterization of materials and devices, Applications of photovoltaic for power generation from few
watts to Megawatts. Concentrating Solar Power generation using photoelectro chemical systems.

ESL734 Nuclear Energy


3 Credits (3-0-0)
Introduction: Scope of nuclear energy (fission and fusion energy), Typical Nuclear reactions
Basics Concepts: Binding Energy of a nuclear reaction, mass energy equivalence and conservation
laws, nuclear stability and radioactive decay, radioactivity calculations.
Interaction of Neutrons with Matter: Compound nucleus formation, elastic and inelastic scattering, cross
sections, energy loss in scattering collisions, polyenergetic neutrons, critical energy of fission, fission
cross sections, fission products, fission neutrons, energy released in fission, -ray interaction with matter
and energy deposition, fission fragments
The Fusion Reactor: The fission chain reaction, reactor fuels, conversion and breeding, the nuclear
power resources, nuclear power plant & its components, power reactors and current status.
Reactor Theory: Neutron flux, Ficks law, continuity equation, diffusion equation, boundary conditions,
solutions of the DE, Group diffusion method, Neutron moderation (two group calculation), one group
reactor equation and the slab reactor.
Health Hazards: radiation protection & shielding
Nuclear Fusion: Fusion reactions, reaction cross-sections, reaction rates, fusion power density, radiation
losses, ideal fusion ignition, Ideal plasma confinement & Lawson criterion.
Basic Plasma Concepts: Saha equation, Coulomb scattering, radiation from plasma, transport
phenomena
Plasma Confinement Schemes: Magnetic and inertial confinement, current status.

STANDARD COURSE TEMPLATES

FOR

REVISED COURSE CONTENTS

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Self-organizing dynamical systems

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

:3

5.

Course number

: ESL300

6.

Status
(Category for program)

: OE

Earned Credit (EC) 60

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

Every Sem.

PG students
1st Sem.

2nd Sem.

Alternate Year

R. P. Sharma
No

The basic idea of the course is to


develop mathematical tools to analyze
self organizing dynamical systems which
are encountered in science and
technology. The complex systems
formation and their applications in
Biological, Physical, Chemical and
Engineering are main themes.

14. Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Dynamical systems dissipative and area preserving, Patterns in Hamiltonian
dynamics invariants and symmetry, KAM theorem / coherent structures,
complexity and pattern formation, Belousov - Zhabutinsky reaction, LandauGinzburg / mean-field models, scaling fractals, Cellular automata, Wavelet
transforms, Phase transitions and order parameter, Criticality the border of order
and chaos, Entropy and direction of time, Negentropic systems, Self-organized
criticality, lattice models, Examples: Electrical circuits, Management systems,
Astrophysical systems, Plasma and magnetic surface systems, Biological
systems, Non-linear systems.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3

4
5

Topic
Dynamical systems dissipative and area preserving
Hamiltonian dynamics and KAM theorem, coherent
structures
Complexity and pattern formation, BelousovZhabutinsky reaction, Landau-Ginzburg/mean field
models
Scaling fractals, cellular automa, wavelet transforms
Criticality the border of order and chaos, entropy and
direction of time, negentropic systems, self organized
criticality, lattice models and other examples.
Course Total

No. of hours
12
7
8

7
8

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not applicable

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable


Module No

Experiment description

No. of hours

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Encounters with Chaos by Denny Gulick, McGraw-Hill, 1992.
2. Regular and Stochastic Motion, by A. J. Lichtenberg and M. A. Lieberman,
Springer- Verlag New York, 1983.
3. Nonlinear Oscillations, Dynamical Systems and Bifurcations of vector fields, by
John Guckenheimer and Philip Holmes, Springer- Verlag New York, 1983.
4. Introduction to Dynamics, by I. Percival and D. Richards, Cambridge University
Press, 1982.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities
Nil

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE

1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Energy, Ecology and Environment

3.

L-T-P structure

: 31-0

4.

Credits

: 4 credits

5.

Course number

: ESL 330

6.

Status
(category for program)

: OE

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

Earned Credits(EC) 60

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre NIL
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Some overlap with ESL
710
8.4 UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
NIL
8.5 Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
NIL
PG students

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

Every Sem.

1st Sem.

2nd Sem.

Alternate Year

Prof. Avinash Chandra, Prof. D. K.


Sharma, Prof. L. M. Das, Prof. (Mrs.)
M. G. Dastidar, Prof. T. C. Kandpal,
Dr. Subodh Kumar
No

To provide knowledge, understanding


and application oriented skills on energy
environment interaction, environmental
emissions from various energy resource
technology combinations and their
impact on ecosystems as well as various
measures and initiatives for emissions
mitigation.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Concepts of ecosystems and environment, Characteristics and types of
ecosystems, Autecology and synecology, Energy flow in ecosystems, Feedback
loops, Trophic webs, Eco-technology and Eco-development, Energyenvironment interaction, Impact of energy sources (coal, oil, natural gas, solar,
wind, biomass, hydro, geothermal, tidal, wave, ocean thermal and nuclear) on
environment, local regional and global implications, Approaches to mitigate
environmental emissions from energy sector, Global initiatives Kyoto Protocol,
Clean development mechanism, Case studies

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2

3
4
5
6
7

Topic
Concepts of ecosystems and environment,
characteristics and types of ecosystems
Energy flow in ecosystems, Carbon, nintrogen,
phosphorous and water cycles, Feedback loops,
Trophic webs, Ecotechnology and eco-development
Environmental emissions from extraction, conversion,
transport and utilization of fossil fuels
Impact of emissions from energy sector on
ecosystems, Local , regional and global impacts
Mitigation of environmental emissions from energy
sector
Global initiatives, Kyoto Protocol, Clean Development
Mechanism
Case studies on mitigation of emissions from energy
sector
Course Total

No. of hours
04
05

07
10
07
05
04
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


Practice of relevant numerical problems, Discussions on relevant issues, written and
oral presentations on related case studies
17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable
Module No
1

Experiment description

No. of hours

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Edward H.Thorndike, Energy and Environment: A Primer for Scientist and
Engineers, Addison Wesley Publishing Co. (1978).
2. Gilbert M.Masters, Introduction to Environmental Engineering and Science,
Prentice Hall of India (1994)
3. Richard Wilson and William J.Jones, Energy Ecology and the Environment,
Academic Press Inc. (1974).
4. David Coley: Energy and Climate Change, John Wiley and Sons, Ltd (2008)
5. Robert A. Ristinen and Jack J.Kraushaav, Energy and the Environment, John
Wiley and Sons Inc. (1999)

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)

19.4
19.5
19.6

Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure

19.7

Site visits

CDs and DVDs of related case studies,


projects undertaken around the globe
Room(s) for lectures and tutorial classes with
audio-visual presentation facility
Nearby power plants, waste treatment and
recycling units, manufacturing industries etc.

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

20%
60%
20%
-

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Non-Conventional Source of Energy

3.

L-T-P structure

: 302

4.

Credits

: 4 credits

5.

Course number

: ESL 340

6.

Status
(category for program)

: OE

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

Earned Credit (EC)60

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre NIL
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Some overlap with ESL
740
8.4 UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
NIL
8.5 Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
NIL
PG Students

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

Every Sem.

1st Sem.

2nd Sem.

Alternate Year

Prof. S. C. Mullick, Prof. G. N. Tiwari,


Prof. T. C. Kandpal, Dr. S. N. Garg,
No

To provide knowledge, understanding


and application oriented skills on all
renewable energy sources and relevant
technologies towards their effective
utilization for meeting energy demand.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Global & National energy scenarios, Forms & characteristics of renewable
energy sources, Solar radiation, Flat plate collectors, Solar concentrators,
Thermal Applications of solar energy, Photovoltaics technology and applications,
Energy storage, Energy from biomass, Thermochemical, Biochemical
conversion to fuels, biogas and its applications, Wind characteristics, Resource
assessment, Horizontal & vertical axis wind turbines, Electricity generation and
water pumping, Micro/Mini hydropower systems, Water pumping and conversion
to electricity, Hydraulic ram pump, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC),
Geothermal, Tidal and Wave energies, Material aspects of Renewable energy
technologies and systems.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

Topic
Global and national energy scenarios, issues and
challenges with fossil fuel utilization
Different renewable energy sources, their basic
characteristics and relevance
Assessment of renewable energy resource availability:
solar, wind, biomass, geothermal, ocean thermal etc
Flat plate solar collectors
Evacuated tubular solar collectors and solar
concentrators
Thermal applications of solar energy : water heating,
cooking, distillation, drying, space heating, space
cooling, thermal power generation
Photovoltaic technology and its applications
Thermochemical and biochemical conversion of
biomass
Improved cookstoves
Bio-ethanol and bio-diesel
Wind energy conversion systems, power generation
Windmills for water pumping
Mini and micro hydro systems
Geothermal energy utilization
Ocean thermal energy conversion
Energy from waves and tides
Integrated energy systems
Course Total

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable

No. of hours
02
02
05
04
02
03

04
03
01
03
04
01
03
02
01
01
01
42

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
A variety of experiments on various renewable energy
devices and systems will be conducted by the students.
In addition several demonstration experiments, local site
visits also will be conducted as the Laboratory
component of the course.

No. of hours
2 hours /
week

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. John Twidell and Tony Weir, Renewable Energy Resources Second Edition,
Taylor and Francis (2006)
2. G. N. Tewari and M. K. Ghosal, Renewable Energy Sources: Basic Principles
and Applications, Narosa Publishing House (2005)
19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)

19.4
19.5

Laboratory
Equipment

19.6
19.7

Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Cds and DVDs on successful installations of


renewable energy technologies, government
policies and programmes
Demonstration experiments
Resource measurement related equipment for
classroom demonstration
Room(s) for lectures and tutorial classes
Visits to nearby renewable energy installations

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

40%
50%
10%
-

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

2.

Course Title

3.

L-T-P structure

: Centre for Energy Studies

: ENERGY CONSERVATION AND MAGEMENT


: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 350

6.

Status
(category for program)

: OE

Earned Credit (EC) 60

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre NIL
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
NIL
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

Every Sem.

PG Students

1st Sem.

2nd Sem.

Alternate
Year

Profs. S.C. Kaushik, V. Dutta, Dr.


S.N. Garg

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

No

To save envieronment and reduce


dependancy on fossil fuel energy, more
and more energy ha to be produced
from renewaqble. Judicious use of
energy, through energy conservation
mesures is a viterl step in this regard.
There is scope for energy saving in
residential sector, industries and
commercial establisments. New
technologies and new products are
coming up in the market, forenergy
saving. Knowledge of thermodynamic
principles, usage of thermal insulation in
buildings, lighting devices and new
electric motor, is important. Energyaudit is an important tool to achieve the
goal.

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Thermodynamic basis of energy conservation, Irreversible processes,
Reversibility and Availability , Exergy and available energy, Energy conservation
in HVAC systems and thermal power plants, Solar systems, Second law
efficiency and LAW, Heat pumps and Heat pipes for space conditioning, Heat
recovery and Heat exchangers, Furnaces and cooling towers, Energy
conservation in buildings, U-Value of walls / roof, Ventilation systems - Fan and
ducts Lighting Systems Different light sources and luminous efficacy,
Insulation use Materials properties, Optimum thickness, Thermo economic
analysis, Energy conservation in electrical devices and systems, Economic
evaluation of energy conservation measures, Electric motors and transformers,
Inverters and UPS, Voltages stabilizers, Energy audit and Instrumentation.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Topic
Thermodynamic Principles Energy & Exergy
Energy Conservation in HVAC Systems &
Thermal Power Plant
Energy Conservation in Buildings Usage of
Insulaions, Optional thickness
Energy Conservation in Lighting Systems
Energy Conservation in Electrical Devices and
System (motors, transformers etc.)
Energy -audit
Economic analysis of conservation measure
Course Total

No. of
hours
10
06
06
04
10
04
03
43

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable


N/A

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable


Module No
1

Experiment description

No. of hours

COURSE TOTAL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Industrial Energy Management and Utilization, L.C. White, P.S. Schmitt and D.R.
Brown, Hemisphere Publishing Corporaion, Washington, Edition 1988
2. Energy Efficiencies for Engineers and Technologist, T.O. Estop and D.R. Crobt,
Longman Scientific & Technical, Esex (UK), 1990 Edition
3. Energy Management Handbook, W.C. Turner, Fairment Prss Inc. USA, 3rd Edition,
1997.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

No
No
Yes
No
No
LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

No

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

No
No
NO
No
No

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE

1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

2.

Course Title

3.

L-T-P structure

: Centre for Energy Studies


: DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION METHODS
: 3-1-0

4.

Credits

: 4

5.

Course number

: ESL 360

6.

Status
(category for program)

: OE

Earned Credit (EC) 60 The students should have basic


knowledge of semiconductor physics.

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre NIL
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
NIL
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

Every Sem.

PG Students

1st Sem.

2nd Sem.

Alternate
Year

Prof. A.Ganguli and Prof. V.Dutta

Yes

The course will introduce the students to


most of the important aspects of Direct
Energy Conversion Technologies, which are
the upcoming technologies for the future.
This will enable them to gain understanding
of these devices and how these may be
combined
with
other
conventional
technologies, so as to arrive at optimal
solutions for different applications.

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Energy classification, Sources and utilization, Principle of energy conversion, Indirect /
direct energy conversion, Basic principles of design and operations of (i) Thermoelectric
(ii) Thermionic convertors (iii) Photovoltaic energy systems (iv) Fuel cells (v) Plasma
diodes (vi) Magneto hydrodynamic Power generators and (vii) Advanced energy
conversion systems.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1

Topic
Energy classification, Sources and utilization,
Principles of energy conversion, indirect / direct energy
conversion
Principles of design and operation of:
(i) Magneto-hydrodynamic power generators
(ii) Plasma diodes
(iii) Thermoelectric Generation: Materials and Design
(iv) Thermionic Generation: Materials and Design
(v) Fuel Cell: Basic Principles & Operation
(vi) Photovoltaic devices: Materials, Design and
Characterization
Advanced Energy Conversion Systems (Advanced
Fusion Machines)
Course Total

No. of
hours
1

12
3
3
3
7
12
1

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities:


The problems will be used to clarify the concepts and discuss the impact of material properties
and design aspects on the conversion efficiency.

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable


Module No

Experiment description

No. of hours

COURSE TOTAL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1)
2)
3)
4)
5)

Fahrenbuch A. L. and. Bube R. H, Fundamentals of solar cells, Academic Press, 1983.


Green, Martin, A. High Efficiency Silicon Solar Cells, Trans Tech. Publication, 1987.
Culp A.W., Principles of Energy Conversion, Tata McGraw Hill, 2000.
Angrist S.W., Direct Energy Conversion, Allyn and Bacon, 1982.
Richard J Rosa, Magnetohydrodynamic Energy Conversion, McGraw Hill, NY, 1968.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

No
No
Yes
No
No
LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

No

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

No
No
NO
No
No

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

POST GRADUATE COURSES

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Basic Thermal Engineering

3.

L-T-P structure

: 1-0-0

4.

Credits

: Zero (No Credit)

5.

Course number

: ESL 704

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (Compulsory Bridge Audit Course)

Nil

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

First Semester

Prof. S.C. Kaushik and Dr. K.A.


Subramanian
No

This is a bridge course for nonmechanical engineering background


students for JEN programme of CES. To
introduce
the
fundamental
of
themodynamics required in thermal
process, heat transfer and fluid
mechanics.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


First and second law of thermodynamics, Thermal fluid systems, Standard
cycles, Mixtures of gases, Heat transfer, Fluid mechanics, Practical examples,
Use of steam tables.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Topic
Introduction
Laws of thermodynamics
Applications of Laws of thermodynamics
Thermo fluid systems
Standard Cycles
Mixtures of gases
Fluid Mechanics
Heat Transfer
Numerical Examples

Course Total

No. of hours
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
2

14

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. L.C., White, P.S. Schmidt and R.D. Brown, Industrial Energy Management and
Utilization, Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1988.
2.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities
Nil

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

10
20
10
10
Lectures

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Energy, Ecology and Environment

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL710

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JES (PC) & JEN (PE)

Nil

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

For morning course, UG


students who have done
ESL330 are not allowed.
The evening course is for
sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

2nd

Sem.

Every Year

Prof. L.M. Das, Prof. A. Chandra


Prof. M.G.Dastidar, Prof. T.C.
Kandpal and Dr. Subodh Kumar
No

To
introduce
the
concepts
of
Interrelationship
between
energy,
ecology
and
environment,
Environmental
issues
related
to
harnessing and utilization of various
sources of energy and Related
environmental degradation.

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Interrelationship between energy and environment, Sun as a source of energy, nature of
its radiation. Biological processes, photosynthesis Autecology and Synecology,
Population, Community Ecosystem (wetland, terrestrial, marine) Food chains,
Ecosystem theories. Sources of energy, Classification of energy sources, Environmental
issues related to harnessing to fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas, geothermal, tidal,
nuclear energy, solar, wind, hydropower, biomass, Energy flow and nutrient cycling in
ecosystes, Environmental degradation, primary and secondary pollutants. Thermal/
radioactive pollution, air and water pollution. Micro climatic effects of pollution.
Pollution from stationary and mobile sources, Biological effects of radiation, heat and
radioactivity disposal, Acid rain, Global warming and green house gases, Ozone layer
depletion.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5

6
7
8
9
10

Topic
Interrelation between energy, ecology and environment.
Sun as a source of energy, nature of its radiations.
Population, Community Ecosystem (wetland, terrestrial, marine)
Food chains, Ecosystem theories. Sources of energy,
Classification of energy sources
Environmental issues related to harnessing of fossils fuels, Energy
flow and nutrient cycling in ecosystem and environmental
degradation
Air and water pollution
Pollution from stationary and mobile sources,
Biological effects of radiation, heat and radioactivity disposal,
Global warming and green house gases
Ozone layer depletion
Course Total

No. of
hours
2
3
4
5
5

8
3
7
3
2
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
COURSE TOTAL

No. of hours
Nil

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Introduction to Environmental Engineering and Science (IInd edition) by Gilbert M.
Masters, Prentice Hall of India Private Limited 1998
2. Environmental Science by G. Ryler Miller Jr.
3. Air Pollution Control Engineering by De Nevers
4. Energy. Beyond oil by Freser Armstrong and Katherine Blundell
5. Ecology by Aulay Mackenzie, Andy S.Ball &Sonia Virdee

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure

19.7

Site visits

Powerpoint presentation, OHP and Black Board


Facilities.

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 711

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JES & JEN (PC)

: FUEL TECHNOLOGY

THERMODYNAMICS, HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre NIL
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
NIL
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

EEZ, CSZ, MAZ, BMZ for


Morning course.
The evening course is for
sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

Every Sem.
Profs. D.K. Sharma, M.G.
DASTIDAR, Dr. K. GADGIL

No

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


NO LABORATORY ACTIVITIES. Solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, Coal as a
source of energy and chemicals in India, Coal preparation, Carbonization,
Gasification and liquefaction of coal and lignite, Principle of combustion,
Petroleum and its derived products, Testing of liquid fuels, Petroleum refining
processes, Inter-conversion of fuels, Natural gases and its derivatives, sources,
potential, Gas hydrates, Combustion appliances for solid, liquid and gaseous
fuels, Introduction to nuclear fuel, RDF, Bio-fuels, etc.

To give an idea about different solid,


liquid, gaseous fuels, thair origin,
composition, classification, combustion
& conversion processes .

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Topic
Principles of Combustion
Solid, liquid and gaseous fuels

Coal as a Source of Energy and Chemical in India


Coal Preparation, Carbonisation, gasification and
liquefaction of coal and lignite
Petroleum, properties and its derived products
Inter-conversion of fuels
Gaseous fuels including natural gas and uses
Combustion of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels

Types of combustion
Introduction to nuclear fuels

Course Total
16. Brief description of tutorial activities
NIL

No. of hours
2
4
3
12
4
3
2
8
2
2

42

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable


Module No
1

Experiment description

No. of hours

COURSE TOTAL

18. Suggested texts books and reference materials


1. Sarkar, S., Fuels and Combustion Orient Longman, 2nd Editions, 1990
2. Francis Peter, Fuels and Fuel Technology, 1st Edition, printed in Great Oritain
by A.Wheatan & Co. Ltd. Of Exefer, 1965.
s19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if
any)

19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure

19.7

Site visits

NO
Power Point Presentation facilities, OHP and Black
Board

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: BASIC ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

3.

L-T-P structure

: 1-0-0

4.

Credits

: 0 (No Credit)

5.

Course number

: ESL 712

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (Compulsory Bridge audit course for non


electrical students)

None

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

Nil
Nil
More than 60%
More than 60%
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

M.Tech.(Energy Studies) ,
M.Tech (Energy and
EnvironementELECTRICAL),B.Tech.

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

I Semester
Profs. R.Balasubramanian,
T.S.Bhatti, V.Dutta
No

The students in M.Tech. (Energy and


Environment) without a background in
Electrical Engineering find difficulty in
coping up with the courses involving the
related concepts. The bridge course is
designed to refresh the students
knowledge to bring them at par with
other students with a background in
Electrical Engineering.

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Fundamental Laws of Electrical Engineering, Phasor Concept, Basics of Electric
Network: DC and AC, Basics of Magnetic Circuits, Single Phase and Three
Phase Circuits, Unbalanced three-phase circuit, Variable speed drives, demand
controls.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Topic
Fundamental Laws of Electrical Engineering
Phasor Concept: R,L,C and their Combination
Basics of Electric Network: DC
Basics of Electric Network: AC
Basics of Magnetic Circuits
Single Phase and Three Phase Circuits
Unbalanced three-phase circuit

Course Total

No. of hours
1
2
2
3
2
3
1

14

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
COURSE TOTAL

No. of hours

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


3. Electrical Engineering Fundamentals by Vincent Del Toro, Prentice
Hall1987.
4. Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering by E.Hughes, Longman

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP

Nil

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Power Plant Engineering

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 714

6.
7.

Status
(category for program)
Nil
Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

: JES (PE)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

1st

1st Sem.

Sem.

2nd Sem.

Alternate Year

Prof. M.K.G Babu, Prof. S.C. Mullick,


Prof. L.M.Das, Dr. K.A.
Subramanian.
No

Power plants include Steam Turbine Plants


(which includes Nuclear or Solar Thermal),
Gas Turbine Plants, I.C. Engines, or Hydro
Plants. The course will make it possible for
the students to have a clear understanding of
these technologies to be able to (i) select an
appropriate

type

of

plant

for

given

requirements under different situations (ii)


select suitable components/equipments (iii)
understand

the

plants/equipments.

operation

of

these

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Types of thermal power stations, Steam power stations based on fossil
fuels, Economy and thermal scheme of the steam power stations, Thermal
power plant equipment boilers, super heaters, super critical steam generator,
economizers, feed water heater, condensers, combustion chamber and gas
loop, turbines, cooling towers, etc. Gas turbine power stations, Combined cycle
power plants, Internal combustion engine plant for peak load, standby and start
up, Elements of hydropower and wind turbine, Elements of nuclear power plants,
Nuclear reactors and fuels. Recent advances in power plants (IGCC, super
critical power plants, etc.). Case studies, Introduction to solar power generation,
Sterling engine, Decentralized power technologies.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Topic
Steam power stations
Gas turbine power stations
Internal combustion engine plant
Hydropower and wind turbine
Nuclear power plants
Recent advances in power plants
Introduction to solar power generation, Sterling engine,
Decentralized power technologies

Course Total

No. of hours
12
10
6
4
5
3
2

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable


17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable
18. Suggested texts and reference materials
1. Power Plant Engineering by F.T.Morse, D.Van.Nostran, Newyork, 1953
2. Power Plant Engineering by P.K.Nag, Tata McGraw Hill 2008
3. Power Plant Technology by M.M.EI- Wakil , McGraw Hill 1984

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Nil
Nil
Photos and videos of Power plant
Nil
Nil
Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP

Power Plant Visit (optional)

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

25%
15%
35%
Nil
Analysis of data from case study available in
literature and self designed power plant (virtual)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Power Generation, Transmission and Distribution

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL718

6.
7.

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4

Status
(category for program)
NIL
Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

: JES (JESP) & JEN (Module Course)

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre

8.5 Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

Nil
Nil
nil
5 -10 %
EEL796, EEL794,
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

10.

Frequency of offering

2nd Sem every year

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

Prof. T S Bhatti

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

No

The subject will enhance the


understanding of the students
on power system dynamic
stability, generation control,
AC and DC transmission,
reactive
power
control,
distribution systems along with
conventional and intelligent
controls.

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Generation: Synchronous generator operation, Power angle characteristics and
the infinite bus concept, dynamic analysis and modeling of synchronous
machines, Excitations systems, Prime-mover governing systems, Automatic
generation control;
Auxiliaries: Power system stabilizer, Artificial intelligent controls, Power quality;
AC Transmission: Overhead and cables, Transmission line equations,
Regulation and transmission line losses, Reactive power compensation, Flexible
AC transmission;
HVDC transmission: HVDC converters, advantages and economic
considerations, converter control characteristics, analysis of HVDC link
performance, Multi-terminal DC system, HVDC and FACTS;
Distribution: Distribution systems, conductor size, Kelvins law, performance
calculations and analysis, Distribution inside and commercial buildings entrance
terminology, Substation and feeder circuit design considerations, distribution
automation, Futuristic power generation.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1

Topic

No. of hours

Synchronous generator operation, Power angle


characteristics and the infinite bus concept,
dynamic analysis
modeling of synchronous machines, Excitations
systems, Prime-mover governing systems,
Automatic generation control
Power system stabilizer, Artificial intelligent
controls, Power quality;

Overhead and cables, Transmission line


equations, Regulation and transmission line
losses, Reactive power compensation, Flexible
AC transmission
HVDC converters, advantages and economic
considerations, converter control
characteristics, analysis of HVDC link
performance, Multi-terminal DC system, HVDC
and FACTS
Distribution systems, conductor size, Kelvins
law, performance calculations and analysis,
Distribution inside and commercial buildings

entrance terminology
Substation and feeder circuit design
considerations, distribution automation,
Futuristic power generation
Course Total

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
nil

No. of hours

COURSE TOTAL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Power Generation, Operation, and Control by Allen J. Wood and Bruce F. Wollenberg,
John Wiley & Sons, 2003.
2. Power System Control and Stability by P. M. Anderson and A. A. Fouad, Wiley-IEEE
Press, 2002
3. Electric Energy Systems Theory: An Introduction by Olle I Elgerad, T M H Edition,
1982
4. HVDC Transmission: Power Conversions Applications in Power Systems by Chan-Ki
Kim, Vijay K. Sood, Gil-Soo Jang, Seong-Joo Lim, Seok-Jin Lee, Wiley IEEE Press,
2009
5. Electric Power Transmission System Engineering Analysis and Design by Turan
Gonen, CRC Press, 2009
6. Power system stability and control by P. Kundur. McGraw-Hill, 1994.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure

19.7

Site visits

Power Point Presentation and OHP, Black Board


Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

Some typical examples

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Energy Conservation

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3 Credits

5.

Course number

: ESL 720

6.
7.

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Status
(category for program)
NIL
Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

: JES & JEN (PC)

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title) none


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of
teaching /or Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

Prof. S.C. Kaushik,


Prof.V Dutta &
Dr. S. N. Garg

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

No

II semester

There is very good scope for saving energy, by


using it judiciously. During these days of saving
the environment, energy conservation plays a vital
role. The government of India has passed Energy
Conservation Act-2003 and Energy Conservation
Building Code (ECBC-2007), in this regard. By
observing energy efficient measures there is
tremendous scope of saving energy in industry,
built environment, transport etc.

13.

Course objective
(about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design


activities):
Introduction, Thermodynamics of energy conservation, Energy and
exergy concepts, Irreversibility and second law analysis and efficiency
of thermal systems such as mixing, throttling, drying and solar thermal
systems, Thermal power plant cycles. Refrigeration and air conditioning
cycles, thermal insulation in energy conservation, energy conservation
through controls, electric energy conservation in building heating and
lighting, energy efficient motors, Tariffs and power factor improvement
in electrical systems, Energy conservation in domestic appliances,
transport, energy auditing, energy savings in boilers and furnaces,
energy conservation Act, Energy conservation in small scale domestic
appliances and agriculture.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3

4
5
6

7
8
9
10

Topic
Introduction
Thermodynamics of energy conservation,
Energy and exergy concepts
Irreversibility and second law analysis and
efficiency of thermal systems such as mixing,
throttling, drying and solar thermal systems
Thermal power plant cycles, refrigeration and air
conditioning cycles
Thermal insulation in energy conservation,
energy conservation through controls
Electric energy conservation in building heating
and lighting, energy efficient motors, energy
savings in boilers and furnaces
Tariffs and power factor improvement in
electrical systems,
Energy Auditing
Energy Conservation Act
Energy conservation in small scale domestic
appliances and agriculture.
Course Total

No. of
hours
1
4
4

5
4
12

4
4
2
2
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


NIL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Energy Efficiency for Engineers and Technologists, First Edition, 1990, by TD Eastop
and DR Croft, Longman Group UK Ltd.
2. Industrial Energy Management and Utilization, 1988, by LC Wittie, P S Schmidt and D
R Brown, Hemisphere Publishing Company.
3. Energy Management Hand Book, Third Edition, 1997, by W C Turner, The Fairmont
Press Inc.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
Black board, LCD projector, OHP
NIL

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
NA
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Integrated Energy Systems

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 722

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JES & JEN (PE)


None

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Pattern of fuel consumption: agricultural, domestic, industrial and community needs,
Projection of energy demands, Substitution of conventional sources by alternative
sources and more efficient modern technologies, Potential, availability as well as
capacity of solar, wind, biogas, natural gas, forest produce, tidal, geothermal, minihydro and other modern applications, Hybrid and integrated energy systems, Total
energy concept and waste heat utilization, Energy modeling to optimize different
systems.

The evening course is for sponsored


students with minimum 1 year of
teaching /or Industrial experience.
Morning UG and PG students are not
allowed in the evening course.

2nd Semester

Profs. T.C. Kandpal and S.C. Kaushik


No

To introduce the patter of fuel consumption,


energy demand, various renewable sources
of energy and modern applications.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6

Topic
Pattern of fuel consumption
Projection of energy demands
Alternative sources and more efficient modern
technologies
Hybrid and integrated energy systems
Total energy concept and waste heat utilization
Energy modeling to optimize different systems
Course Total

No. of hours
4
4
12
8
8
6
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable


17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable
18. Suggested texts and reference materials
1. Laurie Barrtom, Renewable Energy Sources for fuels and Electricity, Island
Press 1993.
2. Tokio Ohta; Energy Technology, Pergamon, Press 1994.
3. John Twidell and Tony Weir, Renewable Energy Resources, E&FN Spon.,
1986.
4. R. Hunter and G. Elliot Wind-Diesel Systems, Cambridge University Press,
1994.
19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre : Centre for Energy Studies


Proposing the course

2.

Course Title

: Energy Audit

(< 45 characters)
3.

L-T-P structure

: 1-0-0

4.

Credits

: 0 (No credit)

5.

Course number

: ESL 725

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (Compulsory bridge course)


Nil

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
The evening course is for
sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of teaching
/or Industrial experience.
Morning UG and PG students
are not allowed in the evening
course.

2nd

Sem.
every year

Prof. S.C. Kaushik, Dr. S.N. Garg, Dr.


K.A. Subramanian
No
As India needs about 50,000 Energy
Manager and 20,000 Energy Auditor for
implementing
energy
efficiency
measures, the course would be
instrumental to get the target as well as

bridge
the
knowledge
gap
on
fundamentals of energy efficiency for
non-electrical
and
non-mechanical
engineering background students for
taking up the advanced level courses
such as cogeneration and energy
efficiency, etc.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Energy Audit concepts, Basic elements and measurements, Mass and energy
balances, Scope of energy auditing for Industries, Evaluation of energy
conserving opportunities and environmental management, Preparation and
presentation of energy audit reports, some case studies and potential energy
savings.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5

Topic
Energy Audit concepts
Scope of energy auditing for Industries
Evaluation of energy conserving opportunities and
environmental management
Preparation and presentation of energy audit reports
Case studies for industries, buildings and transport
sectors, and potential energy savings.

Course Total

No. of hours
2
1
3
1
7

14

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1

1. Beauro of Energy Efficiency (BEE) : www.bee-india.nic.in


2. The Energy and Resource Institute (TERI): http://www.teriin.org/
3. Energy and Buildings Efficiency, Air Quality and Conservation by Joseph
B.Utrick, Nova Science Publishers, Inc, New York, 2009
4. Investment Grade Energy Audit by Shirley J.Hansen and James W.Brown, The
Fairmount Press, INC, 2005

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Power Point Projector, OHP and Black Board
Nil

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

20%
30%
50%
Nil
Nil

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: DIERECT ENERGY CONVERSION

3.

L-T-P structure

3-0-0

4.

Credits

5.

Course number

6.

Status
(Category for program)

: JES (PC) & JEN (PE)

ESL730

Nil

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1 Existing UG course(s) of the


Department/Centre
8.2 Proposed UG course(s) of the
Department/Centre
8.3 Approved PG course(s) of the
Department/Centre
8.4 UG/PG course(s) from other
Department/Centre
8.5 Equivalent course(s) from existing UG
course(s)
9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

ESL-360 Direct Energy


Conversion 4credits (3-1-0)
<5%
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

The evening course is for


sponsored
students
with
minimum 1 year of teaching /or
Industrial experience. Morning
UG and PG students are not
allowed in the evening course.
2nd Sem. Every Year.

A. Chandra, G. N. Tiwari, R. P.
Sharma, A. Ganguli, V. Datta,
A. K. Sharma, H. D. Pandey,
Subodh Kumar.

No

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Basic science of energy conversion ,Indirect verses direct conversion, Physics
of semiconductor junctions for photovoltaic and photo- electrochemical
conversion of solar energy ,Fabrication and evaluation of various solar cells in
photovoltaic power generation systems, Technology and physics of thermoelectric generations, Thermal electric materials and optimization studies, Basic
concepts and design considerations of MHD generators, Cycle analysis of MHD
systems, thermonic power conversion and plasma diodes, Thermo dynamics
and performance of fuel cells and their applications.

To Provide adequate inputs on a variety


of issues relating to Direct Energy
conversion Systems.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

Topic

No. of hours

Introduction
Physics of semiconductors junctions for P.V.&
Photo-electrochemical conversion
Fabrication and evaluation of various solar cells
and their applications.
Technology and Physics of Thermoelectric
generations, Multi stage generators.
Thermoelectric materials and optimization
studies.
Thermonic power conversion and plasma
diodes.
Basic concepts and design considerations of
MHD generators
Cycle analysis of MHD systems
Thermodynamics and performance of fuel cells
and their applications

2
4
6
5
3
4
5
3
10

10
Course Total
16. Brief description of tutorial activities
NIL

42

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
nil

No. of hours

COURSE TOTAL

Nil

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


5. Stanley W. Angrist, Direct Energy Conversion , Allyn and Bacon Inc.1982
6. Sheldon S. L. Chang, Prentice Hall Inc.1963
7. Richard J. Rosa, Magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion McgrawHill
1968.
8. Vladimir S. Bagotsky. Fuel Cell Problems And Solutions, John Wiley &
Sons, Inc. 2009

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Power point and OHP, Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

nil
nil
nil
nil
nil

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Bioconversion and Processing of Waste

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 732

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JES (OE)

NIL

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
NIL
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

NIL

1st Sem. every year

Prof. M.G. Dastidar


Prof. D.K. Sharma
Dr. K. Gadgil
No

To give an idea about different biomass


and other solid waste materials as
energy source and their processing and
utilization for recovery of energy and
other
valuable
products.
A
comprehensive
knowledge of how
wastes are utilized for recovery of value
would be immensely useful for the
students from all fields.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Biomass and solid wastes, Broad classification, Production of biomass,
photosynthesis, Separation of components of solid wastes and processing
techniques, Agro and forestry residues utilisation through conversion routes:
biological, chemical and thermo chemical, Bioconversion into biogas,
mechanism, Composting technique, Bioconversion of substrates into alcohols,
Bioconversion into hydrogen, Thermo chemical conversion of biomass,
conversion to solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, pyrolysis, gasification, combustion,
Chemical conversion processes, hydrolysis and hydrogenation, Solvent
extraction of hydrocarbons, Fuel combustion into electricity, case studies.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1.
2.
3.
4
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

Topic
Introduction to biomass and other solid wastes
Classification of solid wastes
Biomass wastes, Compositions, Characteristics,
Properties, Structural Components
Production of Biomass and Biomass wastes,
Photosynthesis
Utilization of wastes as feedstocks for chemicals
Preprocessing techniques and separation of
components for feedstocks preparation
Thermo chemical conversion of wastes into solid,
liquid gases through pyrolsis and gasification
Combustion principles and appliances for utilization of
solid wastes
Bioconversion of wastes into biogas, alcohols and
other products
Chemical conversion processes, hydrolysis and
hydrogenation, Solvent extraction of hydrocarbons
Fuel combustion into electricity, case studies
Course Total

No. of hours
1
2
4
2
4
3
6
6
9
3
2
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not Applicable

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Sofer, Samir S. (ed.), Zaborsky, R. (ed.), Biomass Conversion Processes for
Energy and Fuels, New York, Plenum Press, 1981
2. Hagerty, D.Joseph; Pavoni, Joseph L; Heer, John E., Solid Waste
Management, New York, Van Nostrand, 1973
3. George Tchobanoglous, Hilary Theisen and Samuel Vigil Prsl: Tchobanoglous,
George Theisen, Hillary Vigil, Samuel, Integrated Solid Waste management:
Engineering Principles and Management issues, New York, McGraw Hill,
1993

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure

19.7

Site visits

NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
Power point projector and OHP, Black Board
Facilities
NIL

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
THEORY

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 735

6.
7.

Status
(category for program)
Nil
Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

: JEN (PE)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre NIL
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
NIL
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of
offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

Prof. D.K. Sharma, K. GADGIL

12.

Will the course require any visiting


faculty?

No

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

1st Sem. Every Year

Appraise about ionic waste generation,


disposal biomedical wastes, Environmental
efforts.

13.

Course objective (about 50


words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Sources and classification of hazardous wastes, Assessment of exposure
potential: Transport processes, Overview of waste management problems,
Guidelines for handling hazardous wastes, Energy from organic wastes,
Chemical waste treatment processes, Physical waste treatment processes,
Biological waste treatment processes, Thermal waste treatment processes,
Waste elimination option, Domestic hazardous waste, Hazardous waste
management options, Toxic metallic waste, Biomedical waste, Remediation of
hazardous waste contaminated soils, Engineering issues in waste remediation,
case studies.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Topic
Sources and classification of hazardous wastes
Assessment of exposure potential, transport processes
Overview of waste management problem
Energy from organic wastes
Chemical waste treatment processes
Physical waste treatment processes
Biological waste treatment processes
Thermal waste treatment processes
Waste elimination option
Domestic hazardous waste
Hazardous waste management option
Toxic metallic wastes
Biomedical wastes
Remediation of hazardous waste contaminated soils
Engineering issues in waste remediation case studies
Course Total

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

No. of hours
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
6
2
2
2
4
4
2
2
42

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable


Module No
1

Experiment description

No. of hours

COURSE TOTAL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


9. Lagrega, H.D., Buckingham, P.L. , Evans, J.C., Hazardous Waste Mnagement,
2nd Edition, MC-Graw Hills
10. Rao, C.S., Environmental Pollution Control Engineering, New Age International
Publishers, Fifth Reprint, 1997.
11. Metcaff and Eddy, Waste Water Engineering, Mc-Graw Hill Publishing
Company, 1995
12. Davis and Commelt, Environmental Engineeridng, Mc-Graw Hill Publishing
Company, 1998

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure

19.7

Site visits

NO
OHP and Power Point Presentation facilities
besides the conventional black board.

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Power from Renewables and Environmental


Impacts

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 736

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (Module)

NIL

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title) None

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is


for sponsored students
with minimum 1 year of
teaching /or Industrial
experience. Morning
UG and PG students
are not allowed in the
evening course.

10.

Frequency of offering

II semester

Prof TC Kandpal &


Dr S N Garg

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective
(about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Environmental impacts of fossil fuel based power generation, Renewable
electricity and key elements, Hydropower and its constraints, Wind energy:
technology and economics, Resources, systems and regional strategies, Solar
thermal power, Photovoltaic technology, Biomass power, tidal power, OTEC,
Global climate change, C02 reduction potential of renewable energy, Social
considerations, standalone systems and grid integration.

No

The objective of this course is to study the potential of


power generation from renewables and quantify its
impact on carbon dioxide mitigation. It includes solar
thermal power, power from wind, biomass power, tidal
power and OTEC power. Some of the advanced
countries around the world are harnessing this power.
The course will include latest technologies related to
different power resources.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Topic

No. of hours

Introduction
Environmental impacts of fossil fuel based power
generation
Renewable electricity and key elements
Hydropower and its constraints
Wind energy: technology and economics
Resources, systems and regional strategies
Solar thermal power, Photovoltaic technology
Biomass power, tidal power, OTEC
Global climate change, C02 reduction potential of
renewable energy
Social considerations, standalone systems and grid
integration
Course Total

1
4
4
6
5
3
6
6
4
2
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


NIL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Renewables and Efficient Electric Power Systems, 2004 Edition, by Gilbert M.
Master, John Wiley and Sons.
2. Renewable Energy, Second Edition, (first published in 2004), by Godfrey
Boyle, Oxford University Press.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP

NIL

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
NA
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: POWER

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL - 738

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (PE)

SYSTEM PLANNING &


OPERATION

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

ESL-860, Electrical Power System Analysis

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

NO
NO
NO
NO
NO

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of
teaching /or Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

2nd Semester
Prof. R. Balasubramanian
Prof. T.S. Bhatti

NO

12.

Will the course require any visiting


faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)


Generation System Capacity Adequacy Planning : Probabilistic models of
generating unit outage performance and system load, Evaluation of loss of load
and loss of energy indices, Probabilistic production costing, Inclusion of
renewable energy sources in the reliability analysis.
Interconnected Systems : Multi-area reliability analysis, Power pool operation
and power/energy exchange contracts, Quantification of economic and reliability
benefits by pool operation.
Demand / Energy Forecasting : Sector-wise peak demand and energy
forecasting by trend and econometric projection methods.
Optimal Generation Expansion Planning : Formulation of least cost
optimization problem incorporating the capital, operating and maintenance costs
of candidate plants of different types (thermal, hydro, nuclear, renewables etc)
and minimum assured reliability constraints, Optimization techniques for solution
by linear, nonlinear and dynamic programming approaches, Case studies.

To introduce the theory and


techniques involved in forecasting
the demand and arriving at the
optimal mix of the resources
required to meet the demand by
the planning target year.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Topic
Generation System Capacity Adequacy
Planning
Interconnected Systems
Demand / Energy Forecasting
Optimal Generation Expansion Planning

Course Total

No. of hours
10
10
10
12

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1

No. of hours

COURSE TOTAL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. R. Billinton & R.N. Allan, Reliability Evaluation of Power Systems, Plenum Press,1984.

2. R.L. Sullivan, Power System Planning, McGraw Hill International Book Company,
1977
3. X. Wang & J.R. MacDonald, McGraw Hill Book Company, 1994.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

GAM optimization software

PC LAB for running the software


Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

50%
25%
25%

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Non-Conventional Sources of Energy

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL-740

6.

Status
(Category for program)

: JES & JEN (PC)

Nil

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1 Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre

8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

ESL-340 Non Conventional


sources Of Energy 4
credits (3-0-2) <5%
NIL
NIL

NIL
NIL
The evening course is for
sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.
1st Sem. Every Year

Profs.G.N.Tiwari,R.P.Sharma,A.Ganguli,
Drs. S.N.Garg, K.Gadgil, H.D.Pandey,
Subodh Kumar.

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

No

The Course will create awareness


among
students
about
NonConventional
sources
of
energy
technologies and provide adequate
inputs on a variety of issues.

14. Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Types of non-conventional sources, Solar energy principles and applications,
efficiency of solar thermal and PV systems, Biomass: generation,
characterization, Biogas: aerobic and anaerobic bio-conversion processes,
microbial reactions purification, properties of biogas. Storage and enrichment,
Tidal and wind energy potential and conversion efficiency, Mini/micro hydro
power: classification of hydropower schemes, classification of water turbine,
Turbine theory, Essential components of hydroelectric system, system efficiency
,Fusion: Basic concepts, fusion reaction physics, Thermonuclear fusion reaction
criteria, Confinement schemes, Inertial and magnetic confinement fusion,
Current status ,Geothermal: Geothermal regions, geothermal sources, dry rock
and hot aquifer analysis Geothermal energy conversion technologies, OTEC.
15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)
]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5

6
7

Topic
Introduction, Solar energy basics, Solar thermal
systems
Solar heating/ cooling of buildings
Solar thermal power generation, Solar P.V.
Biomass: Generation, Characterization
Bio gas: Aerobic and Anaerobic bio conversion
processes, Microbial reactions purification,
Properties of biogas Storage and Enrichment
Tidal and wind energy
Fusion: Introduction, Basic concepts, Fusion
reaction physics, Thermonuclear reaction criterion,
Confinement schemes, Inertial and magnetic
confinement fusion.
Mini/micro hydro power: Classification of
hydropower schemes, Classification of water
turbine, Turbine theory, Essential components of
hydroelectric system
Geothermal: Geothermal regions, Types of
geothermal resources, Analysis of geothermal
resources, Geothermal energy conversion
technologies.

No. of hours
7
3
4
5
6

3
5

10
Course Total

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
Nil

No. of hours

COURSE TOTAL

Nil

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. John Twidell and Tony Weir, Renewable Energy Resources Taylor and Francis Group
2007
2. G. N. Tiwari and M. K. Ghosal, Renewable Energy Resources Basic Principles and
Application, Narosa Publishing House 2005.
3. J. A. Duffie and W.A. Beckman Solar Engineering and Thermal Processes, 2nd Edition John
Wiley and sons.
4. G. N. Tiwari, Solar Energy, Narosa Publishing House.2002.
5. R. A. Gross, Fusion Energy, John Wiley and Sons.1984.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Power point and OHP, Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Economics and Financing of Renewable Energy


Systems

3.

L-T-P structure

: 30-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 742

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (Module)

NIL

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

NIL
NIL
10% with ESL 750
NIL
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

Every semester
Prof. G. N. Tiwari
Prof. T. C. Kandpal

NO

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):

To enable students to undertake


detailed techno - economic evaluation of
various renewable energy technologies
and systems. Also to equip the students
with knowledge and understanding of
various possible mechanisms and
strategies of financing renewable energy
projects

Overview of renewable energy technologies.


Relevance of economic and financial viability evaluation of renewable energy
technologies, Basics of engineering economics, Financial feasibility evaluation of
renewable energy technologies, Social cost benefit analysis of renewable energy
technologies.
Technology dissemination models, Volume and learning effects on costs of renewable
energy systems, Dynamics of fuel substitution by renewable energy systems and
quantification of benefits.
Fiscal, financial and other incentives for promotion of renewable energy systems and
their effect on financial and economic viability.
Financing of renewable energy systems, Carbon finance potential of renewable energy
technologies and associated provisions.
Software for financial evaluation of renewable energy systems.
Case studies on financial and economic feasibility evaluation of renewable energy
devices and systems.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


Module
No.

Topic

1
2

Overview of renewable energy technologies


Relevance of economic and financial viability evaluation of renewable
energy technologies
3
Basics of engineering economics
4
Financial feasibility evaluation of renewable energy technologies,
5
Social cost benefit analysis of renewable energy technologies
6
Technology dissemination models
7
Volume and learning effects on costs of renewable energy systems
8
Dynamics of fuel substitution by renewable energy systems and
quantification of benefits
9
Fiscal, financial and other incentives for promotion of renewable
energy systems and their effect on financial and economic viability
10
Financing of renewable energy systems
11
Carbon finance potential of renewable energy technologies and
associated provisions
12
Software for financial evaluation of renewable energy systems
13
Case studies on financial and economic feasibility evaluation of
renewable energy devices / systems/ projects
Total Lecture Hours

Number of
Lecture
Hours
2
1
4
6
3
2
2
2
3
5
4
3
5
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


A large number of numerical assignments would be given to the students to practice use of
various tools discussed in the lecture hours

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not Applicable


Module No
1

Experiment description
COURSE TOTAL

No. of hours

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Harry Campbell and Richard Broron, Benefit- Cost Analysis, Cambridge
Unversity Press (2003)
2. Chan S. Park, Contemporary Engineering Economics, Prentice Hall Inc (2002)
3. Gerald J. Thuesen and W.J. Fabrycky, Engineering Economy (ninth edition),
Prentice Hall Inc (2001)
4. Kandpal T.C. and Garg H.P., Financial Evaluation of Renewable Energy
Technologies, Macmillan India Ltd., (2003).

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

RETScreen, HOMER
Writing Board, LCD Projection facility

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
Not Applicable
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Environmental Audit and Impact Assessment


:

3.

L-T-P structure:

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 745

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (PE)

None

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of
teaching /or Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

Every year
Prof. A. Chandra and Dr. Subodh
Kumar

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

Nil

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

The major objectives of


course include to apprise
the concept of environment
sampling methods for air,
water etc. environmental
audit in industries, methods
of environmental impacts
studies and environmental
setting.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design


activities):Environmental sampling and monitoring-Design, types and objectives;
Ambient and stack/source air quality monitoring and analysis; Waste water
monitoring and analysis; Environmental audit-detailed procedure; National
environmental policy; Methodology of environmental impact studies; Methods of
impact identification; Environmental setting-air, water etc..

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
Topic
No
1
Environmental sampling and monitoring-Design, types and
objectives;
2
Ambient and stack/source air quality monitoring and analysis;
3
Waste water sampling and analysis;
4
Environmental audit-detailed procedure;
5
Energy and environment relations
6
National environmental policy
7
Methodology of environmental impact studies
8
Methods of impact identification
9
Environmental setting-air, water etc..
Course Total

No. of
hours
4
10
4
4
2
2
6
5
5
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
NIL
COURSE TOTAL

No. of hours
-------------

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. L. W. Canter. Impact Prediction Auditing, International Edition, McGraw Hill, 1996
2. L. H. Deith. Environmental Sampling and Analysis-A practical Guide. Lewis Publishers,
Chelsea. 1991
3. S. M. Khopkar. Environmental pollutions monitoring and control, New age publications
(2005)
4. S. Jayarama Reddy Analytical techniques in environmental monitoring. B. S.
Publications (Hudrabad) 2002
5. Lawrence H. Keith. Principles of envirionmental sampling. American Chemical Society
(Washington), 1988
6. Y. Anjaneyulu. Environment Impact Assessment Methodologies. B. S Publishers,
Hydrabad, 2002

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

NIL
NIL
LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities
NIL

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Economics and Planning of Energy Systems

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

:3

5.

Course number

: ESL 750

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JES (PC)

ESL340/ESL740/ESL330/ESL710

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

NIL
NIL
10% with ESL 742
NIL
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

NIL

10.

Frequency of offering

Second Semester

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

Prof. A. Chandra
Prof. G. N. Tiwari
Prof. T. C. Kandpal

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

NO

To enable students undertake financial


feasibility evaluation studies of energy
technologies and to discuss various
issues involved and techniques used in
energy planning. It is also envisaged to
provide relevant inputs on energyeconomy-environment
interaction
related policy studies.

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities


Relevance of financial and economic feasibility evaluation of energy technologies and
systems, Basics of engineering economics, Financial evaluation of energy technologies,
Social cost benefit analysis, Case studies on techno-economics of energy conservation
and renewable energy technologies.
Energy demand analysis and forecasting, Energy supply assessment and evaluation,
Energy demand supply balancing, Energy models.
Energy economy interaction, Energy investment planning and project formulation.
Energy pricing.
Policy and planning implications of energy environment interaction, Clean
development mechanism.
Financing of energy systems.
Energy policy related acts and regulations.
Software for energy planning.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

Topic
Relevance of financial and economic feasibility
evaluation of energy technologies and systems
Basics of engineering economics
Financial evaluation of energy technologies
Social cost benefit analysis
Case studies on techno-economics of energy
conservation and renewable energy technologies
Energy demand analysis and forecasting
Energy supply assessment and evaluation
Energy demand supply balancing
Energy models
Energy economy interaction
Energy investment planning and project formulation
Energy pricing
Policy and planning implications of energy
environment interaction, Clean development mechanism
Financing of energy systems
Energy policy related acts and regulations
Software for energy planning
Total Lecture Hours

No. of hours
1
4
2
2
3
6
2
2
2
2
2
3
4
2
2
3
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


Students will be given a large number of numerical problems for practice.
17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not Applicable
Module No
Experiment description
1

No. of hours

COURSE TOTAL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1.
2.

3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Maxime Kleinpeter, Energy Planning and Policy, John Wiley & sons (1995)
Rene Codoni, Hi-Chun Park and K.V. Ramani (Editors) Integrated Energy
Planning: A Manual, Vols. I, II & III. Asian and Pacific Development Centre,
Kuala Lumpur (1985).
Jyoti Parikh, Energy Models for 2000 and Beyond, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing
Company Limited (1997).
M.S. Kumar (Editor) Energy Pricing Policies in Developing Countries: Theory
and Empirical Evidence, International Labour Organisation (1987)
Mohan Munasinghe and Peter Meir, Energy Policy Analysis and Modeling,
Cambridge University Press (1993).
Ashok V. Desai (Editor) Energy Planning, Wiley Eastern Ltd. (1990).
Harry Campbell and Richard Broron, Benefit- Cost Analysis, Cambridge
Unversity Press (2003)
Chan S. Park, Contemporary Engineering Economics, Prentice Hall Inc (2002)

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

MARKAL, LEAP
.Writing Board, LCD projection facility

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
Not Applicable
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Energy Policy and Planning

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 756

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (Module)

Nil

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of
teaching /or Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

1st Semester

Prof. T.C. Kandpal

No

A planner should have an overview of


issues involved with energy source,
economy environmental considerations
to chalk out the planning and policy.

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Energy (and power) policies in the country, Tariffs and subsidies, Energy utility
interface, Private sector participation in power generation, State role and fiscal
policy, Energy and development, National energy plan, Role of modeling in
energy policy analysis, Energy data base, Energy balances, Flow diagrams,
Reference energy system, Energy demand analysis, Trend analysis,
Econometric
models,
Elasticities
approach,
Input-output
models,
Simulation/process models, Energy supply analysis, Costs of exploration and
economics of utilization of depletable and renewable resources, Scarcity rent,
International energy supply, Energy demand supply balancing, Energy economy interaction, Energy investment planning, Energy environment
interaction, Energy Pricing.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

Topic
Energy and development
Energy policy
Tariffs and subsidies
Tax structure
National energy plan
Energy Models
Trend analysis
Econometric
Elasticities approach
Input-output
Energy supply analysis
Costs of exploration and alternate energy
International energy supply
Demand supply balance
Energy Pricing
Energy environment inventory
Course Total

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable

No. of hours
2
3
2
2
2
5
2
2
2
2
3
4
2
5
2
2
42

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Mohan Munasinghe, Peter Meier. Energy Policy analysis and Modelling:
Cambridge University Press1993.
2. Stephen W, Sawyer and John R. Armstrang State Energy Policy: Westview
Press.
3. Gerand J. mangone Energy Policies of the world: Elsevier.
4. Rene Codoni, Hi-Chun Park and K.V. Ramni (ed.), Integrated Energy Planning
Vols I, II and III, Asian and Development Centre Kaule Lumpur 1985.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Heat Transfer

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 760

6.

Status
(Category for program)

: JES (PC)

Nil

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

Nil

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

Even semester
Prof.S.C.Mullick, Prof.S.C.Kaushik,
Prof.L.M.Das, Prof.T.C.Kandpal
Nil

Heat Transfer is possible by conduction,


convection, radiation. The subject has a
wide application. It is gaining importance
continuously. The present one is a
fundamental course which provides
adequate concepts and prepares the
students for undertaking calculations of
heat transfer rate through different
mechanisms

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


General heat conduction equation with heat generation, Analysis of extended
surfaces, transient (and periodic) heat conduction, Two dimensional heat
conduction problems and solutions, Theory of convective heat transfer, Boundary
layer theory, Heat transfer in duct flows laminar and turbulent, Boiling,
condensation and heat exchangers, Laws of thermal radiation, Radiation heat
transfer between black and grey bodies, Numerical solutions of radiation network
analysis, Thermal circuit analysis and correlations for various heat transfer
coefficients, Overall heat transfer.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Topic
Introduction
General Heat conduction Equation
Analysis of Extended Surfaces
Transient and Periodic Heat Conduction
Two Dimensional Heat conduction problems
Theory of Convective Heat Transfer
Boundary Layer Theory
Heat Transfer in duct flows
Boiling, condensation & Heat Exchangers
Radiation Heat Transfer Laws & Heat
exchangers
Radiation shield and shape factors
Numerical solutions of radiation network
analysis
Thermal circuit Analysis and problems
Overall Heat Transfer and heat transfer
coefficients
Numerical problems and solutions
Course Total

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

No. of hours
2
2
2
4
4
3
2
2
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
42

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1

No. of hours

COURSE TOTAL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


7. Process Heat transfer Principles & Applications, R.W.Seath, Academic Press, Elsevier
Ltd, 2007, Indian Reprint (Gurgaon, Haryana).
8. Heat Transfer, A.F.Mills and V.Ganesan, 2nd Edition, Publ. Dorling Kindeasle (India)
PVT. Ltd, 2009.
9. Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, Frank P.Incroperal, David P.DeWitt, , John
Wiley & Sons, 1998.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Environmental Economics

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 764

6.
7.

Status
(category for program)
: JEN (Module)
None
Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Economic development and the environment, Relevance of environmental
economics, Economic efficiency and markets, The economics of environmental
quality, Frameworks for environmental cost and benefit analysis: criteria for
evaluating environmental, Command and control strategies, Incentive based
strategies - emission taxes and subsidies, Transferable discharge permits,
Environmental policies, International environmental agreements.

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of teaching
/or Industrial experience.
Morning UG and PG
students are not allowed in
the evening course.

2nd Semester

Profs. T.C. Kandpal and A. Chandra


No

To introduce the concept and analysis of


environmental economics to an energy
policy maker.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

Topic
Economic and environment
Cost benefit analysis
Supply and demand
Benefit and cost of benefit
Economic efficiency and markets
Economics & environmental quality
Evaluation criteria
Decentralized policies
Command and control strategies
Emission taxes and subsidies
Environmental policies
Economic development and in environment
International agreements
Course Total

No. of hours
3
2
3
2
3
3
5
4
4
3
3
4
3
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable


17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable
18. Suggested texts and reference materials
1. C. Barry. Field, Environmental Economics, McGraw Hill, Inc. 1994
2. Ian Goldin and L. Alan Winters, The Economics of Sustainable Development,
Cambridge University Press 1995.
19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.
3.

Course Title
L-T-P structure

: Environmental Regulation
: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.
6.

Course number
Status
(category for program)

: ESL766
: JEN (Module)
Nil

7.

Pre-requisites(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the


course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

2nd Sem.

1st Sem.

2nd Sem.

Alternate Year

Profs. L.M. Das, Prof. A. Chandra, Dr.


K.Gadgil

No

Usually a policy maker on energy is not


aware of environmental law. The course
is designed to provide detailed
knowledge of environmental regulations
in the country.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Environmental legislation and strategies to control pollution, Standards and setting criterion. Role
of national and international agencies in dealing with environmental aspects. Standards
developed by ministry of environment and forest. Sampling and analysis techniques, Data
interpretations and relationships for the design of treatment facilities. Regulations for pollution
controls of water, air industrial, automobile, Noise and hazardous waste environmental audit,
Public liability insurance, Environment management systems, Catalytic converters in vehicles in
metropolitans, EURO standards, Bharat standards

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Topic
Environmental legislation and strategies to control
pollution
Standards and setting criterion.
Role of national and international agencies in dealing with
environmental aspects.
Standards developed by ministry of environment and
forest.
Sampling and analysis techniques, Data interpretations
and relationships for the design of treatment facilities
Regulations for pollution controls of water, air industrial,
automobile, Noise and hazardous waste
Environment management systems
Catalytic converter and EURO norms

Course Total

No. of
hours
5
3
4
5
5
9
4
7

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
COURSE TOTAL

No. of hours
Nil

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1.
2.
3.
4.

B.N. Lohani, Environmental quality management, South Asian Publishers, New Delhi, 1984.
Comprehensive Industry Documents Series (COINDS), Resources, Irwin, Illinois, 1995.
Environmental Science by G. Ryler Miller Jr.
Environmental Sciences (earth as a living planet) by Botkin Keller

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Wind and Small Hydro Energy Systems

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL768

6.
7.

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Status
(category for program)
NIL
Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

: JES & JEN (PE)

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

Prof. T S Bhatti

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

No

1st Sem every year

The subject will enhance


the understanding of the
students on basic concepts
of aerodynamics, horizontal
and vertical axis wind
turbines,
small
hydro
system components and
design, hybrid systems and
controls

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Introduction, General theories of wind machines, Basic laws and concepts of
aerodynamics, Micro-siting, Description and performance of the horizontalaxis wind
machines, Blade design, Description and performance of the verticalaxis wind
machines, The generation of electricity by wind machines, case studies, Overview of
micro mini and small hydro, Site selection and civil works, Penstocks and turbines,
Speed and voltage regulation, Investment issues, load management and tariff collection,
Distribution and marketing issues, case studies, Wind and hydro based stand-alone /
hybrid power systems, Control of hybrid power systems, Wind diesel hybrid systems

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Topic

No. of hours

General theories of wind machines, Basic laws and


concepts of aerodynamics
Description and performance of the horizontalaxis
wind machines, Blade design
Description and performance of the verticalaxis
wind machines,
Micro-siting, The generation of electricity by wind
machines, case studie
Overview of micro mini and small hydro, Site
selection and civil works
Penstocks and turbines
Speed and voltage regulation, Investment issues,
load management and tariff collection, Distribution
and marketing issues, case studies,
Wind and hydro based stand-alone / hybrid power
systems, Control of hybrid power systems, Wind
diesel hybrid systems

Course Total

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

6
5
5
6
6
4

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
nil

No. of hours

COURSE TOTAL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Wind Energy Explained Theory, Design and Application by J. F. Manwell, J. G.


McGowan and A. L. Rogers, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2002
Aerodynamics of Wind turbines by Martin O. L. Hansen, Earthscan, 2008.
Wind Turbine Control Systems- Principles, Modelling and Gain Scheduling Design by
Fernando D. Bianchi, Hernan De Battista and Ricardo J. Mantz, Springer, 2007
Micro-Hydro Design Manual: A Guide to Small-Scale Water Power Schemes by Adam
Harvey, Andy Brown and Priyantha Hettiarachi ITDG,1993.
Guide on How to Develop a Small Hydropower Plant by Maria Laguna, ESHA,2004
Good & Bad of Mini Hydro Power edited by Roman Ritter, GTZ, 2009

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure

19.7

Site visits

Powerpoint presentation, OHP and black board


Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

15 %
05 %

Some typical examples

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Solar Energy Utilization

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 770

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JES (PE)

NIL

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title) None

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

None

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

I semester

Prof G N Tiwari,
Prof S C Mulllick, Dr. S N Garg, Dr.
Subodh Kumar

No

In these days of energy crisis and environmental


deterioration, solar energy finds an important place as a
solution. It is being used globally to generate electricity and
provide industrial and domestic applications. Through
photovoltaic and thermal routes, power is being made
available to distant and isolated places where grid access is
almost impossible. Solar water heating, solar space heating
and solar heat in the form of industrial process heat, is being
used.

13.

Course objective
(about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Solar radiation and modeling, solar collectors and types: flat plate, concentrating
solar collectors, advanced collectors and solar concentrators, Selective coatings,
Solar water heating, Solar cooking, Solar drying, Solar distillation and solar
refrigeration, Active and passive heating and cooling of buildings, Solar thermal
power generation, Solar cells, Home lighting systems, Solar lanterns, Solar PV
pumps, Solar energy storage options, Industrial process heat systems, Solar
thermal power generation and sterling engine, Solar economics.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Topic

No. of hours

Introduction
Solar radiation and modeling
Solar collectors and types: flat plate, concentrating
solar collectors,
Advanced collectors and Selective coatings
Solar water heating, Solar cooking, Solar drying, Solar
distillation and solar refrigeration
Active and passive heating and cooling of buildings
Solar cells, Home lighting systems, Solar lanterns,
Solar PV pumps, Solar energy storage options
Industrial process heat systems
Solar thermal power generation and sterling engine

1
6
5

Solar economics
Course Total

4
7
5
5
3
4
2
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


NIL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1.

Solar Energy of Thermal Processes, Second Edition, 1991, by JA Duffie and WA


Beckman, John Wiley & Sons Inc.
2. Solar Energy, First Edition, 2002, by GN Tiwari, Narosa Publishing House.
3. Principals of Solar Engineering, Second Edition, 2000, by DY Goswami, F Krieth &
JF Krieder, Taylor and Francis Inc.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP

NIL

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
NA
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Instrumentation & Control in Energy Studies

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 771

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (PE)

None

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

2nd Semester

Profs. M.K.G. Babu, V. Dutta, T.S.


Bhatti, L.M. Das, A. Chandra and
Dr. K.A. Subramanian
No

To introduce the concepts of basic


measurement,
instruments
for
measuring various parameters in energy
systems, energy auditing, digital data
processing, computer data processing,
etc.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Basic measurement concepts, Measurement errors, Transducer classification,
Static and dynamic characteristics of transducers, Instruments for measuring
temperature, pressure, velocity and flow, heat flux, liquid level and concentration
in energy systems, characterization of combustors, Flue gas analysers, Exhaust
gas analysers, Solar energy measurement requirements and instruments,
Meteorological data measurements, Energy auditing instruments, Energy audit
kit, humidity measurement, characterization of electrical power systems,
Instruments for monitoring electrical parameters, Analysis of power system
measurements. Analog signal conditioning, A/D and D/A converters, Digital data
processing and display, Computer data processing and control, Feed back
control system, Stability and transient analysis of control systems, Application of
PID controllers, General purpose control devices and controller design, Air
pollution sampling and measurement of particulates, SOx, NOx, CO, O3,
hydrocarbons.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Topic
Basic measurement
Errors Analysis
Transducers
Sensors
Energy auditing instruments
Power Systems Measurements
Microprocessor based data processing and analysis
Controllers
Pollution sampling
Pollution measurement
Course Total

No. of hours
2
2
2
5
5
5
8
6
5

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable


17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable
18. Suggested texts and reference materials
1. D.V.S Murty, Transducers and Instrumentation, Prentice-Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.
1995
2. C.S. Rangan, G.R. Sarma, and V.S,V. Mani, Instrumentation Devices and
Systems, TMH Ltd. New Delhi, 1983
3. B.C. Nakra and K.K. Chaudhry, Instrumentation Measurement and Analysis,
TMH Ltd. New Delhi, 1985.
4. N.H. Afgan, Measurement Techniques in Power Engineering, Hemisphere
Publishing Corporation, 1985
5. Alexander D, Khazan, Transducers and their Elements, PTR Printice Hall,
1994.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP

NIL

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Quantitative Methods for Energy Management and


Planning

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 774

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JES & JEN (PE)


NIL

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title) None

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

The evening course is for


sponsored
students
with
minimum 1 year of teaching /or
Industrial experience. Morning
UG and PG students are not
allowed in the evening course.

II semester

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

Prof. A Ganguli and


Dr S N Garg

12.

Will the course require any visiting


faculty?

No

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

In energy planning, most of the


time one needs optimization. One
needs to consider a mix of
different
renewable
energy
sources. This course is best
suited to such situations and it is
of great practical significance in
Energy Management.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


A review of probability concepts, Forecasting and decision making in view of
multi-variant techniques, Linear programming, Graphical solution, Simplex
method, Duality and post-optimality analysis, Integer programming, Optimal
technology mix in micro and macro level energy planning exercises,
Sequencing, Queuing theory, Networks, PERT and CPM, Decision theory,
Markov analysis, Non linear programming, Decision making with uncertainty
decision making with multiple objectives, Deterministic and probabilistic dynamic
programming, Regression analysis.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

9
10

Topic

No. of hours

A review of probability concepts


Forecasting and decision making in view of
multi-variant techniques
Linear programming, Graphical solution,
Simplex method
Duality and post-optimality analysis, Integer
programming
Optimal technology mix in micro and macro
level energy planning exercises
Sequencing, Quening theory, Networks, PERT
and CPM
Decision theory, Markov analysis
Non linear programming, Decision making with
uncertainty decision making with multiple
objectives
Deterministic and probabilistic dynamic
programming
Regression analysis
Course Total

2
3
6
4
5
4
4
6

4
4
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


NIL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


4. Operations Research, An Introduction, Sixth Edition, 2000, by HA Taha, PrenticeHall of India Pvt. Ltd.
5. Quantitative Techniques in Management, First Edition, 1997, by ND Vohra, Tata
McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Ltd, New Delhi

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
NA

19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP

NIL

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
NA
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Industrial Energy and Environment Analysis

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 776

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (Module)
None

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of
teaching /or Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

1st Semester

Profs. A.Chandra, G.N. Tiwari and


Dr. R. Uma
No

The student should be aware of analysis


of energy use in environmental
pollutants in order to unable him to make
a right choice of energy technologies.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Energy and the environment, The greenhouse effect, Global energy and
environmental management, Energy management and conservation, Energy in
manufacture, Energy technologies, Instrumentation measurement and control,
Energy management information systems, Hazardous waste management,
Contamination of ground water, Treatment & disposal, Pollution from
combustion and atmospheric pollution control methods.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

Topic
Energy and the environment
Greenhouse effect
Global energy and environmental management
Energy management and conservation
Energy in manufacture
Energy technologies
Instrumentation measurement and control,
Energy management information systems
Hazardous waste management
Contamination of ground water, Treatment & disposal
Pollution from combustion
Atmospheric pollution control methods
Course Total

No. of hours
2
2
5
3
6
6
4
4
2
3
2
3
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable


17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable
18. Suggested texts and reference materials
1. O Callaghan Paul, Energy Management, McGraw Hill Book company, London,
1993.
2. A.P. Sincero, and G.A. Sincero, Environmental Engineering, Prentice Hall,
New Jersey, 1996.
3. C.J., Barrow, Developing the Environment, Longman Scientific and Technical
U.K., 1995.
4. R.Socolow, C. Andrews, F. Berkhout and V.Thomas, Industrial Ecology and
Global Change, Cambridge University Press, 1994.
19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)

20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Environmental Science and Engineering

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

:3

5.

Course number

: ESL 777

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (PC)

None

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1 Existing UG course(s) of the


Department/Centre
8.2 Proposed UG course(s) of the
Department/Centre
8.3 Approved PG course(s) of the
Department/Centre
8.4 UG/PG course(s) from other
Department/Centre
8.5 Equivalent course(s) from existing UG
course(s)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

The evening course is for sponsored


students with minimum 1 year of
teaching /or Industrial experience.
Morning UG and PG students are not
allowed in the evening course.

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program


names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

Every Year
Prof. A. Chandra; Dr. Subodh Kumar
No

In
Industries,
the
environmental
engineering is becoming important to
understand the various types of
pollutants and their environmental
chemistry and biology, air quality
modeling, design, construction and
performance of various air pollution
control equipments and assessment of
risk related to these pollutants; Global
warming potential; Radiative forcing of
climate change.

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Environmental Pollutants- types, methods of formation; Design, construction and
performance estimation of particulate matter control equipments-gravity settlers,
cyclones, bag filters, ESP etc. Methodology for Risk assessment and analysis;
Environmental chemistry and biology; Nuclear and air pollution; Global warming
potential-Atmospheric changes, Energy balance and global temperature etc.
Radiative forcing of climate change;atmospheric ozone depletion; International
treaties.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Topic
Environmental Pollutants- types, methods of
formation and impacts on environments
Design, construction and performance
estimation of particulate matter control
equipments of -Gravity settlers, cyclones, bag
filter, ESP etc.
Methodology for Risk assessment and
analysis
Environmental chemistry and biology;
Nuclear and air pollution
Global warming potential-Atmospheric changes
Energy balance and global temperature
Radiative forcing of climate change
Atmospheric ozone depletion
International treaties.
Course Total

No. of
hours
5
11

5
5
2
4
3
3
2
2
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
NIL
COURSE TOTAL

No. of hours
-----------

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


6.

A. P. Sincero and G. A Sincero. Environmental Engineering, Prentice Hall,


New Jessey, 1996
7. M. Giblbert Masters. Introduction to Environmental Engineering and
Science, Prentice Hall, 1991
8. William W. Nazaroff and Lisa Alvarez-Cohen. Environmental Engineering
Science. John Wiley and Sons (Asia), Singapore (2004)
9. Martin Crawford. Air pollution theory. Mc Graw-Hill (USA) 1976
10. H. S. Peavy, D. R. Rowe and G. Techobanogous. Environmental Energy.
Mc Graw-Hill (USA) 1985

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

NIL
NIL
Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP

NIl

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Industrial Waste Management and Recycling


:

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 778

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (Module)

NIL

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

4th Semester
Prof. D. K. Sharma
Dr. Subodh Kumar

12.

Will the course require any visiting


faculty?

NO

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

The major objective of the course


is to impart sufficient knowledge
on generation and management
of solid waste, water and air
pollution from the industrial
sector.
Solid waste disposal
through landfills and various
water treatment techniques are
the important components of the
course. Study on various cses
studies on industrial waste
management
and
recycling
further strengthen the course
objectives.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):Solid


waste management-Treatment and Disposal. Sanitary Landfills. Leachate and
gaseous emissions estimation. Resource recovery and cycle of materials. Waste
management in different industries-steel, aluminum, chemical, paper, petroleum,
petro-chemical. Energy from waste. Waste water treatment techniques.
Agricultural pollution. Application of air pollution control in industries.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5

6
7

Topic

No. of hours

Introduction to solid waste management


Composting of waste
Landfills-design, construction and types
Estimation of leachate and gaseous emissions
from landfills
Waste management in different industries
steel, aluminum, chemical, paper, petroleum,
petro-chemical.; Energy from solid waste
Waste water treatment techniques
Agricultural pollution-causes and impact on
envoronment
Course Total

5
5
8
5

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

9
2
42

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
NIL

No. of hours
NIL

COURSE TOTAL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Nicholas P. Cheremisinoff. Handbook of Solid Waste Management and Waste
Minimization Technologies. An Imprint of Elsevier, New Delhi (2003).
2. P. Aarne Vesilind, William A. Worrell and Debra R. Reinhart. Solid Waste
Engineering. Thomson Asia Pte Ltd. Singapore (2002)
3. M. Dutta , B. P. Parida, B. K. Guha and T. R. Surkrishnan. Industrial Solid Waste
Management and Landfilling practice. Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi (1999).
4. Amalendu Bagchi. Design, construction and Monitoring of Landfills. John Wiley and
Sons. New York. (1994)
5. M. L. Davis and D. A. Cornwell. Introduction to environmental engineering. Mc Graw
Hill International Edition, Singapore (2008)
6. C. S. Rao. Environmental Pollution Control Engineering. Wiley Eastern Ltd. New Delhi
(1995)
7. S. K. Agarwal. Industrial Environment Assessment and Strategy. APH Publishing
Corporation. New Delhi (!996)

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Cogeneration and Energy Efficiency

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 784

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JES (PE)
Nil

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

2nd

1st Sem.

Sem.

2nd Sem.

Alternate Year

Prof. S.C. Mullick, Prof. M.K.G. Babu,


Prof.L.M.Das, Dr. K.A.Subramanian.
No

To make the students appreciate the


importance of cogeneration in improving the
overall efficiency, thus reducing fuel
consumption, improving economy and
limiting global warming. Cogeneration
plants may be based on Steam turbine, Gas
turbine or IC Engines: to make the students
aware of different technologies. To impart to
students
knowledge
of
practical
cogeneration possibilities through case
studies related to different types of process
industries (sugar/textile/paper etc.) and other
industries (steel, cement etc.). Also hotel
industries, hospitals etc.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


The cogeneration concept, Main design parameters for cogeneration,
Cogeneration alternatives, Bottoming and Topping cycles, Steam turbine plants,
Gas turbine plants, Diesel and gas engine plants, Thermodynamic evaluation,
Combined cycle applications, Sterling engine, Industry/Utility cogeneration,
Trigeneration, Techno economic and environmental aspects, Cogeneration in
sugar, textile, paper and steel industry, Case studies.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Topic
Cogeneration concept
Steam turbine plants
Gas turbine plants
Combined cycle applications
Cogeneration, Trigeneration
Cogeneration in sugar, textile , paper and steel
industry
Course Total

No. of hours
3
11
9
4
5
10
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable


17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable
18. Suggested texts and reference materials
1. George Polimeros, Energy Cogeneration Hand Book for Central Plant Design,
Industrial Press inc, Newyork, 1981
2. M.M.EI- Wakil, Power Plant Technology, McGraw Hill, 1984
3. Chapters in a number of books on Power Plant Engineering and
Thermodynamics
19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Energy Analysis

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 785

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (PE)

None

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
NIL
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
NIL
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
NIL
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of
teaching /or Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

2nd Semester

Profs. A.Chandra, G.N.Tiwari,


T.C.Kandpal, S.C.Kaushik
NO

The main objective of the course is to


introduce the concepts and methods of
Energy Analysis, Embodied Energy
Analysis, Energy Yield ratio, and other
performance
indices
for
various
industrial units, products systems and
plants in general.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Energy theory of value: Principles and systems of energy flows, Methods of
energy analysis, Energy intensity method, Process analysis input-output method
based energy accounting, Energy cost of goods and services energy to produce
fuels: Coal, Oil, Natural Gas, Energy to produce electricity, Energy cost of
various modes of passenger & freight transportation, Industrial energy analysis:
Aluminium, Steel, Cement, Fertilizers, Energetics of materials recycling,
Energetics of renewable energy utilization (case studies), General energy
equation, Energy loss, Reversibility & irreversibility, Pictorial representation of
energy, Energy analysis of simple processes, Expansion, Compression, Mixing
and separation, Heat transfer, Combustion, Energy analysis of thermal and
chemical plants, Thermo economic applications of energy analysis and national
energy balance.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

Topic
Energy Theory of value
Principles of energy flows
Methods of energy analysis
Input / Output Method
Energy Accounting
Energy cost
Industrial Energy Analysis
Energetics of renewables
General Energy Equation
Energy Analysis of simple processes
Thermo economic Applications of energy analysis and
energy balance.
Course Total

No. of hours
3
3
4
3
4
6
4
2
2
6
5
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. A.G. Thomas (editor), Energy Analysis, IPC Science and Technology Press
Ltd. 1977.
2. I. Bousted and G.F. Hancock, Handbook of Industrial Energy Analysis, Ellis
Horwood 1979.
3. A. Bejan, Entropy Generation Through Heat and Fluid Flow, John Wiley &
Sons 1982.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Industrial and Commercial Applications of


Renewable Energy Sources

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 788

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (Module-D)

NIL

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title none

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of
teaching /or Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

II semester

Prof G N Tiwari,
Prof. T C Kandpal,
N Garg

Dr. S

No

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective
(about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Commercial and industrial energy demand; Qualitative and quantitative features
and characteristics, Renewables & electricity for a growing economy, Water
heating, process heating and drying applications, Solar, Biomass and
geothermal energy based systems, Combined space and building service hot
water systems, Electricity generation from renewable to meet commercial and
industrial power requirement, Stand alone and grid connected systems, Ethanol
and methanol from cellulosic biomass, Use of renewable in commercial and
industrial buildings for load leveling, lighting and space heating and cooling,
Economics of renewable energy based commercial and industrial installations
case studies, Thermal low and medium energy requirements of different
industries

There is vast potential of usage of renewable energy in


industries and commercial sector. With the study of this
course one can quantify the energy saved and carbon
dioxide mitigation impact. Related latest technologies and
economics of renewable energies would also be studied.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2

3
4
5

7
8

10

Topic

No. of hours

Introduction
Commercial and industrial energy demand;
Qualitative and quantitative features and
characteristics
Renewables & electricity for a growing economy
Water heating, process heating and drying
applications
Solar, Biomass and geothermal energy based
systems, Combined space and building service
hot water systems
Electricity generation from renewable to meet
commercial and industrial power requirement,
Stand alone and grid connected systems
Ethanol and methanol from cellulosic biomass
Use of renewable in commercial and industrial
buildings for load leveling, lighting and space
heating and cooling
Economics of renewable energy based
commercial and industrial installations case
studies
Thermal low and medium energy requirements
of different industries
Course Total

1
4

4
4
4

3
7

4
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


NIL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Solar Applications in Industry and Commerce, First Edition, 1984, by JD Myers, Prentice-Hall
Inc.
2. Fundamentals of Renewable Energy Processes, Second Edition, 2009, by Aldo V da Rosa,
Academic Press

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP

NIL

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
NA
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Applied Mathematics and Computational Methods

3.

L-T-P structure

: 1-0-0

4.

Credits

: 0 (No credit)

5.

Course number

: ESL 791

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (Compulsory bridge audit course)

NIL

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title) None

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of teaching
/or Industrial experience.
Morning UG and PG
students are not allowed in
the evening course.

10.

Frequency of offering

1st Semester

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

Prof. S C Kaushik and


Dr. S N Garg

12.

Will the course require any visiting


faculty?

No

13.

Course objective
(about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Fourier and laplace transform, Complex and vector analysis, Matrices,
Numerical and computational methods, Finite difference, Numerical methods of
integration, Least square curve fitting, Introduction to C++ and MATLAB

This 1-credit course is designed with the objective of giving


some basic mathematical background to those students who
did not have it at there graduation level. In these days of
computers, numerical methods have become indispensable.
Basics of Fourier series / transform and Laplace transform
are also included here, MATLAB is being used very much
for research purpose.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Topic
Fourier and laplace transform
Complex and vector analysis
Matrices
Numerical and computational methods
Finite difference
Numerical methods of integration
Least square curve fitting
Introduction to C++ and MATLAB
Course Total

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


NIL

No. of hours
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
14

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Eighth Edition, 1999, by E Kreyszig John
Wiley & Sons Inc.
2. Applied Numerical Analysis, Fifth Edition, 1998, CF Gerald and PO Wheatley,
Addison Wesley Longman Inc.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

C++ and MATLAB


NIL
NIL
NIL
NIL
Blackboard, LCD Projector, OHP

NIL

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
NA
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Advanced Energy Systems

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 792

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JES & JEN (PE)

None

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of
teaching /or Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

2nd Semester

Profs. A. Chandra, S.C. Mullick, L.M.


Das, V. Dutta
No

The advance power & energy cycles are


the technologies that promise reduced
pollution & higher efficiencies. An
engineer should have basic knowledge
of these systems.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Latest topics on energy, Integrated Gasification combined cycle (IGCC), Fuels
for power generation, Advanced energy storage systems, Hydrogen power,
Clean coal technologies, Pressurized fluidised bed combustion, Natural gas
cycles, Integrated generation, Fuel cells, Energy conservation in power plant,
Battery vehicles, Electric vehicles, Algal bio fuels, Metal hydrates, Geological
CO2 sequestering.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14

Topic
Fuels for power generation
Combined cycles
IGCC
PFBC
AFBC
Advanced combustion systems
Advance energy storage
Hydrogen power
Natural gas cycles
Energy conservation in power plants
Fuel cells
Heavy fuel based power generation
Algal biofuels
Geological CO2 sequestering.
Course Total

No. of hours
2
5
2
2
2
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
1
2
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable


17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable
18. Suggested texts and reference materials
1.
2.
3.
4.

V. Nikolai Khartekenko, Advanced Energy Systems, Taylor & Francies 1988


W.John. Mitchell, Energy Engineering, John Wiley & Sons 1983
B.K. Hodge, Analysis and Design of Energy Systems, Prentice Hall 1985
V.Daniel Hunt, Handbook of Energy Technology, Van Nostrand Reinbold 1982

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP

Nil

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Principles of Chemical Processes and Combustion

3.

L-T-P structure

: 1-0-0

4.

Credits

: 0 (No credit)

5.

Course number

: ESL 794

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (compulsory bridge audit course)

NIL

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course
NIL
Proposed UG course
NIL
Approved PG course
NIL
PG/UG from other department
NIL
Equivalent course from existing UG
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

2nd semester

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

Every year

Dr. K. Gadgil/ Prof.D.K.Sharma

No

To acquaint students of different


disciplines with industrial operations &
combustion principles.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Process development and chemical manufacture in industries, Major unit
operations and unit processes in chemical industries, Petrochemical industries,
Food, Paint, Fertilizer, Drugs, Paper and pulp industries, Coal based chemicals
and combustion.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Topic
Nitrogen industry, ammonia, urea * nitric acid
manufacture
Chloroalkali industry
Glass-types, classification, manufacture, use
Paper & pulp industry
Sugar industry
Phosphate & phosphatic fertilizers
Principles of combustion, mechanism & calculations
Course Total

No. of hours
2
1
2
2
2
2
3
14

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable


NIL
17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable
Module No

Experiment description

No. of hours
NIL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. George T. Austin: Shreves Chemical process Industries, 5th Edition, McGraw
Hill Publisher (1984).
2. W. Francis and M. C. Peter, Fuels and fuel technology a summarized manual,
Pergamon Press, Second Edition (1980).
19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
1

Class room Infrastructure

Power point presentation and OHP, Black


Board facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
1

Date:

Others

Audit course

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Project Evaluation & Management

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 795

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (PE)

None

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

2nd Semester

Prof. S.C. Kaushik and T.C. Kandpal


No

The objective of course is to give


enough
background
for
project
management
techniques
and
methodologies for project evaluation in
terms of various performance indices
and some case studies.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Life cycle approach and analysis, conception, definition, planning, feasibility
and analysis, Environmental impact analysis, Project planning matrix, Aim
oriented Project planning, Network analysis for project management-PERT,
CPM and CERT, Fuzzy logic analysis, Stochastic based formulations, Project
design, Evaluation and management techniques, Funds planning, Project
material management, Evaluation & analysis, Implementation & monitoring,
Performance indices, Case studies, Supply chain management, Customer
relation management.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Topic
Life cycle approach and analysis
Environmental impact analysis
Project planning matrix
Network Analysis
Stochastic based formulations
Evaluation and management techniques
Project material management
Case studies
Supply chain management
Customer relation management
Course Total

No. of hours
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
6
4
4
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Project Management Planning and Control Techniques, Rory Burke, 4th edition
, pub. Johan Wiley & Sons, (Asia) Ptv. Ltd. 2004.
2. P. Chandra, Projects Preparation, Appraisal and Implementation, Tata
McGraw Hill Publishing Co., India, 1987.
3. D.I. Cleland and W.R. King, Systems Analysis and Project Management,
McGraw Hill Book Co., New York 1975.
4. Horst Finck and G.Oelert, A Guide to the Financial Evaluation of Investment
Projects in Energy Supply, GNT No. 163, Eschborn, 1985.
5. H. Kerzner, Project Management: A systems Approach to Planning,
Scheduling and Controlling, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1984.
6. J.R. Meredith and S.J. Mantell (Jr.), Project Management, John Wiley and
Sons, USA, 1985.
7. Case Studies of a few GTZ projects.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: OPERATION

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL - 796

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JEN (PE)

& CONTROL OF
ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

ESL-860, Electrical Power System Analysis

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

NO
NO
NO
NO
NO

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of
teaching /or Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

2nd Semester
Prof. R. Balasubramanian
Prof. T.S. Bhatti

NO

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50


words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 word):


Real Time Monitoring of Power Systems : State Estimation, Topological
observability Analysis, Security Analysis of Power Systems, Economic Dispatch
& Unit Commitment
Control of Power & Frequency : Turbine -Governor Control Loops, Single Area
and Multi-Area Systems Control, Effect of high penetration of Wind & Other
Renewable/Distributed Generation on P-F Control
Control of Voltage & Reactive Power : Generator Excitation Systems, &
Automatic Voltage Regulators, Transformer Tap Changes Controls, Voltage
Control in Distribution Networks using New Power Electronic Devices
Introduction to Market operations in Electric Power Systems : Restructured
Power Systems, Short Term Load Forecasting, Power Trading through Bilateral,
Multilateral Contracts and Power Exchanges, Role of Distributed Generators in
market Operations.

To introduce the real time monitoring and


control systems in a modern computerized
load dispatch centre including the market
operation in restructured power systems

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4

Topic
Real Time Monitoring of Power Systems
Control of Power and Frequency
Control of voltage and reactive power

Introduction of Market operations in electric power

No. of hours
14
14
10
4

systems

10
Course Total

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
COURSE TOTAL

No. of hours

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1.Wood, A.J. and B.F. Wollenberg, Power Generation Operation and Control, Wiley -

Interscience Publication, Second Ediction (2003).


2. O.I. Elgerd, Electric Energy Systems Theory : An Introductuion, Tata McGraw Hill
Publication, Second Edition, 1982
3. Shahidepour, M. et al, Market Operationhs in Electric Power Systems, Wiley
Interscience & IEEE Publication, 2002.
4. Bhattacharya et al, Operation of Restructured Power Systems, Kluwer Academic
Publicshers, 2001

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

PSCAD/ ETAP software

PC LAB for running the software


Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP
Visit to the Northern Regional Load dispatch centre
in Delhi

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

50%
25%
25%

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre:
Proposing the course

2.

Course Title

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number:

: ESL 804

6.
7.

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Centre for Energy Studies


Pollution Control in Power Plants

Status:
(category for program)
: JEN (Module)
None
Pre-requisites
(course no./title)
Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)
Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

Nil
Nil
Yes
Nil
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of
teaching /or Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

Prof. A. Chandra; Dr.


Subodh Kumar

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

No

Every year

The major objective of the


course is to apprise
methods of controlling
various
power
plant
pollutants (including coal
and nuclear based ) air, fly
ash radio-active wastes
and impacts of their
release on environment;
Clean coal technologies.

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities): Coal


and nuclear based power plants-Fly ash generation, utilization, disposal and
environmental impact,; Nuclear fuel cycle; radioactive waste-treatment and
disposal; Instrumentation; Pollution control methods-(i) Pre combustion
control,(ii) Combustion control (iii) Post-combustion Control; Gaseous pollutants
control-Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Systems, SOx and NOx treatments; ESP;
Thermal Pollution and its impact on aquatic life.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
Topic
No
1
Coal based power plants-Fly ash generation
utilization, disposal and environmental impact
2
Nuclear based power plants-Nuclear fuel cycle;
radioactive waste-treatment and disposal
3
Thermal Pollution and its impact on aquatic life.
4
Pollution control methods
5
(i) Pre combustion control
6
,(ii) Combustion control-clean coal technologies
7
(iii) Post-combustion Control; Gaseous pollutants
control-Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Systems, SOx
and NOx treatments; ESP;
Course Total

No. of hours
6
6
2
2
4
10
12

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
NIL
COURSE TOTAL

No. of hours
-------------

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. M. Giblbert Masters. Introduction to Environmental Engineering and Science, Prentice
Hall, 1991
2. C. S. Rao. Environmental Pollution Control Engineering. Wiley Eastern Ltd. Delhi 1991
3. Subodh Kumar and C. B. Patil. Estimation of resource savings due to fly ash utilization
in road construction. Resource conservation and Recycling, 48, 125-140 (2006)
4. U. Bhattcharjee and T. C. Kandpal. Potential of fly ash utilization in India. Energy 27,
151-66, 2002.
5. TIFAC (Technology Information Forecasting and assessment Council) Home page
http://www.tifac.org.in/news/flyindia.htm.2005
6. H. Etherington. Nuclear engineering handbook. McGraw Hill (New York) 1958
7. P. K. Nag. Power Plant Engineering, Tata McGraw Hill (2001)
8. Samir Sarkar. Fuel and Combustion . Orient Longman Limited. (Hydrabad), 2001.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

NIL
NIL
Blackboard, LCD projector, OHP

NIL

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: MHD Power Generation

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

:3

5.

Course number

: ESL810

6.

Status
(Category for program)

: JES (PE)

EC 60

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

Every Sem.

nil
1st Sem.

2nd Sem.

Alternate Year

Profs. R. P. Sharma and A. Chandra


No

After doing this course the students are


expected to have the basic ideas of
MHD systems in general and apply them
for designing the MHD generators.
Problems related to the operations like
instabilities, plasma sheath etc should
be resolved.

14. Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Principle of MHD power generation, Properties of working fluids, MHD equation
and types of MHD duct, Losses in MHD generators, Diagnostics of parameters,
MHD cycles, MHD components (air heater, combustion chamber, heat
exchanger, diffuser, insulating materials and electrode walls, magnetic field etc.)
Economics and applications of MHD, Liquid metal MHD generators.
15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)
]

Module No
1
2
3
4

Topic
Principle of MHD power generation
Properties of working fluids
MHD equation and types of MHD duct,
Losses in MHD generators, Diagnostics of parameters,
MHD cycles, MHD components , Economics and
applications of MHD
Liquid metal MHD generators

No. of hours
4
12
11
9

Course Total

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not applicable

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable


Module No

Experiment description

No. of hours

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Magnetohydrodynamic Energy Conversion, by Richard J. Rosa, McGraw-Hill,
1968.
2. MHD Power Generation, by G.J. Womack, Chapman and Hall Ltd London,
1968.
3. Direct Energy Conversion, by Sutton, McGraw-Hill, 1966.
19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
LCD projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities
Nil

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems

20.3
20.4
20.5

Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

Date:

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Solar Architecture

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 840

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JES (PE)

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

Nil

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Partly with ESL770 Solar
Energy Utilization
8.4 UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
8.5 Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil
Not for UG Students

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

Prof.G.N. Tiwari
Prof. S.C. Kaushik,
Dr. S.N. Garg

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

Yes

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):

nd

Only in 2

Sem.

Once in Year

This course has objectives to elaborate PG


students regarding current trends in solar
architecture and following key concepts: Solar
Radiation, Sun Angles, Importance of Sun
Angles for Building Fenestration/day lighting,
Solar Passive Architecture, heat transfer in
buildings, Natural Heating/Cooling concepts for
Building, Earth to Air Heat Exchanger, Thermal
Comfort Requirements, Energy Conservation,
Concept of Zero Energy Buildings

Thermal comfort, sun motion, Building orientation and design, passive heating and cooling
concepts, thumb rules, heat transfer in buildings: Thermal modeling of passive concepts,
Evaporative cooling, Energy efficient windows and day lighting, Earth air tunnel and heat
exchanger, Zero energy building concept and rating systems, Energy conservation building
codes, Software for Building Simulation, Automation and Energy Management of Buildings

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

Topic

Solar Radiation Concept


Sun Angles
Building Orientation and Design
Passive Heating
Passive Cooling
Basics of Heat Transfer in Buildings
Thermal Modeling of Passive Concepts
Evaporative Cooling
Day lighting through Windows
Earth air tunnel and heat exchanger
ZEBC, Building rating system, Simulation Tools,
Codes
Course Total Number of Hours
16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable
17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable
18. Suggested texts and reference materials

No. of hours
2
1
2
4
4
6
6
4
5
2
6
42

1. Tiwari G.N. Solar Energy. CRC Press, New York (2002).


2. M.S. Sodha, N.K. Bansal, P.K. Bansal, A. Kumar, and M.A.S.Malik, Solar Passive
Building, Science and Design, Pergamon Press, New York (1986).
19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

No
No
Yes
No
No
LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities
No

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

50
25
0
0
25 Assignment/Tutorials/Presentation of one
concept

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Solar Refrigeration and Air Conditioning

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

:3

5.

Course number

: ESL 850

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JES (PE)

None

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

N/A

First Semester

Prof. S.C. Kaushik

Nil

This
course
will
contain
Basic
Thermodynamic
Modelling,
Design
Studies and Evaluation Methods for
Solar Cooling Systems.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Potential and scope of solar cooling, Types of solar cooling systems, Solar
collectors and storage systems for solar refrigeration and air-conditioning, Solar
operation of vapour absorption and vapour compression refrigeration cycles
and their thermodynamic assessment, Rankine cycle, sterling cycle based
solar cooling systems, Jet ejector solar cooling systems, Fuel assisted solar
cooling systems, Solar desiccant cooling systems, Open cycle absorption /
desorption solar cooling alternatives, Advanced solar cooling systems, Thermal
modeling and computer simulation for continuous and intermittent solar
refrigeration and air-conditioning systems, Refrigerant storage for solar
absorption cooling systems, Solar thermoelectric refrigeration and airconditioning, Solar thermo acoustic cooling and hybrid air-conditioning, Solar
economics of cooling systems.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

Topic
Scope of Solar Cooling
Solar Collection and Storage Options
Types of Solar Cooling
Vapour Compression Refrigeration
Photovoltaic Refrigeration
Rankine cycle solar cooling
Gas cycle solar cooling systems
Steam Jet Ejector Cooling
Thermo compression systems
Vapour Absorption Cooling
Types of Absorption cooling
Open cycle Absorption cooling cycle
Vapour Absorption cooling cycle
Solid and Liquid Desicant cooling
Hybrid Solar Air Conditioning cycle
Solar Thermoelectric cooling
Solar Thermo acoustic cooling
Corporative study of cooling systems
Solar economics of cooling systems
Advanced Solar Cooling Concepts
Course Total

No. of hours
1
3
2
3
1
3
1
2
2
3
2
2
2
3
2
3
2
2
2
2
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable


17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable
18. Suggested texts and reference materials
1. Kaushik S.C., Solar Refrigeration and space conditioning, Divyajyoti Publications,
Jodhpur (India). 1989

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

20
20
20
40 (Letures)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Electrical Power System Analysis

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 860

6.

Status
(category for program)

:JES (PE) & JEN (Module)

NIL

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4

Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre


Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre

8.5 Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

Nil
Nil
Nil
5-10 %
EEL791
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of teaching
/or Industrial experience.
Morning UG and PG
students are not allowed in
the evening course.

10.

Frequency of offering

Every Semester

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

Prof. R. Balasubramanian

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

No

The
subject
will
enhance
the
understanding of the students on power
system network modeling and short
circuit analysis, power flow solutions,
security analysis, state estimation and
transient stability.

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Network modeling and short circuit analysis: Primitive network, Y bus and Z bus
matrices formulation, Power invariant transformations, Mutually coupled branches Z
bus, Fault calculations using Z bus, Power flow solutions: AC load flow formulations,
Gauss-siedel method, Newton Raphson method, Decoupled power flow method,
Security analysis: Z bus methods in contingency analysis, Adding and removing
multiple lines, Interconnected systems, Single contingency and multiple contingencies,
Analysis by DC model, System reduction for contingency studies, State Estimation:
Lone power flow state estimator, Method of least squares, Statistics error and estimates,
Test for bad data, Monitoring the power system, Determination of variance, Improving
state estimates by adding measurements, Hierarchical state estimation, Dynamic state
estimation, Power system stability: transient and dynamic stability, Swing equation,
Electric power relations, Concepts in transient stability, Method for stability assessment,
Improving system stability.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5

Topic
Network modeling and short circuit analysis
Power flow solutions
Security analysis
State Estimation
Power system stability
Course Total

No. of
hours
8
10
8
8
8
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


Module No
Experiment description
1
nil
COURSE TOTAL

No. of hours

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Modern Power Systems Analysis by Xi-Fan Wang, Yonghua Song and Malcolm
Irving, Springer, 2009.
2. Power System Dynamics - Stability and Control by Jan Machowski, Janusz W. Bialek
and James R. Bumby, John Wiley and Sons, Ltd., 2008.
3. Computer-Aided Power Systems Analysis by Dr. George Kusic, CRC Press, 2009.
4. Power Systems Analysis by Arthur R Bergen and Vijay Vittal, Prentice-Hall, 2000.
5. Power Systems Analysis by Hadi Saadat, Mc Graw Hill, 2002.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure

19.7

Site visits

Powerpoint presentation, OHP and Black Board


Facilities.

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

12 %

Some typical examples

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Fusion Energy

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

:3

5.

Course number

: ESL870

6.

Status
(Category for program)

: JES & JEN (PE)

EC 60

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

Every Sem.

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum
1
year
of
teaching
/or
Industrial
experience. Morning UG
and PG students are not
allowed in the evening
course.
1st Sem.

2nd Sem.

Alternate Year

Profs. R.P.Sharma, A.Ganguli, Drs. R.


Uma, H.D. Pandey, A.K. Sharma
No

After doing this course the students are


expected to have basic understanding of
nuclear fusion process and the schemes
to achieve this.

14. Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Fission and fusion, Need for plasma, Lawson criterion, Confinement problem,
Laser driven fusion, Magnetic confinement, Plasma concept, Single particle
motions in complex magnetic field geometries, Equilibrium and stability, Cross
field transport, Important heating schemes, Tokamak and magnetic mirror,
Reactor concepts, Current status.
15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)
]

Module No
1
2
3
4

Topic
Fission and fusion
Plasma concept, Need for plasma
Lawson criterion, Confinement problem, Laser driven
fusion, Magnetic confinement,
Single particle motions in complex magnetic field
geometries, Equilibrium and stability, Cross field
transport,
Important heating schemes, Tokamak and magnetic
mirror, Reactor concepts, Current status.
Course Total

No. of hours
4
4
12
10

12

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not applicable

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable


Module No

Experiment description

No. of hours

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Introduction to Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, by Francis F. Chen,
Plenum Press New York, 1983.
2. The Physics of Laser Plasma Interaction, by William L. Kruer, AddisionWeseley, 1988.
3. Introduction to Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, by Hagler and Kristiansen,
Lexington, 1977.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities
Nil

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Advanced Fusion Energy

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

:3

5.

Course number

: ESL871

6.

Status
(Category for program)

: JES (PE)

EC 60
ESL 870

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

Every Sem.

nil
1st Sem.

2nd Sem.

Alternate Year

Profs. R.P. Sharma, A. Ganguli,


Drs. R.Uma, ,H.D.Pandey, A.K.Sharma
No

After doing this course, the students are


supposed to have the basic
understanding of various kinds of
instabilities and their effect on heating
the plasma and transport in fusion
devices.

14. Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Tokamak confinement Physics, Particle motions in a tokamak, Toroidal
equilibrium, Toroidal stability, High-beta Tokamak, Experimental observations,
Fusion Technology, Commercial Tokamak Fusion-power plant, Tandem- mirror
fusion power plant, Other Fusion reactors concepts, Inertial confinement fusion
reactors, Reactor cavity, Hybrid fusion/fission systems, Process heat and
synthetic fuel production.
15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)
]

Module No
1

2
3
4
5

Topic
Tokamak confinement Physics, Particle motions in a
tokamak, Toroidal equilibrium, Toroidal stability, beta
effects
Experimental observations, Fusion Technology,
Commercial Tokamak Fusion-power plant
Tandem- mirror fusion power plant, Other Fusion
reactors concepts
Inertial confinement fusion reactors, Reactor cavity,
Hybrid fusion/fission systems, Process heat and
synthetic fuel production

No. of hours
15

5
5
14
3

Course Total

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not applicable

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable


Module No

Experiment description

No. of hours

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Advances in Plasma Physics, vol.6, by A. Simon and W.B.Thompson, John
Wiley and Sons, 1976.
2. The Theory of Plasma Waves, by T. H. Stix, McGraw- Hill, 1962.
3. Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion, by K. Miyamoto, MIT Press, 1980.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities
Nil

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Alternative Fuels for Transportation

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 875

6.

Status
(category for program)

: JES & JEN (PE)

Nil

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

2nd

The evening course is for


sponsored students with
minimum 1 year of teaching
/or Industrial experience.
Morning UG and PG
students are not allowed in
the evening course.
1st Sem.

Sem.

2nd Sem.

Alternate Year

Prof.M.K.G.Babu, Prof.L.M.Das, Dr.


K.A. Subramanian.
No

To get an insight into the availability of


petroleum based fuels, their progress
and its influence on environment.
Exposure to the need, production and
technology
of
utilizing
different
alternative liquid and gaseous fuels for
transportation which include alcohol,
biodiesel, CNG, LPG, DME, DEE and
hydrogen

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


An introduction to hydrocarbon fuels-their availability and effect on
environment, Gasoline and diesel self ignition characteristics of the fuel, octane
number , cetane number , Alternative fuels liquid and gaseous fuels, physicochemical characteristics , Alternative liquid fuels, Alcohol fuels ethanol and
methanol, fuel composition , Fuel induction techniques ,Fumigation, Emission of
oxygenates, Applications to engines and automotive conversions, Biodiesel
formulation techniques, Transesterification, Application in diesel engines,
DME (Dimethyl ether), properties fuel injection consideration general
introduction to LPG and LNG , Compresses natural gas components, mixtures
and kits, Fuel supply system and emission studies and control, Hydrogen
combustion characteristics, Flashback control techniques, Safety aspects and
system development, NOx emission control, Biogas, Producer gas and their
characteristics system development for engine application.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Topic
Introduction
Ethanol Production & Utilization
Biodiesel Production & Utilization
Hydrogen Production, Storage & Utilization
Compressed Natural gas Production & Utilization
Biogas, DME & DEE
Methanol Production & Utilization

Course Total

No. of hours
3
6
7
8
7
7
4

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not Applicable


17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable
18. Suggested texts and reference materials
1. Richard L.Bechtold, Alternate Fuels Transportation Fuels for Today and
Tomorrow, Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) - 2002
2. John B.Haywood, Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals, McGraw-Hill
Book Company, 1988
3. Thipse.S.S., Alternative Fuels; Concepts, Technologies and Developments,
Publisher: Jaico Book Distributers

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

Drawings

LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities


Industrial Visits (optional)

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

RECENTLY ADDED NEW COURSES

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title
(< 45 characters)

: Hydrogen Energy

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

5.

Course number

ESL-746

6.

Status
(category for program)

PE
Nil

7.

Pre-requisites (course no./title)

8.
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre Nil
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Nil
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Nil
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)
Nil

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course
objective (about
50 words)

Every Sem.

Nil
1st Sem.

2nd Sem.

Alternate Year

Prof.L.M.Das, Prof.M.K.G.Babu,
Dr.K.A.Subramanian
No

To teach fundamentals of hydrogen energy as energy systems,


production processes, storage, utilization, and safety that is
necessary for taking some important elective subjects as well as
to increase the potential for job opportunities in automotive
industries and hydrogen production & its infrastructure
development related sectors as about 40% energy is being
consumed by automotive sectors.

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Introduction of Hydrogen Energy Systems
Hydrogen pathways introduction current uses, General introduction to
infrastructure requirement for hydrogen production, storage, dispensing and
utilization, and Hydrogen production power plants
Hydrogen Production Processes
Thermal-Steam Reformation Thermo chemical Water Splitting Gasification
Pyrolysis, Nuclear thermo catalytic and partial oxidation methods.
Electrochemical Electrolysis Photo electro chemical. Biological Photo
Biological Anaerobic Digestion Fermentative Micro-organisms
Hydrogen Storage
Physical and chemical properties General storage methods, compressed
storage Composite cylinders Glass micro sphere storage - Zeolites, Metal
hydride storage, chemical hydride storage and cryogenic storage.
Hydrogen Utilization
Overview of Hydrogen utilization: I.C. Engines, gas turbines, hydrogen burners,
power plant, refineries, domestic and marine applications. Hydrogen fuel
quality, performance, COV, emission and combustion characteristics of Spark
Ignition engines for hydrogen, back firing, knocking, volumetric efficiency,
hydrogen manifold and direct injection, fumigation, NOx controlling techniques,
dual fuel engine, durability studies, field trials, emissions and climate change
Hydrogen Safety
Safety barrier diagram, risk analysis, safety in handling and refueling station,
safety in vehicular and stationary applications, fire detecting system, safety
management, and simulation of crash tests.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module No
1
2
3
4
5

Topic
Introduction to Hydrogen Energy Systems
Hydrogen Production Processes
Hydrogen Storage
Hydrogen Utilization
Hydrogen Safety
Course Total

No. of hours
4
10
7
14
7
42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities: Not applicable


Practice of relevant numerical problems, case studies, issue based presentations
17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable
Module No
1

Experiment description

No. of hours

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1. Michael Ball and Martin Wietschel, The Hydrogen Economy Opportunities and
Challenges, Cambridge University Press, 2009
2. Bockris.J.O.M, Energy options : real economics and the solar hydrogen
system, Halsted Press and London publisher, 1980
19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6

Software
Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure

19.7

Site visits

Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Power point projector, OHP and Black Board
Facilities
Nil

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

40%
30%
30%
Nil
Nil

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Nuclear Energy

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 734

6.

Status
(category for program)

7.

PE

Pre-requisites (course no./title)

NIL

8.
Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)
8.1 Existing UG course(s) of the
NIL
Department/Centre
8.2 Proposed UG course(s) of the
NIL
Department/Centre
NIL
8.3 Approved PG course(s) of the
Department/Centre
NIL
8.4 UG/PG course(s) from other
Department/Centre
NIL
8.5 Equivalent course(s) from
existing UG course(s)
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective
(about 50 words)

Alternate Semester
A Ganguli, A Chandra, RP
Sharma, HD Pandey, AK
Sharma, RP Dahiya
NO

Due to the rapidly growing energy needs of the


country, India has made definite moves towards
exercising the nuclear option for large-scale energy
generation in the coming years. Simultaneously, India
has become a full partner in the seven nation

international consortium formed for proving the


viability of nuclear fusion as a large scale energy
option by making success of project ITER
(International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)
being set up in France. To further the needs of the
country in this direction a National Fusion Program has
also been set up within the country. In view of these
developments, it is appropriate that a course on basic
nuclear energy be available for students interested in
large scale energy options both for India and globally.
The course treats the basics of both nuclear fission and
fusion, and energy generation using these methods; it is
suitable for students from interdisciplinary background.
14.

Course Content:
Introduction: Scope of nuclear energy (fission and fusion energy), typical
reactions
Basics Concepts: Binding Energy of a nuclear reaction, mass energy
equivalence and conservation laws, nuclear stability and radioactive decay,
radioactivity calculations.
Interaction of Neutrons with Matter: Compound nucleus formation, elastic
and inelastic scattering, cross sections, energy loss in scattering collisions,
polyenergetic neutrons, critical energy of fission, fission cross sections,
fission products, fission neutrons, energy released in fission, -ray interaction
with matter and energy deposition, fission fragments
The Fission Reactor: The fission chain reaction, reactor fuels, conversion
and breeding, the nuclear power resources, nuclear power plant & its
components, power reactors and current status.
Reactor Theory: Neutron flux, Ficks law, continuity equation, diffusion
equation, boundary conditions, solutions of the DE, group diffusion method,
Neutron moderation (two group calculation), one group reactor equation and
the slab reactor
Health Hazards: radiation protection & shielding
Nuclear Fusion: Fusion reactions, reaction cross-sections, reaction rates,
fusion power density, radiation losses, ideal fusion ignition, Ideal plasma
confinement & Lawson criterion.
Plasma Concepts: Saha equation, Coulomb scattering, radiation from
plasma, transport phenomena
Plasma Confinement Schemes: Magnetic and inertial confinement, current
status

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


Module TOPICS
No
1
Introduction

No. of
Lectures
1

Q of nuclear reaction, mass energy equivalence,


conservation laws
Nuclear stability and radioactive decay, radioactivity
calculations, nuclear reactions, binding energy
Compound nucleus formation, elastic and inelastic
scattering, cross sections, energy loss in scattering
collisions
Polyenergetic neutrons, critical energy of fission, fission
cross sections
Fission products, fission neutrons, energy released in
fission
-ray interaction with matter and energy deposition,
fission fragments
Fission chain reaction, reactor fuels

Conversion and breeding

10

Nuclear power resources, power plants & its


components, power reactors
Neutron flux and Ficks law, continuity equation

14

Diffusion equation (DE), boundary conditions, solutions


of the DE, diffusion length
Group diffusion method, Neutron moderation (two
group calculation)
One group reactor equation and the slab reactor

15

Radiation protection and shielding

16

Fusion reactions, reaction cross sections, reaction rates 2

17

Fusion power density, radiation losses, ideal fusion


ignition
Lawson criterion & ideal plasma confinement

3
4

5
6
7

11
12
13

18
19
20

2
3

2
2
1
1

2
1

Saha equation, Coulomb scattering, radiation from


plasma, transport phenomena
Magnetic and inertial confinement, current status

TOTAL LECTURES FOR COURSE

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NA

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


NA
18. Suggested texts and reference materials
(i)
(ii)
(iii)

John R Lamarsh, Introduction to Nuclear Engineering, Addison Wesley


Publishing Co. Inc.
Robert A Gross, Fusion Energy, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., N.Y.
FF Chen, Introduction to Plasma Physics & Controlled Fusion, Plenum Press,
N.Y. (2nd Edition)

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6

Software
Hardware
Teaching Aids
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure

----------LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: Plasma Based Materials Processing

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 737

6.

Status
(category for program)

7.

PE

Pre-requisites (course no./title)

NIL

8.
Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)
8.1 Existing UG course(s) of the
NIL
Department/Centre
8.2 Proposed UG course(s) of the
NIL
Department/Centre
ESL 870 (Very minor overlap)
8.3 Approved PG course(s) of the
Department/Centre
PHL 680 (Very minor overlap)
8.4 UG/PG course(s) from other
Department/Centre
None
8.5 Equivalent course(s) from
existing UG course(s)
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

10.

Frequency of offering

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

13.

Course objective
(about 50 words)

Every Semester
A Ganguli, A Chandra, AK
Sharma HD Pandey, RP Dahiya
NO

In the last few decades, plasma based materials


processing has pervaded almost all areas, from
semiconductors and plasma based coatings to plasma
nitriding and plasma immersed ion implantation to
plasma pyrolysis. Thus a comprehensive knowledge of
how plasmas are utilized for different types of
materials processing would be immensely useful for
the future engineers from all fields.

14.

Course Content:
Introduction: Plasma based processing of materials
Plasma Concepts: Plasma fluid equations, single particle motions, unmagnetized
plasma dynamics, diffusion and resistivity, the DC sheath and probe diagnostics
Basics of Plasma Chemistry: Chemical reactions and equilibrium, chemical kinetics,
particle and energy balance in discharges
Low Pressure Plasma Discharges: DC discharges, RF discharges - Capacitively and
inductively coupled, microwave, ECR and helicon discharges
Low Pressure Materials Processing Applications: Etching for VLSI, film deposition,
surface modification and other applications (plasma nitriding, plasma ion implantation,
biomedical and tribological applications)
High Pressure Plasmas: High pressure non-equilibrium plasmas, thermal plasmas the
plasma arc, the plasma as a heat source, the plasma as chemical catalyst
Applications of High Pressure Plasmas: Air pollution control, plasma pyrolysis and
waste removal, plasma based metallurgy ore enrichment, applications in ceramics,
plasma assisted recycling

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


Module
No
1
2
3
4
5

6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

TOPICS

No. of Lectures

Introduction
Fluid equations for plasma
Single particle motions, unmagnetized plasma dynamics
Diffusion & transport
DC sheaths basic equations, Bohm sheath criterion, ChildLangmuir law, Matrix sheath, collisional sheath, Langmuir
probe diagnostics
Energy and enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy, chemical
equilibrium
Elementary reactions, gas phase kinetics, surface processes
and kinetics
Plasma equilibrium electropositive and electronegative
DC discharges
RF Discharges capacitively and inductively coupled
ECR and helicon discharges
Plasma etching, nitriding deposition and implantation
High pressure non-equilibrium plasmas, thermal plasmas the
plasma arc
The plasma as a heat source plasma torch, the plasma as
chemical catalyst
Air pollution control, plasma pyrolysis and waste removal,
plasma based metallurgy ore enrichment, applications in
ceramics, plasma assisted recycling
TOTAL LECTURES FOR COURSE

2
3
2
3
5

3
5
2
2
4
2
2
2
2
3

42

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NA

17. Brief description of laboratory activities:


NA
18. Suggested texts and reference materials
(i)
(ii)
(iii)

MA Lieberman & AJ Lichtenberg, Principles of Plasma Discharges and


Materials Processing, John-Wiley, N.Y.
PI John, , Plasma Sciences and the Creation of Wealth, Tata McGraw-Hill
Book Co. Ltd., New Delhi
SM Rossnagel, JJ Cuomo and WD Westwood, Handbook of Plasma
Processing Technology, Noyes Publications, Park Ridge

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1
19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6

Software
Hardware
Teaching Aids
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure

----------LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)

COURSE TEMPLATE
1.

Department/Centre
Proposing the course

: Centre for Energy Studies

2.

Course Title

: SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC DEVICES AND


SYSTEMS

3.

L-T-P structure

: 3-0-0

4.

Credits

: 3

5.

Course number

: ESL 755

6.

Status
(category for program)

: PE

7.

Pre-requisites
(course no./title)

ESL730/ESL770-so that the basics of PV Device physics


are known to the students.
Electronics: The students should know semiconductor
device physics

8.

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5

Overlap of contents with any (give course number/title)


Solar Energy Utilization and Direct Energy Conversion cover basic topics on
solar cells and systems.
Existing UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Proposed UG course(s) of the Department/Centre
Approved PG course(s) of the Department/Centre
UG/PG course(s) from other Department/Centre
Equivalent course(s) from existing UG course(s)

NIL
NIL

9.

Not allowed for (indicate program names)

NIL

10.

Frequency of offering

Every Sem.

1st

NIL
NIL
NIL

2nd Sem.

Sem.
Prof. V. Dutta

11.

Faculty who will teach the course

12.

Will the course require any visiting faculty?

Yes

Alternate
Year

The Course will be introducing the


students to all the aspects of PV
technology. This will enable them to
understand the requirements for PV
materials and PV systems for different
applications.
The role of PV in
autonomous, hybrid and distributed
generation will be emphasized.

13.

Course objective (about 50 words)

14.

Course contents (about 100 words)/(include laboratory/design activities):


Photovoltic materials will be discussed in details. This will include materials in
bulk and thin film forms.
The role of microstructure (single crystal,
multicrystalline, polycrystalline, amorphous and nanocrytalline) in electrical and
optical properties of the materials will be emphasized. The need for different cell
design will be identified and the technology route for making solar cells will be
discussed. Different methods of characterization of materials and devices will be
discussed. Applications of Photovoltaic for power generation from few watts to
Megawatts will be introduced.

15. Lecture Outline (with topics and number of lectures)


]

Module
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Topic
Review of Photovoltaic Conversion
Thermodynamics of Photovoltaic Conversion
First, Second and Third Generation PV
Devices: Design and Fabrication
PV device characterization
PV system for stand alone applications
(Lighting, Water Pumping etc.)
PV system for grid interactive applications
PV based hybrid system
Very Large Scale Photovoltaic (VLSPV)
PV Instrumentation
Environmental effects of Photovoltaic
Course Total

16. Brief description of tutorial activities


NIL

No. of hours
02
03
12
03
06
06
02
02
04
02
42

17. Brief description of laboratory activities: Not applicable


Module No
1

Experiment description

No. of hours

COURSE TOTAL

18. Suggested texts and reference materials


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Chopra K.L. and Das, S.R., Thin Film Solar Cells, Plenum Press, 1981.
Fahrenbuch A. L. and Bube R.H, Fundamentals of solar cells, Academic Press, 1983
Green, Martin A. High Efficiency Silicon Solar Cells, Trans Tech. Publications, 1987
Brendel R. and Goetzberger A., Thin Film Crystalline Si Solar cells, Wiley VCH, 2003.
Bhattacharya, Tapan, Terrestrial solar photovoltaics, Narosa Publishing, 1998.
Lasnier France and Tony Gan Ang, Photovoltaic Engineering Handbook, Adam Hilger,
1990.
7. Roger A. Messenger and Jerry Ventre, Photovoltaic Systems Engineering, CRC
Press, 2000.

19. Resources required for the course (itemized & student access requirements, if any)
19.1

Software

Photovoltaic System Design Software


(TRANSYS)

19.2
19.3
19.4
19.5
19.6
19.7

Hardware
Teaching aides (videos, etc.)
Laboratory
Equipment
Classroom Infrastructure
Site visits

LCD Projector, OHP and Black Board Facilities

20. Design content of the course (percent of student time with examples, if possible)
20.1
20.2
20.3
20.4
20.5

Date:

Design-type problems
Open-ended problems
Project-type activity
Open-ended laboratory work
Others (please specify)

(Signature of the Head of the Department / Centre)