Group Work Summary

Our group consisted of Tarei King, Stephen Ticharwa, Thorsten Ziller, Jason Sabbage  and Josh Scorrar. Topics were discussed in several initial meetings and divided by interest per person.  There   were   4   meetings   scheduled   over   the   past   4   weeks   which   allowed   time   to  independently research chosen topics and communicate zindings to the group as a  whole. All members attended mentioned meetings and the workload was shared equally, for  which help offered to members through discussion via email and physical mediums.

1

Abstract
The content of our report has intended to provide an insight into function of fractals  as   well   as   investigation   of   their   relevance   to   applied   science   and   humanities.   It  comprises a collective effort encompassing research and individual perspective on  Fractal existence through discussion of subject matter such as Geology, Art History,  Computing   Science   and   Medical   Biology.   As   such   we   have   detected   signizicant  utilization   of   mathematic   principles   to   facilitate   exploration   and   development   of  interdisciplinary arts and thought.  In   particular,   the   advent   of   technology   meant   computers   initially   gave   scientists  opportunity   for   tangible   representation   of   the   Fractal   discovery.   The   immediate  impact   on   all   other   respective   investigative   disciplines   was   now   that   a   scientizic  method could be implemented to identify and depict the pervasive nature of Fractals  in human culture itself.

2

Table of Contents
Group Work Summary.............................................................................................................. 1 Abstract.......................................................................................................................................... 2 Table of Contents........................................................................................................................ 3 1.   Discussion on the Historical impact of Fractals on Western Artistic  Thought.......................................................................................................................................... 4 28........................................................................................................................................ 1 2.  Mathematical Background and Theory........................................................................ 9 2.1 The history of Fractal Theory and those involved................................... 9 2.2  Introduction to the maths of Fractal Geometry.................................... 10 2.3 Julia Sets................................................................................................................. 11 2.4 How to generate a Julia Fractal Set.............................................................. 12 3.  Natural Fractals and Artistic Forgeries of Nature................................................. 14 3.1 Briezly on Euclidean.......................................................................................... 14 3.2 Natural Fractals and dimensions................................................................. 15 3.3 Recognition of self‐similarity in nature..................................................... 15 3.3.1 On measurements of coastlines................................................................ 16 3.4 Before the computer......................................................................................... 17 3.5 Computer Art ...................................................................................................... 17 3.6 Using computers to forge nature................................................................. 18 4.  Practical Applications of Fractal Geometry............................................................. 19 4.1 Fractal Image Compression............................................................................ 19 4.2  Fractal Use in Visualization and  Simulated Terrain generation....20 4.3 Fractals in Hollywood....................................................................................... 21 4.4 Fractal Art and Fashion.................................................................................... 22 4.5 Emerging Fractal Based Technologies....................................................... 22 5. Fractals in medicine........................................................................................................... 23 5.1 How are fractals involved in the process in which certain cells form  together to create organs?...................................................................................... 23 5.2 Technology and Maths used for understanding Fractals in Biology ........................................................................................................................................... 23 5.3 Fractals use in Cellular structures............................................................... 25 5.4 Technological advances involving Fractals in Biology ......................... 25 Conclusion.................................................................................................................................. 27 Bibliography............................................................................................................................... 28

3

1.   Discussion on the Historical impact of Fractals on  Western Artistic Thought
Given the general subjective nature of Western thinking plus prolizic and voluminous  accounts of History of Art, I briezly attempt to identify the 'simple' fractal, as well as  provide a context for how it is applicable in unfolding 'history'. The phenomenon of  evolving   History   is   impact   itself,   yet   the   fractal   can   perhaps   pertain   to,   or   be  juxtaposed with it . 'Nothing exists except atoms and empty spaces; everything else is opinion' [Democritus,  400B.C] A basic dezinition of a fractal  is imperative if  I am  to discuss  its inzluence or  any  subsequent derivation or meaning. So, what is a fractal? ‘… a fractal is a shape that, when you look at a small part of it, has a similar (but not  necessarily identical) appearance to the full shape.' 
[https://www.fractalus.com/info/layman.html]

A geometric pattern that is repeated at ever smaller scales to produce irregular shapes  and surfaces that cannot be represented by classical geometry. Fractals are used  especially in computer modeling of irregular patterns and structures in nature. 
[http://www.answers.com/topic/fractal]

Without attributing any specizically mathematical properties we could argue that a  fractal   in   essence   is   a   demonstrable   output,   or   arrangement,   of   tangible   yet  inextricable interrelationships.  'Life on Earth is an intricate network of mutually interdependent organisms held in a  state of dynamic balance. The concept of life is fully meaningful only in context of the  entire biosphere.' 
[Paul Davies, The Cosmic Blueprint]

So how does the notion of fractals inzluence the human psyche or reach levels  effecting or contributing to artistic thinking? "The structure of the Universe is complex...Science and Art both attempt to explore this  in order to understand, and then make use of it... Maths and science seek to analyze  experience while art attempts to synthesize experience."  (M.Fowler, 1996) According to the above authors, they further suggest Architecture and Sculpture, as  art   forms,   were   inevitably,   attributed   sacredness   during   connection   through  (essentially institutionalized) knowledge and ritual. Places became literal 'sanctizied'  environments ‐ containing   these select  perceivable  qualities e.g.  in  land  mass, the  elements,   existing   vegetation   and   animal   life.   Resultant   depiction   ranged   from  echoing form, to contrasting it and not only its contents, but (historical) Architecture  itself,   notably   became   a   mediating   device   for   referential   transition   (as   human)  between earth and the celestial. "...The artist is extremely aware of the limits of space. Felt as a physical presence with  physical properties, it is through this medium that all of the arts are expressed. Dance,   4

music, theatre, architecture, and sculpture, all manipulate the space/time experience….  Intelligible space enters realms of mass and boundary… Sculpture is active volume while  architecture is active container…. but both require more than mere presence of form to   be discernable arts...  clear concept and experience of emotion predicate sensitive use of   materials in organization."  (M.Fowler, 1996) Adding   to   this   example   art   historian   Albert     Elsen     (as   scrutinizer)   decidedly  remarks… "… Up until abstraction evolved in the twentieth century we know that shapes such as  triangles, circles, and squares historically symbolized concepts and values. All three of   these shapes, for example, have stood for God.... the circle has stood for eternity,   resurrection… the Pythagorus triangle referred to human knowledge. In Christianity   triangular shape stood for the Trinity, and has signitied hieratic social systems... for   many painters change to the face of the square (similar to changes seen in depictions of   Christ) appears through the history of art...  often personal history and artists intentions  deliver new dimensions of meaning..."  (Elsen, 1981) As such, perhaps the (early) introduction of applied geometrical principles in two  dimensional   space   allows   for   'strengthening',   'reinforcement'   or   'solidizication'   of  specizic variables or qualities pertinent to the 'artist', whose demonstrative role may  predominantly serve to visually represent a desire for the designated relationships of  these values, to also be held ‐ or at least 'received'  ‐ by the viewer.  (detinition of)  Euclidean Geometry ­ Study of points, lines, angles, surfaces, and solids  based on Euclid's axioms. This axiomatic method has been the model for many systems   of rational thought, even outside mathematics, for over 2,000 years… This work was  long held to constitute an accurate description of the physical world and to provide a  sufticient basis for understanding it. [http://www.answers.com/topic/euclidean­geometry­1] Observing   the   inclusion   of   Pythagorus   and   also   Euclidean   geometry,   this   invokes  reexamination of interrelationship with the fractal.  "The Euclidean plane is an abstraction used to examine geometrical relationships in   two dimensions. In Nature, a perfectly tlat, rigid plane with no thickness does not exist...  In actual fact the reality is that... surfaces are twisted, convoluted, rough and irregular.  In short they are fractal."  (M.Fowler, 1996) In the case of Pythagorus, he posits that ‐ if the length of a right triangle's sides are  designated  a,  b, and  c  (where  c  is opposite 90°)  then  a  squared +  b  squared =  c  squared. So if squares (as shapes) are placed on the triangle's sides the total number  on side a and b would = total number on side c, (the hypotenuse). This is considerably  important   because   basically,   in   all   of   art   history,   delegated   visual   space   is  (pronouncedly) dezined or contained by the proxies of shape and form ‐ and thus  appear,   inevitable   relationships   of   intersecting   line   ‐   which   as   they   straighten,  comprise   a   natural   abundance   of   squares,   rectangles   and   triangular   (general)  convergence.  By terrestrial standards, certainly for those of the human eye ‐ 90° as a 'pull' ‐ for  'frame of reference', would be an unsuitable host if it were not to 'lead' the party.  That  means,   that   there   is   a   tendency   for   the   viewer   to   extrapolate   from   sometimes  5

multifaceted and intricate space ‐ some sense (literally) of 'containment' ‐ through  detecting fulcrums of continuity.   Enter 90°. (Complete with Pythagarol   little black  dress). ".... can a shape that is detined by a simple equation or a simple rule of construction be  perceived by people other than geometers as having aesthetic value.... When the   geometric shape is a fractal, the answer is yes. Even when the fractals are taken 'raw',  they are attractive..."  (Emmer, 1993) With   divisibility   in   mind,   the   Golden   Ratio   as   well   warrants   mention.   A   ratio  ultimately  becomes an  inzinite repeating decimal  e.g.  1.666.... the 'Golden Ratio'  is  sometimes referred as Phi (∅) approximately equal to 1.1.618. "... it is extracted from the ratio of lengths of two line segments, where one line is divided   (using a compass) at a particular point (the 'Golden Cut') .... and the smaller segment is  in relation to the larger which is relation to the whole line (namely)...       

[ http://www.cosarch.com]

  "Our perception of the complexity of a contiguration is altered when we can tind an  algorithm and a set of modules to generate that contiguration"  (Emmer, 1993) "An entire fabric as a warp… (comprised of individual strands) its weft’s horizontal   elements interlace with stronger vertical ones becoming more stable ...Symmetry is the   working structure, while elements, such as the Golden ratio, are the weft threads… Depending on perception,  pattern of symmetry may be hidden within the layers,  suggesting only asymmetry, or absence of order, when in truth, they both coexist..."  
(M.Fowler, 1996)

Inzinitely presented with the logistics of characterizing space, both artist and viewer  are   confronted   with   the   human   'oeuil's   natural   gravitation   for   compositing   visual  elements aesthetically, often identizied as symmetry. If it is suggested that symmetry  is a concept that allows description of relationships in space and that the visual artist  is   able   to   explore   its   limits   therein,   (given   rise   and/or   opportunity   for   aesthetic  'presence')   we   could   dezine   basic   symmetry   as   characteristic   repetition   of  arrangement with equality, and asymmetry as being arrangement which lacks equal  quality.   Therefore   natural   symmetrical   arrangement   as   opposed   to   applied  symmetrical arrangement (or movement) could be described as inherent symmetry. "Picasso… admired more the asymmetrical constructions of symmetrical human   6

features and objects in Cézanne’s art. … Picasso also received the idea of creating   continuities in art where in nature there were discontinuities, and vice versa Cézanne’s   reduction of myriad shapes to multiples of each other found comprehension in Picasso's   conjugation of ovoid forms...and multiplicity of arcs...  (Elsen, 1981) "... Mathematics provides a rich array of materials from which to select, limit and   control, and therefore compose. Mathematics not only supplies materials but can also be  applied to the problem of visual consonance, consequently contributing to both the form  and content of the work... "  (Emmer, 1993) "...Mathematical language uses the word "fold" for describing a rotation...The pentagon   is tilled with Golden Ratios and by extension the patterns that arise through 5­turn  symmetry is associated with organic forms..."  (M.Fowler, 1996)  If we expand on the principle of rotation and apply it to three dimensions in space ‐  this   posits   freedom   of   movement   without   constraint   in   a   singular   plane.   Fractals  dezinitively   through   their   recapitulation   relay   an   emancipated,   interdependent  synergetic   process   that   substantiates   vitality   and   braces   infrastructure   for  metamorphosis.  'The crystal may be regarded as one of the basic form patterns… atoms or molecules are  so spatially arranged that the unit can withstand the stresses of the environment, or be  able to accommodate itself either to free space or to the pressures of continement.' David Drabkin, Biochemist "From the distribution of foliage on a tree, to the complex neural network of our  nervous system… these can be better described with the help of Fractal Geometry. In the  human body, the fractal design of its components allow our organism, to greatly extend  its contact surfaces to carry out the innumerable and complex functions of interchange  that make life possible. This optimal structure must surely be motivated by evolutionary  reasons."  (Salingaros, 2000) In my opinion, we can thus far acknowledge that fractals possess intrinsic properties  that   display   striking   resemblances   to   mathematic   principles   utilized   throughout  history. Discourse unsurprisingly continues over the respective roles and impetus of  Maths, Art and Science in a seemingly, sometimes misled debate of collective, versus  individual cultural 'endowment' .   But     the   necessity   for   'clout'   is   thankfully   diminished   by   the   wisdom   of   those  immersed in disciplines, both historical and present day, where 'artistic' thinking and  subsequent impact is an interdisciplinary method or approach ‐ if not pathway ‐ best  described   perhaps;   as  an   unfettered   explorative   journey.   Here,   the   essence   of   the  fractal prevails: complete reciprocity is perpetually summative. "...I believe that the collective/individual mind, tries to protect itself from the ‘unknown’.   Simultaneously tlexible, it eventually evolves by incorporating new content… a possible  explanation… why people spontaneously build structures that have fractal properties.  We can also connect the ‘fractal ‘ universe with the mind structurally… the impact of  our experiences may account for why our mind is fractal; because so is our  environment… surrounded by fractal structures for millions of years….  a great deal of  7

our mind's structure stems from this ancient relationship...."  (Salingaros, 2000) “Faced with pure algorithmic art (of the fractal) no experienced person will fail to  realize eventually that the work is neither a painting nor a photograph… it certainly  does not raise the issue of 'artiticial creativity'. Yet, these are often perceived as   beautiful on their own terms. Therefore, creativity and beauty and the production and  consumption of art must be viewed separately."  (Emmer, 1993) The   fractal   then,   it   seems,   literally   conjures   magic.   Enchanting,   spellbinding,  fascinatingly  hypnotic ‐ at times polemic   ‐   perhaps 'conjurer' deservedly  and by  inference becomes it. Yet most telling and astonishing of all, I believe, is its ubiquitous  nature and  the potency  of consistency  in  all past, current and imminent, pending  permutations and/or manifestations. Essentially, it permeates culture. By default, this  includes the realm of the artistic mind.  The mind is inextricable from History as phenomenon.   As homo sapiens, perhaps  relentless   examination   of   the   Fractal   and   desire   for   further   understanding   of  quantiziable or identiziable complexities belies its absolute value.  Quite   possibly,   the   unique   experience   of   witnessing   the   fractal   is   rezlection   in   a  mirrored surface of interconnectedness ‐ a source for contemplative choice ‐ to be  enveloped by inevitable change while seeking awareness of its profound momentum.  What do you see in the Fractal? Or does the Fractal see something in you? "The ancient idea of the Eastern philosophers on the interconnection between the   microcosm and macrocosm is acquiring rigor in our times with the scientitic   understanding of the universal laws of nature. The discovery of fractal geometry and its  role in the description of a great variety of natural phenomena plays an important part  in this process."  "... Recently I read a very interesting book: "The Evolution of Consciousness" by R.   Ornstein, a leading neuro­physiologist, on the subject of evolutionary psychology. The   author mentions a study comparing students from Western cities, which contain many  horizontal and vertical outlines in their designs, but few oblique ones, to a group of Cree   Indians, whose houses contained lines in all orientations. The conclusion of the   experiment is that the urban students had less acuity for oblique lines than the Indians  did, which shows that the level of complexity of the urban environment has a  corresponding impact in the level of complexity of the human mind… "  – Benoit B. Mandelbrot.

8

2.  Mathematical Background and Theory
“Although computer memory is no longer expensive, there's always a tinite size buffer  somewhere. When a big piece of news arrives, everybody sends a message to everybody   else, and the buffer tills.” [ Benoît Mandelbrot.]

2.1 The history of Fractal Theory and those involved
When we talk about fractals we come across the Mandelbrot set which is the most  famous example of fractals. It is named by the mathematician Benoît Mandelbrot. In 1979 Mandelbrot zirst started to study fractals called the Fatou sets and the Julia  sets at Harvard University.  His knowledge was based on the previous work of Pierre  Fatou and Gaston Julia from France who started experimenting with fractal formulas  in 1917 in Paris.

Fig 2.1 Benoît Mandelbrot inspired by Gaston Julia and Pierre Fatou

The french mathematicians were working in the zield of complex numbers. Pierre  Fatou started to focus and specialize in applying a function repeatedly by using the  output  from one number as the  input to  the  next  which is  known  as  mathematic  iteration. He zigured that iterations of a simple function can produce complex outputs  in graphical representations. At the same time at the age of 25, Gaston Julia wrote an article on iteration about  rational   functions   which   gained   immense   popularity   among   mathematicians.   As   a  result of that he received the Grand Prix award. Despite his fame, his works were all  forgotten until the day Benoît Mandelbrot mentioned them in his works. Benoît   Mandelbrot’s   main   focus   was   to  come   up   with   the   most   simplest   possible  transformation of a fractal. His main advantage to any other mathematician from the  past was to use modern computers to calculate iteration functions. For the zirst time  in   history   with   the   use   of   computer   technologies   he   could   calculate   and   plot   a  tremendous  amount  of images  of Julia sets with the formula z n+1  =  zn2  +  μ. While  investigating the topology of the Julia set in depth he changes the formula into zn+1 =  zn2 + c and called it the Mandelbrot set. To have a better understanding of the scientizic  discovery Benoît Mandelbrot made in the 1980s we have to look into more detail.

9

2.2 Introduction to the maths of Fractal Geometry
The Mandelbrot set is one of the most implemented fractals in plotting programs now  a days. It is produced by the formula: [1]

zn 1 zn  c

2

The variables z and c are complex numbers such as 3 + 2i. The formula is iterated  until   |zn|   is   greater   thanor   equal   to   the   bailout   value   2.   Then   the   pixel   that   c    corresponds to is colored according to the number of iterations that occurred before  the   process   bailed   out.   The   uninteresting   black   area   of   the   image   is   the   actual  Mandelbrot Set. It consists of all the values for c where |z n| never got larger than 2. Of  course this area is impossible to change accurately, so the program decides to color  black all pixels for which |zn| never gets larger than 2 for a given number of iterations.  [2] It is astonish that such a simple formula can produce such an interesting picture. If  you zoom into the image you will zind sections that look the same as portions of the  image at other zooms. This inzinite level of detail is common to all fractals and makes  them so fascinating.

Fig 2.2 “The best know fractal and one of the most complex and beautiful mathematical objects known.” - Adrien Douady.

10

2.3 Julia Sets

Fig 2.3: Original Mandelbrot Fractals. (Mandelbrot B. 1983)

Julia sets are created with the same formula as the Mandelbrot set, but they use the  formula differently. For the Mandelbrot set, c is the point being tested, on the complex  plane. For the Julia set, c remains constant. From this dezinition, you can see that there  is an inzinite number of Julia sets. One for each value of c. In fact, there is a Julia set  that   corresponds   to   each   point   on   the   complex   plane.   There   is   an   interesting  relationship between the Mandelbrot set and the Julia sets. In a way, you can think of  the Mandelbrot set as an index for the Julia sets. For values of c that are inside the  Mandelbrot set, you will get connected Julia sets. That is all the black regions are  connected.   Conversely,   for   those   values   of   c   outside   the   Mandelbrot   set,   you   get  unconnected sets. 

Fig 2.4: Discetion of the Mandelbrot Fractal. (Mandelbrot B. 1983)

11

2.4 How to generate a Julia Fractal Set

Fig 2.5 Examples of a simple and a more complex Julia set. (cite needed for picture) We  put  in   a  complex  number   z,  then  multiply   it   by   itself   ,  and  then  add  another  complex number c to the result. The c is a complex constant, that is, a number that   does not change throughout the entire fractal calculation. [4] Let z = 2 + 3i and c = 4 + 5i. f(z) = z2 + c = [(2 + 3i) · (2 + 3i)] + (4 + 5i) = [(2 · 2) + (2 · 3i) + (3i · 2) + (3i · 3i)] + (4 + 5i) = [4 + 6i + 6i + (-9)] + (4 + 5i) = (-5 + 12i) + (4 + 5i) = -1 + 17i So f(z) = f(2 + 3i) = (2 + 3i)2 + (4 + 5i) = -1 + 17i. The next thing we need to do is to zind out  the size or norm of a complex number. The norm of a real number is just the number itself. For example the norm of 7 is 7.  To zind out the norm of a complex number is a bit differently:

z  x  yi  (x 2  y 2 )
As an example we have:

 3  4i  (32  ( 4) 2  (9 16)  (25) 5
With   this   knowledge   in   mind   we   can   understand   now   how   a   computer   program  handles   a   function   with   complex   numbers   to   output   a   Julia   set   in   a   cartesian  coordinate system:

1.) We   have   to   determine   the   size   of   the   cartesian   coordinate   system   on   the  computer screen. For example: Resolution: 900 x 900 = 81’000 Pixels 2.) We set up the computer to use the mandelbrot formula f(z) = z2 + c. Then we  12

input a complex constant value for c. For example: c = 4 + 5i 3.) The   computer   starts   calculating   in   the   upper   left   corner   of   the   coordinate  system. In this  example it would be (‐900,900). The computer program is set  up to interpret these values as (‐900,‐900). These two values are then be used  as x and y in the function. 4.) The computer calculates the function and uses it’s result to calculate its norm. 5.) If this norm is smaller then the parameter of the coordinate system, then the  resulting x and y values of the function become the new input value for the  same function. This iteration will be repeated until the norm is bigger then the  parameter of the coordinate system. There is also an inbuilt limitation of 256  iterations otherwise some functions run in a loop forever. 6.) Once   the   norm   is   bigger   than   the   parameter   of   the   coordinate   system   the  calculation stops and records the amount of iterations that occurred. Then the  computer program goes to the next pixel in the cartesian coordinate system  and returns to step 4.). 7.) The number of iterations tells the computer what color this very zirst pixel has.  For example the iteration would be 55 which could mean that the color of this  pixel is red. The next pixel has an iteration of 54 which could mean that it has a  slightly lighter shade of red. etc. [5] 8.) Step 3.) to 7.) are repeated 810‘000 times for all the pixel on this particular  coordinate system. If we multiply the amount of maximum iteration that could  occur to the amount of pixel then we can see how it can take up to 900 x 900 x  256   =   207‘360‘000   calculations   for   each   fractal   image.   Also   take   into  consideration that some of the complex numbers are much more complicated  to calculate than the one shown above.

13

3.  Natural Fractals and Artistic Forgeries of Nature

“the more things change, the more they stay the  same”
‐Glenn Elert, Mathmatics in the Digital age, 1995‐1998. Fractal   based   visualisation   was   not   realised   in   a   complex   iteration   prior   to   the  invention of the computer. Benoit   B.   Mandelbrot   (who   worked   for   IBM)   in   the   1970’s   argued   against   Euclid  geometric   laws   and   theories,   which   ignore   “formless”   shapes   such   as   coastlines,  mountains and clouds.   As with any progression of knowledge and the increasing  contribution   to   the   ‘global   intelligence’,   Mandelbrot’s   ideas   separated   from   the  existing Euclid theory – Euclid of course, separating from Newton theory before that  and herein lies a great irony which is; progression of ideas can be seen to have a self­ similar nature and are in fact, fractal in nature.   Fractals in nature have a different story in the context of this report.  The continued  discussion will visit a brief history of why fractals are a more accurate measure for  natural   occurrences   (such   as   coastlines,   leaf   perimeters   and   snowzlakes),   provide  examples of the theory and describe the social context and continued outcomes of the  discovery of fractals in nature.

3.1 Briefly on Euclidean
Euclidean geometry described all natural shapes as “cones, sphere or cylinders”.  Any  object with did not fulzil such a dezinition was coined as “noisy Euclidean geometry”  and such were parasitic forms. When one observes natural shapes such as coastlines, mountains and even snowtlakes  it becomes obvious that nature cannot be included with the Euclidean dezinition. At   this   point,   Fractal   geometry   takes   centre   stage   in   dezining   and   exploring   such  shapes.  Giving them dezinition, theoretical duplication and allowing for such visuals  as “the forgery of nature”  (Mandelbrot, 1983)

14

3.2 Natural Fractals and dimensions
The Koch snowzlake illustrated the true nature of fractals and could also present one  of the early representations of a “forgery of nature”  (Mandelbrot, 1983)in the form of  a snowzlake.

Fig 3.1  Four iterations of a Koch curve to create the Koch Snowtlake  (GNU License). Representation on the Lindenmayer System is derived from the following:

F  F  F  F  F
F = forward one.  –F = turn 60 left.  +F = turn 60 right.

3.3 Recognition of self-similarity in nature
Mandelbrot discovered that coastlines viewed from aerial photos say 1 km in radius,  presented similar shapes when a level of magnizication was applied to the same image  – lets say 0.5 km in scale. Applying another level of magnizication, the same result was evident and proving a  level of self‐similarity was present in coastlines.

15

3.3.1 On measurements of coastlines
In a basic form, to measure a coastline one would start with two or more point at two  heads of the coastline and join with a straight line.  We would then take a smaller scale  and repeat the process – therefore gathering a more accurate depiction, and repeat  the process again.

Fig 3.2:  Example of scaling  measurements of the university (Yale University , 2009) It should be quickly deduced that this method yields two fundamental issues: 1. The reduction of scale can occur a theoretical inzinite amount of times –  making the length of the coastline inzinite in theory. 2. Measuring at such scales in practically impossible.

3.3.2 On Rivers and mountains
Fractals are evident within satellite images of rivers and channels of a continent or  land mass.  Magnizication on the whole will reveal another self‐similarity within rivers  themselves as displayed below.

Fig 3.3 self similarity of a river bed, magnitied to show self  (Yale University , 2009)

16

3.3.3 Visual examples of other fractals found in nature

Fig 3.4  Other fractals found in nature  (Yale University , 2009)

3.4 Before the computer
Although   simple   fractals   where   found   historically   throughout   many   ages   in   art,  religion and nature their visual conception circa 1970‐1980  in a complicated way  extending past say 10+ iterations.  To appreciate this statement, one would only have  to consider drawing zigure 1. – the Koch snowzlake up to 10 iterations are realise the  time involved and the level of intricacy extends past that of even the more patient  human. Throughout the report Mandelbrot and his fractal set has been mentioned.  Some 256  iterations were required to create the complex set, of which would be the life work of  one person had this been undertaken by hand. However, simple fractals are witnessed throughout history in different places and it  would be prudent to mention these places by visual reference only.

Fig 3.5 Castel del Monte was the hunting seat of the Hohenstaufer Emperor Friedrich II  in Apulia 1240 ­ 1250 ­  (SALA, 2000).

3.5 Computer Art
The   modern   computer   overcame   the   difziculty   with   iteration   and   with   powerful  graphics engines, more and more interesting forms of fractals were able to take place.  17

Artists,   users   and   mathematicians   were   able   to   now   visually   realise   the   inzinite  pleasure and beauty of self‐similarity and self‐iteration on a large scale. Like a well‐known mathematical equation, viewing a fractal shares an elegant and  innately understood beauty.   As well as being beautiful, they represented the visual  state of inzinity.

Left Fig 3.6:  “The Mandelbrot Set” – B. Mandelbrot, 1987. Right Fig 3.7 : “Composition with Black, Red, Grey, Yellow and Blue” – Piet Mondrian.

3.6 Using computers to forge nature
Evidence of fractals in nature should be clearly illustrated up to this point and paint a  clear   picture   of   their   applications   and   more   importantly   the   notion   of  intinite   dimensions. To recursively end on the zirst point made in this section, fractals are natural and  nature exists within fractals.   Computers were initially used to visualise the vast history of fractal art and compute  it at a higher iteration rate to ultimately create something, which exists in nature. As nature itself started the discover and research into fractals, it seems only fair to  illustrate   how   well   the   theory   of   Mandelbrot   and   his   predecessors   were   by   the  following images created through computation means, but still fractal based.

    Fig 3.8:  3D renditions of fractal geometry produced by wiki username:  Solkoll.

18

4.  Practical Applications of Fractal Geometry

Fig 4.1 ‐ Sydney Harris, Fractal Cartoon.   This part of the report attempts to show the impact of fractals and the  practical  applications that have emerged as a direct or indirect result of fractal geometry.  Nowadays     barriers   among   math,   science,   art,   and   culture   are   increasingly   being  diminished due to advances in fractal geometry.

4.1 Fractal Image Compression
The use of fractals in compressing images originates from the basic   notion that in  certain images  parts of the images resemble other parts of the same image. Fractal  algorithms  convert these parts, into geometric shapes into mathematical data called "fractal codes" which are used to recreate the encoded image. In the book the fractal geometry on Nature Benoit Mandelbrot put forward a theory that traditional geometry with its straight lines and smooth surfaces does not resemble the geometry of trees and clouds and mountains .It is no coincidence that Fractal Image Compression is best suited for nature images. In 1987 Michael Barnsley author of the book Fractal Everywhere and Alan Sloan formed a 19

company Iterated Systems Compressing.

which went on to receive patents on Fractal Image

In the 1997 Arthur Clarke documentary “Fractals- The Color of Infinity ” Barnsley describes the notion of fractal image compression to have come about from what he called the collage theorem. The basic idea of the theorem was to cover an arbitrary picture with tiles of smaller copies of its self to form a collage, then tell the computer to look at the picture and automatically find the fractal formula of the picture then you could turn it into an entity of infinite resolution. “If you took a fern and covered it with little ferns then you would have created a  formula for a fern” .­ Michael Barnsley The fractals used in the image compression system are iterated functions . In commercial application Microsoft has used fractal image compression in the Encarta Mutimedia encyclopedia. As this is heavily patented technology one would argue that perhaps this has hindered the development of this technology and the use and development by other commercial enterprises.

4.2 Fractal Use in Visualization and Simulated Terrain generation
Using   geometric   primitives   such   as   lines,   curves   ,rectangles   and   polygons   CAD  software succeeded in creating graphic representation and illustrations of man made  structures  and objects . This success however could not be replicated when it came to  representing natural objects such as mountains, clouds, rivers and coastline.  In 1975 Richard F Voss  created a computer generated graphic  illustration of realistic  looking  mountains using fractal iterations.  This was a breakthrough in the world of  computer graphics.

Fig 4.2 Voss succeeded imitating the roughness of a mountain landscape.  ‐ Richard F.  Voss.  Mountains Illustration. With   advancements   in   computer   technology   bringing   the   development   of   super  computers like the IBM Blue Gene capable of reaching speeds of petaFlops, computer  20

graphics   have   become   more   and   more   realistic.   User   requirements   have   driven  developments in the zield of simulated computer graphics,   Military,   Film Industry,  Gaming Industry.

4.3 Fractals in Hollywood

When   Loren   Carpenter   ‐A   Graphic   Image   researcher   presented   a   two   minute  animated zilm in 1980  showing a complicated landscape called Von Libre Hollywood  immediately realized the potential of the technic ,he had used fractal geometry to  create  the  intricate   mountain   ranges   and   valleys  in   the   animation.  Carpenter   was  called to Lucas Films to take a leading role in the preparation of Star Trek 2 – The  Wrath of Khan. “The tilm is credited as having the tirst feature  tilm sequence created   entirely with computer graphics”   Loren Carpenter went on to be the cofounder of  Pixar Animation Studios. Fractals graphic images of simulated terrain and landscapes and worlds appear in  most  Hollywood blockbusters utilizing computer graphics and special effects  as well  as entire productions created and completed on the computer . The technology has revolutionized the zilm as well as the gaming industries. More and  more   games   are   being   released   with   realistic   graphics   of   natural   objects   like  mountains clouds and rivers.

21

4.4 Fractal Art and Fashion.
The   beauty   of   nature     has   inspired   many   fashion   designers   and   artists.   It   is   not  uncommon to zind fractal inspired materials on todays fashion runways. 

Fig 4.3: Mandelbrot Fractal Art Shoe by Aquavel

4.5 Emerging Fractal Based Technologies
Questions are being asked on the possibilities of creating new materials based on  fractal   geometry.   Countless   aesthetic   products   are   inspired   by   nature's   properties  such   as   roughness   ,Since   roughness   is   dezined   by   fractal   geometry,   Questions   are  asked wether there are possibilities for new manufacturing or assembling techniques  using fractals. “To optimize the structure and properties of alloys, it is necessary to take into account  the effect of the self­organization of a dissipative structure with fractal properties at  load. This requires the development of self­organizing technologies for material   production. Fractal material science takes into account the relation between the  parameters of fractal structures and the dissipative properties of alloys. It also takes  into account the base properties of highly non­equilibrium systems and the self­ organizing process of the fractal structure in bifurcation points.” ­ V.S. Ivanova, I.J. Bunin, and V.I. Nosenko, Fractal material science: A new direction  in materials science.

22

5. Fractals in medicine
Fractals recently become a large area of research in the zield of biology and medicine.  The realization of fractal patterns inside the liver and lungs has resulted in the ability  to reproduce certain organs like a rats liver. By adapting the use of 3D printing to print  out cell structures offers the human race an extended form of life. 

5.1 How are fractals involved in the process in which certain cells form together to create organs?
The term used to describe a number of cells (primordium) that becomes a complete  functional organ is called organogenesis. This requires a precisely timed sequence of  events to allow the successful generation of a working organ. Each organ has its own  mechanism (method of construction) which is applied to different individuals of the  same   species.  Organogenesis  initially   consists   of   rapid   expansion   of   immature  functional   parts   (parenchyma)   of   an   organ,   differentiating   into   the   expansion   of  functional mature tissue (stroma)  (Castro, 2006). A good example in which fractal  patterns appear in an organ is the bronchi in our lungs. These fractals follow similar  principles to a trees trunk ‐ branch ‐ twig pattern in order to cover a large surface area  to absorb more oxygen into the blood stream. The bronchial tree generates an optimal  oxygen reservoir at minimal energy dissipation. 

5.2 Technology and Maths used for understanding Fractals in Biology
As technology has adapted so has our understanding of our biological engineering.  Studies using a light microscopy had measured the internal surface area of an adult  human lung at 60‐80 m2 whereas using a electron microscope the results showed the  estimate to be around 130 m2 (Weibel, 2005).  The human lung is a fractal structure  that contains 23 generations of branches (this is a very high number of branching  generations   because   most   deciduous   trees   have   only   7   or   8).   The   self   similar  replication of the diameter of the lungs airway vessels takes on a parent daughter  design relationship of bifurcation (d0, d1, and d2). The equation reads as follows d0x = d1x  + d  2 x exhibiting the property of self organization. The bifurcation exponent, x, is said  to be a specizic design because its value rezlects energy dissipation during transport.  (Bennett). 

23

www.stat.rice.edu/~riedi/UCDavisHemoglobin/fractal3.pdf

It is believed that this process is genetically specizied. But, it is hard to grasp that the  one hundred trillion cells in a human can be coded in about 100,000 genes. All these   cells can then be broken down to the trillions of trillions of fractals that make up  cellular  membranes.  It  is  argued  that  during  organogenesis  that  not  all  the  cells  might require a method of construction or that this method only applies at certain  stages of development (Weibel, 2005). But, this contradicts how fractals self replicate.  Fractals are always changing in either scale, size, rate or rotation. This is represented  all throughout nature e.g. fern leaves get smaller in scale as they near the tip of the  branch. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Thorax_Lung_3d_(2).Jpg              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:H_fractal2.png

Above (left) shows the large amount of bronchi and airways that till the lung. (right) is the Koch tree   model, this is very similar to the human airway tree

"Using [the] fractal concept will make it easier to mimic... nature and also to scale up  our designs from one animal to another." (Kaazempur­Mofrad.) (Patch) "In order to make living replacements for large vital organs such as the liver and kidney,  it is essential to integrate the creation of vasculature with the tissue engineering,"  “And  the growth of these vascular networks has to be highly controlled and precise” said   Kaazempur­Mofrad. (Patch) 24

“…in 1977, morphometric studies on liver cells presented controversial results because  the surface area of the endomplasmic reticulum membrane, (the sight of drug   metabolism and protein synthesis had been estimated and 6m2/cm3 by Loud, whereas  we (Weibel ER) had obtained a value of 11 m2/cm3” both methods used were the same   but Weibels was used at 90,000 X magnitication on the electron microscope whereas  Loud used a smaller magnitication.  (Weibel, 2005)

5.3 Fractals use in Cellular structures
The compact design of a well functioning organism (with all its complexity) depends  on a high density of internal membrane systems. The internal membrane systems are  made   up   of   small   fractal   rectangular   shapes   and   play   the   role   in   which   chemical  reactions and transfer processes take place in a precise manner. These membrane  systems constitute 'space zilling' geometries and are thus agreeable to fractal analysis.  These substances must then be transferred between different organs and cells which  requires a distribution network of blood vessel and airways that also has to be 'space  zilling'. Fractal concepts now lead me to believe that they are everywhere and help us  to understand underlying construction principles.

5.4 Technological advances involving Fractals in Biology
In 2006 a new type of technology called 'bioprinting' was developed by Gabor Forgacs  at the University of Missouri in Columbia. This technique uses droplets of 'bioink'  (clumps of cells a couple of micrometers in diameter). Forgacs has found this 'bioink'  behaves just like a liquid. When the 'bioink' is applied the cells fuse together and form  a layer. When the 'bioink' layer is set an alternate layer of 'biopaper' is applied and a  structure can be formed. This can result in printing out any desired structure. e.g. For  blood vessels successive rings of muscle and endolethlial cells are laid down on top of  each‐other to create a tube like blood vessel.  (Ruis, 2006)

25

     http://www.musc.edu/bioprinting/assets/images/bioprinting02.jpg

This type of technology could provide transplant patients with new organs without  worrying   about their  body  rejecting  them.  This is  because the  printed  organs are  constructed out of their own stem cells which are recognized and accepted by the  patients body. This would minimize the waiting list for an organ donor as well as  giving the patient a less stressful operation and recovery. The discovery of fractals in  biology offers us unique insights into how our cells, organs, veins, blood vessels etc.  are constructed. We can now understand the process behind our biological evolution  in the inzinite aspect of fractal patterns. 

26

Conclusion
Our collective zindings suggest to us that the Fractal exists as an identiziable pattern  and   is   a   multiplex   process.     Within   it,   is   consistent   demonstration   of   properties  pertaining   to   interrelationships   of   space,   where   voids   cannot   be   separated   from  importance  to  their   surrounding.   This   conforms   to  our   examination   of   the  fractal  where not only division of space occurs but it also appears dezinitively recurrent.  From this we conclude that the signizicance of the appearance of such an element  (whether astutely aware of it or not) is clear indication that the fractal is a transfer  process   enabling  economy  and  efKiciency  of   space.   Often   this   is   perceived   as  expansion   or   contraction   of   changeable   structure.   This   successfully   allows  interconnection   of   multiple   structures,   which   in   turn   potentiates   activity   for  (animate)   growth   or   fundamental   change   of   overall   structure   as   a   whole.   Quite  literally ‐ the Fractal makes sense.  On an evolutionary scale, it would be prudent not to consider its total absence.

27

Bibliography
Bennett, S. H. (n.d.). (Department Of Pediatrics) From  http://www.stat.rice.edu/~riedi/UCDavisHemoglobin/fractal.html Castro, L. N. (2006). Google books. (L. Taylor & Francis Group, Producer) From https:// docs.google.com/Doc? docid=0AVL90cL7sKJuZGhmc2ZnOGpfMGM4NTVobmhm&hl=en Elsen, A. E. (1981). 'PURPOSES of ART' . Harcourt Brace College Publishers. Emmer, M. (1993). The Visual Mind Art and Mathematics. Cambridge, Mass. : MIT  Press. FRACTAL MODELS IN ARCHITECTURE: A CASE OF STUDY, CH‐ 6850 (2000). M.Fowler, R. N. (1996). 'SPACE, STRUCTURE and FORM' . Brown & Benchmark  Publishers. Mandelbrot, B. B. (1978). The Geometry of Nature. Mandelbrot, B. (1983). The fractal geometry of nature. New York: W. H Freeman and   Company. Patch, K. (n.d.). Fractals support growing organs. From ‐1  http://www.trnmag.com/Stories/2003/073003/Fractals_support_growing_organs_0 73003.html  Ruis, J. J. (2006, December 29). From  http://www.fractal.org/Fractalary/Fractalary.htm Salingaros, V. P. (2000).  COLOGY and the FRACTAL MIND in the NEW ARCHITECTURE:   E a Conversation' by Victor Padrón and Nikos A. Salingaros (This conversation was   published electronically by RUDI ­­ Resource for Urban Design Information . From  http://zeta.math.utsa.edu/~yxk833/Ecology.html Weibel, E. R. (2005). Fractals In Biology and Medicine Volume IV. Birkhauser Verlag,  Basel ‐ Boston ‐ Berlin. Yale University. (2009). Introduction to Fractals. Retrieved October 2009 from http:// classes.yale.edu/fractals/

28

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful