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Volume 48 - Issue 13

January 14, 2015
theeyeopener.com
@theeyeopener
Since 1967

4th
quarter

p6

the rams host nationals,
but just showing up isn’t enough
PHOTO: ROB FOREMAN AND SIERRA BEIN

Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015

2

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Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015

NEWS

3

Res fire forces students out Briefs &

groaners
> Slap happy

On Dec. 28 a woman was walking up from Yonge and Dundas
when she was grabbed by the hair
and pulled to the ground. Her assailant slapped her repeatedly before disappearing. The psychotic
bastard has not been found.
> Dudes being guys
Two fellas were seen walking
down the street together when
one of them decided to give the
other a nice punch in the head.
After that, the assailant decided
to walk away by himself. Shit
happens, ya know?
> Almost a fight
Toronto firefighters responded to a two-alarm fire at O’Keefe House on Jan. 7. The fire caused an estimated $15,000 in damages.

By Aidan Hamelin
O’Keefe House residents had to
evacuate last Wednesday after an
overloaded power bar sparked a
two-alarm fire in the second floor
common area, according to Director of Student Housing Ian Crookshank.
“The power bar is no more,”
Crookshank said.
Toronto Fire Services received
a call about the fire at 5:57 p.m.
on Jan. 7 and responded with nine
fire trucks and 35 firefighters.
Student Housing evacuated 17
students who were in the residence
at the time and then contacted the
remaining 15 residents who were
not on campus.
Just as firefighters arrived,
O’Keefe’s sprinkler system went
off and helped to contain the
flames before any serious damage
was caused.
However, there is extensive
smoke and water damage to three

rooms in the 140-year-old building. The majority of the damage
is in the common area and an adjacent room, with a room below
suffering damage from water dripping through the floor.
The fire and smoke caused an estimated $15,000 worth of damage
to the building, according to Toronto Fire Services Capt. Adrian
Ratushniak. Any damage estimate
would not include additional costs
needed to coordinate O’Keefe
residents who were displaced the
night of the fire, said Residence
Life and Education Coordinator
Brandon Smith, which includes
lost revenue and temporary meal
plans for those affected.
All O’Keefe House residents
were relocated to spare emergency
rooms in Pitman Hall and the International Living and Learning
Centre (ILLC) until further notice,
said Smith.
“[Campus facilities and sustainability] is working with Ryerson

Security, Toronto Fire, our insurance adjuster and a small group of
contractors to ensure the space is
cleaned up and repaired as soon
as possible,” campus facilities and
sustainability manager Kerri Bailey said in an email. Bailey said
it was too early to establish other
details.
A first-year student who didn’t
want to be named was moved
from O’Keefe House to ILLC after
the fire. She wasn’t home when the
fire started but heard about it after a friend texted her. The student
said she thinks Ryerson is “being
really good about it.” O’Keefe
residents were given “awesome
rooms” in ILLC as well as money
for food, she said.
Another person in ILLC declined to talk to The Eyeopener
and said that a residence advisor
had instructed everyone not to
talk “until everything’s been sorted out.”
The majority of cleaning and re-

Year’s first homicide near MAC
By Jackie Hong
A 51-year-old man is dead and
another man is seriously injured
in Toronto’s first murder of 2015.
Toronto police responded to a
call about a stabbing in an apartment at 330 Jarvis St., near the
Mattamy Athletic Centre, at 6:34
p.m. on Jan. 10.
Officers found the 51-year-old
male with serious slash and stab
wounds. Paramedics rushed him
to St. Michael’s Hospital where
he was pronounced dead.

Police later identified the victim
as Brent Gartner, who lived in the
apartment.
Toronto paramedics initially
said that Gartner’s wounds were
inflicted with a samurai sword
but police said later that they
could not confirm that.
Shortly after finding Gartner,
police responded to a call about
another man suffering from an
injury nearby. He was taken to
hospital.
Police identified the man as a
suspect in the stabbing and have

taken him into custody.
On Tuesday afternoon, police
announced in a press release that
67-year-old Roderick MacIntosh
was charged with second-degree
murder.
Police said Gartner and the suspect knew each other and that the
stabbing happened during a fight
between the two men.
Correction: The Eyeopener had
previously reported online that
the suspect was 66 years old, citing the Toronto Star. This is incorrect, he is 67.

PHOTO: SIERRA BEIN

pairs are estimated to be completed by Jan. 15, according to Crookshank, but it is unclear whether or
not students will be able to move
back in at this time.
Crookshank added that students affected by the fire will be
updated regularly.

Ryerson security was alerted to
a group of three people who were
swearing at each other in public.
They became quickly aware that
a fight was being discussed. One
guy’s shoulder bumped another’s.
It wasn’t chill.
Seen some crazy stuff on campus?
Email news@theeyeopener.com

EDITORIAL

4

Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015

Mom, Dad, I have something to tell you. I’m ... in love with the coco.

Editor-in-Chief
Mohamed “Buttless Chap” Omar
News
Jackie “Da Real MVP” Hong
Jake “Hates Pineapples” Scott
Keith “Sheldon Fan” Capstick
Features
Charles “Dazzling Jams” Vanegas
Biz & Tech
Laura “Avocados” Woodward
Arts and Life
Alex “Licensed To Ill” Downham
Sports
Josh “Loves Metal” Beneteau
Communities
Dylan “Java King” Freeman-Grist
Photo
Rob “Beard” Foreman
Sierra “Floor-crosser’” Bein
Stephen “Hi Stephen” Armstrong
Fun
Emma “Fun” Cosgrove
Media
Badri “Of The Week” Murali
Online
Farnia “Desk Elitist” Fekri
Behdad “Traumatized” Mahichi

JanandFeb2015_Ryerson.indd 1

Web Developer
Kerry “To The Window, To The”
Wall

2015-01-05 2:42 PM

General Manager
Liane “Havarti” McLarty
Advertising Manager
Chris “My Man Chris!” Roberts
Design Director
J.D. “Discordian” Mowat
Circulation Manager
Megan “Lord Of Circ” Higgins
Contributors
Brennan “Bart” Doherty
Aidan “Green Eggs And” Hamelin

Emily “P-Slam” Craig-Evans
Jake “Flying V” Kivanc
Andrei “Rufus” Pora
Hayley “Fashionista” Adams
Tagwa “YAS” Moyo
Annie “Nonono” Arnone
Krista “Sabre” Robinson
Devin “Beach Boy” Jones
Lana “Unreal” Hall
Julia “Yeah Or” Knope
Lauren “Checkmate” Malyk
Super Awesome Interns
Julia “Vote Counter” Tomasone
Anika “Heart Drawer” Syeda
Hayley “Street Smarts” Adam
Playing the part of the Annoying
Talking Coffee Mug this week is quitting smoking. Sure, it’s nice to be able
to smell and taste things a bit better, but do you know what I miss?
Brooding. Brooding with one foot
up against the wall and a cigarette
dangling from my lips. Yeah, baby.
Brooding. Ain’t nothin’ like standing outside a Metro in Oakville on a
Tuesday afternoon with that smoke
stickin’ out your mouth, watchin’ all
those fine suburban moms buyin’ fine
suburban groceries. Oh yeah, baby.
Some like it hot.
We’re always looking for talented
writers, designers, photographers,
videographers and illustrators. Is
that you? Oh, it is? Our contact
info is below.
The Eyeopener is Ryerson’s largest
and only independent student newspaper. It is owned and operated by
Rye Eye Publishing Inc., a non-profit corporation owned by the students
of Ryerson. Our offices are on the
second floor of the Student Campus
Centre.

You can reach us at 416-979-5262,
at theeyeopener.com or on Twitter at
@theeyeopener.

Welcome
back, ye
olde chaps
By
Mohamed
Omar
Look who decided to crawl back
onto the naked, concrete arteries
of Gould Street. Welcome back
to Ryerson. There was a fire. You
missed it.
Other stuff happpened, too. For
starters, the campus radio station,
The Scope, got well-endowed with
an AM radio frequency. That’s
right baby, tune in to channel 1280
for all of Rye’s rockin’ news and
tunes. Well, not now. The channel
isn’t set up yet, but the plan is to
have it on air by January 2016.
What am I saying? You probably don’t care about this old stuff!
You’re a forward thinker, not a
sad booger stuck in the nasal cavities of time, so here’s a primer on
the changes you can expect this
semester.
Administration shake-up: Ryerson president Sheldon Levy will
have a successor by the end of the
term. Most university presidents
aren’t mentioned much, but Levy’s
reputation as a — dear lord have
I grown sick of this term — city
builder will no doubt give the new
boss some big shoes to fill.
The ever-sexy world of student
politics could get sexier: When it
comes to student activism, something feels a bit different this semester. The Ryerson Students’
Union election, which takes place
in Feburary, could — and could
is a tremendously strong word
here — see some official opposition. Back in the fall, a group of
students calling themselves Rise
For Ryerson organized against the
RSU’s campaign to get the school
to freeze tuition fees.
The group wasn’t for rising
tuition fees, but it was no doubt
against the student union’s Tent
City — set up outside Jorgenson
Hall — and its way of dealing
with the university’s board of
governors.
This might translate into an exciting election, for once.
Sports! Brought to you by sports!:
Ryerson will get slapped with some
March madness as it hosts the Canadian Interuniversity Sport basketball championship.
This is a national tournament,
and since we’re hosting all those
bastards here, we automatically get
a spot. Yippee ki-yay.
The championship runs March
12-15. Bring the ruckus, as well
as yourself, to the Mattamy Athletic Centre to show this country
you give a poo about your school.

NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015

SLC construction in final stretch
The sign is up, the lights are on but the doors are still closed ... for now
By Brennan Doherty
The Student Learning Centre
(SLC) section at the Ryerson
Builds website reports that, as of
Dec. 1st, most of the building’s exterior work is finished. A few additional components were scheduled to have been completed by
the end of December.
These include the blue ceiling
panels under the plaza soffit, glass
doors for the stores on the ground
floor, and furniture installations
and insets along the bordering
Yonge St. sidewalk.
The main lobby’s domed ceiling is done and construction of a
ground-floor café should be underway this month.
A picture of the interior, posted
last Friday on the Ryerson Student
Learning Support’s Twitter account, shows significant progress
on the fourth floor of the building
— reserved for academic services
such as the Writing Centre, Test
Centre, English Language Support
and others.
Furniture fixtures are already

5

News
Bites
Nominations now open for
student union’s annual election
As of Jan. 12, the nominations for this year’s Ryerson Students’ Union
(RSU) elections are open to full-time Ryerson students. Voting will take
place on Feb. 10, 11 and 12. Nomination packages are available at the
RSU office (SCC 307).

RTS programs not going
anywhere soon
SLC is set to open on schedule late next month.

in place, part of the back wall has
been painted a light green and carpets appear to have already been
installed.
While the SLC will be open
again for media tours at the end
of January, Ryerson has not announced any concrete information
regarding the leasing of the building’s ground-level retail space.
Ryerson said in August 2013
that it would be leasing the ground
and lower floors of the building.
Rent money will help finance the

PHOTO: ROB FOREMAN

SLC’s construction.
According to Ryerson President
Sheldon Levy, it’s been difficult to
sell the retail space as two separate
offers. So, Ryerson is combining
both floors into a package deal.
While there is currently no leasing
deal, Levy thinks it’s “very close.”
“We’ve had pharmacies, we’ve
had telecommunications companies, we’ve had a variety that have
looked at it and shown an interest. I think we’ll get something,”
he said.

What you missed over the break
The Scope gets
Rye gets $13 mil- Ryerson ranked
CRTC AM radio
lion for innovaone of Toronto’s
broadcast licence tion projects
best employers

PHOTO: SIERRA BEIN

PHOTO: FARNIA FEKRI

PHOTO: JACKIE HONG

The Canadian Radio-television
and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved Ryerson’s campus radio station
The Scope’s application for an
AM radio licence in December.
The Scope will be broadcasting
under
AM
channel 1280 and is aiming to be
on the air by January 2016.
“We are overjoyed with the
decision and want to give heartfelt thanks to all of the station’s
volunteers and also the hundreds
of people who took the time to
write a letter of support,” said
Elissa Matthews, The Scope’s program director, in a press release.

Ryerson University has received a
$13-million donation from Jack
Cockwell and the Brookfield Partners Foundation. The money will
go toward creating the Brookfield Institute for Innovation and
Entrepreneurship at Ryerson,
funding innovation projects on
campus and supporting the Student Learning Centre. Ryerson
President Sheldon Levy will be
the institute’s first honorary chair.
To date, the Brookfield Partners
Foundation has donated more
than $20 million to the university,
making it “among Ryerson’s most
generous private sector benefactors,” according to a press release.

A survey by Media Corp Inc. and
the Globe and Mail ranked Ryerson University as one of the Greater Toronto Area’s best employers.
Employers were evaluated by the
editors of Canada’s Top 100 Employers.
Some of the reasons Ryerson
made it on to the list include the
three weeks of paid vacation allowance for new employees, maternity and paternity leave, top-up
payments, on-site daycare and tuition subsidies for courses taken at
other schools.
“Ryerson is the place to be,”
Ryerson President Sheldon Levy
said in a press release.

Ryerson President Sheldon Levy confirmed on Jan. 12 that the theatre
school’s programs will not be moving out of their building at the end of
this academic year like previously planned, but the university is hoping
to have them out by fall 2016.
The university and the theatre school are teaming up with Ryerson
Builds and are looking to find an optimal permanent home for the theatre school. As previously reported by The Eyeopener, the team will be
exploring both new building opportunities and moving the school into
a pre-existing vacant space.

Rye gets new dietetics master’s
Ryerson has partnered with St. Michael’s Hospital for a new master’s
diploma in dietetics. The year-long program is the first of its kind in
Canada and mixes classes with hospital placements. After graduation,
students can write registration exams to become registered dieticians.

6

IN THE
HEART OF
THE CITY

FEATURES

Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015
PHOTOS BY CHARLES VANEGAS
UNLESS INDICATED; GRAPHIC
BY

CHARLES

VANEGAS

AND

STEPHEN ARMSTRONG.

In a span of just five years, Roy Rana has transformed
the Ryerson men’s basketball team from perennial losers
into national title contenders
By Charles Vanegas

I

n the summer of 2009, newly
appointed athletic director Ivan
Joseph dismissed men’s basketball head coach Glenn Taylor,
preferring to bring in a new face to
lead Ryerson’s team into the next
era of athletics — to be housed in
Maple Leafs Gardens. With just a
lone trip to the Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) national championships in 1999, the program had
developed a reputation of futility,
going just 29-103 over the previous six seasons (which included an
abysmal 0-22 record in 2003-04).
“Typically we’ve already got
training camp started in August.
I remember sitting around in July,
early August, thinking to myself
‘what are we going to do next
year?’ Because we had no coach,”
says Luke Staniscia, a Ram from
2006 to 2012.
Joseph selected Roy Rana, head
coach at Scarborough’s Eastern
Commerce C.I., who had led the
Saints to four provincial titles and
a 384-78 record in his tenure. In
addition to the high school level,
Rana had spent years working
with Ontario Basketball’s development and high performance
program and was also serving as
head coach for the Canadian Cadet (U17) National Team.
Arriving on campus in September, Rana implemented daily video analysis, team meals and even
yoga sessions. While the previous
regime’s practices would sometimes only last half of the allotted
two-hour timeslot in the gym, Rana’s were described as “long and
grueling” and became the place
where players earned their keep.
“None of us were his recruits so
he didn’t really feel like he owed
us anything,” says Staniscia. “Everyone on the team was in a situation where we had to prove our-

selves to the new coach. We knew
the next season he was bringing in
his new recruits and we could all
be replaced.”
Only six players would return
the next year, with Rana’s
first class of high school
commits lauded as one of
the nation’s best. Bjorn
Michaelsen, a 6-foot-8
forward from Quebec,
Jordon Gauthier, an elite
scorer from Windsor, and Jahmal
Jones, a point guard from Mississauga, would form the base of
Rana’s team.
ana also brought in Ola
Adegboruwa, a transfer
student who had grown up
in North York’s Jane and
Finch neighbourhood — where
Rana once ran an alternative to
expulsion program for students
with violence-related issues.
“He represented a lot of what I
liked about guys in the game, that
toughness, that edge,” says Rana.
While knee injuries forced Adegboruwa to retire before his eligibility expired, he and Jones were the
start of Ryerson’s new approach to
team recruiting: building around
Toronto kids. Since Rana’s second
season, the team’s number of victories has increased adjacent to its number of GTA
players (up from 11-11
with four players in 201011, to 16-6 with 10 in
2013-14).
“It’s not accidental. Certainly
we want to have a GTA feel to us,
we’re a Toronto school — we want
to have Toronto kids. We want to
be able to be successful that way,”
says Rana, who’s coached the
Rams to a 73-45 record in his fiveplus years at the helm. “It doesn’t
necessarily make sense for me to
recruit an out of province kid un-

R

less he’s going to be a solid rotation player, if not a starter. And if
it’s equal, then I might as well take
the kid in our backyard.”
Rana maintains a close eye on
the local scene, as many of his
close friends are still high school
coaches. A decade after Vince
Carter dazzled Raptors fans with
jaw-dropping jams, the city has

become one of the most concentrated sources of basketball talent
in the world, with nine players
selected in the NBA draft since
2011 — including back-to-back
#1 overall picks Anthony Bennett
and Andrew Wiggins. According to North Pole Hoops (NPH),
a Canadian basketball scouting
service, eight of the top 10 ranked
high school teams in the country
are located in the GTA.
Universities in the United States

have taken notice, with many of
the area’s top talents heading south
of the border (53 GTA players are
in the NCAA this season). While
Rana doesn’t bother recruiting
NBA-ready players like Wiggins
or Bennett — both of whom he
has mentored in his coaching capacities at the national level — he
isn’t afraid to go after ones being
courted state-side, estimating that
at least half of his current roster
could play in the NCAA.
“I think for a lot of the kids who

FEATURES

Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015
decide [not] to stay in Canada,
there’s two things: one, just the
stigma of staying in Canada. This
whole kind of ‘oh he didn’t succeed
because he didn’t get a scholarship,’
and two, there are some financial
challenges for some kids to stay,
whereas if they go south they can
get a full ride. So we have to try to
overcome that,” says Rana. “But
once they kind of mature and lose
the stigma side of it, they usually
understand that it’s a pretty good
level [of basketball] up here.”
hile players can get
some financial assistance for academic
success, Ryerson athletes don’t receive athletic scholarships. On top of daily practice
and video sessions and two games
per week, players work part-time
jobs to pay their tuition — ranging
from moving for 1-800-Got-Junk
to cleaning up after classes at the
Cineplex movie theatre.
Fourth-year shooting guard Aaron Best was the eleventh-ranked
(NPH) Canadian high school prospect in 2011, and was heavily recruited by the University of Pennsylvania. While the Ivy League school
was a tough option to pass up, Best
says his familiarity with Rana (Best
played for former-Rana assistant
Kevin Jeffers at Eastern Commerce)
and Jones, whom he had played
with for various provincial teams
and camps, and the ability to play
in front of his family weighed heavily in his decision to stay in Toronto.
“My mom always told me, ‘if
you’re good enough and you do
what you’re supposed to do, they’ll
find you,’” says Best on whether
skipping out on the NCAA would
have an impact on a potential pro
career. “I made the decision to stay,
and I stand by it.”
While Best and other players
forfeit TV exposure by staying in
Canada (with Sportsnet broadcasting just this year’s CIS championships on national TV), there
are benefits
to playing
for Ryerson.
The
team
regularly
plays exhibitions
against top U.S.
teams like Syracuse and Wake
Forest, and started last season with a 10-day tour
of China. Through Rana’s national team and NBA connections —
he estimates he’s coached at least
40 current NBA players in some
capacity — the Rams often work
side by side with pros.
“Because we’re in Toronto, we
get to be around a lot of people
who have actually made it,” says

7

W

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: J.V.
MUKAMA HAS RECENTLY BEEN PLAY-

Gauthier. “[Anthony] Bennett and
Tristan [Thompson] were working
in the gym at Kerr Hall last year
and we were on the other side of
the gym. You just get to see what
they go through and what they put
into their craft.”
Recently the team has welcomed
Raptors rookie Bruno Caboclo,
who was left home by the team
during a five-game road trip. Since
the average age of his Raptors
teammates is 26.4, the pairing allows the 19-year-old Brazilian to
hang out with players his own age,
and gives the Rams a first-hand
view of a future star.
“He lives in downtown Toronto
and sometimes he gets bored, so he
comes here,” says second-year guard
Jean-Victor Mukama. “I’m a couple
months older than him, so even
though he doesn’t [fully] understand
English, it’s easy to communicate because we both love basketball.”
This season, Ryerson will host the
CIS National Championships — the
first time that the tournament will
ever be held in Toronto — automatically earning a spot in the field of
eight. With 20-point victories over
#4 McMaster and #5 Windsor, Ryerson appears worthy of its #3 national ranking. But lopsided losses
against the top-ranked Ottawa
Gee-Gees and #2 Carleton Ravens
— winners of 10 of the last 12 national titles — tell them there’s still
work to do if they want to raise the
trophy in front of home fans.
“We’re the third best team in
the country for a reason. They’re
number one and number two, and
it’s not even close right now,” says
Jones. “[But] we’re not going to rely
on someone else to beat them, we’re
not relying on upsets. We know we
have to go through both of them.”
The Rams have carried on an intense rivalry with the Gee-Gees for
the past three seasons, eliminating
Ottawa in the 2012 OUA playoffs

ING 1-ON-1 WITH RAPTORS ROOK-

(74-71), before los- IE BRUNO CABOCLO; JAHMAL JONES
ing to them in 2013 GUARDS BRAMPTON’S TYLER ENNIS
(70-74) and 2014 DURING THE RAMS’ NOV. 5, 2013
(78-79). Each game EXHIBITION AGAINST THE SYRACUSE
was decided in the ORANGEMEN. PHOTO: FARNIA FEKRI;
final seconds, with CARLETON’S PHILIP SCRUBB BATTLES
the victor going on OTTAWA’S JOHNNY BERHANEMESKEL,
to qualify for nation- PHOTO: BRIAN BATISTA BETTENals. And while Car- COURT; TWO STINTS IN THE NCAA,
leton has traditionally 6-FOOT-9 VAUGHAN NATIVE KADEEM
dominated Ryerson, GREEN JOINED THE RAMS IN 2013-14.
winning every single
game since 1999, the
Rams seemed to have
turned a corner last
season, losing a close
68-71 game at home
— the narrowest margin during that span.
Rana is quick to
admit the Rams “got
[their] asses kicked”
on the November
road trip to Ottawa,
but is confident that
his team — loaded with the CIS’s
third-ranked defense and fifthranked offense — will be its morecompetitive self come playoff time.
“My belief hasn’t changed that
we’re good enough to win a national championship,” says Rana.
“I think we’re in that conversation
with those two (Carleton and Ottawa) and there’s three or four other
teams around the country that are
going to be big challenges.”
ow playing in his fifth and
final year of eligibility, Jones
says it’s only fitting to finish his career at the national
championships in front of a Toronto
crowd, where home-court advantage
may be key — the Rams are 24-3 at
home since moving to the Mattamy
Athletic Centre in 2012.
“This is what [we] have been
talking about since we got to Ryerson,” says Jones. “If we win in
our fifth year, no one can take it
from us. There’s no coming back.
No, we won. We go out on top.”

N

My mom always told me, ‘if you’re good enough and you do what you’re supposed to do, they’ll find you’ ... I made the decision to stay, and I stand by it
— Aaron Best on his decision to stay in Canada to play basketball

KINGS of the DOT

Since 2012, the Rams have posted a 13-1 record against crosstown
rivals York and U of T, with an average score of 81-69. “You always
want to dominate your city,” says fifth-year guard Jordon Gauthier.

SPORTS

8

Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015

Volleyball hits the beach
The men’s team’s annual trip to Cuba gives them time to bond together
By Devin Jones
For the past 16 years Mirek Porosa, head coach of the Ryerson
men’s volleyball team, has chaperoned his squad to Cuba for some
fun in the sun.
“I fell in love with the country,”
Porosa says. “I saw an opportunity to establish a quality sports
camp for Ryerson athletes on a
budget, that provides quality of
competition and a positive environment to grow.”
Spending seven days together
has become a ritual for Porosa
and some of his veteran players
who have made the trip three or
four times already. While having fun is part of the process,
Porosa points out that the experience is much more than
just a vacation.
“There’s no cell phones, no In-

ternet, nothing. It’s about getting
to know each other and how diverse of a team we are,” Porosa
says. “It can be a very intense experience, but one that helps us as a
team and as individuals.”
Each day the team is up at
6:30 a.m., where a group meeting discussing the theme of
the day is followed by a quick
breakfast. That’s followed by
a 45-minute bus ride to a gym
in Matanzas, “where all the
action happens,” according to
fourth-year libero Wesley Kosiba.
Matanzas is where the Ryerson
Rams face off against the Cuban
national team, considered one of
the best in the world.
“For the guys who are here for
the first time, it can be daunting
because the [Cuban] national
team has some of the best players in the world,” Kosiba says.

“It’s a great opportunity for us,
and for the seniors it’s all about
handling business.”
The trip poses a great financial
responsibility to the Rams, but
Porosa notes that going to Cuba
has always made the most economic sense. Although the trip
isn’t always a guarantee, Porosa
made it clear that no player is left
behind. Sponsorships, fundraising and contributions from players have been able to cover the
costs, but the trip could one day
become too expensive.
“It would be economic reasons,
if we stopped going,” he says.
“Right now the players love it and
want to continue with the trip, but
with certain things happening, it
might become too expensive for
us to go eventually.”
To some, this annual trip looks
just like a vacation. But for the

The men’s volleyball team, just chillin’.

Rams, Cuba gives the team a
chance to form a special bond only
found in sports. To second-year
outside hitter Lucas Coleman, this
bond is important.
“With guys commuting back
and forth from Ryerson, we don’t

PHOTO COURTESY MIREK POROSA

always have the opportunity to get
to know each other and just hang
out,” Coleman says. “This trip allows us to say the things that are
hard to say, but are worth it in the
end. We’ve all become a lot closer
for it.”

Swinging for the fences
The Ryerson fencing team will be going for gold at Brock later this month
By Krista Robinson

Jason Schneider, right, competes in the épée sword team event.

PHOTO: JOSH BENETEAU

If you’re able to adjust to the
frequent use of French fighting terms, accept the Clockwork
Orange-esque attire, and overlook that it’s commonly dubbed
the “physical chess,” then there’s
a good chance you can get on
board with the sport of fencing. Even if you’ve never seen it
played before.
“Not a lot of people know we

exist, usually they just think we
build fences,” said Arman Amin,
captain of the Ryerson men’s
épée sword team.
It’s relatively unknown that Ryerson has had a fencing team for
more than 50 years, and a pretty
good one at that. Last season, Rams
seniors Joanna Kolbe and Sebastien
Dubois-Didcock were named Ontario University Athletics (OUA)
All-Stars and helped their team pull
off its best season yet.

In a couple weeks 11 schools
will compete in the OUA championships. Last year, the Carleton
Ravens and the Queen’s Gaels
won the team events for men’s and
women’s, respectively.
This year, the Ryerson Rams
hope to challenge that outcome at
Brock University, where the OUA’s
will take place on Jan. 31-Feb. 1
for the women and Feb. 21-22 for
the men.
While the Rams strive to medal
in the individual and team events,
assistant coach Darcy Gates said
this has been a “building year”
for the Rams, with “lots of newcomers.” Kolbe and Dubois-Didcock have graduated so the team
will be counting on the many
first-years who attended September’s open tryouts.
Anna Cianni was one of those
bright-eyed freshmen, looking
for a varsity team to join during
Frosh Week. Four months later
she’s wearing a lamé and breeches, preparing to compete for Ryerson at the end of the month.
The journalism major competed
at the other major tournaments
at Brock and Western earlier
this season.
“I remember being really nervous,” said Cianni. “I was standing on the piste and looking at my
opponent, just thinking, all the
stuff I learned is coming together
and making sense, and that I could
probably do this.”
You can read the rest of this story and watch a video on the team
at theeyeopener.com

ARTS & LIFE

Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015

F o r m o r e c o o l c o n t e n t , g o t o t h e e y e o p e n e r. c o m

Local artist and film supporter Rage Williams paints a mural.

COURTESY: DYLAN MORGAN

Ousted from their home
By Jake Kivanc
A new documentary by Ryerson
students focuses on gentrification
in one of Toronto’s most diverse
neighbourhoods.
This House Is Not A Home is a
film aiming to shine light on real
estate agencies in the low-income
area of Parkdale. It’s an issue director and radio and television
arts student Katrina Singleton said
she feels strongly about.
“I’ve always been really invested
in social justice,” Singleton said.
“I remember coming downtown
as a kid and seeing the inequality between there and my home in
Scarborough.”
Gentrification occurs when
wealthier residents and businesses pop up in a drastically poorer
area, sometimes raising the cost of
living for long-time residents and
often times forcing them out.
The documentary reveals Parkdale residents’ struggle against
gentrification partly caused by
Akelius, a European real estate
agency that has purchased four
local properties for development.
They did not respond to the film
team for an interview.
“We wanted to tell [the issue] through human stories —
through the community—so people who aren’t aware of the issue

can see how truly connected and unified Parkdale is,”
Singleton said.
Last year, Singleton and her team
built connections within the community through word-of-mouth.
“One person would hear about
the film and they would refer us to
three others. It was like a domino
effect,” she said.
Local artists like Rage Williams
helped fund the film’s production
by selling their pieces.
“[Art] is a way for our team to
get our name out there,” producer
Adam Hopwood said.
Hopwood said the film crew
is also writing a “sparse” music score to make sure “people’s
words speak for themselves.”
Writer Jamie Hurcomb said one
of her greatest challenges making
the film was extracting the personal stories of these residents .
“We’ve heard stories about racism and people with economic issues. The key is to make them feel
comfortable,” Hurcomb said.
“We’re trying to tell the
story from both sides so people
can make the verdict for
themselves on who is right and
wrong,” Singleton said. “[The issue] isn’t black or white.”
This House Is Not A Home is
now in the post-production stage
with a release date in March.

Winter break recap
> Full Frame at the Artspace > Alumnus at UK Fashion Awards
The Ryerson Artspace held its Full
Frame 2014 fundraiser during
winter break, including more than
60 Ryerson affiliated artists.
Full Frame 2014 sold photographic prints and other creative
work by Ryerson students, alumni
and faculty. Artists included Max
Dean, Blake Fitzpatrick and Annie
MacDonnell.
The fundraiser made more than
$4,000 from Nov. 27 to Dec. 14,
with funds going toward improving the space.

Ryerson
alumnus
Erdem
Moralioglu was named best
womenswear designer at the 2014
British Fashion Awards in early
December.
Moralioglu — a 2001 Ryersonfashion grad — received the award
for his “versatile yet powerful”
clothing label Erdem.
Moralioglu
has
sold
his
label’s
clothing
at
more
than 170 retailers, including
Barney’s in New York and Harvey
Nichols in London.

9

biz & tech

10

Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015

RTA students’ thesis project gets kickstarted
By Lana Hall
A virtual reality program being developed by a team of fourth-year
radio and television arts (RTA)
students is set to launch next
month after reaching its funding
goal through Kickstarter.
Vessels Virtual Reality (VR),
created by Josh Maldonado, is
an educational program designed
to simulate being immersed in the
human circulatory system; shuttling the user through veins and
arteries.
The experience requires the use
of the Oculus Rift, a powerful VR
headset. To develop a program
compatible with it, Maldonado

and his team require specialized
software and must pay a monthly
licensing fee that enables them to
work within a specific 3D development environment.
Since Vessels VR is being developed as a research project through
Ryerson’s Transmedia Zone, the
team has access to a workspace
and mentorship, but the Zone
does not provide financial assistance.
To cover some of their costs,
Maldonado and his team launched
a crowdsourcing campaign on
Kickstarter. In 30 days, the team
reached their funding goal of
$2,300.
“We got a lot of response from

other fourth-year students,” said
Brenda Grajales, director of marketing and communications for
Vessels VR. “Which was surprising, because of course, they are all
busy with their own final projects
as well.”
Their fellow students are not the
only ones interested to see the outcome of the project.
“We are really excited about
this for several reasons,” said Ramona Pringle, acting director at
the Transmedia Zone. “It’s a fascinating use of technology.”
In fact, she says, it is the first
project incubated at the zone that
is dedicated to the Oculus Rift.
“The project has substance behind
it, in addition to exploring stateof-the-art technology,” she says.

“They are interested in not just
novelty, but narrative.”
The team plans to have the project completed by mid-February

Josh Maldonado, creator of Vessels VR.

and is planning a screening party
later in the month, where students
will be able to try the experience
out for themselves.

PHOTO: SIERRA BEIN

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The Ryerson Students’ Union represents over 30,000 full time undergraduate students and alll graduate
students. Each year a Board of Directors is elected by the membership to represent and advocate for all
RSU members. You must be a full time undergraduate or full/part-time graduate student to run.

ELECTION DAYS ARE FEB 10, 11, 12

No, this is not a giant egg or a space shuttle. It’s the bod pod.

By Julia Knope
Creating a fitness schedule and nutrition plan to achieve those “New
Year, New You” resolutions is
now made easier.
Ryerson nutrition professor
Nick Bellissimo and his team of
eight undergraduate technicians
opened a series of fitness tests at
the Nutrition and Exercise Testing
(NExT) Lab that determine body
composition, resting metabolic
rate and aerobic fitness level.
The tests cost $300 for the general public, but students can get a
discounted rate of $150.
“We take information [from the
tests], we analyze it and then we
give you [numeric results of body

PHOTO: Julia knope

composition],” Bellissimo said. “If
you are concerned, then you go to
a dietician, go to a physician, go
to your certified exercise physiologist and have them design a plan
for you.”
The Bod Pod is the first of three
tests. After enclosing yourself in
this dome-shaped compartment,
the machine uses air pressure to
determine the percentage of fat
and lean muscle tissue in your
body. The results place you in one
of the following categories: low
body fat, ultra lean, lean, moderately lean, excess fat and high
body fat.
“If you are slightly out of range,
that could be a trigger to get you
to start thinking,” Bellissimo said.

“It’s not meant to alarm, it’s meant
to motivate.”
The second test is the indirect
calorimeter. A plastic dome is
placed over your head for 20 minutes, calculating calories burned
at rest. This test determines your
resting metabolic rate (RMR),
indicating how many calories are
needed to consume or burn to
reach the client’s ideal weight.
Aerobic fitness is the third test
being phased into the program, requiring exercise on the lab’s treadmill. Using a metabolic analyzer,
the test determines your body’s
abilities during exercise. This
evaluates what type and quantity
of fuel it’s burning, like fat or carbohydrates — to decipher which
type of exercise suits you best to
achieve your fitness goals.
“Ryerson is well positioned
to get something like this off the
ground,” Bellissimo said. “We are
a very business savvy institution.
People are very optimistic about
it and that’s part of Ryerson’s applied approach.”

Julia’s insider of being inside
When I first saw the bod pod,
it looked like a giant egg. After
checking for an angry mother
goose, I hopped in.
When Bellissimo shut the doors,
sounds of ticking and whirring
had me feeling as though I was in
a spaceship preparing for takeoff.
The bod pod testing took three
minutes — like I was in a container that was getting microwaved.
When I stepped out, Bellissimo
handed me an organized piece of
paper with my percentage of fat
and lean mass, as well as a chart
outlining the different categories
for men and women.

FUN

Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015

11

Your New Year’s resolution ain’t shit
For the love of Big Macs, it’s time to light your dusty-ass treadmill on fire
By Emma Cosgrove
It’s the third week of January and
your hopes and dreams for 2015:
The Year of the Hot Bod are plummeting like a torpedo into the
depths of a shark-ridden ocean.
There are no possible means of regaining control of the New Year’s
resolutions you foolishly conjured
up on the night of Dec. 31, 2014
in a drunken, puke-covered, tearful haze.
Give in to the call of the carb
and swim for your life to the near-

est multi-billion dollar fast food
establishment to subdue your hankering for still-clucking chickens
ground to a pulp and deep-fried
in the greasy tears of Ronald McDonald (luckily for lazy dorks
there’s at least one restaurant conveniently located on each and every landmass on the entire planet
of Earth).
Once you wash up on shore,
station your hungry self in the
newly-updated interior of said fast
food joint, where contemporary
decor, sensual mood lighting and

terribly cringeworthy soft rock offer delightful concealment of the
evils of a corporation profiting
off calorie inhalation via Happy
Meal-chomping children and dollar menu-devouring drunkards.
In today’s economy, food is
no longer just fast; it travels at
the speed of light through your
pores to your eager thighs and
bum. So it’s a relief that body
positivity and all that good shit
is on the rise. Cut yourself some
goddamn slack and feast on, you
beautiful, bootylicious dweeb.
ILLUSTRATION: EMMA COSGROVE

Mark Twain alive, shirtless
179-year-old writer vows to take over fun sectio—whoa whoa whoa there BUDDY
Ladies, gentlemen and all, it is revealed to you now, without further
ambiguity, that I, Mark Twain,
am in fact alive and well among
you. It was a hoax, my death
was staged, and I have
lived in recluse from
my beloved American
south as a practical
joke until this day.
The simple pleasure that anonymity affords has faded and with it the
treasured memories
of watching my
funeral. The charade’s tender wit has
gone to boredom in
time and I no longer
feel the same sense of
pride in maintaining my
death hoax. I effectively
invented death-trolling in
1910, but the humour lasts
only as long as people are sad,
and the world has stopped mourning the death of Samuel Clemens.
I’ve seen bobbleheads of myself

Sudoku addicts, here
is your weekly fix.
“Extra hard” because
your tolerance is too
damn high. Drop your
completed puzzle in the
contest box outside The
Eyeopener office (SCC
207) for a chance to win
a $25 Tim’s card.

PHOTO: WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

in gas stations, I’ve heard people refer to my likeness as ‘The
Colonel,’ and now I feel like the
world is once again ready for
some Twain. I faked a heart attack and travelled the world,
watching history write itself
and commenting dryly.
I’ve seen Dali in his home,
Churchill naked and
the Beatles before they
were truly dad-cool.
But I’ve grown tired
of observing, so I’ve
resolved to stretch,
drink and get to
work again. I am reclaiming my throne
as the greatest satirist
to ever hold a pen and
I will begin my reign
here at The Eyeopener.
Many thanks to Emma
Cosgrove, for holding my
place as fun editor while I
was “dead.” Good luck in your
future endeavours. It’s going to
be all Twain, all 2015. Peace.
-Mark Twain

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12

Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015

Need a break from your books for a quick bite or refreshment? 10 Dundas East
is just around the corner to satisfy your craving. We’re only a short walk from
class, right at Yonge & Dundas.
Baskin Robbins

Johnny Rockets

Sauté Rosé

California Thai

Juice Rush

Starbucks

Caribbean Queen

Milo’s Pita

Subway

Chipotle

Mrs. Fields Cookies
/Pretzelmaker

Teriyaki Experience

Curry & Co.
DAVIDsTEA
Harvey’s

NEW

Opa! Souvlaki

The Beer Store
Express

Poptopia/Yoyo’s
Yogurt Café

Tim Hortons

FREE

WIFI

IN THE
FOOD
COURT