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COTTRILL

| ENGL 101 Syllabus

ENGL 101 D
First Year Composition
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
11:00 11:50 AM
(Krumm 26)
Instructor: Dr. Brittany Cottrill
Email: bcottrill@grandview.edu
Office: 101 Jensen
Office Phone: 263-2906
Office Hours: T/H 11-1:30 and by
appointment.
Writing Center: Rasmussen Room 205
Writing Center Phone: 263-2855

Course Description and Prerequisites


First Year Composition emphasizes the process model of academic writing. The course focuses on organization of ideas,
clarity of statement, smoothness of expression and correct use of Standard American English and its conventions. Students
compose expository and persuasive essays including the writing of an original research paper. Students also critique models
of writing, gather information from an academic library and appropriate Internet sources, and practice formal styles of
documentation. Core outcomes met: CI, IL, W. Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on the English Placement Test or ENGL 100
with a C or better.
This semester our course will focus on writing, but more specifically, how technology is changing the way we write and
communicate. We will focus on strategies to write to a variety of audiences and for a variety of purposes, which are skills
necessary for writing in any class and any situation. In unit one you will compose an argumentative essay with limited
resources, in unit two you will analyze a digital argument being made by others, and in unit three you will research a
topic of your choice related to technology, writing, and communication in an original, researched argument. These
assignments are designed to let us look at the current conversations in research about the theme of the course, critique
arguments being made, and create original arguments. In addition, you will encounter a wide variety of activities, be
provided with ample feedback on your drafts, be helped to critically evaluate your own writing in order to revise effectively,
and be given assistance presenting your ideas clearly and supporting them with academically credible sources.
You will.

Activities demonstrating learning

Rhetorical Knowledge: In ENGL 101, you will focus on purpose, respond to the needs of
different audiences and rhetorical situations, and use appropriate conventions and structure
(including voice, tone, formality) for the rhetorical situations.
Critical Thinking, Reading and Writing: In ENGL 101, you will use reading for inquiry,
learning, thinking, and communicating; understand writing as a series of tasks, including
finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and secondary sources;
integrate your own ideas with those of others; and understand the relationship among
language, knowledge, and power
Process: In ENGL 101, you will be aware that it usually takes multiple drafts to create and
complete a successful text; develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing, and
proof-reading; understand writing as an open process that permits writers to use later
invention and re-thinking to revise their work; understand the collaborative and social nature
of writing; and learn to critique their own and others works

Essays 1, 2, 3, and reflection


Informal writings
Course discussions and homework
Essays 1, 2, 3, and reflection
Homework assignments
Course discussions and homework

Essays 1, 2, 3, and reflection


Peer review
Mandatory rough drafts
Required conferences and Writing
Center visits

* Subject to revision. All revisions will be announced in class and on Blackboard. Students are responsible for all changes.

COTTRILL

| ENGL 101 Syllabus

How the course will be taught


This course will
largely be a workshop. That means each of you will be expected to come prepared to
participate every single day. Even so, you will be expected to work outside of class as well.
We will discuss readings, critique sample essays, and work on our own writing. In addition,
each of you will be required to submit rough drafts of all of your essays to me for
feedback. I will provide suggestions for revision, which you will consider before turning in
your essay for the final grade. We will also conduct peer reviews in class, where you will
provide and receive feedback and suggestions for additional revision.

What you will learn

Figure 1: From
http://theoatmeal.com/comics/selfies

Activities demonstrating learning

Critical Inquiry
You will apply disciplinary approaches and evidentiary standards for the purpose
of investigating, researching, assessing and generating knowledge.
Information Literacy
You will analyze questions, theses, or problems and collect and evaluate related
information for the purpose of producing evidence-based responses.

Written Communication
You will develop effective written communication skills through the process of
forming ideas and presenting them to a specified audience (e.g. the instructor,
classmates, community members, discipline specific peers, etc.).

3 essays including research essay


Reflection
Documenting the writing process
Library visits
Evaluation of academic sources and
appropriate internet resources
Essays 2, 3 (research essay), and reflection
At least 3 unique academic essays that go
through at least two drafts and are
written for a variety of audiences and
purposes.
Practicing the writing process (pre-writing,
composing, and revising) for every essay.
20-22 pages of polished writing
Ungraded and informal writing
assignments (blogs, homework, in-class
writings, etc.)

Resources Necessary for Learning


Assessment Artifact for Institutional Purposes: Research Essay (#3)

Texts/Resources

Graff, Gerald, and Cathy


Birkenstein. They Say I Say: The
Moves That Matter in Academic
Writing 3rd Edition. New York:
W.W. Norton & Co, 2014. Print.
ISBN: 978-0393935844
Bullok, Richard, Michal Brody,
and Francine Weinberg. The
Little Seagull Handbook 2nd
Edition. New York: W.W. Norton
& Co, 2014. Print. ISBN: 9780393935806
Additional readings provided in
class or posted on Blackboard.

Technology Necessary

Access to a computer with


Microsoft Word, Internet access,
a GV email account, and a GV
Blackboard account.

REQUIRED BOOKS

Supplies

A data storage device (e.g., flash


drive, Dropbox account, Google
Docs account, etc.) to back up
files. Please dont just rely on
your hard drive computers fail.

* Subject to revision. All revisions will be announced in class and on Blackboard. Students are responsible for all changes.

COTTRILL

| ENGL 101 Syllabus

Course Requirements
Throughout this course we will cover four units. Each unit will focus
on a different type of writing (persuasive, analytic, research,
reflective) and each will build on the other. You will be expected to
compose multiple drafts, receive feedback from peers and your
instructor, and revise. It is important that you keep all drafts,
feedback, invention activities, etc. Below is a breakdown and brief
introduction to the assignments you will be expected to complete
this semester.
Project 1: Argument Essay (100) You will compose an argument
related to a theme raised in readings/discussion. Additional
instructions will be provided in class.
Project 2: Rhetorical Analysis (150) You will complete a rhetorical
analysis of a companys website, Facebook page, or Twitter
account. Additional instructions will be provided in class.
Project 3: Research Paper (200) You will write an original, sourcebased research essay. This means you will pick an arguable topic,
take a position, and then work to add something new and insightful
to the current conversation. Additional instructions will be provided
in class.
Rough Draft Grades (25 each) You will be expected to submit a
rough draft for your three main writing projects. You will receive 25
points for each rough draft submitted on time. Late rough drafts
will not receive credit or written feedback.
Peer Review Grade (75 total) You will provide and receive feedback
on each of your writing projects. After each peer review you will be
anonymously evaluated by your group members. Your final peer
review grade will be based on these scores and my evaluation.
Final Course Reflection (100) This course reflection will be a digital
project that reflects on your growth as a writer throughout the
semester. You will point to specific examples from your work
throughout the semester to support this persuasive piece of
writing. Additional instructions will be provided in class.
Conferences (100) The best way to give you immediate feedback on
your writing is through one-on-one conferencing. All students are
required to have at least two conferences with me during the
semester so we can monitor your progress in the course and help
you map out your future in the class. One conference must be
made before the end of week 9, the other before the end of the
semester. An appointment is recommended any time you wish to
see me during office hours.
Writing Center Visit (60) You will be required to meet with a writing
tutor at least once in the semester to work on a writing project or
revision. I encourage you to visit early and often! Additional
information will be provided in class.
Participation (140) Your participation grade will be determined by
your attendance, classroom participation, in-class activities,
homework, quizzes, etc.

Point Distribution
14%

Essays

10%
21%

Process
55%

Meetings
Participation

Earning Your Grade


All assignment sheets will include specific criteria that projects will be
used for grading. Generally, all essays will be graded for audience,
purpose, organization, development, process, research (if applicable),
and correctness.
** Note** You must earn a C or better to pass this class (some majors require
students to earn higher grades). If you do not meet the grade requirement, you will
be required to retake this course.

Grading Standards
A (outstanding): A paper that receives an A (90-100%) meets and
exceeds the criteria of the assignment, maintains a sophisticated focus
throughout the work, and demonstrates mastery of major rhetorical
principles and approaches the subject in a unique way so the reader
enjoys and learns from the essay.
B (above average): A paper that receives a B (80-89%) clearly meets all
criteria of the assignment. The essay has a focused purpose throughout
and demonstrates solid command of major rhetorical principles. The
subject matter is presented in an original and interesting way, though it
is not as sophisticated as the A paper.
C (average): A paper that receives a C (70-79%) meets all the criteria of
the assignment and maintains a controlling purpose, though at times
the essays focus my drift. The essay demonstrates adequate control of
major rhetorical principles and adequate command of the subject
matter. The argument/perspective may not be original and/or as
completing as the A or B level work. The essay may contain sentencelevel errors, but not sever enough to interfere with communications.
**Note: many students are surprised to receive a C when they have done
everything listed on the assignment sheet. Simply meeting the minimum
requirements constitutes a basic passing grade; to get a B or an A, you must
exceed those minimum requirements through more sophisticated execution.

D (below average): A paper that receives a D (60-69%) meets some of


the criteria but not others. The purpose may be weak or unclear.
Perspectives presented may not be original or truly argumentative.
Connections between ideas may be rough or confusing. The essay may
contain patterns of sentence-level errors that are severe enough to
interfere with communication.
F (not acceptable): A paper that receives an F (0-59%) fails to meet
more criteria of the assignment than it meets.

* Subject to revision. All revisions will be announced in class and on Blackboard. Students are responsible for all changes.

COTTRILL

| LIBA 110 Syllabus

Course Policies

Late Work All assignments are due at the start of class unless
otherwise stated. If you know you will be missing a class when an
assignment or paper is due you must turn the assignment in
Participation and Attendance in this class are mandatory. Your
early. Work submitted after the due date/time will be penalized
preparation, participation, and performance are critical to your
10% for each additional day. If you feel that you need extra time
success in this class. Absenteeism and tardiness compromises
for an assignment please come to me before the day it is due. If
your ability to succeed because you will miss opportunities to
you do not talk to me until the due date I will not be able to
participate in class writing assignments that contribute to your
discuss a possible extension. Extensions will be considered on a
development as a writer. I realize, however, that sickness or
emergencies can occur; should you need to miss class, please be case-by-case basis considering effort towards meeting the
sure to contact me, preferably beforehand, to discuss what might deadline and are not guaranteed.
be done to assist you with getting on track. Similarly, if you must Lost Essay Policy You are responsible for maintaining a copy of
each draft of your essays (including invention activities, audience
miss class for a University-sponsored event, it is your
activities, rough drafts, peer reviews, instructor feedback, final
responsibility to inform me beforehand. Missing class (or being
drafts, revisions, etc). Since occasionally essays (or backpacks,
absent by being unprepared to participate) will result in a loss
laptops, and flashdrives) are stolen, lost, or destroyed, you should
of 5 points from your participation score, regardless of reason.
keep a back-up file of each essay in a safe place. You might
Being late may lower your participation score (2 late arrivals = 1
missed class). After three absences, your final course grade may consider saving your documents to http://dropbox.com or
http://docs.google.com to ensure their safety.
be dropped one letter grade per additional absence. Missing six
Academic Honesty In addition to following University sanctioned
or more classes may result in failing the course.
Writing Center Visit All students in ENGL 101 must visit the Grand policy, academic dishonesty in this course will not be tolerated
and will lead to a failing grade on the assignment and may lead to
View Writing Center at least one time during the semester.
Students may visit the Center at any stage of the writing process failing the course.
Courtesy and Integrity Courtesy and integrity must be shown to
(prewriting, writing, revising) and for any ENGL 101 project.
Please note that you can get help from the Writing Center tutors everyone in the class. Please be respectful of others thoughts,
opinions, views, time, and learning. We are in a computer lab
for writing done in any class, but it is required you attend for
which can bring a new level of distraction. Having cell phones out
ENGL 101 at least once. Students should make an appointment
online at http://grandview.mywconline.com or through MyView or being off task means you may miss important information or
valuable time to work on your writing. Use the technology
by going to MyView > Campus Life > Writing Center.
Rough Drafts Getting feedback on essays is important. Because of responsibly, please. Being off task may impact your participation
grade.
this, we will have class peer review sessions where you will
receive and provide feedback to your peers to help improve your Resources
I am committed to the principle of universal learning. This means
writing. Rough drafts and participation in peer review will count
that our classroom, virtual spaces, practices, and interactions will
toward your final grade in this class
be as inclusive as possible. Mutual respect, civility, and the ability
In addition, you will be required to submit completed rough
to listen and observe others carefully are crucial to universal
drafts to me. Rough drafts should be submitted as per the
learning.
assignment sheet instructions. I will provide feedback with
suggestions for revision before your final essay is due. This
If you are a student with a documented disability and would like
feedback will give you suggestions on how to improve your
to discuss special accommodations, you must contact me during
essays before your essay receives a grade. Rough drafts that are office hours or by email at the beginning of the semester. If you
incomplete or submitted late will not receive feedback or points think you might have a learning disability, it is your responsibility
and it will be your responsibility to come to my office for
to contact the Director of Academic Enrichment and Disability
feedback.
Coordinator and apply for any requested accommodation. The
Revision Policy Because writing is a process, and most writers find director is Ms. Joy Brandt and she can be reached at 263-2971.
that a work must go through multiple revisions, you may choose Additional support can be found at the Career Center at 263to revise your graded essays. Your revised essay may earn up to a 2955, and at the Counseling Center at 263-2986. Academic
full letter grade from the original graded draft (for example, if
support can be found at the Tutoring Center (for all concerns
your essay earned a 75% then you may revise the essay to no
outside of writing and math), the Math Lab, and the Writing
higher than an 85%). It is not possible to get a worse grade on a
Center. The Tutoring Center is located on the second floor of the
revision; however, the extent to which the grade increases
library. The Math Lab is located in Elings, and the Writing Center
depends entirely on the success of the revision. If you choose to is located at 205 Rasmussen.
revise, you must first schedule an appointment with me to
discuss your revision strategy within one week of the original
paper being returned. Revisions will not be accepted from
students who have not met with me.
* Subject to revision. All revisions will be announced in class and on Blackboard. Students are responsible for all changes.

COTTRILL

| ENGL 101 Syllabus

Contacting Me Online Email is a wonderful communications tool


and I welcome the chance of using it to help you with questions
about your writing or about assignments. Please note, however,
that email can be unreliable. As a result, I cannot be responsible
for any email messages that are lost or addressed incorrectly (and
this is not an excuse for late work). I typically respond to emails

within 24 hours during the week. However, if you dont receive a


reply, this may mean I did not receive your message and that you
should discuss the content of your email with me personally.
Similarly, if you email me right before class, I will not be able to
read your message until after class. *Note: emails will not be
replied to between 4:00 pm on Friday and 9:00 am on Monday.

A final word . . . I hope that you will find our class to be a place where you can receive help with developing your academic
writing skills. Though many students are uncomfortable with academic writing (which is a new kind of writing for many),
understanding how to go through the writing process will help you achieve your writing goals. To make this course as
successful as possible for yourself, I encourage you to take advantage of the resources around you and to keep in touch
with me as we go through the semester. If you have any questions about the classroom policies or other class matters,
please feel free to talk to me. I look forward to working with you and helping you develop your academic writing skills.
Institutional Undergraduate Syllabus Statement
Revised: 7/10/2014
University E-Mail Account
It is essential that all students check their Grand View University e-mail
account or set their account to forward to a preferred e-mail address.
Students may set-up an e-mail auto forward from the myView web site
(myView > Campus Life > Technology Resources > myView Mail > myView
Mail Forwarding).
IDEA Student Ratings of Instruction
Grand View University is interested in knowing how learners experience
the classroom environment. To that end, all students will be asked to
participate in the IDEA survey of student ratings of instruction system at
the end of each fall and spring term. IDEA is also administered in some
summer classes. Students are asked to provide honest and thoughtful
feedback to their instructor through the IDEA process. All student
responses are confidential and are not provided to the instructor until
after grades are submitted.
Academic Responsibility/Academic Honesty
In accordance with its mission statement, Grand View University is
dedicated to the development of the whole person, and committed to
truth, excellence, and ethical values. The University strives to promote
appreciation of the dignity and worth of each individual and open
interaction among students, faculty and staff. Personal integrity and
academic honesty are essential to building a campus of trust. Thus,
honesty in all aspects of the college experience is the responsibility of each
student, faculty, and staff member. This is reflected in the Grand View
University Code of Integrity which states: As a member of the Grand View
University community, and in accordance with the mission of the
university and its Lutheran identity, I agree to appreciate and respect the
dignity and worth of each individual. I will honor and promote a
community of open interaction, personal integrity, active and intellectual
engagement, and academic honesty with students, faculty and staff.
The following list describes various ways in which the principles of
academic honesty/integrity can be violated. This list is not exhaustive; see
the Student Handbook for a complete list.

Plagiarism: The use of anothers ideas, words, or results and


presenting them as ones own. To avoid plagiarism, students are
expected to use proper methods of documentation and
acknowledgement according to the accepted format for the particular
discipline or as required by the faculty in a course.

Cheating: The use or attempted use of unauthorized materials,


information, notes, study aids, or other devices in any academic
exercise. Cheating also includes submitting papers, research results
and reports, analyses, etc. as ones own work when they were, in fact,
prepared by others.
Fabrication and Falsification: The invention or falsification of sources,
citations, data, or results, and recording or reporting them in any
academic exercise.
Facilitation of Dishonesty: Facilitation of dishonesty is knowingly or
negligently allowing ones work to be used by another student
without prior approval of the instructor or otherwise aiding another
in committing violations of academic integrity. A student who
facilitates a violation of academic honesty/integrity can be considered
as responsible as the student who receives the impermissible
assistance, even if the facilitator does not benefit personally from the
violations.
Academic Interference: Academic interference is deliberately
impeding the academic progress of another student.

Procedure for an Incident of Academic Dishonesty


Any incident of academic dishonesty requires action by both the student
and the instructor directly involved, and the submission of an Academic
Dishonesty Report to the Office of the College Deans. If the instructor is
unsure how to proceed, she/he may consult with the Student Academic
Life Committee at any point in the process.

The faculty member must also provide the student with a copy of the
Academic Dishonesty Report. The report form should identify the
following series of consequences:

If it is the students first incident of academic dishonesty:


o The instructor can impose a range of sanctions from the
following, depending upon the nature of and degree of
seriousness of the incident:

A warning with opportunity to rectify the violation

A failing grade for the academic exercise with no


opportunity to rectify the violation

A failing grade for the course


o The student will receive a letter from the Provost and Vice
President for Academic Affairs about the incident, the
Universitys expectations regarding academic
honesty/integrity, and future possible consequences should
the student commit another act of academic dishonesty
during their enrollment at Grand View. Copies of the letter
will be sent to the students academic advisor, the
instructor, and the registrar.

Following a second incident of academic dishonesty, the student


minimally will fail the course and be placed on academic dishonesty

* Subject to revision. All revisions will be announced in class and on Blackboard. Students are responsible for all changes.

COTTRILL

| ENGL 101 Syllabus

probation. Upon receiving notification from the instructor of a


violation, and determining that it is a second violation, the Provost
and Vice President for Academic Affairs must notify the student about
the incident. This letter will inform the student of her/his failing grade
and placement on probation. Copies of the letter will be sent to the
students academic advisor, the instructor, and the registrar.

When a student is reported for a third incident of academic


dishonesty, the student will fail the course and will be suspended
from the University, and the suspension for academic dishonesty will
be noted on the students transcript. Upon receiving notification from
the instructor of a violation, and determining that it is a third
violation, the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs must
notify the student about the incident. This letter will inform the
student of her/his failing grade and suspension. Copies of the letter
will be sent to the students academic advisor, the instructor, and the
registrar. Should the student appeal the decision, he/she will be
allowed to complete the term during which the appeal is heard; if
upheld, the suspension will occur during the regular term following
the appeal.

Students suspended for Academic Dishonesty must follow the same


procedures for readmission as those listed for students who have
been academically suspendedwith the exception that they will not
be required to enroll elsewhere during their suspension.

When a student has returned to Grand View after being suspended


for a third violation and is subsequently reported for a fourth incident
of academic dishonesty, the student will fail the course and will be
suspended immediately from the University, and the suspension for
academic dishonesty will be noted on the students transcript. The
suspension will remain in force during the appeal process; if the
suspension is upheld, the student will be expelled from the
University.
Netiquette (from Internet etiquette)
"Netiquette" refers to the standards for appropriate interaction in an
online environment. Students are expected to display proper netiquette in
their communications with their teacher and with other students. This
includes using proper written English, being polite, by disagreeing
agreeably when necessary, including your name and other necessary
identifiers on any communication. If an email or discussion post ever
concerns you, please notify the instructor right away in a private manner.

6
Classroom Conduct
Students should conduct themselves as responsible members of the
University community respecting the rights of others. Any student
behavior interfering with the professors ability to teach and/or the
students ability to learn constitutes a violation of the Code of Student
Conduct found in the Grand View Catalog. The professor may ask the
student to leave the classroom and that student will be subject to
disciplinary sanctions.
Appeal of Final Course Grade or Faculty Members Final Academic
Disciplinary Action
Students who wish to appeal a final course grade or other academic
disciplinary action of an instructor must complete at least section I.A. of
the Academic Appeal Form on-line within fourteen calendar days after the
published due date for the final grade submission of the academic term in
which the issue of disagreement occurred. Visit site below to complete
first part of the form.
https://secure/grandview.edu/gradeappealform.html This form must be
submitted electronically to the Office of the Provost. Nursing Students
appealing a grade in a nursing course must follow the Nursing Division
procedures.
Use of Blackboard and MyGrades
The MyGrades tool of Blackboard is intended to be a communication tool
and to facilitate information sharing between instructors and
students. The grades and feedback posted on MyGrades are not to be
interpreted as the final grade submitted by the instructor. Discrepancies
and mistakes can be made in using and interpreting the technology by
both student and instructor. Refer to the grade policy in the syllabus for a
full understanding of how your grade is calculated. Students will find their
final grade on myView > myTools > Academic Profile > Grades by Term.
Assignment of Credit Hours
With successful completion of this course, Grand View University will
award you a specified number of credit hours on your transcript. Our
accrediting body, the Higher Learning Commission, as well as the US
Department of Education have standards in the definition of what counts
as a credit hour (see GV Catalog for a full definition) so that students
receive the full educational experience we claim. This course will involve
face-to-face class time and outside learning activities to fulfill credits
awarded.

Accommodation
Grand View University prohibits unlawful discrimination and encourages
full participation by all students within the university community. When a
student requires any instructional or other accommodation to optimize
participation and/or performance in this course, it is the
The Unicorn Code
responsibility of the student to contact both the instructor and
1. Unicorns never cheat.
the Associate Director of Student Success: Academic Support and
2. Unicorns always lend a helping hand.
Disability Services and apply for any requested accommodation.
3. Unicorns dont talk to strangers.
The associate director is Ms. Joy Brandt and she can be reached
4. Unicorns respect the Earth.
at 515/263-2971.
5. Unicorns are never late.
6. Unicorns arent conceited.
Class Attendance
7. Unicorns dont judge people.
Students are responsible for adhering to the attendance policies
8. Unicorns always give 100%.
as expressed by the instructor/department. Furthermore, the
9. Unicorns graze on peace and love.
Federal Government requires that students receiving financial aid
10. Unicorns dont do drugs.
attend classes. Students, who are identified by the instructor as
From: http://www.mcphee.com/blog/2010/02/15/creation-of-the-unicornnot attending classes, will be reported. Students who fail to
code/
return to classes may lose all or a portion of their financial aid.

* Subject to revision. All revisions will be announced in class and on Blackboard. Students are responsible for all changes.

COTTRILL

| ENGL 101 Syllabus

Course
Calendar
* Subject to revision
Due Dates // Essay 1 Due: 2.2 // Essay 2 Due: 2.23 // Essay 3 Due: 4.8 // Reflection: Due 4/17 //
Unit 1: Argument
Date
Daily Activities
Homework Due for Next Class
Week 1
1/5
Introductions and course
Read Lamotts Shitty First Drafts on BB
expectations; Goal Setting
Read Writing Processes p. 9-16 in LSH
1/7
Shitty First Drafts & The Writing
Read Introduction: Entering the Conversation in TSIS
Process
Read Arguments p.43-48 in LSH
1/9
Identifying claims; Making claims;
Read They Say: Starting with What Others are Saying
Intro to Essay 1
in TSIS
Read Academic Contexts p. 6-8 in LSH
Read Barrons From Pencils to Pixels on BB
Week 2
1/12
Starting with what others are saying
Read Her Point Is: The Art of Summary in TSIS
Read pages 129-133 (stop at Tiles as
Metacommentary) from Chapter 10 in TSIS
Read and listen to Hashtag Activism in 2014: Tweeting
Why I Stayed on BB
1/14
Summary and Avoiding Plagiarism;
Read Purpose Audience (p. 2-3) in LSH
Summarizing the Conversation;
Read Scott Neumans Facebook Finds That Not All
Summary as Evidence
Users Want to Review Their Year: on BB
Read Eric Meyers Inadvertent Algorithmic Cruelty on
BB.
1/16
Purpose and Audience; Drafting
Read Bunns How to Read Like a Writer on BB
Read Matt Richtels Young, in Love and Sharing
Everything, Including a Password on BB
Read Judith Newmans If Youre Happy and You Know
it, Must I Know Too? on BB
Week 3
1/19
Reading Like a Writer; Drafting
Read Peer Review on BB
1/21
Sample Peer Review
Complete your rough draft. Make your draft as strong
as possible.
1/23
Rough Draft Due; Peer Review
Read Integrating Sources, Avoiding Plagiarism p. 97108 in LSH
Week 4
1/26
Avoiding Plagiarism and Academic
Read Writers on Revision on BB
Honesty
1/28
Introduction to Revision
Read Revising Using Your Instructors Feedback and
Strategies for Rewriting on BB
1/30
Revision Workshop
Complete the strongest version of Essay #1 for the
following class and post it to BB.
Week 5
2/2
Essay #1 Due on BB
Read What is Rhetoric? on BB
Reflection and Goals
Read What is Motivating This Writer in TSIS
Intro to essay 2
2/4
Rhetoric and Writers Motivation
Read Backpacks vs. Briefcases on BB
2/6
Analyzing Websites
Read As He Himself Puts It: The Art of Quoting in TSIS
Read p. 133-137 in Chapter 10 in TSIS
* Subject to revision. All revisions will be announced in class and on Blackboard. Students are responsible for all changes.

COTTRILL

| ENGL 101 Syllabus

Unit 2: Rhetorical Analysis


2/2

2/4

Essay #1 Due on BB
Reflection and Goals
Intro to essay 2
Rhetoric and Writers Motivation

2/6

Analyzing Websites

2/9
2/11

Quoting and Metacommentary


Writing Workshop: Writing a
Rhetorical Analysis
Rough Draft Due
Peer Review

2/13

2/16
2/18
2/20

2/23

2/25
2/27

Distinguishing What You Say from


What They Say
Finding the Significance
Revision Workshop

Essay #2 Due on BB
Reflection and Goals
Introduction to Essay 3
The Research Process; Googlepedia
Responding to the Conversation

Week 5
Read What is Rhetoric? on BB
Read What is Motivating This Writer in TSIS

Read Backpacks vs. Briefcases: Rhetorical Analysis on


BB
Read As He Himself Puts It: The Art of Quoting in TSIS
Read p. 133-137 in Chapter 10 in TSIS

Week 6
TBA
Complete your rough draft. Make your draft as strong
as possible.
Read And Yet: Distinguishing What You Say from What
They Say in TSIS
Week 7
Read So What? Who Cares? in TSIS

Read style reading on BB


Complete the strongest version of Essay 2 for the
following class and post it to BB.

Week 8
Read McClures Googlepedia: Turning Information
Behaviors Into Research Skills on BB

Read Chapter 4 Yes/ No/ Okay, but from TSIS


Read Stedmans Annoying Ways People Use Sources
on BB under readings
Complete your research proposal

* Subject to revision. All revisions will be announced in class and on Blackboard. Students are responsible for all changes.

COTTRILL

| ENGL 101 Syllabus

Unit 3: Research Essay


2/23

2/25
2/27

3/2
3/4

Essay #2 Due on BB
Reflection and Goals
Introduction to Essay 3
The Research Process; Googlepedia
Responding to the Conversation

Proposal Due
Annoying Ways People Use Sources
Introduction Workshop

3/6

Introduction Due
Planting Naysayers

3/9
3/11

The Sixth Paragraph


Integrating Research and Drafting

Week 8
Read McClures Googlepedia: Turning Information
Behaviors Into Research Skills on BB

Read Chapter 4 Yes/ No/ Okay, but from TSIS


Read Stedmans Annoying Ways People Use Sources
on BB under readings
Complete your research proposal

Week 9
Reread TSIS Entering the Conversation (p. 1-14)

Read TSIS Skeptics May Object: Planting a Naysayer in


Your Text (p. 78-90)
Read Paul Lynchs The Sixth Paragraph on BB

3/16-3/20

Week 10
Read Integrate Research Avoid Plagiarism on BB
Complete your mini-draft (3 pages minimum). Submit it
on BB before the start of class.
Mini-draft Due; Early Peer Review
Use the feedback youve received to continue to
improve your essay
Week 11
No Class Spring Break

3/23
3/25
3/27

Research Day
Connecting the Parts
Revising for Voice and Tone

3/30
4/1
4/3

Rough Draft Due


Peer Review
Introduction to Course Reflection
Planning a Reflection

4/6

Revision Workshop

4/8
4/10

Essay 3 Due
Reflection Workshop

4/13
4/15
4/17

Reflection Workshop
Reflection Workshop
Reflections Due by 4:00 pm

3/13

Week 12
Read TSIS As A Result (p. 105-118)
Read TSIS Aint So/ Is Not (p. 121-128)
Complete your rough draft. Make your draft as strong
as possible.
Week 13
Read Reflective Writing and How Do I Write
Reflectively on BB

Read TSIS He Says, Contends (p. 139-143)


Week 14
Continue to work on revising your Essay 3. Make sure
you have the strongest version of your essay ready to
submit on Wednesday.
Read Reflective Writing on BB
Continue to work on your reflection
Week 15
Continue to work on your reflection
Continue to work on your reflection

* Subject to revision. All revisions will be announced in class and on Blackboard. Students are responsible for all changes.