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Technology What about Android? Medical Android Apps to Considers

Submitted by Alison Aldrich, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region, University of Washington–Seattle; edited by Dina J. McKelvy, AHIP

Apple’s iPhones and iPads may still be the most frequently preferred mobile devices of physicians and medical students, but Android is catching up. In January of this year, the Android operating system surpassed iOS (Apple) and RIM (Blackberry) in percentage of overall US market share [1]. Application developers are taking notice, and the selection and quality of medical apps available for Android is improving. As of this writing, there are more than 1,000 applications in the Android Market medical category. Here are some free and low-cost medical apps to consider recommending to Android users.

Many apps that have been popular on other mobile platforms are now available for Android and are receiving good reviews. EPocrates Rx includes access to national and regional drug formularies, a drug interaction checker, pill identifier, medical calculators, and more. Medscape (from WebMD) and Skyscape offer competing multipurpose applications. Medscape comes with a great deal of free content including drug and condition reference information, news, medical calculators, procedural protocols with demonstration videos, continuing medical education (CME) activities, and professional directories. Skyscape offers free drug and condition reference information, calculators, and alerts. The Skyscape app is required for running certain site-licensed mobile content, such as DynaMed.

For PubMed searching on an Android device, try PubMed Mobile from CRinUS. This app allows searching by keyword in any of thirty-two specific fields, including Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). Searches can be saved, and lists of citations can be saved or shared via email, text message, Twitter, or Facebook.

For students, PhysicianBoardReview offers a nice selection of apps to help with preparation for the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) and other board exams. Speed Anatomy and other games by the same developer make memorizing anatomical structures less of a chore. Medical Mnemonics includes more than 1,500 memory aids for medical concepts.

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s Electronic Preventive Services Selector (ePSS) is especially useful in primary care settings. Entering a patient’s age, gender, and behavioral risk factors returns a prioritized list of screenings recommended for that patient according to US Preventive Services Task Force guidelines.

Another potentially lifesaving app is the audio Emergency Medical Spanish Guide, an aid to communication between Spanish-speaking patients and English-speaking care providers. The app includes more than 100 phrases and questions, with Spanish-language audio recordings, organized into color-coded categories for quick reference. When possible, the questions follow a yes/no format to minimize misunderstandings.

There is good reason to expect that Android use in health care settings will continue to expand. Google and outside developers are taking steps to improve Android’s security for sensitive operations, such as those involving electronic medical records. New tablet computers running the Android operating system are set to compete with Apple’s iPad [2]. Look for an even better selection of medical applications for Android by the end of the year.

Technology What about Android? Medical Android Apps to Considers Submitted by Alison Aldrich, National Network of

References

  • 1. comScore. comScore reports January 2011 U.S. mobile subscriber market share [Internet]. 7 Mar 2011 [cited 22 Mar 2011].

<http://www.comscore.com/Press_Events/Press_Releases/2011/3/comScore_Reports_January_2011_

U.S ._

Mobile_Subscriber_Market_Share/(language)/eng-US>.

2.

Wodajo F. Why locked Android tablets will beat the iPad for hospital use [Internet]. iMedical Apps; 8 Mar 2011 [cited 22 Mar 2011]. <http://www.imedicalapps.com/tag/android-tablet-medical/>.

2. Wodajo F. Why locked Android tablets will beat the iPad for hospital use [Internet]. iMedicalwww.epss.ahrq.gov/PDA/android.jsp  Emergency Medical Spanish Guide ($3.99): market.android.com/details? id=com.mavro.emsg.lite  EPocrates Rx (free): www.epocrates.com/products/android/  PhysicianBoardReview ($9.99 per subject): www.physicianboardreview.com  PubMed Mobile (free and $2.99 Pro versions): www.cyrket.com/p/android/com.bim.pubmed/  Medical Mnemonics ($1.99): market.android.com/details? id=com.regularrateandrhythm.medmnemonics  Medscape (free): www.medscape.com  Skyscape (free): www.skyscape.com  Speed Anatomy (free lite version): www.speedanatomy.com NOTE: Only noncommercial websites are linked. " id="pdf-obj-1-7" src="pdf-obj-1-7.jpg">

Medical Android Apps

Android Market: Medical Category: market.android.com/apps/MEDICAL/

Electronic Preventive Services Selector (ePSS) (free):

Emergency Medical Spanish Guide ($3.99): market.android.com/details? id=com.mavro.emsg.lite

EPocrates Rx (free): www.epocrates.com/products/android/

PhysicianBoardReview ($9.99 per subject): www.physicianboardreview.com

PubMed Mobile (free and $2.99 Pro versions): www.cyrket.com/p/android/com.bim.pubmed/

Medical Mnemonics ($1.99): market.android.com/details? id=com.regularrateandrhythm.medmnemonics

Medscape (free): www.medscape.com

Skyscape (free): www.skyscape.com

Speed Anatomy (free lite version): www.speedanatomy.com NOTE: Only noncommercial websites are linked.