This form was updated on 4-23-2013

Peace Corps Small Grants Completion Report
This report template has been developed as a tool to help Volunteers and their communities
assess their small grants projects. The information that you record here will also be transmitted to
Peace Corps/headquarters for internal reporting and reporting to donors.
Please work with your community to fill out this report and return it to the appropriate staff member
at post for review. You can use either the links on the table of contents or the buttons on the menu
to the left to navigate between sections. Please check each box as you complete the section.

Table of Contents
Completion Report Instructions
1. Project Classification
2. Project Report Narrative
3. Monitoring and Evaluation
4. Project Log
5. Tell Your Story
6. Grant Type Selection Menu
7. Signature Forms

PC-2106

Instructions for this Completion Report and Project Log
This workbook contains both the small grants completion report, which is used for reporting
on the results of your project, and the project log, which is used to record all expenditures of
small grant funds under the project. The data you collect will be transmitted to Peace
Corps/headquarters to be used for internal Peace Corps reporting.
Upon approval of your project, you should save a copy of this report to bring to your site, or
print it out in hardcopy. Before you begin spending funds, set up the project log by filling in the
Project Information at the top of Section 4. Then, as you spend down project funds, you should
fill in a row for each expenditure (and save the original receipts). The worksheet formulas will
automatically calculate the total spending, subtotals by budget category, and remaining funds.
Detailed instructions on filling out the project log are located at the top of Section 4.
It is important that you set this up and fill it out along with a community counterpart. If the
counterpart you are working with is not computer literate, or if that person would learn more by
filling out the log by hand, then you can print out the project log or draft a similar log on paper by
whatever means appropriate. If you do record the log by hand, at the end of the project you
should transcribe each line into Section 4 of this workbook.

Upon completion of the project, you should complete all four sections of the Peace Corps Small
Grants Completion Report and submit this document to the small grants coordinator at your
post. Note that the Grant Contribution column in the Project Cost Breakdown in Section 1 will fill
in automatically from the project log. Please review the Peace Corps Small Grants Application
you submitted at the time your project was approved before filling out this completion report, as
much of the information will be the same, and the responses to the completion report
questionnaire (Section 2) should build on the responses to the application's questionnaire you
filled out prior to carrying out the project.

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Some notes about this workbook:
CELL COLORS:
BLUE CELLS

Cells to be filled out by the PCV and community

PINK CELLS

Cells to be filled out by post staff

BROWN CELLS

Cells that will automatically populate based on information entered
in elsewhere in the report

COMMENTS ON CELLS
Please take note of the comments (red triangle) at the top right corner of certain cells (including
this one), which provide additional information. These have been included on many cells to help
guide users through each step of the process.

HOW TO START A NEW PARAGRAPH IN A CELL:
Please remember: If you want to start a new line within the same cell, you must hit "Alt + Enter";
simply hitting "Enter" will jump to the next cell.

PROTECTED CELLS
Each one of these sheets is protected and will allow data only to be entered in areas that are
shaded in yellow. This is done to ensure that the all data that is entered is of the correct type to
be used in reporting within Peace Corps.

PRINTING THIS REPORT
The pages in this workbook are set up to be printer-friendly. The default settings will print only
the sheet that you are on. If you would like to print the whole workbook at the same time, go to
"File > Print" and under "Print what" select "Entire workbook."

PC-2106

Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report
1. Project Classification
Fiscal Year:

Country:

Project Number:

Project Funding
Source:
Project Title:
Project City/Town/Village:
Region:
Community Group Name:
Group Contact Person:
Community Group Contact
Information (address,
phone, etc.):
Project Start Date:

Project End Date:

Number of PCVs:

Volunteer Information:
Last Name

First Name

Peace Corps Sector

COS Date

Names of Other PCVs Involved in Project
Planning or Implementation:

Primary PCV
PCV 2
PCV 3
Responsible Program Manager/APCD:

Project Classification
(Mark only one classification with "XX" as the primary classification of this project. Mark additional applicable descriptors with an "X.")

Agriculture

Municipal Development

HIV/AIDS

Food Security

Education

Community and Economic
Development

ICT

Gender and Development

Environment

Youth Development

NGO Development

Health

Water and Sanitation

Volunteerism

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Male(s)
25 and above

Female(s)

15-24

14 and below 25 and above

15-24

14 and below

Total

# of Participants (direct):
Community members directly involved in
the design and implementation of the
project, including those who attended
trainings or workshops

0

# of Beneficiaries (indirect):
Community members who received an
indirect benefit from the project, not
including those counted above

0

Project Cost Breakdown (in US$)
(This will auto-fill based on information you enter in the project log screen.)
Grant
Contribution
Cash

Community

Third-Party

Contribution
Cash
In-kind

Contribution (if applicable)
Cash
In-kind

Labor

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

Equipment

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

Materials/Supplies

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

Land/Venue Rental

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

Travel/Per Diem/Food/Lodging

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

Materials Transport

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

Other

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

Total

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

All Volunteers should reference
the Peace Corps Small Grant
Volunteer Handbook which
specifically outlines allowable
and unallowable costs.

$0.00

Budget Narrative
Please provide a general list of what items or services were funded.

Grant Contribution

Community Contribution

Labor
Equipment
Materials and Supplies
Land/Venue Rental
Travel/Per Diem/Food/Lodging
Transportation of Materials
Other: (be specific)

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Third-Party Contribution
(if applicable)

Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report
2. Project Report Narrative

Directions

Your descriptions should be between 150-250 words. Please be succinct in describing your project's outcome. Keep in mind that your report may be shared or distributed to donors
and the agency.

1) Were the project goals and objectives achieved?
Describe any changes in the initial project goals and
objectives. Did the community feel they reached the
goals of the project? How do you know?

Goals Achieved,
Changes in Initial
Objectives, and
Community Feeling

2) How did the project build capacity in the
community? What new skills have been acquired by
the project participants? (Be specific as to what skills
and which participants/community members.)

Capacity and Skills
Built

3) How will community members apply their new skills
or otherwise sustain the activities and/or benefits of
the project? How will they cover any recurring costs?

Sustainability

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4) What unexpected events (positive or negative) did
you encounter during the project? Based on your
experiences, do you have any recommendations for
others implementing a similar project?

Unexpected Events
and
Recommendations

5) What were major lessons learned during this
project? If you have developed modules or training
materials, please share them with the grants
coordinator or the IRC manager at your post for
sharing with other PCVs.

Lessons Learned
and Promising
Practices

PC-2106

Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report
3. Monitoring and Evaluation
Directions

How successful was your project? First, report on the Peace Corps global small grants indicators. Then, enter the goals, objectives, and indicators that you and your community created and entered into your application.

Capacity Development

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s) 25 and
above

Male(s) 15-24

Female(s) 15-24

Male(s) 14 and below

Female(s) 14
and below

Male(s) 15-24

Female(s) 15-24

Male(s) 14 and below

Female(s) 14
and below

# of individuals who have increased capacity due to this
small grant
# service providers who have increased capacity due to
this small grant

# of community organizations and/or associations that
have increased capacity due to this small grant

Organizations

New Technology & Practices
Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s) 25 and
above

# of individuals who have applied new technologies
and/or practices as a result of this grant

# of new technologies and/or practices that have been
adopted as a result of this small grant

Technologies

Practices

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Community/Volunteer Determined Project Indicators
Objective(s)
Enter the same objectives that were submitted with your project application.

Indicator(s)
Enter the indicators that were submitted with
your project application. You will report on the
actual results in the next box.

Results
Please fill in the results of your
indicators/measures. Did you achieve your
targets?

Comments
Enter any relevant supporting information.
NOTE: Please limit the text to
20 words or less in the blue "Indicators",
"Who", and "When" boxes.

1.1

GOAL 1

1.2

1.3

1.4

2.1

GOAL 2

2.2

2.3

2.4

3.1

GOAL 3

3.2

3.3

3.4

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Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report
4. Project Log (Local Currency)

Directions

1.

Fill in the total amount awarded for the grant in the Project Information section at the top of this sheet. Please make sure that you enter the project amount (in local currency) and the exchange rate. If you are not sure of the exact exchange
rate, please enter your best estimate of the exchange rate when the project was approved. If you would like to enter amounts directly in U.S. dollars, leave the exchange rate at $1.

2.

As you complete this project log, the summary budget below and the budget on the Project Classification page will automatically fill in.

3.

As project funds are spent, enter each expenditure on the next open line of the log. If you are filling out the form electronically, fill out all of the blue cells on each line. For the budget category, please select from one of the seven options in the
dropdown list. The total cost and grant funds balance will fill in automatically by formula. For each line, split the total cost between grant funds, community contribution, and third-party contribution, depending upon which source paid for (or
provided in-kind) the goods or services. Please note that while receipts are not required for items covered by the community contribution or by a third party, these amounts should be included in the project log (you may leave the receipt #
column blank for these items).

4.

If you need additional rows, there are over 100 additional lines that are "hidden" at the bottom of the worksheet. Unhide the rows by following the instructions at the bottom righthand side of the sheet.

Project Title:
Community Group:
APCD/Program Manager:

Project
Information

Project Number:
ProjectCompletion
Start Date:
Project
Date:

Grant Amount (in local currency):
Exchange rate: $1 USD = 1

- - -

Community
Contribution %:
Community Contribution

Grant Funds (Cash)
Category
Local Currency US$
Labor
- $
Equipment
- $
Materials/Supplies
- $
Land/Venue Rental
- $
Travel/Per Diem/Food/Lodging
- $
Materials transport
- $
Other
- $
Total
- $

Budget
Summary

Project Log Line #

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18

Date

Receipt #
n/a

Item Description
Opening Balance

Local Currency
-

Cash
US$
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $

Budget Category
n/a
n/a

-

In-Kind
Local Currency
US$
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $

Unit Cost

Quantity
n/a

-

Grant Funds
Expended
n/a

Total Cost
n/a
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

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Third-Party Contribution (if applicable)
Cash
In-Kind
Local Currency US$
Local Currency $US
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $
- $

Grant Funds
Community Contribution
Balance
(if applicable)
In-Kind
- Cash
-

-

Third-Party Contribution
(if applicable)
Cash

19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
n/a

n/a

Total

n/a

n/a

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n/a

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00

-

0.00

0.00

0.00

d-Party Contribution
(if applicable)
In-Kind

PC-2106

0.00

PC-2106

Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report
5. Tell Your Story (Vignette)

Directions

Every project has a story. Please describe any anecdotal evidence/stories from a community member or your personal experience that
attest to the project's success. This vignette may be used to highlight your exemplary work when reporting to stakeholders. If you have
photos from the project, please attach a JPG file(s) and share them with your small grant coordinator. Please note that your coordinator
may send these photos to PC /headquaters.

Your Story

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Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report
Grant Type Selection Menu
Each small grant program at Peace Corps has specific application requirements. Select the grant program through which your project was
funded below to provide the information required by that program.

PCPP
SPA
VAST
ECPA

Peace Corps Partnership Program (PCPP): Funded through donations from your family
and friends in the United States. Available in every PC country.
You're done! There is no PCPP-specific completion report requirement.

Small Project Assistance (SPA) Program: Funded by USAID. Report on the indicators
selected by the Volunteer and community in the small grants application.

Volunteer Activities Support and Training (VAST): Funded by the President's
Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Report on the indicators selected by the
Volunteer and community in the small grants application.

Energy Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA): Funded through an agreement
with the U.S. Department of State. Report on the indicators selected by the Volunteer
and community in the small grants application.

FTF

Feed the Future (FTF): Funded by USAID. Part of FTF is a regional partnership called,
WAFSP, which takes place in West African countries. Report on the indicators selected
by the Volunteer and community in the small grants application.

GEF

Global Education Framework (GEF): Funded by USAID. Currently available in
Mozambique and Uganda only. Report on the indicators selected by the Volunteer and
community in the small grants application.

PC-2106

Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report
PCPP

YOU'RE DONE!!
There is no PCPP-specific report to fill out.

Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report
SPA Indicators
SPA Indicators

Directions:

These data will be transmitted to Peace Corps/headquarters to be used for internal Peace Corps reporting and for inclusion in the SPA annual report submitted to USAID/Washington. Information may also be shared with the in-country USAID
mission.
Choose the program element that the project was funded under from the drop-down list below. Once you choose the program element, the indicators for that program element will appear. Please fill in information for the indicators relevant to your
project.

Country: Nepal
Program Element: 4.5.1, Agriculture Enabling Environment

Example:
# of individuals who received a benefit from the project

12

Male(s) 25 and
above

15

Female(s) 25
and above

5

Male(s) 1524

10

Female(s) 1524

Male(s) 14 and
below

Female(s)14
and below

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1.3.7

2.2.3

# of communities in USG-assisted areas using community policing methods
# of programs conducted to enhance and improve police/community
relationships
# of community based organizations (CBOs) or governmental entities that
received assistance to strengthen local government and/or decentralization
efforts
# of individuals who received training or assistance to strengthen local
government and/or decentralization efforts
# of private sector actors/entities engaged during the planning or
implementation of the activity (CARSI)
# of service providers who have benefitted from USG-supported educational
and socio-economic opportunities (CARSI)
# of youth between 15 and 25 who have benefitted from USG-supported
educational and socio-economic opportunities (CARSI)
# of youth who are under 15 who have benefitted from USG-supported
educational and socio-economic opportunities (CARSI)
# of communities benefited with USG assistance (CARSI)
# of USG-assisted organizations and/or service delivery systems that serve
youth (CARSI)
CARSI Risk Factor: 1. Dysfunctional families, lack of supervision in the home
and high rates of domestic violence
CARSI Risk Factor: 2. Loss of family and social values
CARSI Risk Factor: 3. The need for Identity and belonging, low self-esteem,
negative peer contact and lack of dreams
CARSI Risk Factor: 4. Irresponsible sexual activity at an early stage
CARSI Risk Factor: 5. Limited access to formal and informal education
CARSI Risk Factor: 6. Low quality of education/teachers, high school dropout
rate
CARSI Risk Factor: 7. High unemployment among youth and a lack of skills
for employment
CARSI Risk Factor: 8. Overcrowded neighborhoods with limited access to
basic services and spaces for recreation

2.2.4

# of community based organizations (CBOs) or governmental entities that
received assistance to strengthen management skills and/or fiscal
management
# of individuals who received US government-assisted training in
management skills and/or fiscal management
# of individuals trained/educated in civic education and leadership capacity

2.3.2

# of individuals receiving civic education through US government-assisted
programs
# of local mechanisms (such as formation of girls empowerment clubs, youth
leadership camps and student governance/student peer-group learning)
supported with US government assistance for citizens to engage their subnational government

2.4.1

# of civil society organizations using US government assistance to improve
internal organizational capacity
# of people who have completed USG-assisted civic education programs
# of people trained/educated in organizational capacity and/or leadership

3.1.1

# of individuals reached through community outreach that promotes
HIV/AIDS prevention
# of health care workers who successfully completed an in-service
training
program
HIV/AIDS
relatedreached
servicewith
delivery
# of MARP
(most for
at-risk
population)
individual and/or
small group level HIV preventive interventions that are based on
evidence and/or meet the minimum standards required
# of individuals reached through community outreach that promotes
#
of individuals
trained
in HIV-related stigma and discrimination
HIV/AIDS
care and
treatment
reduction
# of local organizations provided with technical assistance for HIV-related institutional
capacity building

3.1.3

# of community health workers trained in home
basedPresumptive
care
Intermittent
Treatment for pregnant
women (IPTp)
# of community health workers trained in Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) use
# of community health workers trained in malaria prevention Behavior Change
Communication (BCC) messaging skills
# of people receiving malaria prevention Behavior Change Communication (BCC)
messaging regarding early treatment
# of people receiving malaria prevention Behavior Change Communication (BCC)
messaging regarding net usage

# of people receiving malaria prevention Behavior Change Communication (BCC)
messaging regarding Intermittent Presumptive Treatment for pregnant women (IPTp)
# of people receiving malaria prevention Behavior Change Communication (BCC)
messaging regarding Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS)
# of Long Lasting Insecticide-Treated Nets (LLITNs) distributed

3.1.6

# of individuals trained in maternal or newborn health through USG supported programs
# of individuals trained in child health and nutrition through US government-supported
health area programs

# of children reached by USG-supported nutrition programs

# of US government-assisted community health workers (CHWs) trained to
provide family planning (FP) information and/or services during the year
3.1.7

# of individuals that have seen or heard a specific USG-supported FP/RH message
# of local non-governmental organizations trained and providing quality family plan
# of new family planning approaches successfully introduced through USG support
# of people trained in family planning and reproductive health with USG funds
3.1.8

# of people gaining access to an improved drinking water source
# of people gaining access to an improved sanitation facility
# of men and women trained in water sanitation and hygiene

3.1.9

# of people trained in child health and nutrition through USG-supported health area progr
# of health facilities with improved capacity to manage acute under-nutrition
# of children under five reached by US government-supported nutrition programs

3.2.1

# of textbooks and other teaching and learning materials (TLM) provided with US
government assistance
# of schools using Information and Communication Technology due to US government
support
# of classrooms built or repaired with US government assistance
# of teachers/educators who received training with US government support

# of education administrators and officials trained with US government support
# of PTAs or similar ‘school’ governance structures supported

# of learners enrolled in USG-supported secondary schools or equivalent non-schoolbased settings
# of learners receiving literacy interventions at the primary level

3.2.2

# of learners at the primary level receiving US government-supported training other than
literacy interventions
# of US government-assisted curricula revised with private and/or public sector
employers’ input
# of US government-supported tertiary or vocational programs
# of individuals trained as a result of US governement investments in higher education
institutions

3.3.2

# of vulnerable individuals benefitting from US government-supported social services

# of service providers trained who serve vulnerable persons
# of US government assisted organizations and/or service delivery systems strengthened
who serve vulnerable populations

3.3.3

# of individuals benefiting from US government-supported social assistance
programming
# of service providers trained who serve vulnerable persons
# of US government assisted organizations and/or service delivery systems
strengthened who serve vulnerable populations

4.2.1

# of individuals who received capacity building training and/or assistance in
trade and/or investment enabling environment

# of community based organizations, businesses or governmental entities that
received assistance to strengthen trade and investment

4.2.2

# of individuals who received capacity building training and/or
assistance in trade and/or investment capacity
# of community based organizations, businesses or governmental entities that received
assistance to strengthen trade and/or investment capacity

4.3.1

# of individuals who received capacity building training and/or
assistance to enable or enhance the financial sector environment
# of community based organizations (CBOs), businesses or
governmental entities that received assistance to enable or enhance
the financial sector environment

4.3.2

# of individuals who received capacity building training and/or assistance in the financial
sector (such as trainings or assistance that improve financial management systems)

# of community based organizations (CBOs), businesses or governmental entities that
received assistance to enable or enhance the financial sector environment

4.5.1

# of hectares under improved technologies or management practices as a result of USG
assistance
# of farmers and others who have applied new technologies or management practices as
a result of US government assistance
# of food security private enterprises, producers organizations, water users associations,
women's groups, trade and business associations, and community-based organizations
receiving USG assistance
# of individuals who have received USG supported short term agricultural sector
productivity or food security training
# of food security private enterprises, producers organizations, water users associations,
women's groups, trade and business associations, and community-based organizations
that applied new technologies or management practices

# of individuals trained in improving and promoting food security

# of individuals trained in business development, including income generation
# of households that report production of off-season vegetables

# of individuals that are reached by non-formal education activities focused on post-harves

4.5.2

# of hectares under improved technologies or management practices as a result of USG
assistance
# of farmers and others who have applied new technologies or management practices as
a result of US government assistance
# of food security private enterprises, producers organizations, water users associations,
women's groups, trade and business associations, and community-based organizations
receiving USG assistance
# of individuals who have received USG supported short term agricultural sector
productivity or food security training
# of food security private enterprises, producers organizations, water users associations,
women's groups, trade and business associations, and community-based organizations
that applied new technologies or management practices

4.6.1

# of individuals who received capacity building training and/or
assistance
to strengthen
the business(CBOs),
environment
# of community
based organizations
businesses or

4.6.2

governmental entities that received assistance to strengthen the
business environment
# of private sector firms that have improved management
practices as a result of US government assistance

# of individuals who received training or assistance to
strengthen private sector productivity

4.6.3

# of individuals who received training or assistance in workforce development
# of workforce development initiatives completed as a result of USG participation in
public-private partnerships

4.7.3

# of microenterprises supported by US government enterprise assistance
# of individuals who received training or assistance to strengthen
microenterprises

4.8.1

4.8.2

5.2.1

# of people with increased economic benefits derived from sustainable natural resource
management and conservation as a result of US government assistance
# of hectares of biological significance and/or natural resources under improved natural
resource management as a result of US government assistance
# of people receiving US government supported training in natural resources
management and/or biodiversity conservation.
# of institutions with improved capacity to address climate change issues as a result of
US government assistance
# of people with increased capacity to adapt to the impacts of climate variability and
change as a result of US government assistance

# of people trained in disaster preparedness as a result of US government assistance
# of hazard risk reduction plans, policies, strategies, systems, or curricula developed

5.2.2
6.1.1

infrastructure improvement that mitigates effects of
inaccessibility to food or water.
# of youth participating (ages 15-25)
# of community groups benefitting
# of new services provided

# of service providers benefitting/using
6.6.6

9.9.9

# of communities with strengthened capacity to conduct supplementary early
grade reading and literacy activities.
# of community and school libraries established.
# of textbooks and other teaching and learning materials provided with USG as
# of activities that promote gender equitable practices
PLACE HOLDER TO END THE LIST

Communities
Programs

Community based organizations ( Government entities
Female(s)
25 and
Female(s)
Male(s) 25 and above
above
Male(s) 15-24 15-24
Actors/Entities
Male(s) 25 and above
Male(s) 15-24
Male(s) 14 and below

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Female(s)
15-24
Female(s)
14 and
below

Communities
Organizations
Mark "X" if applies
Mark "X" if applies
Mark "X" if applies
Mark "X" if applies
Mark "X" if applies
Mark "X" if applies
Mark "X" if applies
Mark "X" if applies

Service delivery systems

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Female(s) entities
Community based organizations ( Government
25 and
Female(s)
Male(s) 25 and above
above
Male(s) 15-24
25 and
Male(s) 25 and above
above
Male(s) 15-24

Female(s)
15-24
Female(s)
15-24

Male(s) 14
and below
Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
Female(s)
below
14 and
below

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Girls empowerment clubs

Youth
leadership
camps

Student
governence

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
Female(s)
above
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24
Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below
Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
Female(s)
below
14 and
below

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above
Female(s)

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Civil society organizations
Male(s) 25 and above

Male(s) 25 and above
Commercial sex workers (CSW)
Male(s) 25 and above
Male(s) 25 and above

25 and
above
Injecting
drug users
(IDU)
Female(s)
25 and
Female(s)
above
25 and
above

Student
peer group Other
learning
mechanisms

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24
Men who have sex with
men (MSM)
Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24
Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Other vulnerable
populations
Female(s)
Male(s) 14
14 and
and below
below

Organizations

Male(s) 25 and above
Male(s) 25 and above
Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25
and
Female(s)
above
25 and
Female(s)
above
25 and
above

Male(s) 15-24
Male(s) 15-24
Male(s) 15-24

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Female(s)
15-24
Female(s)
15-24
Female(s)
15-24

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Male(s) 6-14

Female(s)
25 and
above
Female(s)
25 and
above
Female(s)
6-14

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24
Female(s)
15-24
15-24
Male(s) 5
and 5
and
below
below

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24
Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24
Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below
Male(s) 14
and below

Male(s) 25 and above

Male(s) 25 and above
Nets

Male(s) 25 and above
Male(s) 25 and above

Organizations
Approaches

Male(s) 25 and above

Male(s) 25 and above
Male(s) 25 and above
Male(s) 25 and above

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above
Female(s)
25 and
above
Female(s)
25 and
above
Female(s)
25 and
above
Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Facilities
Male(s) 5 and below

Female(s) 5
and below

Textbooks
Schools
Classrooms
Male(s) 25 and above

Male(s) 25 and above
Parent Teacher Associations
(PTAs)

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Female(s)
14 and
below
Female(s)
14 and
below
Female(s)
14 and
below

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24
Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below
Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
Female(s)
below
14 and
below
Female(s)
14 and
below

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above
Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24
Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Organizations

Service delivery systems

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25
and
Female(s)
above
25 and

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24
Female(s)

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Male(s) 25 and above

above

Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Organizations

Service delivery systems

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Male(s) 25 and above
Male(s) 25 and above
Male(s) 25 and above
Curricula
Programs
Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
Female(s)
above
25 and
above
Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Community based organizations ( Government eBusinesses

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Community based organizations ( Government eBusinesses

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Community based organizations ( Government eBusinesses

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Community based organizations ( Government eBusinesses

Hectares

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above
Producers
organization
s
Female(s)
25 and
above

Private enterprises

Producers
organization Water users
s
associations

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below
Community

Male(s) 25 and above

Private enterprises

Male(s) 25 and above
Households

Male(s) 25 and above

Hectares
Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24
Water users
associations

Women's
groups
Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 25 and above

Producers
organization Water users
s
associations
Female(s)
25 and
above
Male(s) 15-24

Private enterprises

Producers
organization Water users
s
associations

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Private enterprises

Female(s)
14 and
below
Community
based
organization
s (CBOs)
Female(s)
14 and
below

Community
Trade and
based
business
organization
associations s (CBOs)

Female(s)
15-24

Trade and
based
business
organization
associations s (CBOs)
Female(s)
Male(s) 14
14 and
and below
below

Women's
groups

Community
Trade and
based
business
organization
associations s (CBOs)

Women's
groups

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Community based organizations ( Government eBusinesses
Firms

Women's
groups

Male(s) 14
and below
Trade and
business
associations
Male(s) 14
and below

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 25 and above

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Male(s) 14
and below

Female(s)
14 and
below

Risk reduction plans

Policies

Strategies

Curricula

Initiatives

Microenterprises
Male(s) 25 and above
Male(s) 25 and above
Hectares
Male(s) 25 and above

Institutions

Female(s)
25 and
above
Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Systems

Communities
Male(s) 15-25
Community groups
Services

Male(s) 25 and above
Communities
Libraries, community
Textbooks
Gender activities

Female(s) 15-25

Female(s)
25 and
above

Female(s)
Male(s) 15-24 15-24

Libraries, school
Other teaching and learning materials

1
2

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18

19
20
21

22

23

24
25
26

28
29
30
31
32
33

34
35
36

37

38

39

40

41
42

43
44
45

46

47

51
52

53
54
55

56
57
58
59

60
61

62
63
64
65
66
67
68

69
70

71
72
73

74

75

76

77

78

79

80

81

82
83

84
85

86

87
88

89
90

91

92
93
94

95

96
97

98
99
100
101
102

103
104

105
106
107
108
109
110

111
112
113
114
115

2.2.3

# of youth trained with USG support
# of communities benefited with USG assistance.

Male(s) 14
Communities

3.1.1

# of individuals trained to provide HIV/AIDS palliative care (may
include: clinical/medical care; psychological; spiritual; and/or support
care services for HIV-infected individuals and family members)

Male(s) 25

3.1.3

# of targeted populations reached with individual and/or small group level HIV prevention
interventions that are based on evidence and/or meet standards required
# of individuals trained to promote HIV/AIDS prevention through programs that promote
abstinence and/or being faithful
# of individuals reached through community outreach that promote HIV/AIDS prevention
through abstinence only
# of individuals reached through community outreach that promote HIV/AIDS prevention
through abstinence and/or being faithful
# of individuals reached through community outreach that promotes HIV/AIDS
prevention through other behavior change beyond abstinence and/or being faithful
# of individuals trained to promote HIV/AIDS prevention through other behavior change
beyond abstinence and/or being faithful
# of targeted population reached with individual and/or small group level HIV prevention
interventions that are based on evidence and/or meet standards required
# of people reached with malaria prevention or treatment messages

Populations
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25

# of people reached with IEC/BCC message on malaria treatment or
prevention
# of people trained with USG funds in malaria treatment or prevention
# of people reached with malaria treatment or prevention messages
# of community leaders/members trained
# of radio spots produced/transmitted
# of people who slept under ITN the previous night

Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Radio spots
Male(s) 25

# of women who received intermittent preventive treatment during
antenatal care (ANC) visits during their last pregnancy

Female(s)

# of targeted houses adequately sprayed with residual insecticide in
the
12 months
# oflast
individuals
with fever in the last two weeks who received

Houses

antimalarial treatment according to national policy within one day after
onset of fever
Male(s) 25
# of entrepreneurs trained to create businesses in malaria prevention
goods or services

Male(s) 25

# of teachers or other formal educators trained to incorporate malaria
prevention themes into their lesson planning
Male(s) 25

3.1.6

# of Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs) and their counterparts who have
received malaria awareness training, and are able to mention at least
two methods of malaria control.

Male(s) 25

# of small scale community-level malaria projects supported through
PCVs and PCRVs that are directly implementing at least two methods
of malaria control.
# of health facilities rehabilitated

Male(s) 25
Facilities

Liters of drinking water disinfected with USG-supported point-of-use
treatment products

Liters

# of people reached by community support projects for improving
child health and nutrition

Male(s) 25

# of people reached by community support for projects for improving
child health and nutrition

Male(s) 25

# of people in target areas with access to improved sanitation facilities
as a result of USG assistance
Male(s) 25
3.1.9

3.2.1

3.2.2

4.2.2
4.5.2

4.6.1

# of people impacted by community support projects for improving child health and
nutrition
# of persons reached through mass media
# of women educated on the benefits of breast feeding
# of individuals (men, women) trained in child health and nutrition through US governmen
# of health facilities with improved capacity to manage acute under-nutrition
# of children under five reached by US government-supported nutrition programs
# of institutions with improved management information systems, as a result of USG
assistance
# of school buildings renovated or rehabilitated
# of students benefiting from procurement and distribution of text books and learning
materials
# of orphans, out-of-school youth and vulnerable members of the community being
provided with learning instruction
# of libraries built
# of science labs built
# of primary teachers (grades 1-3) trained as a result of USG assistance
# of adult learners enrolled in USG supported schools equivalent non-school based
settings
# of learners enrolled in USG-supported primary schools or equivalent non-school-based
settings
# of Volunteer host family members trained
# of beneficiaries trained
# of beneficiaries accessing reading materials through USG assistance
# of beneficiaries attending USG-sponsored events
# of books borrowed per cycle
# of outreach evenets held
# of adult learners enrolled in USG-supported schools or equivalent non-school-based
settings
# of community grants provided in support of Literacy in Uganda
# of teachers who have benefitted from SPA support
# of students who have benefitted from SPA support
# of host country individuals completing USG-funded exchange program conducted
through higher education institutions
# of host-country individuals receiving USG-funded scholarships to attend higher
education institutions
# of micro enterprises receiving business development services from USG assisted
sources
# of vulnerable households benefiting directly from USG interventions
# of vulnerable households benefiting directly from USG interventions
# of rural households benefiting directly from USG interventions

Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Female(s)
Male(s) 25
Facilities
Male(s) 5
Institutions
Buildings
Male(s) 25
Orphans, m
Libraries
Labs
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Books
Events
Male(s) 25
Grants
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Microenterprises
Households
Households
Households

# of municipal regulations and administrative procedures that have
been simplified as a result of USG assistance

Regulation

# of commerce laws and regulations simplified and implemented in
accordance with international standards as a result of USG assistance

Laws

Person hours of training completed in business enabling environment
supported by USG assistance

Hours, Mal

4.6.3

4.7.3
4.8.1

# of days of USG funded technical assistance in business enabling
environment provided to counterparts or stakeholders

Days, Male

# of institutions/organizations undergoing needs assessments and
identifying priority needs as a result of USG assistance
# of youth and adults trained
# of trained youth and adults who developed workforce skills

Institutions
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25

# of community members  involved with the planning, organization
and implementation of the project
# of public officials that participated in the project
# of public departments that participated in the project
# of counterparts participating in capacity building events
# of Counterparts benefitting from Volunteer training

Male(s) 25
Male(s) 25
Departments
Counterpar
Counterpar

# of youth microenterprises receiving business development services
from USG assisted sources

Microenterprises

# of hectares of natural resources showing improved biophysical
conditions
asUSG-funded
a result of USG
assistance
# of days of
technical
assistance in natural resources
management and/or biodiversity povided to counterparts or
stakeholders

Hectares
Days, Male

# of person hours of training in natural resources management and/or
biodiversity conservation supported by USG assistance
Hours, Mal
4.8.2

Quantity of greenhouse gas emissions, measured in metric tons CO2 equivalent,
reduced or sequestrated as a result of USG assistance in natural resources
management, agriculture, and/or biodiversity sectors
Person hours of graining completed in climate change supported by USG assistance
Amount of investment leveraged in US dollars, from private and public sources, for
climate change as a result of USG assistance
# of institutions with improved capacity to address climate change issues as a result of
USG assistance
# of stakeholders with increased capacity to adapt to the imacts of climate variability and
change as a result of USG assistance
# of days of USG funded technical assistance in climate change and/or biodiversity
conservation provided to counterparts or stakeholders.
# of laws, policies, strategies, plans, agreements or regulations addressing climate
change (mitigation or adapatation) and/or biodiversity conservation officially proposed,
adopted, or implemented as a result of USG assistance
# of stakeholders receiving trainings on climate change impacts, adaptation techniques,
innovative agricultural practices and other related topics

Metric tons CO2
Hours, Mal
USD
Institutions
Male(s), Im
Days, Male

Laws
Male(s) 25

# of homes that been converted to and indoor clean air environmental
setting as a result of USG assistance
Homes
# of family members that have benefited from an indoor clean air environment as a result
of USG assistance
# of families that have benefited from an indoor clean air environment as a result of USG
assistance
# of women that have received the direct benefit from an indoor clean air environment as
a result of USG assistance
# of communities that are now less exposed to green house gasses as a result of USG
assistance

Male(s) 25
Families
Female(s)
Communities

5.2.1
6.1.1

# of people receiving USG-supported training in environmental law, enforcement, public
participation and cleaner production policies, stragegies, skills and techniques

Male(s) 25

# of people receiving USG-supported training in environmental law, enforcement, public
participation and cleaner production policies, stragegies, skills and techniques
# of schools/communities with a disaster risk reduction plan
# of women benefitting/using
# of men benefitting/ using
# of children benefitting/ using
# of projects implemented
# of grants and size of grants to community organizations

Male(s) 25
Schools
Female(s)
Male(s) 25
Male(s) 14
Projects
Grants

Female(s) 14 and below
Communities

Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Populations
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s)
Female(s)
Female(s)
Female(s)
Radio spots
Female(s)

Male(s) 15
Male(s) 15
Male(s) 15
Male(s) 15

Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) 15-24
Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) 15-24

Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below

Female(s) 15-24

Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24

Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24

Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24

Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below

Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) 15-24
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24
Female(s) 5 and below
Institutions

Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Orphans, f Out of schoOut of schoVulnerable Vulneralbe community members, female

Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24
Female(s)
Female(s)
Female(s)
Female(s)
Female(s)

Male(s) 15
Male(s) 15
Male(s) 15
Male(s) 15
Male(s) 15

Female(s)
Female(s)
Female(s)
Female(s)
Female(s)

Male(s) 14
Male(s) 14
Male(s) 14
Male(s) 14
Male(s) 14

Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) 14 and below

Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24
Microenterprises
Households
Households
Households
Administrative procedures
Regulations
Hours, FemHours, Mal Hours, FemHours, Mal Hours, Female(s) 14 and below

Days, FemaDays, MaleDays, FemaDays, MaleDays, Female(s) 14 and below
Institutions
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24
Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24
Departments
CounterparCounterparCounterparts, Female(s) 15-24
CounterparCounterparCounterparts, Female(s) 15-24
Microenterprises

Days, FemaDays, MaleDays, FemaDays, MaleDays, Female(s) 14 and below
Hours, FemHours, Mal Hours, FemHours, Mal Hours, Female(s) 14 and below

Metric tons CO2
Hours, FemHours, Mal Hours, FemHours, Mal Hours, Female(s) 14 and below

Institutions
Female(s), Male(s), usFemale(s), using climate information in their decision making
Days, FemaDays, MaleDays, FemaDays, MaleDays, Female(s) 14 and below

Policies

Strategies Agreement Regulations

Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below

Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below

Female(s) Female(s) 14 and below
Communities

Female(s) Male(s) 15 Female(s) Male(s) 14 Female(s) 14 and below
Risk
Female(s) reduction
Male(s) 15 Female(s) 15-24
Communit
ies
plans
Female(s) 15-24
Male(s) 15-24
Female(s) 14 and below
$500 and b$500-$100 $1,000-$5, $5,000-$7, $7,000-$10,000

1.3.7
2.2.3
No Indicator
No Indicator
2.2.4
2.3.2
2.4.1
3.1.1
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
3.1.3

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
No Indicator

No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
3.1.6
No Indicator
No Indicator
3.1.7
3.1.8
3.1.9

# of women educated on the benefits of breast feeding
# of individuals (men, women) trained in child health and nutrition through US government-supported health area pr
# of health facilities with improved capacity to manage acute under-nutrition
# of children under five reached by US government-supported nutrition programs
3.2.1
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
3.2.2
No Indicator
No Indicator
3.3.2
3.3.3
4.2.1
4.2.2
No Indicator
4.3.1
4.3.2
4.5.1

4.5.2
No Indicator
4.6.1
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
4.6.2
4.6.3
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
4.7.3
No Indicator
4.8.1
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
4.8.2
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
5.2.1
No Indicator
5.2.2
6.1.1
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
No Indicator
6.6.6
9.9.9

-supported health area programs

2.2.3

Panama
# of youth trained with USG support
# of communities benefited with USG
assistance.

3.1.1

3.1.3

Benin

Mali

Eastern Caribbean

# of individuals reached through
community outreach that
promote HIV/AIDS prevention
through abstinence only

# of individuals reached
through community
outreach that promote
HIV/AIDS prevention
through abstinence only

Madagascar

Zambia

# of people reached with malaria
prevention or treatment messages

# of people reached with
IEC/BCC message on
# of people trained with
malaria treatment or
USG funds in malaria
prevention
treatment or prevention

# of people who slept
under ITN the previous
night
# of women who
received intermittent
preventive treatment
during antenatal care
(ANC) visits during their
last pregnancy

# of people reached
with malaria treatment
or prevention messages

# of targeted houses
adequately sprayed with
residual insecticide in the
last 12 months
# of individuals with
fever in the last two
weeks who received
antimalarial treatment
according to national
policy within one day
after onset of fever
# of entrepreneurs
trained to create
businesses in malaria
prevention goods or
services
# of teachers or other
formal educators trained
to incorporate malaria
prevention themes into
their lesson planning
3.1.6

Malawi

Senegal

Nicaragua

# of health facilities
rehabilitated

Liters of drinking water
disinfected with USGsupported point-of-use
treatment products

# of people reached by
community support
projects for improving
child health and nutrition

# of health facilities
rehabilitated
3.1.9

3.2.1

Malawi

Mozambique

# of people impacted by community
support projects for improving child
health and nutrition

# of persons reached through
mass media

Liberia

Malawi

Nepal

# of women educated on the benefits
# of individuals (men, women) trained
# of health facilities with improved ca
# of children under five reached by U
Jamaica

# of primary teachers
# of institutions with improved
(grades 1-3) trained as
management information systems, as # of school buildings renovated a result of USG
a result of USG assistance
or rehabilitated
assistance
# of students benefiting from
procurement and distribution of
text books and learning
materials

# of adult learners
enrolled in USG
supported schools
equivalent non-school
based settings

# of orphans, out-of-school
youth and vulnerable members
of the community being
provided with learning
instruction

# of learners enrolled in
USG-supported primary
schools or equivalent
non-school-based
settings

# of libraries built
# of science labs built
3.2.2

Liberia
# of host country individuals
completing USG-funded exchange
program conducted through higher
education institutions
# of host-country individuals receiving
USG-funded scholarships to attend
higher education institutions

4.2.2

Peru
# of micro enterprises receiving
business development services from
USG assisted sources

4.5.2

Uganda

Senegal

Jamaica

# of vulnerable households
# of vulnerable households benefiting benefiting directly from USG
directly from USG interventions
interventions
4.6.1

# of vulnerable
households benefiting
directly from USG
interventions

Mexico

# of municipal regulations
and administrative
procedures that have been
simplified as a result of USG
assistance
# of commerce laws and
regulations simplified and
implemented in accordance
with international standards
as a result of USG assistance
Person hours of training completed in
business enabling environment
supported by USG assistance
# of days of USG funded technical
assistance in business enabling
environment provided to counterparts
or stakeholders

4.6.3

Paraguay

Mongolia

# of institutions/organizations
undergoing needs
assessments and identifying
priority needs as a result of
# of youth and adults
USG assistance
trained
# of trained youth and
adults who developed
workforce skills

Jordan

# of beneficiaries
of SPA grants
# of counterparts
participating in
capacity building
events
# of Counterparts
benefitting from
Volunteer training

4.7.3

Eastern Caribbean
# of youth microenterprises receiving
business development services from
USG assisted sources

4.8.1

Mexico
# of hectares of natural resources
showing improved biophysical
conditions as a result of USG
assistance

# of days of USG-funded
technical assistance in natural
resources management
and/or biodiversity povided to
counterparts or stakeholders
# of person hours of training
in natural resources
management and/or
biodiversity conservation
supported by USG assistance
4.8.2

Mexico

Jamaica

Dominican
Republic

Quantity of greenhouse gas
emissions, measured in metric tons
CO2 equivalent, reduced or
sequestrated as a result of USG
assistance in natural resources
management, agriculture, and/or
biodiversity sectors

# of stakeholders receiving
trainings on climate change
impacts, adaptation techniques,
innovative agricultural practices
and other related topics

# of homes that been
converted to and indoor
clean air environmental
setting as a result of
USG assistance

# of people receiving USGsupported training in
environmental law,
enforcement, public
Person hours of graining completed participation and cleaner
in climate change supported by USG production policies, stragegies,
assistance
skills and techniques

Amount of investment leveraged in
US dollars, from private and public
sources, for climate change as a
result of USG assistance
# of institutions with improved
capacity to address climate change
issues as a result of USG assistance

# of stakeholders with increased
capacity to adapt to the imacts of
climate variability and change as a
result of USG assistance

# of family members
that have benefited from
an indoor clean air
environment as a result
of USG assistance

# of families that
have benefited
from an indoor
clean air
environment as a
result of USG
assistance

# of women that
have received the
direct benefit from
an indoor clean air
environment as a
result of USG
assistance
# of communities that
are now less exposed to
green house gasses as
a result of USG
assistance

# of days of USG funded technical
assistance in climate change and/or
biodiversity conservation provided to
counterparts or stakeholders.
# of laws, policies, strategies, plans,
agreements or regulations
addressing climate change
(mitigation or adapatation) and/or
biodiversity conservation officially
proposed, adopted, or implemented
as a result of USG assistance
5.2.1

Micronesia
# of schools/communities with a
disaster risk reduction plan

6.1.1

Colombia
# of women benefitting/using
# of men benefitting/ using
# of children benefitting/ using
# of projects implemented

Kyrgyz Republic
# of grants and size of grants to community organizations

Guinea

Burkina Faso

Togo

# of individuals trained to
promote HIV/AIDS prevention
through programs that promote
abstinence and/or being faithful

# of targeted
population reached
with individual and/or
small group level HIV
# of targeted population reached prevention
with individual and/or small group interventions that are
level HIV prevention interventions based on evidence
that are based on evidence
and/or meet standards
and/or meet standards required
required

# of individuals reached through
community outreach that
promote HIV/AIDS prevention
through abstinence and/or being
faithful
# of individuals reached through
community outreach that
promotes HIV/AIDS prevention
through other behavior change
beyond abstinence and/or being
faithful

# of individuals trained to
promote HIV/AIDS prevention
through other behavior change
beyond abstinence and/or being
faithful
Tanzania

Mozambique

Uganda

# of people trained with USG
funds in malaria treatment or
prevention

# of Peace Corps
Volunteers (PCVs) and
their counterparts who
have received malaria
awareness training,
and are able to
mention at least two
# of community leaders/members methods of malaria
trained
control.

# of radio spots
produced/transmitted

Tanzania

Madagascar

# of people reached by
community support projects for
improving child health and
nutrition

# of people reached by
community support for projects
for improving child health and
nutrition

# of small scale
community-level
malaria projects
supported through
PCVs and PCRVs that
are directly
implementing at least
two methods of
malaria control.

# of people in target areas with
access to improved sanitation
facilities as a result of USG
assistance

ducated on the benefits of breast feeding
ls (men, women) trained in child health and nutrition through US government-supported health area programs
cilities with improved capacity to manage acute under-nutrition
under five reached by US government-supported nutrition programs
El Salvador

Nicaragua

Kyrgyz Republic

# of learners enrolled in USGsupported primary schools or
equivalent non-school-based
settings

# of learners enrolled in USGsupported primary schools or
equivalent non-school-based
settings

# of Volunteer host
family members
trained

Zambia

Ethiopia

# of rural households benefiting
directly from USG interventions

# of vulnerable households
benefiting directly from USG
interventions

Philippines

Guatemala

# of people receiving USGsupported training in
environmental law, enforcement,
public participation and cleaner
production policies, stragegies,
skills and techniques

# of stakeholders with increased
capacity to adapt to the imacts of
climate variability and change as
a result of USG assistance

area programs

Rwanda

Uganda
# of
community
# of adult learners
grants
enrolled in USGprovided in
supported schools or support of
equivalent non-school- Literacy in
# of beneficiaries trained based settings
Uganda
# of beneficiaries
accessing reading
materials through USG
assistance

# of beneficiaries
attending USGsponsored events
# of books borrowed per
cycle
# of outreach evenets
held

Dominican Republic

# of teachers
who have
benefitted
from SPA
support
# of students
who have
benefitted
from SPA
support

Zambia
# of learners enrolled in
USG-supported primary
schools or equivalent
non-school-based
settings

Country
Albania
Armenia
Armenia
Armenia
Azerbaijan
Benin
Benin
Benin
Benin
Benin
Benin
Burkina Faso
Burkina Faso
Burkina Faso
Burkina Faso
Cambodia
Cambodia
Cambodia
Cambodia
Cameroon
Cape Verde
Colombia
Colombia
Costa Rica
Dominican Republic
Dominican Republic
Dominican Republic
Dominican Republic
Dominican Republic
Eastern Caribbean
Eastern Caribbean
Eastern Caribbean
Eastern Caribbean
Eastern Caribbean
Ecuador
El Salvador
El Salvador
El Salvador
El Salvador
Ethiopia
Fiji
Georgia
Ghana
Ghana
Ghana
Ghana
Ghana
Ghana
Ghana
Guatemala
Guatemala
Guatemala

Program Elements
2.4.1, Civic Participation
2.4.1, Civic Participation
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.3.3, Social Assistance
2.4.1, Civic Participation
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.3, Malaria
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health
3.2.1, Basic Education
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.7.3, Strengthen Microenterprise Productivity
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.3.2, Social Services
6.1.1, Cross Cutting
2.2.3, Local Government and Decentralization
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.6.2, Private Sector Capacity
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity
4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
4.7.3, Strengthen Microenterprise Productivity
4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.6.3, Workforce Development
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity
2.2.3, Local Government and Decentralization
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
2.4.1, Civic Participation
3.1.3, Malaria
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.1.9, Nutrition
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
4.6.3, Workforce Development
2.2.3, Local Government and Decentralization
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity

Guatemala
Guinea
Guinea
Guinea
Guinea
Guinea
Guinea
Guinea
Guyana
Guyana
Jamaica
Jamaica
Jamaica
Jamaica
Jamaica
Jamaica
Jamaica
Jamaica
Jordan
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyz Republic
Kyrgyz Republic
Kyrgyz Republic
Kyrgyz Republic
Kyrgyz Republic
Kyrgyz Republic
Kyrgyz Republic
Kyrgyz Republic
Kyrgyz Republic
Kyrgyz Republic
Liberia
Liberia
Liberia
Liberia
Macedonia
Madagascar
Madagascar
Malawi
Malawi
Malawi
Malawi
Malawi
Malawi
Malawi
Mali

4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health
4.7.3, Strengthen Microenterprise Productivity
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
3.2.1, Basic Education
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.6.3, Workforce Development
1.3.7, Law Enforcement Restructuring, Reform and Operations
2.4.1, Civic Participation
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.2.1, Trade and Investment Enabling Environment
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity
4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
4.6.3, Workforce Development
2.4.1, Civic Participation
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
4.7.3, Strengthen Microenterprise Productivity
4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
2.4.1, Civic Participation
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
4.7.3, Strengthen Microenterprise Productivity
4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
6.1.1, Cross Cutting
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.2.1, Basic Education
3.2.2, Higher Education
2.4.1, Civic Participation
3.1.3, Malaria
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.9, Nutrition
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
4.7.3, Strengthen Microenterprise Productivity
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity
2.2.3, Local Government and Decentralization

Mali
Mali
Mali
Mali
Mali
Mali
Mali
Mali
Mali
Mali
Mexico
Mexico
Mexico
Micronesia
Moldova
Moldova
Mongolia
Morocco
Morocco
Morocco
Mozambique
Mozambique
Nepal
Nepal
Nepal
Nicaragua
Nicaragua
Nicaragua
Nicaragua
Nicaragua
Nicaragua
Nicaragua
Nicaragua
Panama
Panama
Paraguay
Paraguay
Peru
Peru
Peru
Peru
Peru
Philippines
Philippines
Philippines
Philippines
Romania
Romania
Rwanda
Rwanda
Senegal
Senegal
Senegal

3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.3, Malaria
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.3.1, Financial Sector Enabling Environment
4.3.2, Financial Sector Capacity
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity
4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
4.6.1, Business Enabling Environment
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity
4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
5.2.1, Capacity Building, Preparedness and Planning
2.4.1, Civic Participation
4.7.3, Strengthen Microenterprise Productivity
4.6.3, Workforce Development
2.4.1, Civic Participation
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity
3.1.3, Malaria
3.1.9, Nutrition
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.1.9, Nutrition
4.5.1, Agriculture Enabling Environment
2.2.3, Local Government and Decentralization
2.4.1, Civic Participation
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
5.2.2, Disaster Readiness and Mitigation
2.2.3, Local Government and Decentralization
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity
2.2.4, Anti-Corruption Reforms
4.6.3, Workforce Development
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.2.2, Trade and Investment Capacity
4.6.2, Private Sector Capacity
4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity
4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
2.4.1, Civic Participation
4.6.3, Workforce Development
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
3.1.3, Malaria
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health

Senegal
Senegal
Senegal
Sierra Leone
Sierra Leone
Sierra Leone
Sierra Leone
Tanzania
Tanzania
Tanzania
Tanzania
Tanzania
The Gambia
The Gambia
The Gambia
Togo
Togo
Togo
Togo
Turkmenistan
Turkmenistan
Turkmenistan
Turkmenistan
Turkmenistan
Turkmenistan
Turkmenistan
Turkmenistan
Turkmenistan
Uganda
Uganda
Uganda
Uganda
Uganda
Ukraine
Vanuatu
Zambia
Zambia
Zambia
Zambia
Zambia
Zambia

3.2.1, Basic Education
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity
2.3.2, Elections and Political Processes
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.1.3, Malaria
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
2.4.1, Civic Participation
3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
4.7.3, Strengthen Microenterprise Productivity
4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
3.1.3, Malaria
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
2.4.1, Civic Participation
4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
3.1.3, Malaria
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health
3.1.9, Nutrition
3.2.1, Basic Education
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity

This sheet is linked to the data validation/dropdown for
the "Program Element" box on the For SPA Funded
Activities page. It controls which program elements
show up when you choose a SPA country on the
Classification and Budget page. If a country has
funding in a new program element, simply add another
entry for that country (both the country name and the
name of the new program element) to columns A and
B.

Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report

Main Menu
Instructions

VAST Indicators

Project Classification
Project Report Narrative

HIV Prevention

Monitoring & Evaluation

General Population, Excluding People Living with HIV (PLHIV), Reached with HIV Prevention Interventions (HE-140-PEPFAR)
Male(s)

Project
Project Log
Log
Ages (in years)

Tell Your Story
Grant
Grant Type
Type Selection
Selection
PCPP
PCPP

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

Female(s)
18-24

25 and
above

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

18-24

25 and
above

18-24

25 and
above

# of general population (NOT including Most At
Risk Populations/ Key Populations and People
Living with HIV) reached with individual and/or
small group level HIV prevention interventions
that are based on evidence and/or meet the
minimum standards required (P8.1.D & P8.2.D)

SPA
SPA
VAST
VAST
ECPA
ECPA

Can Identify Ways of Preventing HIV and can Reject Major Misconceptions (HE-144-PEPFAR)
Male(s)

Male(s)

Female(s)

Female(s)

15-17

18-24

15-17

18-24

FTF
FTF
Ages (in years)

GEF
Signature
Signature Forms
Forms
Completion
Completion Signatures
Signatures
Press
Press Authorization
Authorization

# of young women and men aged 15 -24 who
both correctly identify ways of preventing
sexual transmission of HIV and who reject
major misconceptions about HIV transmission
(P8.8.N)

Addressing Stigma Related to HIV (HE-182)

End

Male(s)
9 and
Ages (in years)
below

10-14

15-17

Female(s)
18-24

25 and
above

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

# of the general population with accepting
attitudes toward people living with HIV
(P8.22.N)

Key Populations (Commercial Sex Workers, Injecting Drug Users, Men who have Sex with Men, etc.) Reached with HIV Interventions (HE-142-PEPFAR)
Commercial Sex Workers (SW)
Ages (in years)
# of key populations reached with individual
and/or small group level HIV interventions
that are based on evidence and/or meet the
minimum standards required (P8.3.D)

Male(s)
17 and
below

18 and
above

Female(s)
17 and
below

Men Who Have Sex With
Men (MSM)

Injecting Drug Users (IDU)
Male(s)

18 and
above

17 and
below

18 and
above

Female(s)
17 and
below

18 and
above

Male(s)
17 and
below

People Living with HIV (PLHIV) Provided with a Minimum Package of "Prevention With PLHIV" as Defined by PEPFAR (HE-143-PEPFAR)
PC-2106

18 and
above

Other Vulnerable Populations
Male(s)
17 and
below

18 and
above

Female(s)
17 and
below

18 and
above

Male(s)
9 and
Ages (in years)
below

10-14

15-17

Female(s)
18-24

25 and
above

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

25 and
above

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

18-24

25 and
above

18-24

25 and
above

18-24

25 and
above

18-24

25 and
above

18-24

25 and
above

# of PLHIV reached with a minimum package
of "Prevention with PLHIV (PwP)" since the
last reporting period (P7.1.D)

Educated on the Importance of Voluntary Testing and Counseling for HIV (HE-147)
Male(s)
Ages (in years)

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

Female(s)
18-24

# of target population reached with individual
or small group level education on the
importance of voluntary testing and
counseling for HIV

Indivduals Reached with an HIV Prevention Message Promoting Male Circumcision (HE-151)
Male(s)
Ages (in years)

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

Female(s)
18-24

25 and
above

# of target population reached with individual
or small group messaging promoting male
circumcision as a way to reduce the risk of
HIV infection since the last reporting period

Educated on the Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV (HE-155)
Female(s)
Ages (in years)

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

25 and
above

18-24

# of women reached with individual or small
group level education on the prevention of
mother to child transmission of HIV during
pregnancy and breastfeeding

HIV Care Support and Treatment &
OVC
Umbrella- Provided with a Minimum of One Care Service (HE-162-PEPFAR)
Male(s)
Ages (in years)

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

Female(s)
18-24

25 and
above

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

18-24

25 and
above

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

# of eligible adults and children provided with
a minimum of one care service (psychological,
spiritual, preventive, food support, shelter,
protection, access to health care, education,
economic strengthening) (C1.1.D)

Educated on Best Practices in Care and Treatment (HE-171)
Male(s)
Ages (in years)

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

Female(s)

# of PLHIV/ caregivers educated on best
practices in care and treatment

PC-2106

1 Care Service- Economic Strengthening (HE-164-PEPFAR)
Male(s)
Ages (in years)

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

Female(s)
18-24

25 and
above

9 and
below

10-14

18-24

25 and
above

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

18-24

25 and
above

# of elegible individuals provided with
economic strengthening services (C5.7.D)

1 Care Service- Food and/or other Nutritional Support (HE-165-PEPFAR)
Male(s)
Ages (in years)

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

Female(s) NOT pregnant

# of eligible individuals who received food
and/or nutritional services (C5.1.D)

Health System Strengthening
New Care Workers (HCW) and Para-social Workers Completing a Pre-Service Training Program (HE-180-PEPFAR)
Male(s)
15-17

18-24

Female(s)
25 and
above

15-17

18-24

25 and
above

# of community health care and para-social
workers who successfully completed a preservice training (PST) program (H2.2.D)

Health Care Workers (HCW) Completing an In-Service Training Program (HE-181-PEPFAR)
Male(s)
15-17

18-24

Female(s)
25 and
above

15-17

18-24

Number of health care workers who
successfully completed an in-service training
program.(H2.3.D)

PC-2106

25 and
above

15-17

18-24

Female(s) Pregnant
25 and
above

9 and
below

10-14

15-17

18-24

25 and
above

Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report
Outputs and Outcomes for ECPA Project

Directions

All projects funded through ECPA must report on the indicators that the Volunteer and community selected in the small grants application.

Micro-financing and ongoing support to small businesses and consumers
Outputs
Small business entrepreneurs trained in developing business plans and financing strategies for renewable energy businesses
Small businesses received assistance to access bank loans or private equity

Outcomes
Entrepreneurs with improved business operations as a result of assistance [including starting or expanding their renewable energy small
businesses]
Entrepreneurs and consumers successfully accessed bank loans or private equity as a result of assistance

Awareness and knowledge
Municipal, school, and communities’ awareness and knowledge of climate change, natural resources management, energy efficiency and renewable energy
technologies, as well as mitigation and adaptation to climate change.
Outputs
Community members trained in renewable energy technologies, energy efficiency principles and practices businesses

PC-2106

Community members trained in climate change mitigation and adaptation, including natural resources reforestation
Teachers, outreach workers, and technicians trained in environmental education, nursery management and/or reforestation
Outcomes
Community members demonstrate an increased knowledge of renewable energy technologies and/or energy efficiency principles.
Community members demonstrate an increased knowledge of climate change, disaster preparedness, natural resources management and/or
biodiversity conservation, including reforestation

Teachers, municipal workers, local NGOs, or other outreach workers use new or revised environmental instructional materials and/or lesson
plans.resources management and/or biodiversity conservation, including reforestation
Homes, businesses, or public locations adopt new energy efficiency practices as a result of assistance

Climate Change
If applicable, please include information on the following indicators
Amount of investment leveraged in U.S. dollars, from private and public sources, for climate change as a result of collaboration

# of institutions with improved capacity to address climate change issues as a result of collaboration

# of laws, policies, strategies, plans, agreements, or regulations addressing climate change and vulnerability to climate change impacts formally
proposed, adopted, or implemented as a result of consultation

Planning and implementation of projects
Planning and implementation of projects that mitigate or adapt to the effects of climate change: the technologies may include solar or fuel efficient stoves or ovens,
biodigesters, solar water heating, photovoltaics, wind or mini hydroelectric power generation, or use of alternative fuels.
Outputs
entrepreneurs and community members supported with project planning, design, management and financing
Outcomes
PC-2106

Renewable electrical energy (new or rehabilitated):

# of installations
complete

Community
members who use

kWhr/yr
at homes
in businesses
in public locations

PC-2106

Improved cook stoves or ovens

Number of households or institutions with
Number of cookstoves (new or rehabilitated) purchased or constructed individuals correctly using and maintaining
for households or institutions (e.g. health clinics, schools) with
improved stoves or ovens, as defined by a
assistance of Volunteers or partners
checklist, for at least 50 percent of cooking needs
at homes
in businesses
in public locations
Number of individuals living in households benefitting from new or rehabilitated cookstoves or ovens
Estimated average monthly savings in:
(note: these cells may be left blank

kg of fuel wood (household)
Female(s) 25 Female(s) Male(s) 25
and above
and above
14-24

in project abstract)

Male(s) 14- Female(s) Male(s) 14
14 and
and below
24
below

hours gathering fuel

Natural resources management / climate change adaptation
Hectares
Forest production area

Number of hectares under improved natural resource management as a result of assistance

Watershed area
Agroforestry and tree crop system area
Biodigestors
Homes

Number of biodigestors (new or rehabilitated) purchased or constructed for households or institutions (e.g. health
clinics, schools) with assistance of Volunteers/partners

Public Institutions
Photovolaics
Homes

Number of photovoltaics purchased or constructed for households or institutions (e.g. health clinics, schools) with
assistance of Volunteers/partners
PC-2106

Number of photovoltaics purchased or constructed for households or institutions (e.g. health clinics, schools) with
assistance of Volunteers/partners
Public Institutions
Businesses
Available Cookstoves - Number of cookstoves (new or rehabilitated) purchased or constructed for households or institutions (e.g. health
clinics, schools) with assistance of Volunteers or partners
Maintained Cookstoves - Number of households with individuals correctly using and maintaining improved stoves or ovens, as defined by a
checklist, for at least 50 percent of cooking needs
Cookstove Benefits - Number of individuals living in households benefitting from new or rehabilitated cookstoves or ovens

PC-2106

WAFSP Indicators

Peace Corps Small Grant Application
Feed the Future Indicator Reporting
All projects funded through Feed the Future must report on the indicators that the Volunteer and

Directions community selected in the small grants application.

FTF Indicators

All General FTF applicants must complete this section.

WAFSP Indicators

WAFSP applicants must complete this section.

PC-2106

Peace Corps Small Grant Application
Feed the Future Indicators and Environmental Review Forms
Project Title

Food Security Reporting Workaround (FSRW)

Dates
Project
Description

1 October 2012 to 30 September 2013
This Food Security framework is designed to allow Volunteers to report at the level of disaggregation necessary for the Food Security initiative during FY
2013. (Beginning in FY 2014, VRT 3.0 will support reporting on these indicators in a more natural manner.) All Volunteers who conduct food security
activities should report against one or more objectives from this framework (in addition to any applicable objectives from their project frameworks) to
allow both posts and Peace Corps as a whole to understand and report on our food security efforts.

Sector
Goal 1

Improved Agriculture Productivity
Increase agriculture sector productivity, food security training, and application of new technologies or management practices
Obj. 1.1

Productivity - New Tech or Mgmt Prac
Number of farmers and others who have applied new technologies or management practices as a result of PC
assistance

Obj. 1.2

1.1.a

Number of MALE farmers and others for the FIRST TIME applying new technologies or management
practices as a result of PC assistance (NEW) (4.5.2-5)

1.1.b

Number of FEMALE farmers and others for the FIRST TIME applying new technologies or
management practices as a result of PC assistance (NEW) (4.5.2-5)

1.1.c

Number of MALE farmers and others CONTINUING to apply new technologies or management
practices as a result of PC assistance (CONTINUING) (4.5.2-5)

1.1.d

Number of FEMALE farmers and others CONTINUING to apply new technologies or management
practices as a result of PC assistance (CONTINUING) (4.5.2-5)

Productivity - Ag prod or food sec trng
Number of individuals who have received PC supported short-term agricultural sector productivity or food security
training
Number of MALE PRODUCERS who have received PC supported short-term agricultural sector
productivity or food security training (4.5.2-7) (PRODUCERS = Farmers, fishers, pastoralists,
1.2.a
ranchers, and other primary sector producers)

Goal 2

1.2.b

Number of FEMALE PRODUCERS who have received PC supported short-term agricultural sector
productivity or food security training (4.5.2-7) (PRODUCERS = Farmers, fishers, pastoralists,
ranchers, and other primary sector producers)

1.2.c

Number of MALE PEOPLE IN GOVERNMENT who have received PC supported short-term
agricultural sector productivity or food security training (4.5.2-7) (PEOPLE IN GOVERNMENT = policy
makers, extension workers)

1.2.d

Number of FEMALE PEOPLE IN GOVERNMENT who have received PC supported short-term
agricultural sector productivity or food security training (4.5.2-7) (PEOPLE IN GOVERNMENT = policy
makers, extension workers)

1.2.e

Number of MALE PRIVATE SECTOR who have received PC supported short-term agricultural sector
productivity or food security training (4.5.2-7) (PRIVATE SECTOR = processors, service providers,
manufacturers)

1.2.f

Number of FEMALE PRIVATE SECTOR who have received PC supported short-term agricultural
sector productivity or food security training (4.5.2-7) (PRIVATE SECTOR = processors, service
providers, manufacturers)

Increased income and employmnt opportnty
Increase income and employment opportunities through access to bank loans and other assistance to food security organizations
Obj. 2.1

Income/Employ - MICRO Enterp Bank Loans
Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises receiving PC assistance to access bank loans

Obj. 2.2

2.1.a

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (MALE owned) receiving PC assistance to access bank
loans (4.5.2-30)

2.1.b

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (FEMALE owned) receiving PC assistance to access
bank loans (4.5.2-30)

2.1.c

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (JOINT owned) receiving PC assistance to access bank
loans (4.5.2-30)

Income/Employ - SMALL Enterp Bank Loans
Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises receiving PC assistance to access bank loans

PC-2106

Obj. 2.3

2.2.a

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (MALE owned) receiving PC assistance to access bank
loans (4.5.2-30)

2.2.b

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (FEMALE owned) receiving PC assistance to access
bank loans (4.5.2-30)

2.2.c

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (JOINT owned) receiving PC assistance to access bank
loans (4.5.2-30)

Income/Employ - MEDIUM Enterp Bank Loans
Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises receiving PC assistance to access bank loans

Obj. 2.4

2.3.a

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (MALE owned) receiving PC
assistance to access bank loans (4.5.2-30)

2.3.b

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (FEMALE owned) receiving PC
assistance to access bank loans (4.5.2-30)

2.3.c

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (JOINT owned) receiving PC
assistance to access bank loans (4.5.2-30)

Income/Employ - PRIVATE ENTERPRIS Assist
Number of food security PRIVATE ENTERPRISES (FOR PROFIT) receiving PC assistance

Obj. 2.5

2.4.a

Number of food security PRIVATE ENTERPRISES (FOR PROFIT) receiving FIRST TIME PC
assistance this year (NEW) (4.5.2-11)

2.4.b

Number of food security PRIVATE ENTERPRISES (FOR PROFIT) receiving PC assistance AGAIN
this year (CONTINUING) (4.5.2-11)

Income/Employ - PRODUCER ORGS Assist
Number of food security PRODUCERS ORGANIZATIONS receiving PC assistance

Obj. 2.6

2.5.a

Number of food security PRODUCER ORGANIZATIONS receiving FIRST TIME PC assistance this
year (NEW) (4.5.2-11)

2.5.b

Number of food security PRODUCER ORGANIZATIONS receiving PC assistance AGAIN this year
(CONTINUING) (4.5.2-11)

Income/Employ - WATER USERS ASSOC Assist
Number of food security WATER USERS ASSOCIATIONS receiving PC assistance

Obj. 2.7

2.6.a

Number of food security WATER USERS ASSOCIATIONS receiving FIRST TIME PC assistance this
year (NEW) (4.5.2-11)

2.6.b

Number of food security WATER USERS ASSOCIATIONS receiving PC assistance AGAIN this year
(CONTINUING) (4.5.2-11)

Income/Employ - WOMEN'S GROUPS Assist
Number of food security WOMEN'S GROUPS receiving PC assistance

Obj. 2.8

2.7.a

Number of food security WOMEN'S GROUPS receiving FIRST TIME PC assistance this year (NEW)
(4.5.2-11)

2.7.b

Number of food security WOMEN'S GROUPS receiving PC assistance AGAIN this year
(CONTINUING) (4.5.2-11)

Income/Employ - TRADE & BUS ASSOC Assist
Number of food security TRADE AND BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS receiving PC assistance

Obj. 2.9

2.8.a

Number of food security TRADE & BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS receiving FIRST TIME PC assistance
this year (NEW) (4.5.2-11)

2.8.b

Number of food security TRADE & BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS receiving PC assistance AGAIN this
year (CONTINUING) (4.5.2-11)

Income/Employ - COMM BASED ORGS Assist
Number of food security COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATIONS (CBOs) receiving PC assistance

Goal 3

2.9.a

Number of food security COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATIONS (CBOs) receiving FIRST TIME PC
assistance this year (NEW) (4.5.2-11)

2.9.b

Number of food security COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATIONS (CBOs) receiving PC assistance
AGAIN this year (CONTINUING) (4.5.2-11)

Improved Nutrition Behavior
Improve nutrition behavior of children through training adults in child health and nutrition and through children's nutrition programs
Obj. 3.1

Nutrition - TRNG in Child HE and Nutrit.
Number of people trained in child health and nutrition through PC-supported health area programs

Obj. 3.2

3.1.a

Number of MALE(S) trained in child health and nutrition through PC-supported health area programs
(3.1.9-1)

3.1.b

Number of FEMALE(S) trained in child health and nutrition through PC-supported health area
programs (3.1.9-1)

Nutrition - Child 5 and under Nutrition Programs
Number of children 5 and under reached by PC-supported nutrition programs

PC-2106

Goal 4

3.2.a

Number of MALE(S) 5 and under reached by PC-supported nutrition programs (3.1.9-11)

3.2.b

Number of FEMALE(S) 5 and under reached by PC-supported nutrition programs (3.1.9-11)

YRLY- Increased Investment in ag & nutr.
Year over year, Increase business development services provided to and profitability of agricultural and food-security-related firms and CSOs
Obj. 4.1

YRLY-Invstmnt - Profitable ag / food sec
Number of firms (excluding farms) or Civil Society Organizations engaged in agricultural and food-security-related
manufacturing and services now operating more profitably (at or above cost) because of PC assistance

Obj. 4.2

4.1.a

Number of more profitable FIRMS engaged in agricultural and food-security-related manufacturing
and services now operating more profitably (at or above cost) because of PC assistance (4.5.2-43)

4.1.b

Number of more profitable CSOs engaged in agricultural and food-security-related manufacturing and
services now operating more profitably (at or above cost) because of PC assistance (4.5.2-43)

YRLY-Invstmnt - MICRO Bus. Dev. Services
Number of Micro (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises receiving business development services from PC assisted sources

Obj. 4.3

4.2.a

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (AGRICULTURAL PRODUCER - MALE) receiving
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.b

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (AGRICULTURAL PRODUCER - FEMALE) receiving
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.c

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (AGRICULTURAL PRODUCER - JOINT) receiving
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.d

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (INPUT SUPPLIER - MALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.e

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (INPUT SUPPLIER - FEMALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.f

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (INPUT SUPPLIER - JOINT) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.g

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (TRADER - MALE) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.h

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (TRADER - FEMALE) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.i

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (TRADER - JOINT) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.j

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (OUTPUT PROCESSORS - MALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.k

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (OUTPUT PROCESSORS - FEMALE) receiving
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.l

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (OUTPUT PROCESSORS - JOINT) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.m

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (NON-AGRICULTURE - MALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.n

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (NON-AGRICULTURE - FEMALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.o

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (NON-AGRICULTURE - JOINT) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.p

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (OTHER - MALE) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.q

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (OTHER - FEMALE) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.2.r

Number of MICRO (1 to 5 FTEs) Enterprises (OTHER - JOINT) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

YRLY-Invstmnt - SMALL Bus. Dev. Services
Number of Small (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises receiving business development services from PC assisted sources
4.3.a

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (AGRICULTURAL PRODUCER - MALE) receiving
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.b

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (AGRICULTURAL PRODUCER - FEMALE) receiving
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.c

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (AGRICULTURAL PRODUCER - JOINT) receiving
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.d

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (INPUT SUPPLIER - MALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

PC-2106

Obj. 4.4

4.3.e

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (INPUT SUPPLIER - FEMALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.f

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (INPUT SUPPLIER - JOINT) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.g

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (TRADER - MALE) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.h

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (TRADER - FEMALE) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.i

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (TRADER - JOINT) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.j

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (OUTPUT PROCESSORS - MALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.k

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (OUTPUT PROCESSORS - FEMALE) receiving
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.l

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (OUTPUT PROCESSORS - JOINT) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.m

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (NON-AGRICULTURE - MALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.n

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (NON-AGRICULTURE - FEMALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.o

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (NON-AGRICULTURE - JOINT) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.p

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (OTHER - MALE) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.q

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (OTHER - FEMALE) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.3.r

Number of SMALL (6 to 50 FTEs) Enterprises (OTHER - JOINT) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

YRLY-Invstmnt - MEDIUM Bus. Dev. Service
Number of Medium (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises receiving business development services from PC assisted
sources
Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (AGRICULTURAL PRODUCER - MALE) receiving
4.4.a
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)
4.4.b

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (AGRICULTURAL PRODUCER - FEMALE)
receiving business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.c

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (AGRICULTURAL PRODUCER - JOINT) receiving
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.d

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (INPUT SUPPLIER - MALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.e

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (INPUT SUPPLIER - FEMALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.f

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (INPUT SUPPLIER - JOINT) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.g

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (TRADER - MALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.h

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (TRADER - FEMALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.i

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (TRADER - JOINT) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.j

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (OUTPUT PROCESSORS - MALE) receiving
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.k

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (OUTPUT PROCESSORS - FEMALE) receiving
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.l

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (OUTPUT PROCESSORS - JOINT) receiving
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.m

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (NON-AGRICULTURE - MALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.n

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (NON-AGRICULTURE - FEMALE) receiving
business development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.o

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (NON-AGRICULTURE - JOINT) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

PC-2106

4.4.p

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (OTHER - MALE) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.q

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (OTHER - FEMALE) receiving business
development services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

4.4.r

Number of MEDIUM (51 to 100 FTEs) Enterprises (OTHER - JOINT) receiving business development
services from PC assisted sources (4.5.2-37)

PC-2106

FTF Menu

WAFSP Indicators

Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report
WAFSP Indicator Results
Directions

Goal of the
WAFSP

Please fill in information (numbers) for the indicators relevant to the project in the blue columns on the right. These are the actual indicator results accomplished
through the implementation of the project.

Key Objectives of
the WAFSP

Ind. codes

4.5.2-5

1. Increase
availability of
healthy foods,
especially for
women and children

Indicator Title

Disaggregation of the indicator

New
Number of farmers and others who New or
Continuing Continuing
have applied new technologies or
management practices as a result of
Male(s)
Sex
USG assistance
Female(s)
Producers

4.5.2-7

Number of individuals who have
received USG supported short-term
agricultural sector productivity or
food security training

Type of
individual

Sex

People in Government
People in Private Sector
Firms
People in Civil Society

Value of the
indicator
(number)

Indicator narrative
(write one paragraph on the story/activities
behind the figures by responding to the
questions in brackets)
(What types of technologies/management
practices were applied? How many people
applied what?)

(What were the topics of the trainings? How
many individuals were trained per topic?)

Male(s)
Female(s)
Private Enterprises

INCREASE FOOD SECURITY IN THE COMMUNITIES WHERE PCVs WORK IN WEST AFRICA

Producer Organizations

4.5.2-11

Number of food security private
Type of
enterprises (for profit), producers
organizatio
organizations, water users
n
associations, women's groups, trade
and business associations, and
community-based organizations
(CBOs) receiving USG assistance

(What types of assistance were received per
type of organization? Provide names and
location of organizations assisted)

Water Users
Associations
Women's Groups
Trade & Business
Assoc.
CBOs

New
New or
Continuing Continuing

2. Increase
accessibility of
healthy foods by
decreasing poverty
and increasing
incomes

4.5.2-30

Number of MSMEs, including
farmers, receiving USG assistance
to access loans

Size of
MSME
Sex of
owner

PC-2106

Micro Enterprise
Small Enterprise
Medium Enterprise
Male owner
Female owner
Joint ownership

(What types of assistance were received?
What types of loans were accessed (cash/inkind, formal/informal)?)

INCREASE FOOD SECURITY IN THE COMMUNITIES WHER

accessibility of
healthy foods by
decreasing poverty
and increasing
incomes
Size of
MSME

Micro Enterprise
Small Enterprise

(What types of business development services
were received per type of MSME? Provide
names of MSMEs assisted)

Medium Enterprise
Agricultural Producer
4.5.2-37

Number of MSMEs, including
farmers, receiving business
development services from USG
assisted sources

Input Supplier
Type of
MSME

Trader
Output Processors
Non-Agriculture
Other

Sex of
owner

3. Improve

Male owner
Female owner
Joint ownership

4.5.2-43

Number of firms (excluding farms) or
# of Firms
CSOs engaged in agricultural and
food-security-related manufacturing
and services now operating more
profitably (at or above cost) because # of Civil Society Organizations
(CBOs)
of USG assistance

3.1.9-1

Number of people trained in child
health and nutrition through USGsupported health area programs

Male(s)

(What were the topics of the trainings? How
many individuals were trained per topic?)

Female(s)

utilization of
available food stuffs
to improve nutritional
Number of people trained in
status of women and
maternal health and nutrition
Custom indicat.
children
through USG-supported health area

Male(s)

(What were the topics of the trainings? How
many individuals were trained per topic?)

Female(s)

programs

3.1.9-15

(Describe assistance provided, and how
profitability was calculated)

(Briefly describe the nutrition program)

Number of children 5 and under
reached by USG-supported nutrition
programs

Male(s)
Female(s)

PC-2106

Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report
Signature Forms
Once you have completed all other sections of this application, please print out the following pages,

Directions obtain the required signatures, and return the hard copies to post.

1. Completion Signatures

Must be printed for all projects.

3. Press Authorization

If you already filled this out and signed it when you turned in
your proposal, you will not need to submit this form.

PC-2106

Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report
Completion Signatures
By signing below, I verify that all funds associated with this project have been accounted for through receipts (duly submitted
and verified) and a final budget and that any funds that have not been expended have been given to the director of
management and operations to be returned to the Peace Corps. Any funds released to me that cannot be accounted for, or
are spent on non-approved costs, may be deducted from my readjustment allowance as a debt owed to the Peace Corps
(Pursuant to MS 223: 6.4).

Peace Corps Volunteer (print)

Peace Corps Volunteer Signature

Date

By signing below, I certify that I have reviewed this final report and that the Peace Corps Small Grants project met its
intended Goals and Objectives.

Peace Corps Small Grants Coordinator
(print)

Peace Corps Small Grants Coordinator
Signature

Date

By signing below, I certify that I have reviewed this final report and that all receipts are present and fiscal accounting is
accurate.

Peace Corps Director of Management
Operations (print)

Peace Corps Director of Management
Operations Signature

Date

By signing below I certify that I have reviewed and approved this Completion Report for submission.

Country Director (print)

Country Director Signature

PC-2106

Date

Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report
Press Authorization Form
Please fill out the Press Authorization form (if you did not turned in with the application) so PC/headquarters
staff may publicize your project. For PCPP, this will also allow staff to upload any of your submitted photographs
to your project page on the Peace Corps Website (www.peacecorps.gov/donate). PC/headquarters staff may
also contact you to be featured in articles about your project and PC experiences.

Project Photo Details: For those submitting a PCPP project, PC/headquarters staff can upload
Volunteer/Community photos with each project summary on the donation website. Each project may have one
to three photographs associated with the summary. Pictures of community members, the site of the project,
and “before” pictures are generally the most compelling for donors. Please use at least the standard quality of
picture–no less than 72 pixels/inch. (PC/headquarters staff may need to crop images.) You must fill out this
form for your pictures to be shown on the Peace Corps Website.

I, the undersigned, hereby grant to the Peace Corps a perpetual, worldwide, royalty-free, non-exclusive license
to use, reproduce, or publish for purposes authorized by the Peace Corps Act: my name; the negatives and
prints of photographs, videotapes, and/or other audio or visual recordings of myself; my articles and stories; and
any other documents, writings, statements, recordings, representations, or information I may provide pursuant
to and in accordance with the terms of this Authorization.
In particular, I hereby authorize the Peace Corps to use, reproduce, or publish any or all of the above-listed
items and to make reference to me in connection with these items to promote the Peace Corps using various
media and publicity means, including, but not limited to: websites; books; public service advertising on television
and radio stations; television and radio broadcasts; direct-mail pieces; print advertisements; brochures; flyers;
posters; articles; editorials; speeches; roundtable discussions; radio interviews; and television programs.
I acknowledge that I will receive no compensation from the Peace Corps in consideration of this Authorization or
the use of the above-listed items pursuant to this Authorization.

Volunteer Name

Volunteer Signature

Date

PC-2106

Thank you for submitting your completion report. Please submit this report to the appropriate
staff member at post to close your project.

Return to Main Menu

Return to Grant Menu

Labor
1.3.7, Law Enforcement Restructuring, Reform and
Equipment
2.2.3, Local Government and Decentralization
Materials/Supplies 2.2.4, Anti-Corruption Reforms
Land/Venue Rental 2.3.2, Elections and Political Processes
Travel/Per Diem/Foo 2.4.1, Civic Participation
Materials transport 3.1.1, HIV/AIDS
Other
3.1.3, Malaria
3.1.6, Maternal and Child Health
3.1.7, Family Planning and Reproductive Health
3.1.8, Water Supply and Sanitation
2012 3.1.9, Nutrition
2013 3.2.1, Basic Education
2014 3.2.2, Higher Education
2015 3.3.2, Social Services
2016 3.3.3, Social Assistance
2017 4.2.1, Trade and Investment Enabling Environment
2018 4.2.2, Trade and Investment Capacity
4.3.1, Financial Sector Enabling Environment
4.3.2, Financial Sector Capacity
4.5.1, Agriculture Enabling Environment
4.5.2, Agricultural Sector Productivity
4.6.1, Business Enabling Environment
4.6.2, Private Sector Capacity
4.6.3, Workforce Development
4.7.3, Strengthen Microenterprise Productivity
4.8.1, Natural Resources and Biodiversity
4.8.2, Clean Productive Environment
5.2.1, Capacity Building, Preparedness and Planni
5.2.2, Disaster Readiness and Mitigation
6.1.1, Cross Cutting
6.6.6, Mozambique USAID Education Funds
9.9.9, PLACE HOLDER TO END THE LIST

1
3
4
5
6
7
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

Albania
Armenia
Azerbaijan
Belize
Benin
Bolivia
Botswana
Bulgaria
Burkina Faso
Cambodia
Cameroon
Cape Verde
China
Colombia
Costa Rica
Dominican Rep
Eastern Carib
Ecuador
El Salvador
Ethiopia
Fiji
The Gambia
Georgia
Ghana
Guatemala
Guinea
Guyana
Honduras
Indonesia
Jamaica
Jordan
Kazakhstan
Kenya
Kyrgyz Republ
Lesotho
Liberia
Macedonia
Madagascar
Malawi
Mali
Mexico
Micronesia an
Moldova
Mongolia
Morocco
Mozambique
Namibia
Nepal
Nicaragua
Niger
Panama
Paraguay
Peru

304
305
314
535
680
511
637
313
686
303
694
655
366
514
515
517
538
518
519
663
411
635
242
641
520
675
504
522
497
532
440
306
615
307
632
669
249
684
614
688
510
401
261
309
378
640
697
367
524
683
525
526
527

Philippines
Romania
Rwanda
Samoa
Senegal
Sierra Leone
South Africa
Suriname
Swaziland
Tanzania
Thailand
Togo
Tonga
Turkmenistan
Uganda
Ukraine
Vanuatu
Zambia

492
403
696
491
685
636
674
568
645
621
493
693
421
315
617
343
461
611

EMA
EMA
EMA
IAP
AF
IAP
AF
EMA
AF
EMA
AF
AF
EMA
IAP
IAP
IAP
IAP
IAP
IAP
AF
IAP
AF
EMA
AF
IAP
AF
IAP
IAP
EMA
IAP
EMA
EMA
AF
EMA
AF
AF
EMA
AF
AF
AF
IAP
IAP
EMA
EMA
EMA
AF
AF
EMA
IAP
AF
IAP
IAP
IAP

XX
X

Yes
No
N/A

Agriculture
Small ProjeSP
Community Economic DevelopmePeace CorpPP
Education
Volunteer AVA
Environment
Energy Cli EC
Health
Feed the F FF
Youth
Global EduGEF

Albania
E/E
Armenia E/E
Azerbaijan E/E
Benin
AF
Burkina Fa AF
Cambodia Asia
Cameroon AF
Cape Verd AF
Colombia LAC
Costa Rica LAC
Dominican LAC
Eastern CaLAC
Ecuador LAC
El Salvado LAC
Ethiopia AF
Fiji
ANE
Georgia E/E
Ghana
AF
Guatemala IAP
Guinea
AF
Guyana
IAP
Jamaica LAC
Jordan
ME
Kyrgyz RepAsia
Liberia
AF
Macedonia E/E
MadagascaAF
Malawi
AF
Mali
AF
Mexico
LAC
Micronesia LAC
Moldova E/E
Mongolia Asia
Morocco ME
MozambiquAF
Nepal
Asia
Nicaragua LAC
Panama LAC
Paraguay LAC
Peru
LAC
Philippines Asia
Romania E/E
Rwanda AF
Senegal AF
Sierra Leo AF
Tanzania AF
The GambiAF
Togo
AF
Turkmenist Asia
Uganda
AF
Ukraine
E/E
Vanuatu ANE
Zambia
AF

EMA
EMA
AF
IAP
AF
AF
AF
IAP
AF
AF
IAP
AF
IAP
EMA
AF
EMA
IAP
AF

(men/women)
(organizations)

Peace Corps S

Main Menu
Instructions
Project
Project Classification
Classification
Project Report Narrative

Directions

This Global Education Framework is designed to allow V
Volunteers who conduct Global Education activities sho
objectives from their project monitoring and evaluation
Education efforts.

Monitoring & Evaluation
Project
Project Log
Log
Tell
Tell Your
Your Story
Story

Education
Indicator

Grant
Grant Type
Type Selection
Selection
PCPP
PCPP
SPA
SPA
VAST
VAST
ECPA
ECPA
FTF
FTF
GEF
GEF
Signature
Signature Forms
Forms
Completion Signatures
Press
Press Authorization
Authorization
End

# of students who
exceed the average
reading fluency
level for their
grades, as was
measured at
baseline

Record total
number
below

Unit of
Measure

Learners that
exceed average
fluency levels

Peace Corps Small Grant Completion Report

amework is designed to allow Volunteers to report at the level of disaggregation necessary for the Global Education initiative. All
Global Education activities should report against one or more objectives from this framework (in addition to any applicable
ect monitoring and evaluation plans) to allow both posts and Peace Corps as a whole to understand and report on our Global

Where appropriate for your project, record number of beneficiaries disaggregated by age

Male(s) 25 and Female(s) 25
above
and above

Male(s) 15-24 Female(s) 15-24 Male(s) 14 and
below

e Global Education initiative. All
addition to any applicable
nd and report on our Global

age

Female(s) 14 and
below