ADM 6260 C

Project Management I
Winter 2015

Professor:

Abdel Hamou-Lhadj
MSc, MBA, PEng, OCEB, CMQ/OE, CGEIT, CGRCM, CGOVP

Office:

Desmarais Building, 5th floor

Telephone:

613 841-0438

E-Mail:

hamou-lhadj@telfer.uottawa.ca
abdelkrim.hamou-lhadj@rogers.com

Office Hours:

By appointment

Class Location:

DMS 4130

Class Hours:

Thursday 19:00 – 22:00

Course Deliverables

Type

Due Date

Weight

Comments

Project Report & Presentation

Team

February 12

50%

Hard and soft copies

Case Analysis Paper

Individual

As per course schedule

40%

Hard and soft copies

Learning Contribution

Individual

Ongoing

10%

Notes:
 Soft copies should be submitted to Turnitin prior to being handed out to the professor.
 Hard copies should contain the associated Turnitin summary report, as well as the Ethics Agreement form.

1

High performance organizations pride themselves on their ability to manage projects effectively and efficiently to meet their business needs. The aim is to introduce the practical skills required of project managers to effectively deal with the difficulty in defining and assessing project success and. 2 . Based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) of the Project Management Institute (PMI). hence. and in particular will give the students the right means to initiate a project and create a project charter for the project. Establishing an integrated perspective on business functions – the course focuses on assessing project success at different levels (process. outcome. and covers basic concepts. they will develop a good understanding of the following:     Key project management concepts and framework How to use appropriate tools and techniques at the initiation phase How to develop an effective project charter How to assess a project’s success Telfer MBA Focus on Leading High Performance Organizations The Telfer MBA distinguishes itself through its focus on the development of skills and knowledge related to leading high performance organizations. thus. business. students will acquire a basic knowledge of standard project management. Course Objectives At the end of this course. and end-users).Course Description Over the last few decades. the strategic importance of projects for organizations. Developing a strategic perspective – the course emphasizes the link between strategy execution and project management and. many projects still fail and fall short in meeting their stakeholders’ expectations. approaches. Therefore. tools and techniques in project management. organization) and from different stakeholders’ perspectives (project team. more specifically. and focuses on project initiation phase. understanding and responding to the different perceptions that project stakeholders might have of project success. the course links to three Telfer MBA Learning Goals:    Understanding of management foundations and the global business environment – the course accounts for the fact that projects play a significant role in value creation globally and it focuses on the tools and techniques that project managers need to understand and lead projects. Many experts argue that a straightforward project management process could significantly improve the likelihood of project success. This course proposes a straightforward approach to managing projects. client and parent organizations. methods. And. this course provides students with an effective overview of project management. Yet. This course is among one of the core examples of such a focus. project management has become very popular.

79% 1 To develop an increased understanding of the project management process. was the project a success or a failure? And. The teams are required to analyze the project (from the project management standpoint) and relate project outcomes to the overall organization’s effectiveness and efficiency.Course Evaluation Course evaluation components will be based on the following: A) Group Project Analysis (50%) Students will be organized in teams. if possible sponsored by a client organization. feasibility analysis. a 5% penalty will be applied):         Due date: February 12 Style and form: Summary report to the client Number of core pages: 6 to 9 Appendices: Any relevant material Margins: 1” Font type: Arial Font size: 11 Points Spacing: Single space In addition. with a initiation phase. Each team should select a specific project. at least in the initiation phase? In terms of the project management process. Does address the key considerations of the project management process. 2. feasibility analysis. The analysis must address the following questions: 1. and risk management. the team will share their project analysis findings with the class in a 30-minute professional presentation. why? More specifically. in which organizational context was it done? Overall. Professor’s grading rubric for the learning is as follows: # Grading Elements Below: 50% . Does not address the key considerations of the project management process. feasibility analysis. needs analysis. and risk management. including the key elements of stakeholder management. needs analysis. and risk management. needs analysis.69% Meets: 70% . what lessons can be learned from such a project? Report submissions should adhere to the following guidelines (if not. needs analysis. What was the project about (the project concept)? And. including stakeholder management. with a special focus on recognizing the contributing factors to Exceeds: 80%+ Does address the key considerations of the project management process. feasibility analysis. Does demonstrate a Does demonstrate a good Does demonstrate a good limited appreciation of the appreciation of the appreciation of the criticality of the project criticality of the project criticality of the project initiation phase. what went wrong and/or well. and especially for the initiation phase. and risk management. with a initiation phase. 4. including the key elements of stakeholder management. 2 To develop an appreciation of the criticality of the project initiation phase. and provides a relevant and consistent analysis of the interrelationship between those considerations. with a special focus on special focus on special focus on recognizing the recognizing the recognizing the contributing factors to contributing factors to contributing factors to 3 . 3. including the key elements of stakeholder management.

Exceeds: 80%+ All of the information conveyed in the document / presentation is relevant to the topic. and the interrelationship and the interrelationship and the interrelationship and the interrelationship between these factors. Professor’s grading rubric for the deliverable is as follows: # Grading Elements Below: 50% . B) Individual Case Analysis (40%) Each student should choose one (and only one) from the 4 proposed cases. between these factors. Professor’s expectations are as follows: 1. between these factors. Paper submissions should adhere to the following guidelines (if not. The style used to convey the majority of the information in the document / presentation made it easy to understand. Almost all of the information All of the information conveyed in the document / conveyed in the document / presentation is complete. 4. The style used to convey almost all of the information in the document / presentation made it easy to understand. The majority of the information conveyed in the document / presentation is relevant to the topic. The style used to convey all of the information in the document / presentation made it easy to understand.79% Exceeds: 80%+ project success or failure. Success/Failure Reasons: This is about the reasons that could explain the project success or failure in that organization. 5.69% Meets: 70% . Key PM Considerations: This is about the key project management considerations that had an impact on the execution of the project. and prepare an analysis paper in which they summarize key project management considerations underlying the case. and provides a relevant and consistent analysis framework for that. The majority of the information conveyed in the document / presentation is accurate. as well as the impact of these results on the organization’s objectives. presentation is accurate. project success or failure. 2. project success or failure. Project Outcome(s): This is about the project results.79% 1 Professional Look The majority of the document / presentation does have a professional look. a 5% penalty will be applied): 4 . Almost all of the information All of the information conveyed in the document / conveyed in the document / presentation is accurate. 3. Project Purpose: This is about the organizational objectives intended by the project.# Grading Elements Below: 50% . presentation is complete. 2 Information Relevancy 3 Information Completeness 4 Information Accuracy 5 Communication Style Almost all of the information conveyed in the document / presentation is relevant to the topic. Almost all of the document / All of the document / presentation does have a presentation does have a professional look. between these factors. The majority of the information conveyed in the document / presentation is complete. including factors that are at the source of project success or failure. and the underlying reasons for its execution.69% Meets: 70% . project success or failure. professional look. Context Elements: This is about who is involved in the case and what is important to know about them to understand the project.

Almost all of the information conveyed in the document / presentation is complete. Exceeds: 80%+ All of the information conveyed in the document / presentation is relevant to the topic. The style used to convey all of the information in the document / presentation made it easy to understand. The majority of the information conveyed in the document / presentation is complete. Exceeds: 80%+ Does demonstrate a good understanding of the project management perspective. Does demonstrate a good understanding of the project management perspective. The majority of the information conveyed in the document / presentation is relevant to the topic. professional look. Professor’s grading rubric for the deliverables is as follows: # Grading Elements Below: 50% . presentation is accurate.69% Meets: 70% .69% Meets: 70% . 2 To increase the skills of students in analyzing projects and detecting potential project failure conditions. Does demonstrate a Does demonstrate a good Does demonstrate a good limited knowledge of knowledge of analyzing knowledge of analyzing analyzing projects and projects and detecting projects and detecting detecting potential project potential project failure potential project failure failure conditions. The style used to convey the majority of the information in the document / presentation made it easy to understand.79% 1 To develop an understanding of the project management perspective. All of the information conveyed in the document / presentation is complete. 2 Information Relevancy 3 Information Completeness 4 Information Accuracy 5 Communication Style The majority of the document / presentation does have a professional look. and provides a relevant and consistent analysis framework for that. The majority of the information conveyed in the document / presentation is accurate. 5 . Almost all of the information conveyed in the document / presentation is relevant to the topic. and provides a relevant and consistent analysis of the interrelationship between project management considerations. The style used to convey almost all of the information in the document / presentation made it easy to understand. Almost all of the information All of the information conveyed in the document / conveyed in the document / presentation is accurate.        Due date: As per the schedule Style and form: Structured analysis for the professor Number of core pages: 2 to 3 Appendices: Any relevant material Margins: 1” Font type: Arial Font size: 11 Points Spacing: Single space Professor’s grading rubric for the learning is as follows: # Grading Elements Below: 50% . Does demonstrate a limited understanding of the project management perspective. conditions. conditions.79% 1 Professional Look Almost all of the document / All of the document / presentation does have a presentation does have a professional look.

C) Individual Learning Contribution (10%) Each student is expected to positively contribute to the overall learning experience during course sessions. Lavagnon A.cio. Pinto & al. 22 Jan. Stephanie 2005 Overby. 15 Jan. Johansena. Course Material There is no compulsory course textbook. Meridith http://www.html 2 3 4 2004 Course Schedule # Date Topics 1 2 3 4 5 Jan. Bausea.html Inside an IT Audit Levinson. 12  Student Presentations Readings Deliverables 1. KPMG Moustafaev. Jamal 2013 2014 2014 2014 2009 Overby.com/article/2438920/risk-management/comair-schristmas-disaster--bound-to-fail. Dov & al. Isabelle 2009 2014 2011 2014 2013 2003 8 9 10 11 12 The question every project team should answer Stakeholder benefit assessment Feasibility studies in the product development process Project risk management How and why do we write project charters Brown. 3 4. 29 Feb.cio. 8 9. 6 7.com. Stephanie 2005 Project Management . 08 Jan.au/article/166287/inside_an_it_audit/ 2006 In addition. Relevant and practical examples or questions are more than welcome. 05      The Challenge of Project Management Introduction to Project Management Project Initiation Phase – What to Do Project Initiation Phase – How to Do It Project Charter Deliverable – Key Components 6 Feb. and structured as follows: # Reference 1 How to fail in PM without really trying Jeffrey K. PwC PMI Royer.cio. Katharina & al. & al. the following cases are also posted on Blackboard: # Reference 1 Outsourcing Is Cheaper in China http://www.cio. Karen A.com/article/2448489/outsourcing/outsourcing-ischeaper-in-china. Meridith http://www. PMI Dvir. 10 11. 2. Agnar & al. 12 Case 1 Paper Case 2 Paper Case 3 Paper Case 4 Paper Reports 6 . 5.When Failure Is Not an Option Levinson. 1996 2 3 4 5 6 7 Project success as a topic in PM journals The high cost of low performance What great projects have in common When will you think differently about programme delivery Executive guide to project management Why bad projects are so hard to kill Ika. Readings are posted on Blackboard.com/article/2446386/leadership-management/projectmanagement---when-failure-is-not-an-option.html Comair's Christmas Disaster: Bound to Fail http://www.

643 – 653. 7 . 56. (2006). Jr. S. S. J. Why projects are “always” late: A rationale based on manual simulation of a PERT/CPM network. (1981). Mantel. QUE: Indianapolis Kerzner. H. Sanford. Lies.R. (2003). F. Horine. (2013). P. Shafer. Scheduling. Learning from corporate mistakes: the rise and fall of Iridium. and project plans: Recurring human errors that can ruin the project planning process. Prentice Hall. New York: John Wiley & Sons. K. Integrated Project Management. Pinto. 11(5). Business Horizons. Reconstructing Project Management. Fifth Edition. J.J. Project Management in Practice. Mingus.M. H. Gray Clifford. Third Edition.. Attendance should be planned accordingly. (2000). S. Project Management: The Managerial Process. (2002). possibly in a client organization. G. Alpha Teach Yourself Project Management in 24 Hours. This will require time and a client-centered attitude in the gathering of data.M.Attendance and Participation The approach to learning and teaching in this course is experience-based and relies on active involvement of students. 2013. The course also involves a group project. R. Schonberger. Morris. For this reason. damned lies. Fifth Edition. W. and Controlling..M. Absolute Beginner’s Guide. student attendance at all classes and active involvement is highly recommended. Project Management: A Systems Approach to Planning. Madison: CWL Publishing. 29(2):138–148. Additional References The following documents might be of interest to students:            Finkelstein. M. J. New York: John Wiley & Sons. New York: John Wiley & Sons.. 66 – 70. Project Management. Meredith. Erik..W. (2014). A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge. PMI. PMI (2013). Sutton (2011). (2013). Organizational Dynamics. S. Interfaces. Larson. (2013). Hall J. G. McGraw-Hill/Irwin. N. 9th edition.

the Telfer School of Management asks that students sign and submit with their deliverables the Personal Ethics Agreement form. Here are some examples of the academic sanctions. submitting the same assignment in more than one course. presenting falsified research data. the development of the Internet has made it much easier to identify academic plagiarism. Assignments will not be accepted or marked if this form is not submitted and signed by all authors of the work. suspension or expulsion from the School.php Persons who have committed or attempted to commit (or have been accomplices to) academic fraud will be penalized. Anyone found guilty of academic fraud is liable to severe academic sanctions. tips and tools for writing papers and assignments: http://web5. Here are a few examples of academic fraud:     engaging in any form of plagiarism or cheating. where you will find resources. and one for group submissions. Finally.Beware of Academic Fraud Academic fraud is an act committed by a student to distort the marking of assignments. Academic fraud is neither accepted nor tolerated by the University. without the written consent of the professors concerned In recent years.ca/mcs-smc/academicintegrity/home. Please be advised that professors have been formally advised to report every suspected case of academic fraud. In cases where students are unsure whether they are at fault.uottawa. Also please note that all written assignments for this course must include an authenticity report generated by Turnitin. in whole or in part. handing in an assignment that was not authored. 8 . We hope that by making this personal commitment. examinations and other forms of academic evaluation. it is their responsibility to consult the University’s Web site at the following address. Two versions of this form exist: one for individual assignments. The tools available to your professors allow them to trace the exact origin of a text on the Web. an additional program requirement of between three and thirty credits. You will automatically be issued with a course ID Number for this service upon registration in the course. which can be imposed:    a grade of “F” for the assignment or course in question. by the student. using just a few words. In most cases of a first offence of academic fraud. Repeat offenders are normally expulsed from the School of Management. tests. the sanction applied to students who have been found guilty is an “F” for the course with an additional three credits added to their program requirements. all students will understand the importance the School places on maintaining the highest standards of academic integrity.

Illness or other medical condition:  Students should obtain a medical certificate from the University Health Service (located at 100 Marie-Curie. 2. we have reached the point where technologically we have the capability to fulfill such requests on an exceptional basis. If for any reason you object to a class in which you participate being videotaped. 3. please contact us by e-mail at:   MBA: mba@telfer. and a copy of their plane ticket. Business trip or other unavoidable constraints related to work (part-time students) :  Students should provide a letter from the employer. Death in the immediate family. Acceptable reasons to request the videotaping of a course: A student may make a request that a course be videotaped on any of the following grounds: 1.  Other compassionate grounds.Important Notice On a number of occasions over past years students have requested that we videotape lectures in circumstances where they unavoidably have to be absent from class.ca 9 .uottawa. Religious holidays. please inform the professor as soon as possible.uottawa. IP issues with the professors. The request should be made at least 48 hrs in advance (2 business days) to the professor. (564-3950). cost. and privacy issues for the students). 4. For further information. with justifying documents. While there are a number of issues associated with undertaking such an approach (availability of technology.ca MHA: mha@telfer. The professor reserves the right to refuse such a request based on IP or other pedagogical considerations.

At the discretion of the professor. Email this form to your professor immediately after submitting the group project. If the person contributed fully according to team expectations. # Team Member Name (do not rate yourself) Score (0 to 5) Comments (be specific: point out why you are providing a grade of less than 5). individual marks will be adjusted according to the results of the peer evaluation. 1 2 3 4 5 10 . Marks will not be adjusted unless a majority of the team members have participated in the evaluation. Assign scores of 1 through 4 according to the degree of participation. assign a score of 0. If the team is having trouble. DO NOT use this form to rate team members unless you have already talked to the individual(s) about his/her/their contribution. assign a score of 5. The evaluator does not evaluate him/herself. It is optional: use it only if you need to provide differential grades. Scoring Method If the individual did not provide any input into the group project. Application Each team member will evaluate the others on their contribution to group projects. Use additional pages if necessary.Peer Evaluation Form Group number: _______ Date: _______________ Name of Evaluator: _________________________________ This form is for use in evaluating the members of your team related to their contribution on your group project. please see the professor before the assignment is submitted.