Electricity Sector Matrix 

Country:  Tanzania 

Topic 

Explanation 

References and Remarks 

Electricity Sector Policy 
 
Energy and Water Utilities Authority Act 2001 and 2006 
National Energy Policy, 2003 
Rural Energy Act 2005 established the Rural Energy Board, 
Fund and Agency 
Electricity Act 2008: established a general framework for the 
powers of the Ministry of Energy and Minerals and EWURA.

The Act opened the electricity sector to private companies, to
compete with the state-run Tanzania Electric Supply Company The 2008 Electricity Act focuses on 
(TANESCO), in providing electricity and generating power in
restructuring the electricity supply 
the country 

Electricity Act (name, year …) 

 
Public Private Partnership Act No. 18 of 2010: 
Medium Term Strategic Plan (2012‐2016)  
 
Power Sector Master Plan 2012 Update reinforces the 
commitment towards collaboration with and encouraging the 
private sector 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 

industry ‐ attracting private sector 
and other participation thus 
bringing the end of TANESCO 
monopoly. 
The sector has been undergoing 
reforms to allow higher 
participation by the private sector 
 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
 
 
 
 

Electricity Sector unbundled (yes/no), since 
when? 

Regulation of the electricity sector; mandate; 
organization, autonomy status 

Master plans / Least Cost Power Development 
Plans / capacity expansion plan 


 

The Tanzania Electric Supply Company (TANESCO) is the 
principal electricity generator and a single vertically integrated 
national utility. TANESCO fully owns transmission and 
distribution. Unbundling into separate entities has not happened 
yet but is the intention of the 2008 Act  
 
Zanzibar Electricity Corporation (ZECO) supplies power to the 
two islands of Ungula and Pemba. 
 
The energy sector in Tanzania is facing difficulties. TANESCO 
has been poorly managed and has been in a bad financial 
situation (high demand, too low tariffs). (SREP‐IP, 2013 + IED, 
2013) 
 
Energy and Water Utilities Regulatory Authority (EWURA)  
REA, EWURA and TANESCO are the 3 key actors under MEM 
(Ministry of Energy & Mineral Resources)  
 
Energy and Water Utilities Regulatory Authority (EWURA) 
came into being in 2006.  
REA is an autonomous body established under the Rural 
Energy Act of 2005 
 
The Power System Master Plan (2010 – 2035) anticipates that 
Tanzania will increase electrification status from 18.4 percent 
to at least 75 percent by 2035 
 

The unbundling process is 
expected to cost $500‐million. 
With a $300‐million loan from the 
World Bank and a $200‐million 
loan from AfDB. 
 
 
 

The Energy and Water Utilities 
Regulatory Authority (EWURA) is 
an independent body. 
 
The Ministry of Energy and 
Minerals (MEM) oversees the  
activities of REA 
11th EDF National Indicative 
Programme for Tanzania will 
provide EU support to core 
reforms in the electricity sector to 

Electricity Sector Matrix 

Grid expansion plans 

IPPs allowed / operating? 

The Government will introduce a road‐map for the reform of 
the energy sector by mid‐2014. 
The Power System Master Plan sets out objectives to bring 
electricity generation capacity from the current 1501 MW to 
2780 MW by 2015  
There are plans for upgrading of transmission and distribution 
lines and the construction of some 3000 km of new HV lines 
which will facilitate increase of power supply to rural areas. 
Independent Power Producers and Emergency Power 
Producers:  
The electricity sector is open to IPPs. There are currently six 
IPPs/EPPs (Symbion‐Ubungo, IPTL, Symbion Arusha, Songas, 
Aggreko and Symbion Dodoma) contributing 40 percent of 
generating capacity to the national grid.  
Small Power Producers (SPPs): Currently 3 SPPs are selling 
power to the grid and an additional 8 SPPA signed 
with TANESCO. 
The GoT has a target to increase the share of renewable 
energy (excluding large hydro), in the electricity mix to 14 
percent by 2015. Achieving the target will require adding 
about 300 MW of new renewable energy capacity before 2016
(Source: MEM, Medium Term Strategic Plan (2012‐2016), December 2011).  

RE electricity share targets 


 

There is a Scaling‐up Renewable Energy Programme 
(SREP).Currently  excluding large hydro 4.9 percent of total 
generation capacity in 
Tanzania is from renewable energy, including captive 
generation in sugar, tannin and sisal factories, solar, and small 
hydro plants.  
 
 

restore the long term financial 
viability of the national utility 
 

 

 

An additional ten projects with a 
capacity of over 60 MW are in the 
pipeline. 
(Source: Global Status Report 
(GSR) 2013. "Country 
Profile Tanzania") 

 

Electricity Sector Matrix 

Power Purchase Agreements; Feed‐in tariffs 

There is a feed‐in tariff (FIT).The feed‐in tariff is calculated by 
EWURA as the average of the avoided costs of supply and the 
incremental cost of mini‐grids.  
 
For 2012, the feed‐in tariff for mini‐grids was set at 
TZS480.50/kWh ($0.30/kWh). 
There are Standardized small Power Purchase agreements in 
place 

 

Wheeling policy 

No Information available 

 

Future sector reform 

A Government road map for the electricity sector reform will 
be launched in mid‐2014, whose implementation could be 
supported from 2015/16 through a Sector Reform Contract by 
the EU. This will require a credibly improved financial situation 
EU has identified Sector Budget 
and decisive initiatives taken to deliver on the road map. 
Reforms may include the restructuring of TANESCO, measures  Support as a possible intervention 
modality. 
to improve planning and attract investment, measures to 
strengthen transparency for public procurements, and 
measures to promote energy efficiency and renewable 
energies 
 

Utilities 
GENERATION 

Main utilities (s=state owned; p=private; 
m=mixed), shareholders 


 

 

 

TANESCO Tanzania Electric Supply Company Ltd (s) 
Zanzibar Electricity Corporation (ZECO) (s) 
 
 
 

Tanzania has an electricity deficit. 
Despite large hydro power 
potential and other renewable 
resources, the development of 
new sites is currently not keeping 
track with the increasing local 
demand. 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
(Source: TANESCO, March 7, 2013)

 (TANESCO) plant output 3, 034 GWh.  
 

Generation (GWh produced in year ….) 

The country’s available electricity generation capacity in March 
2013 was 1,564 MW of which 1,438.24 MW is available in the 
main grid and the balance of 125.9 MW is accounted by mini 
grids and imports.  
 
It is based principally on thermal (62 percent – 32 percent 
from natural gas and 29 percent from oil), large hydropower 
(35 percent) and with the balance from small renewable 
energy power and imports 

Frequent droughts in the 
catchments of the hydro 
generating dams have led to 
dually constrained systems – lack 
of MWh and peaking MW  Energy 
constrained systems with over‐
depleted reservoirs  

 

Generation type (coal, hydro, wind …) and 
capacities of main utilities (MW) 

Generation by fuel source (GWh) in year … 


 

Generation Capacities (MW) in March 2013 
 
Hydropower                       553MW ‐ ‐ ‐35% 
Oil (Jet‐A1 and diesel)     456MW‐‐    29% 
Gas                                      501MW  ‐‐  32% 
Imports                                14MW ‐    0.9% 
 
Total                              1,564 MW ‐‐ 100% 
 
Hydro contributed 57 % of total power generation from 
january 2012 up to december 2012. Gas and Thermal 
contributed the remaining amount  
Large hydro capacity installed (561MW) but its part of the 
consumption has actually been reduced (35%) in favour of gas 
generation (32%). 

Hydro which accounted for 79% 
capacity in 2003, accounted for 
less than 40% of total generation 
capacity in 2012, while natural gas 
and oil accounted for most of the 
balance. 
 

Future generation plan will largely 
be dominated by Coal and Gas 
power plants. 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
950 – 1,000MW Unconstrained Peak Demand  
851.35MW (October 2012) Suppressed Peak Demand 
 

Peak load (MW) in year … 

TRANSMISSION 

TANESCO anticipates major 
demand increases from several 
mining operations, LNG plant, 
 
factories and water supply 
 
schemes. Peak demand is 
Generation 2013 ‐ Peak demand 1, 444MW  Available Capacity 
projected to increase rapidly from 
1, 143MW (79% of Peak Demand) 
about 1,000 MW today 
 
to about 4,700 MW by 2025 and 
(Source: Analysis based on SAPP (2013a) *Figures include estimates of 
7,400 MW by 2035 
suppressed demand).  
 

 

Utility (ies) 

TANESCO Tanzania Electric Supply Company Ltd (s) 
Zanzibar Electricity Corporation (ZECO) (s) 

 

Length and capacity of HV lines 

The transmission lines comprise of 4816.86 km of system 
voltages totaling by the end of November, 2012 
 
Transmission Expansion projects HV Lines: 
400kV Iringa – Shinyanga (648km) – 2015 
400kV Singida – Arusha – Nairobi (577km) – 2016 
400kV Kasama ‐ Mbeya (220km) – 2016 
400kV Mbeya – Iringa (280km) – 2016 

Old and overloaded Transmission 
and Distribution Systems cause 
high technical losses. 

Electricity trade (export/import) 

Uganda via 132 kV, (8MW) 
Zambia through 66 kV, (5MW) 

 

Utilities 

TANESCO Tanzania Electric Supply Company Ltd (s) 
Zanzibar Electricity Corporation (ZECO) (s) 

 

Length of MV and LV lines 

220 kV ‐ 18 lines (2,732 km) 
132 kV – 16 lines (1,543 km) 
66 kV – 5 lines (544 km). 

 

DISTRIBUTION 


 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
 

Development of on‐grid customer base 

The number of customers served by the power utility 
TANESCO is 1,032,000 

TANESCO Financial Performance for 2012/13 (Source SAPP‐Utility 
Financial Performance 2013) 
Debtors
Rate 
Revenue  Net  
Sales in GWh and local currency in year … (per  Energy  $ 
Days 
of  
Income 
Reported 
Million
Sales 
consumer of tariff sector) 
Return 240 
7.4 USc/  ‐19.1 
 
3770 
$Million  4.86% 
GWh    2 77.3  kWh 
 

Demand forecast national grid (MW) 

TANESCO plans to increase its 
customer base to 1,500,000 by 
2015. 
TANESCO not being able to meet 
its sales target is not due to the 
loss of major customers like the 
mines, but rather due to high 
electricity tariffs and poor or 
unreliable power supply. 

1 380MW (TANESCO 2013) (Source SAPP 2013 Energy 
Statistics) 

 

TANESCO  submitted to EWURA a system wide tariff 
adjustments over three years from 1st October, 2013. The 
proposed tariff increases were 
67.87% effective from 1st October 2013, 12.74% effective 
from 1st January 2014 and 9.17% effective from 1st January 
2015 
 
According to TANESCO, the proposed tariff adjustments will 
enable it to finance its operational costs and capital 
investment program (CIP); demonstrate its bankability to 
donors offering concessionary loans and grants; increase 
capacity needed to meet system peak demand; and 
adequately fund repairs and maintenance of its infrastructure 
in order to ensure consistent and stable supply of electricity. 
(Source EWURA December 2013) 
 

TANESCO’s huge proposed 
increase of tariff 
which is far above that 
recommended by the 
Independent Consultant 
 
(Source: Cost of Service Study 
AFMERCADOS EMI Oct 2012) 
 
A study by AFMERCADOS EMI 
recommended cost reflective 
tariffs with increases of 33.8 per 
cent for 2013, followed by small 
increase of 0.85 per cent in 2014 
and 15.14 per cent in 2015. 
Current tariff regime yields an 
average revenue of 197.81 

Tariffs / cost coverage / subsidies 

Electricity tariffs 


 

Electricity Sector Matrix 

Lifeline tariffs in place 

Tariffs cost‐covering? Tariff increases planned? 

Level and source of subsidies 


 

TANESCO tariffs effective from 1st January 2014 will increase 
by 39.19% compared to the current tariffs 
 
In 2012, the rates were set at TZS152.54/kWh (around $0.09) 
for on grid projects and TZS480.50/kWh (around 
$0.28) for micro‐grid projects.  
 
The end‐user retail tariff is uniform on TANESCO network (60 
to 273 TZS/kWh for domestic categories, $0.04 and $0.17 
respectively). The average retail tariff is estimated at 
$0.12/kWh18. A 3% tax is levied on the tariff for REA and 
EWURA 
 
 
A low social tariff is available for customers using up to 50 kWh 
a month. However, very few of that beneficiary group were 
able to benefit from the lower tariff as the high connection 
cost was a barrier to gaining electricity access. It was 
drastically reduced in December 2012. 
Since 2005 there has been a scaling back of lifeline tariffs and 
cross subsidy between industrial and residential customers 
The proposed average adjustments requested by TANESCO are 
67.87% effective from October 1, 2013, 12.74% effective from 
January 1, 2014, and 9.17% effective from January 1, 2015. 

TShs/kWh, yet the revenue 
requirement target for TANESCO 
in 2013 is 332.06 TShs /kWh.  
 
TANESCO says the shortfall of 
134.25 TShs/kWh (67.87%) 
severely restricts the ability of the 
company to provide the services 
required to meet its obligations to 
both its lenders and its customers.

 

EWURA approved a tariffs  
increase of 39.19% compared to 
the current tariffs, effective 1 Jan 
2014 to remain in force until 31st 
December 2016 

TANESCO retail tariffs are regulated by EWURA. Tanzania 
raised electricity tariffs by 40.29 percent in January 2012. 
Despite this increase TANESCO losses continued. 
40% increase of tariffs in January 2014, a level of Government 
subsidies to the national utility will be needed over the next 
 
years 
 

Electricity Sector Matrix 

Financial situation of main utilities 

The government said it would limit subsidies to TANESCO to 
US$105 million in the 2013/14 financial year against the 
company's projected financing needs of US$352 million 
including US$19 million from 2012/13 
 
The government covers the quasi‐fiscal deficit ‐the difference 
between the actual revenue charged and collected at 
regulated electricity prices and the revenue required to fully 
cover the operating costs of production and capital 
depreciation. 
TANESCO losses amounted to more than USD 300 million in 
2012 (€ 221 million), compared to revenues of only USD 536 
million (€ 395 million) 
 
WB is providing $113.7 million for TANESCO for urgent 
investments in its transmission and distribution network. 
 

 

Performance: Losses/efficiencies/service reliability 

Generation efficiency 


 

TANESCO’s actual expenditure in 2011 was only about 4 
percent of revenues 
 
TANESCO has spent only a fraction of the funds for repairs and 
maintenance (R&M) dictated by international best practice 
since 2002, the cost of electricity generation has continuously 
increased, primarily as the reliance on thermal energy has 
increased.  
Large hydro has been continuously decreasing from 98 percent 
of total capacity in 2002 to 40 percent in 2006, In 2013 35 
percent of the available capacity, with hydro electricity output 
declining due to extended droughts. 
 

High dependency on Emergency 
Power Plants.
TANESCO says use of EPPs will be 
substituted by gas plants from 
the year 2015. 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Transmission losses, trends and targets 

Distribution losses (technical/non‐technical 

The transmission system losses recorded in 2011 were 6.3%, in 
 
2012 6.12%, in 2013, 6.17%  
Distribution losses 18.8%  (2013) 
 
TANESCO has committed to reduce technical and non ‐ 
technical losses in the distribution network from the level of 
19 per cent in 2012 to a level of 15.1 percent in 2015. 
 

Non‐charged/paid revenues 

No Information found 

Between 2008 and 2010 power interruptions to Tanzanian 
industries increased by almost 20% to a total of 26 
Average hours of blackouts, targets for improved  hours/month. 
TANESCO had to procure in 2011 more than 300 MW of 
performance 
expensive emergency power generation capacity, based on 
fossil fuels. 

Transmission & distribution 
losses of 24.97% for the year 
2013 are high compared to the 
current industrial standard of 
15% 
 

 

Energy access and off‐grid electrification 

Electrification rate (urban/rural) 

10 
 

Electrification rate 14%  (Overall)  
Electrification rate 3%  (Rural) 
 
There is less than 3% electricity access in rural areas. The first 
objective is to electrify all district centres and to reach 16% by 
2015 in rural areas (Source REA, Club‐ER, 2013). 
 
Rural electrification challenge remains daunting. 
 
About 75 percent of Tanzanians live in the rural areas, and 
almost 95 percent of them are off grid. 
80 percent of the population live in areas where population 
densities were less than 70 persons/km2. 

A baseline survey in  
2011 showed rural access levels at 
6.6%, largely due to the efforts of 
REA. 
 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Half the population lived in regions where the population 
densities were less than 40 persons/km2. 

Electrification targets 

Rural Electrification Agency in place? 

Status and plans for off‐grid rural electrification 

11 
 

The Government of Tanzania has set ambitious targets for 
extending electricity access which includes reaching an 
electrification ratio of 30 percent by 2015 and 50% of the 
population having access to modern energy services by 2020. 
Rural Energy Agency (REA) established in 2005 
REA is in charge of peri‐urban and rural electrification. REA has 
implemented more than 140 grid extensions 
Tanzania Energy Development and Access Project (TEDAP) is 
financed by the World Bank through a US$157.9 million IDA 
credit and a US$6.5 million grant from the GEF 
 
 
In  2008  a  GEF/World  Bank  US$100  million  for  grid  extension 
projects developed  by TANESCO and small off grid  renewable 
energy projects by private developers. 
 
To  underline  plans  for  rural  electrification,  REA  has  prepared 
with  the  support  of    Norad,  a  document  for  a  coordinated 
electricity  sector‐wide  framework  for  Tanzania’s  national 
coverage  (rural,  per‐urban,  rural,  and  deep  rural)  scale  up 
program, a “Sector Investment and Policy Prospectus”  
 
Investment plan over the next 10+ years.Electrification of 
almost 1,500 settlements in the period 2013 – 2015 
 
11th EDF National Indicative Programme for Tanzania the 
European Union has identified the energy sector as a focus 
area, with an indicative budget allocation of up to 180 million 
Euro. Of these, up to 85 million Euro are available for Sector 

Regulator says the proposed new 
connections of 250,000 annually 
from 2014 appear to be over 
ambitious considering the actual 
connections achieved. 
 
 (Souce :REA‐Club‐ER, 2013). 

REA is supporting renewable 
energy based mini‐grids and 
stand‐alone solar solutions that 
are operated by the private sector 
and NGO  
 
REA and TANESCO are 
implementing the World Bank 
and GEF‐assisted Tanzania 
Energy Development and Access 
Project (TEDAP) to support rural 
electricity access 

 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
Budget Support and up to 80 million Euro are available for 
Rural Electrification 
 
Assistance from NORAD is preparing a Rural Electrification 
Investment Prospectus that, for the first time, will fully 
integrate grid‐based electrification with use of mini‐grids and 
stand‐alone options. NORAD and SIDA are expected to provide 
significant funding to the Rural Energy Fund 
 

The European Union has supported 5 mini‐grids in Tanzania 
 

USAID is establishing a fund for financing rural and renewable 
energy. AFD is establishing a €20 million credit line that can be 
accessed through domestic commercial banks for renewable 
and rural energy.  
 
DFID has a £30 million regional soft loan facility that could 
finance renewable energy investments, and is preparing a 
mini‐grid program for Tanzania. 
 
TEDAP has supported the creation of an enabling environment, 
including regulatory and tariff framework for power plants 
committing to supply up to 10 MW to TANESCO, and capacity 
building. It has also facilitated the development of a pipeline of 
renewable energy electrification projects – with the potential 
for around 135 MW.  
 
A TEDAP credit line available through commercial banks offers 
financing. Several other donors are also supporting renewable 
energy‐based mini‐grids. 
 

12 
 

Electricity Sector Matrix 

Operators of isolated grids etc. 

The first few privately run mini‐ and micro‐grids have 
emerged recently in response to the enabling financing and 
regulatory framework that the Government has put in place 
State‐run MG:  
o Existing: 21 diesel‐based MG (TANESCO)  
o Existing: 13 hydro, 2 biomass, 2 gasifier MGs  
o Planned: hybridation of existing diesel‐based MG  
o Planned: > 13 new micro‐ or mini‐hydro  
o Planned: hybrid solar/wind/diesel for telecom base 
stations  
o Major programmes: TEDAP, SREP …  
Private‐ or community‐run MG: many micro‐ and mini‐
hydro projects  
Tariff: uniform for grid and off‐grid = ~0.12$/kWh (2013)  
SPPs: 11 grid connected SPPs mainly hydro & biomass and 
one SPP for isolated MGFIT in place for Grid injection and for 
mini‐grids  

 (Source: Ministry of Energy and 
Minerals, “Final Report on Joint 
Energy Sector Review for 2010/11, 
September 2011). 

 

Regulation for setting up isolated grids, incl. 
micro‐grids (concession territories in place?) 

13 
 

The 20 townships in other regions served by TANESCO are 
dependent on isolated diesel (18) and natural gas (2) 
generators, and imports. Independent Power Producers (IPP) 
supplied 26 percent of the capacity. Emergency Power 
Producers(EPP) supplied 13 percent. In addition, there is an 
estimated 300 MW of private diesel generation not connected 
to TANESCO grid, whose fuel cost alone is expected to exceed 
US cents 35/kWh. 
 
The new institutional framework is favourable to IPP and to 
renewable energies with FIT tariffs adjusted by EWURA for on‐
grid and off‐grid injection. IPP regime is set with standard 

procedures, PPA and annual licences (>1MW). 
 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
The MEM has adopted in 2007 the Standardized Power 
Purchase Agreements (SPPA) and Standardized Power 
Purchase Tariffs (SPPT) for interconnecting and selling power 
(< 10MW) to the main grid and to mini‐grids 
 
TANESCO will purchase power from privately developed and 
operated, small renewables projects under the SPPA 
programme and where required will supply power under a 
bulk power supply arrangements to the mini‐grids that are 
interconnected with its network, when the mini‐grid 
generation is in deficit. Larger geothermal projects will follow 
existing IPP approaches 
 
The Small Power Projects programme allows small renewable 
energy and co‐generation facilities of up to 10 MW of capacity 
to be connected to the grid and to be paid a fixed pre‐defined 
tariff for the power they sell to the utility, under a 
standardised power purchase agreement. 

Policy for BoP electricity supply (low‐level 
electrification) 

TANESCO is running 21 diesel‐based off‐grid stations supplying 
isolated mini‐grids for small towns (installed capacities ranging 
from 400kW to 12MW and 8 stations have peak loads below 
1MW). TANESCO’s priority is to connect those isolated grids to 
the main grid 
A grant of $500 for each new household that is connected to a 
micro‐grid is provided by Tanzania’s Rural Electrification 
 
Agency (REA). 
 

Energy Efficiency 
Demand‐side Management programmes 
14 
 

Conditions for TANESCO operating under new tariffs is a plan 
for implementation of a Demand Side Management 
Programme. 

Source: USAID WORKSHOP ON DEMAND SIDE 
MANAGEMENT  
AND ADVANCED METERING, May 2013 

Electricity Sector Matrix 
 

There has been a recent introduction of an Advanced Metering 
Infrastructure system by TANESCO. The system was developed 
to help improve revenue collection and reduce the theft of 
energy. Prior to the program, energy losses  
for TANESCO were estimated to be 26% from  
transmission/distribution losses and non‐technical losses. A 
pilot project was instituted to convert all of TANESCO’s large 
power customers to Advanced Metering. By installing smart 
meters for large power users TANESCO has reduced power 
losses from 26% to 21% and improved revenue collection. 

Energy Efficiency activities 

 A study by TANESCO to improve 
capacity factors in industrial 
The residential sector contributes most to energy consumption
plants came up with proposals to 
in the country (72% in 2009), mainly due to the large amounts
reduce power demand in Tanzania
of biomass consumed for heating, light and cooking.  
to begin  January 
 
2012,implementation 
has not started. 

Other Issues 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author: Detlef Loy 
Status as of February 2014 

15